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Ep.155: Tim McGraw, Revolution Enterprises Part II

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.155: Tim McGraw, Revolution Enterprises Part II

Ep.155: Tim McGraw, Revolution Enterprises Part II

Tim McGraw returns.  Tim’s back to discuss SB 10 which on a dime completely changes the Illinois cannabis landscape.  We discuss the extension of the sunset provision, patient counts, the relationship between the legislature and the governor, how the governor now sees the program and the addition of PTSD to the list of qualifying conditions.  Out of the shadows and into the light for Illinois cannabis.  Feel free to send feedback to engage@canneconomy.com.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Tim Mcgraw returns, but first we're gonna go all the way back to episode 26 when Tim first joined us to get a sense of his philosophy behind getting started with revolution. He really shares, uh, you know, his thinking in getting in on this whole thing. Enjoy it.

Speaker 1: We wanted the building from the ground up. We didn't want to do a take a take something I'd worked somewhere else and do kind of a find a replace and it put our, plug our name into it and modify it, the Illinois law a little bit, but we wanted to build ours from scratch from the ground up and we scored a nine slash 88. I mean there's guys that scored higher than us, but we're, we're proud of the fact that it was the first time this application has ever been seen by anybody. It wasn't retreading from another state. And then we did a lot of things differently too. I think that we, you know, like I said earlier, we worked backwards into our real estate. We went out, we found communities that wanted us. Uh, the two towns were under Barre in Delavan. The reason we're in varying Delavan is because they sought us out and water them to come into town. And then we found the property, we backed into the car. We bought real estate that wasn't for sale. Instead of going out and finding real estate and then trying to force ourselves down the throat of the local community, we, we, we went where we were wanted.

Speaker 3: How, how did you connect that, those dots. How, how did you know those towns? Why did you, how did you get introduced to them? You know, what, what's the, uh,

Speaker 1: Delavan was actually a, a, a friend of a friend that grew up in Delavan and mentioned it to the mayor and in the village manager and said, yeah, we'd love to meet Tim. I haven't come out. So I did. And we hit it off. And uh, you know, they knew my heart was in the right spot, you know, while this is a capitalistic endeavour, they saw how passionate I am about this and how much I believe in doing this the right way. This is not just a, you know, I'm not just looking to get rich, it's not a get rich quick scheme for us. This is, we're in this for the long haul and for the betterment of the industry.

Speaker 3: Now, let me, because I had anybody listening. You've got the background to be one of the get rich quick, you know, let's make a quick dollar here. Like, you know, that's where you were, that's what you were doing. How come it's different in all seriousness?

Speaker 1: Uh, again, because those were, those were opportunistic, uh, jobs or, or, or, or a business that I was in that I didn't care. I mean, I thought, I didn't know. I cared a lot less about those. I care about this industry, this, this, this means a lot to me. I know how I've seen what can cannabis, how cannabis helps people. I've seen how it changes people's lives and I've seen, uh, the how very, very industry are very, very easy to sell your name in this industry by, by doing things the wrong way and not having a long view of things. So everything we do at revolution enterprise is not a immediate Roi. We do things that we are not going to make money on for a long time because we, we believe we have a moral obligation, quite frankly to advance science because because we've been handcuffed for so long and we've been lied to for so long that somebody has to spend the money and innovate and push the ball, continue innovating and and, and not just say, okay, well we're up and running. We're making tons of money, which just keep popping out flour and be. Now we're going to do what's necessary to, to make sure that is the medicine just gets more and more effective and more widely used. Tim Mcgraw Returns

Speaker 2: Tim's back to discuss sb 10, which on a dime completely changes the Illinois cannabis landscape. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle hand economy. That's two ends in the word economy. If you're into more direct communication, feel free to send me an email. It engage@Canneseconomy.com. Would love your feedback on the show. We'll also start featuring supporters of the program in July, so you can use engage at Cannacon [inaudible] dot com if you're interested in helping out the shop. We discussed the extension of the sunset provision. Patient counts the relationship between the legislature and the governor, how the governor now sees the program and the addition of Ptsd to the list of qualifying conditions out of the shadows and into the light for Illinois cannabis. Okay. And

Speaker 1: so tim returns a, an exhausted tim mcgraw. Thank you so much for giving us a few minutes. No problem man. You can say that again. This has been probably the most exhausting last 12 months of, uh, of my life, that's for sure. And when the last time we talked to, to you, you know, you're, you're not a guy that shies away from work. You're a hard worker. He's been a hard worker all of your life, including kind of hands on labor. Uh, these last two, 12 months though, they beat everything else, don't they? Oh yeah. Hands Down, hands down. And it's not the, it's not even so much the hours, the hours are or for when I wake up to when I go to bed, if my eyes are open, I'm working, but the anxiety and the stress related to this business as the regulatory environment we work in. And then the whole political situation was really the most stressful part of all of it, you know, kinda feeling handcuffed.

Speaker 4: Uh, as far as politics goes, sometimes somethings are out of your control and it's frustrating.

Speaker 1: Plus, you know, you're, you're looking to work in more than one region, I think as well. Right. So you do a fair amount of travel? Yes, I do

Speaker 4: quite a bit. Uh, our focus is on Illinois at the moment because it is such a large and important state. But uh, yeah, we have licenses in other countries and we've applied in several other states. So Illinois is, our focus is our, is our mother ship, so to speak. But that's not the end of our expansion. No.

Speaker 1: Got It. Right. Well, first things first, I mean this is turning into Illinois week. What, uh, what has just very recently happened there in Illinois, take us through it.

Speaker 4: Well, it's a historic quite frankly, which is having the passing, uh, the overwhelming, uh, as far as the votes go, passing of SB 10, which, uh, is a piece of legislation that expanded the pilot programming in Illinois, another two and a half years as well as removed the need for Dr. Recommendation, um, which is big, which is very important. That was a big barrier in Illinois to patients getting cards with their doctors had to recommend in addition to certify they had a condition that Dr had to recommend and give a reason why they were recommending cannabis. So a lot of doctors without experiencing canvas obviously weren't comfortable doing that. So remove the removal of that language. The recommendation language was very important, uh, the addition of a posttraumatic stress disorder as a condition a also very important. Huge. Yeah. Yeah. It's unbelievably huge, especially for veterans obviously, but the veterans are the only ones that ptsd, but they are a group that definitely needs special attention in regards to help with that because so many commit suicide every month.

Speaker 4: So, uh, we're, we're, we couldn't be happier about the fact that the, the rounder administration essentially did a one 80 and from what the previous stance was, and that was the reason for it. The reason, the reason that was that happened is because of the overwhelming support, first off by the public. But secondly, uh, this became a, a bipartisan issue. This was sponsored by leaders in the Republican Party, including a leader, Jim Durkin. He was really key to getting this accomplished, that negotiation with the administration and with Democrats and the Republicans are all along as long as, uh, as well as Tim Butler, uh, and other Republican leaders, um, that were instrumental in getting the administration to agree to the legislation, which we expect to be signed any day now.

Speaker 2: Tim Mcgraw returns, but first we're gonna go all the way back to episode 26 when Tim first joined us to get a sense of his philosophy behind getting started with revolution. He really shares, uh, you know, his thinking in getting in on this whole thing. Enjoy it.

Speaker 1: We wanted the building from the ground up. We didn't want to do a take a take something I'd worked somewhere else and do kind of a find a replace and it put our, plug our name into it and modify it, the Illinois law a little bit, but we wanted to build ours from scratch from the ground up and we scored a nine slash 88. I mean there's guys that scored higher than us, but we're, we're proud of the fact that it was the first time this application has ever been seen by anybody. It wasn't retreading from another state. And then we did a lot of things differently too. I think that we, you know, like I said earlier, we worked backwards into our real estate. We went out, we found communities that wanted us. Uh, the two towns were under Barre in Delavan. The reason we're in varying Delavan is because they sought us out and water them to come into town. And then we found the property, we backed into the car. We bought real estate that wasn't for sale. Instead of going out and finding real estate and then trying to force ourselves down the throat of the local community, we, we, we went where we were wanted.

Speaker 3: How, how did you connect that, those dots. How, how did you know those towns? Why did you, how did you get introduced to them? You know, what, what's the, uh,

Speaker 1: Delavan was actually a, a, a friend of a friend that grew up in Delavan and mentioned it to the mayor and in the village manager and said, yeah, we'd love to meet Tim. I haven't come out. So I did. And we hit it off. And uh, you know, they knew my heart was in the right spot, you know, while this is a capitalistic endeavour, they saw how passionate I am about this and how much I believe in doing this the right way. This is not just a, you know, I'm not just looking to get rich, it's not a get rich quick scheme for us. This is, we're in this for the long haul and for the betterment of the industry.

Speaker 3: Now, let me, because I had anybody listening. You've got the background to be one of the get rich quick, you know, let's make a quick dollar here. Like, you know, that's where you were, that's what you were doing. How come it's different in all seriousness?

Speaker 1: Uh, again, because those were, those were opportunistic, uh, jobs or, or, or, or a business that I was in that I didn't care. I mean, I thought, I didn't know. I cared a lot less about those. I care about this industry, this, this, this means a lot to me. I know how I've seen what can cannabis, how cannabis helps people. I've seen how it changes people's lives and I've seen, uh, the how very, very industry are very, very easy to sell your name in this industry by, by doing things the wrong way and not having a long view of things. So everything we do at revolution enterprise is not a immediate Roi. We do things that we are not going to make money on for a long time because we, we believe we have a moral obligation, quite frankly to advance science because because we've been handcuffed for so long and we've been lied to for so long that somebody has to spend the money and innovate and push the ball, continue innovating and and, and not just say, okay, well we're up and running. We're making tons of money, which just keep popping out flour and be. Now we're going to do what's necessary to, to make sure that is the medicine just gets more and more effective and more widely used. Tim Mcgraw Returns

Speaker 2: Tim's back to discuss sb 10, which on a dime completely changes the Illinois cannabis landscape. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle hand economy. That's two ends in the word economy. If you're into more direct communication, feel free to send me an email. It engage@Canneseconomy.com. Would love your feedback on the show. We'll also start featuring supporters of the program in July, so you can use engage at Cannacon [inaudible] dot com if you're interested in helping out the shop. We discussed the extension of the sunset provision. Patient counts the relationship between the legislature and the governor, how the governor now sees the program and the addition of Ptsd to the list of qualifying conditions out of the shadows and into the light for Illinois cannabis. Okay. And

Speaker 1: so tim returns a, an exhausted tim mcgraw. Thank you so much for giving us a few minutes. No problem man. You can say that again. This has been probably the most exhausting last 12 months of, uh, of my life, that's for sure. And when the last time we talked to, to you, you know, you're, you're not a guy that shies away from work. You're a hard worker. He's been a hard worker all of your life, including kind of hands on labor. Uh, these last two, 12 months though, they beat everything else, don't they? Oh yeah. Hands Down, hands down. And it's not the, it's not even so much the hours, the hours are or for when I wake up to when I go to bed, if my eyes are open, I'm working, but the anxiety and the stress related to this business as the regulatory environment we work in. And then the whole political situation was really the most stressful part of all of it, you know, kinda feeling handcuffed.

Speaker 4: Uh, as far as politics goes, sometimes somethings are out of your control and it's frustrating.

Speaker 1: Plus, you know, you're, you're looking to work in more than one region, I think as well. Right. So you do a fair amount of travel? Yes, I do

Speaker 4: quite a bit. Uh, our focus is on Illinois at the moment because it is such a large and important state. But uh, yeah, we have licenses in other countries and we've applied in several other states. So Illinois is, our focus is our, is our mother ship, so to speak. But that's not the end of our expansion. No.

Speaker 1: Got It. Right. Well, first things first, I mean this is turning into Illinois week. What, uh, what has just very recently happened there in Illinois, take us through it.

Speaker 4: Well, it's a historic quite frankly, which is having the passing, uh, the overwhelming, uh, as far as the votes go, passing of SB 10, which, uh, is a piece of legislation that expanded the pilot programming in Illinois, another two and a half years as well as removed the need for Dr. Recommendation, um, which is big, which is very important. That was a big barrier in Illinois to patients getting cards with their doctors had to recommend in addition to certify they had a condition that Dr had to recommend and give a reason why they were recommending cannabis. So a lot of doctors without experiencing canvas obviously weren't comfortable doing that. So remove the removal of that language. The recommendation language was very important, uh, the addition of a posttraumatic stress disorder as a condition a also very important. Huge. Yeah. Yeah. It's unbelievably huge, especially for veterans obviously, but the veterans are the only ones that ptsd, but they are a group that definitely needs special attention in regards to help with that because so many commit suicide every month.

Speaker 4: So, uh, we're, we're, we couldn't be happier about the fact that the, the rounder administration essentially did a one 80 and from what the previous stance was, and that was the reason for it. The reason, the reason that was that happened is because of the overwhelming support, first off by the public. But secondly, uh, this became a, a bipartisan issue. This was sponsored by leaders in the Republican Party, including a leader, Jim Durkin. He was really key to getting this accomplished, that negotiation with the administration and with Democrats and the Republicans are all along as long as, uh, as well as Tim Butler, uh, and other Republican leaders, um, that were instrumental in getting the administration to agree to the legislation, which we expect to be signed any day now.

Speaker 1: Well that, that's, uh, that's the one thing that it still does need is the signature. And you. I can't help but notice that you're already talking about the past tense as far as the doctor a stipulation. When is that signature expected? Uh, it went through the governor two days ago. I was one of only a few days ago. By the time this goes up, but uh, he, he, there's, you mentioned expedition, uh, in terms of signing a deal. Do we have a date certain or not necessarily? We don't have a date. Certain he has 60 days. There was by agreement, but by agreement between the bill sponsor and Lou Lang and the governor's office, uh, the administration has agreed to expedite signature. How many cases that is, we don't know. It could be within the next couple. It could be a week, 10 days would, but it won't be the full 60. He's not going to sit on it. Gotcha. Alright. So we're talking less than a month and all of a sudden things are very, very different in Illinois, Huh? Well, yeah. It's perception. It's optics. You know, the Illinois program was successful to begin with. I mean the,

Speaker 4: yeah, there was, there weren't a ton of 7,000 patients that we're at now is not a large number, but you know, we're growing at 800 per month and this is without any of the legislative changes. This is just the way as it stands now, 800 new patients a month are getting added and that the reason it's only 800 and the reasons are around number every month is because that's the only, that's the number that the department of public health can get through in a month. They're now adding staff. So we should be able to hopefully double that number, you know, to close to 15 or $1,600 per month as far as getting approved. Uh, hopefully we can quickly get the, this process implemented, the new process and new forms implemented the breed created now. Um, but it's gonna be a lot simpler process for patients and for doctors for sure with the certification process. Uh, but then the, you know, and you can't, but you can't under understate the importance of the extension to. I mean this was a pilot program that some people were fearful would go away. Well that's, that's not the case. Now this thing extended another two and a half years. By that time we'll have, you know, tens of thousands of patients, you know, if not 100 over 100,000 patients by then, uh, so the program, the program will be, is not going anywhere.

Speaker 3: Alright. So, so elected officials really a on both sides of the fence, kind of helped turn the governor around. Is that your perception of what happened?

Speaker 4: Yeah, well it was a negotiation between a Republican and Democratic leadership and um, you know, they, they, they saw the white, they saw that this was a bipartisan issue. There's wide range of support for this and on both sides of the aisle. It's important to note this was one of only seven pieces of legislation that passed the entire session. Illinois Ingrid lack right now. We haven't had a budget for forever. Nothing is getting done in Illinois, but because of some very hardworking people, um, you know, there's a few people that are in the state, uh, that will go unrecognized, but that had a huge impact on getting this done and um, to get to be one out of seven and it, to be a bill with wide bipartisan support in the session when nothing is, nothing is getting done in Illinois speaks to how important this legislation was to everybody involved, especially if patients.

Speaker 3: Yeah, well, I mean obviously patients. Absolutely. And uh, but that does speak to the, the, you know, the cannabis advantage, no matter who you are, cannabis gets more votes than you, you know, whether you're Republican, Democrat or anybody in between.

Speaker 4: Yeah, I mean 80 percent. I mean, you can watch the numbers go up month over month. We did. There was two poles down in Illinois, a, uh, a harper polling and then also a, a Paul Simon Institute pole. And they were done about three or four months apart. And uh, the second one was thrown was three percent. The four percent higher in every category. Do you support the program? You support legalization and they're all in the, you know, 70 plus percent. No matter what question you asked about cannabis besides outright legalization, anything that has medicinal to do with is in the high seventies, you put medical in front of cannabis and it has over 75 plus percent support of, of the people. So it's, it's that message has made its way now to legislators. They're starting to get it.

Speaker 1: Excellent. I need to stop you. As far as the Paul Simon a group there, is that related to the musician or no? No, no, no. It's a, uh, he's a famous Illinois politician. He was a, uh, it was sending her something for many years in Illinois and says Paul Simon Institute was something that has southern Illinois University. I believe it is. There you go. So, uh, with all due respect to musicians in Illinois, Paul Simon and Tim Mcgraw, or getting it done, you know what I mean? Hey, I can't, I can't carry a tune in a bucket, but I'm pretty good at advocating for patients. They go, there we go. Alright. So you had mentioned that Illinois is a, is obviously what you're focused on now, but you're also active, uh, in other markets for first take us through what's happening in, in, um, other places in the US as far as revolution and Tim Mcgraw Concert.

Speaker 4: I'm not talking that we've made public yet. I can tell you that there are two other countries in which we are required licensing to cultivate and do other things. We are still waiting on an approval or we're watching and hopefully in Maryland. Uh, we did not. We came in second in, uh, in Florida unfortunately, but it's a bummer, but that'll be a while before that. The states really up and running anyway. And there's going to use some more issues. So we still plan on going into Florida just in a little little while. We're looking for. We're always looking at opportunities. A couple in Colorado, a couple of night, Arizona and Las Vegas. So we, the footprint will be expand rapidly over the next 18 to 24 months.

Speaker 1: And that's by design, right? I mean, are you moving as quickly as possible on purpose or is it just that you don't like to be bored?

Speaker 4: No, no, no. It's just, it's, it's, it's opportunity driven. A lot of these obviously about these states, you'll only get one chance to apply. Marilyn, for example, is one of those licenses finally do get awarded, which who knows when it will be at this point. It probably won't be until July or August, but those are, those are, those are some very, very potentially valuable licenses because of the way the program's set up there. It's a very well written program, very broad, good facial population in reciprocity across state lines or a lot of things. So those are highly competitive states as far as licensing goes and you only get one chance. So you Kinda, you gotta take your, your, your swing at it. But for the meantime though, we are right as of right now, focus very heavily. I don't want to getting up and successful as possible.

Speaker 1: Excellent. I couldn't help but notice on social that the, uh, the clothing came out. Tim,

Speaker 3: I also noticed you were not on a model.

Speaker 4: I wasn't modeled, they just so bad he chose not to use them.

Speaker 3: Don't get me wrong, I have tee shirts. It's just, you're not going to see them.

Speaker 4: So the models that we used tend to be a farmer looking that I. So

Speaker 3: fair enough. Alright. So how serious of a play is, is the uh, is this apparel line? Well, you know, why are we doing it?

Speaker 4: Oh, it purely just a man driven. Really. We mostly apparel line was created a swag for dispensary and whatnot. But uh, it just become so popular that dispensary's want to sell it and we have some other stores that are looking in, picking up the line and I can ask about every time I wear a revolution shirt I had somebody asked me where I can get one. So we just put the online store up a pretty hastily actually doesn't have quite a bit of what we have available but we'll have a couple of months and left quite a bit of stuff on there. There we go.

Speaker 3: You gotta wait, you gotTa wait to harvest on the tee shirts? I guess

Speaker 4: those little gorilla glue, a t shirts are really popular,

Speaker 3: but as far as the actual operation, you know, this is wonderful that we have the apparel. That's fantastic. Talk about though the grow. Talk about what's happening as far as, you know, nuts and bolts,

Speaker 4: nuts and bolts are beautiful. That's, that's the one part of this thing that's not really stressful, quite frankly, is the grow operations, the operations are spending like a pap, a, we're getting a far better than projected yields, good medicine and the test results are coming out or are unbelievable. Uh, even with a very, very strict rules in Illinois, far as pesticides go and, uh, parts per million as far as residual sop solving's go. We've never had, we've never failed a single test of any kind. Uh, you know, we can use pesticides of any kind. Basically nothing at all during this flower, during the flower cycle. So even underneath those very, very strict requirements, we've had a very, very good yield and burning, no crop loss, uh, both facilities or are fully operational. Our labs are coughing up some awesome products now. And, you know, we just released our cosmos line are naturals line and our zero line, those are all, uh, all brand new products that we've just released from moon rocks to Moroccan Hash, a shatter wax seal oil. We have some of the best steel to. Oh, I have ever seen produced. It's amazing how beautiful it is. It's like a, it's almost seethrough. Um, yeah, it's, it's, it takes a lot of processing. But um, yeah, we, we spent the last few months down in our labs in and now we're kind of seeing the fruits of our labor being able to put out a lot of really high, high potency and

Speaker 1: high quality stuff. Great. Alright. So you've got a flour, you've got products as far as, you know, you mentioned the yield a couple times as far as canopy, you know, as far as square footage, are you sharing, you know, what, uh, what the two facilities, uh, kind of put out or is that private information? I can tell you that a fully operational bolt between the facilities a lot, tens of thousands of pounds. I thought we were going with a lot. But at least tens of thousands. It's a lot, but we're not at this point where you're not using the facilities that are to their full potential so that Margaret burroughs in Illinois, we, you know, we wouldn't go to ramp up to full capacity and for the market. So yeah, as of right now we are producing enough to supply the market, will say it, put it that way.

Speaker 1: Got It. And it sounds like what you are doing is going well and seamlessly. Um, are there any issues as far as, you know, I don't. It's all indoor grows, so climate is not going to be an issue. But uh, any issues that have come up along the way over the last six, nine, 12 months, I mean. Hell yeah. I mean you learn a ton of a ton of things. So, uh, if you learned that most engineers are dead wrong on a lot of things when it comes to a golden cannabis facilities, they, uh, a lot of times, every time we use took her advice, I ended up being either overkill are under way under a. When we used our way of doing it, it was that on, um, uh, so you learned a lot of lessons through the engineering of the building. Um, you know, humidity in Illinois is obviously a problem, especially at night with the plants off gassing.

Speaker 1: So keeping that A. Yeah, there's a lot of little tricks you learn what facility did as large as ours. You magnify any issue, you know, a thousand fold just because of the scale of the thing. So if we were to get mites of any kind or Russet Mites, powdery powdery mildew or spider mites or anything like that, it's a much potentially a much larger problem if it spreads. So, you know, risk mitigation is, is very, very important in our facilities. I mean they're, they're the clean room facilities, so you scrub it and scrub out, you're wearing a, you know, you don't bring anything from outside into the facility. It's a very, very important biologically that we control all that stuff. So that was surprisingly not heading any, any major problems. But knock on wood, there's a that's to say so at the moment, but at some point.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, I totally understood why I haven't been to the facility. You talk about it though as though you do not have separate grow rooms. Is, am I missing? We do know there's, there's 40 separate rooms, 40, 40 rooms between the two facilities. So the parents are, because of the fact we can't use pesticides, we have to purposely limit the size of the rooms to, to mitigate any outbreaks that will take over the whole facility. So every, every room in the facilities it's own environment. We can have, you know, 40 different, 40 different temperatures in 40 different seal, two levels in 40 different humidity settings. So our, it's a very, very compartmentalized and modular facility for that purpose.

Speaker 3: How, uh, how did you know what you wanted to do as far as product from the jump? How much kind of a, I don't want a r and d. Did you do before you started

Speaker 1: pumping out product from the flour that you're growing? Which just say that we are, we are confident in the genetics that we brought in and we, you know, we knew where they came from, we clean, we always clean everything up that we get, you know, we, we, uh, uh, through breeding, we upgrade and we get, you know, pick the right phenotypes, are always cleaning up our genetics. But, uh, you know, we started off with really, really good genetics and the state of Illinois actually allows us to, uh, every 60 days or 90 days bringing more genetics. So, which is pretty cool. That is great. Yeah. So we, so we have a huge stockpile of, I think we're probably close to a hundred different strains between seed and tissue culture and uh, in, you know, actual mothers, uh, in the facility. So we're a pretty good stock and now we're doing, now we have 24 breeding rooms within our facilities too. So we're always breathing. Uh, so we're always releasing most of our strange by this time next year, almost all of our strains will be proprietary. They won't be, there'll be a rebirth right into something else. Interesting. Yeah.

Speaker 3: So, uh, you know, how, uh, how long do you think it took, um, you know, when you were getting things up and running to get to a place where you were satisfied with what was happening because, you know, if I'm hearing you right, you do sound pretty satisfied with what you are producing right now.

Speaker 1: Yeah, I mean that's probably the thing I'm satisfied most with art. The art is our production capability and in our qualities. How quick were you able to get to that kind of level of accomplishment? Pretty quickly. I mean, this is, this is not a reflection on me by any stretch. I mean, this would be our coo and our, our, our chief cultivator in our operations guys. I mean, I believe me, I'm not a grower. I'm, I'm pretty decent CEO, but I'm a terrible grower. Uh, so they get credit for all that and that's just really having a good plan and the smart people and we don't, uh, some places if some grows, if the head grower gets hit by a bus, the place has done. They have, they can't operate revolutions not designed that way. We're a very, very sop driven company. Everything is dialed in and it's kind of dummy proof, better way to put it.

Speaker 1: But you know, we, we are our manuals that our, our, um, internal standard operating procedures make it nearly impossible to screw it up if you, if you, if you follow out the right direction now we have very experienced people there to make sure that happens. And the third look for to spot problems before they happen and you have to have an eye for that. But we are very, very strict about following our methodology within the facility. So there's not, we don't really have any cowboy type growers, you know, it's, it's just if they know mavericks, we not to say we don't let our growers in our R and d rooms try new things, try different nutrient mixes and try, you know, we, we let them have a couple of breeding rooms now and again let them do some breeding. And so we'd let them experiment. But when it comes to the large scale in the big rooms, whatever it's done, the way that we, we'd do it, if we, if we modify it based on something that you proved out in an r and d room, that's obviously, that's a potential for that. We're always evolving. We're the least dogmatic growers you'll ever meet. Um, we're always learning. So, um, but it's a skill to have an operation to scale of ours. You have to have a very strict slps in place.

Speaker 3: So you had mentioned, you know, you're obviously taking this learning out of Illinois and go into some other places. You mentioned one by name, you mentioned, uh, the fact that you're also looking internationally as far as what you're looking to do to grow revolution. You know, without telling me what you can't talk about. Tell me what you can talk about. What are you looking to do with the company, whether it be in the states or internationally?

Speaker 1: The goal is to, uh, like we've said from the beginning is to advance the science of cannabis. That's our underlying goal in everything that we do is to better understand the plant, uh, and to constantly be evolving to use the plant to its highest and best use and that is understanding the chemistry and the genetics of the plant. So a lot of what we do is in Illinois and what we'll be doing in other countries is focused on that is focused on the whole value chain of the cannabis industry, not just flower, not just co two oil, uh, but really having control over our entire value chain. So, um, that's easier to do. Some of these things are easier to do or cheaper to do a clinical trial wise and things like that, uh, in other countries. Um, so yeah, we will be a revolution is already international. We just not announced it yet, but there'll be more, there'll be more growth like that in the next couple of years.

Speaker 3: Got It. So it is, it is a company that has aptly named Tim is what we're saying. Yes, yes. See, so kind of to that end you mentioned, um, we, we're constantly evolving, you know, we're, we are, every day is a different day and we're doing new and different things everywhere. What are a couple or a few, even of the biggest learnings that you've had over the last six months? I mean, you've been nonstop, uh, you've been nonstop in Illinois. You've been nonstop elsewhere, whether it be philosophical or actual, uh, just give us a few kind of key learnings that, that, uh, that you've taken and you're taking forward.

Speaker 1: Oh boy. Wow. I've learned that. So that's a hard one to nail down, man. I've learned a lot about investment banking in Alaska.

Speaker 3: That's an honest answer. Honest answer.

Speaker 1: I've raised a lot of money in real estate. I've been a lot of things, but, uh, you know, that has its own set of raising capital within the cannabis space, especially in the amounts that we, we have, uh, brings a whole set of variables that I, that I, that uh, you can't really prepare for it to something you have to learn through the process. Um, you know, rate raising tens of millions of dollars in cannabis for cannabis operations is a, it takes a lot of time. It takes a lot of work, but

Speaker 3: for actual, and you're saying for plant operations, you're not saying for, you know, a digital extension of whatever you're talking about touching the plant. Correct.

Speaker 1: Yeah, that's an important distinction for sure. Uh, this is not a mass roots or a delivery app or something when you're actually growing. Cultivating cannabis, being a schedule one drug it makes, just makes your limited in who you can raise money from them. So it's, it's, uh, you know, the private placements and um, family offices and things like that. Not a lot of institutional money available. So, uh, it's, it's, uh, it's, it's, it's, it's, it's been interesting

Speaker 3: for sure. Fair enough. Alright. So that's one area of particular, uh, uh, learning. Uh, what else, what other kind of key areas where were you enlightened through? We're

Speaker 1: operating in the strictly regulated cannabis world, so states with states like Illinois or Minnesota or New York or Florida state's like that a soon to be a Hawaii are, is one of the. I mean, I've been in business, I described in my, in my last podcast, I've, you know, I've been in a lot of businesses my entire adult life and I've never seen anything as nuanced as this industry is. It really, really is one of the most complex at the end of the day in a regulated environment in a regulated state. It's one of the toughest industries and is not for the faint of heart, but uh, it's definitely, it's definitely exciting and you're definitely going to, uh, not, not having any boredom. You're not going to lay around every day and wondering what you're going to do

Speaker 3: a, it's nonstop every day that you used an interesting word, you said nuance. Do you just mean particular and this, and obviously we're specifically talking about Illinois, is that what you mean? Kind of. We've got a rule for everything type of deal. Yeah. It's just, it's just a number of variables that you, it's not,

Speaker 1: I've said this before to investment bankers when analyzing it, because I do what we do, a lot of analyzing of other businesses that we might advise or consult or potentially roll up or buy or whatever. And so we've gotten very good at due diligencing are good there or underwriting a cannabis company. Well, the numbers are important, but obviously very important. The, the stuff that isn't obvious is potentially more risky areas that carries more risk with it. So, um, it's, it's just a very, very, very unique business that's. But uh, it's fun.

Speaker 3: It's fun, it's fun. And it, uh, it keeps you going. What? Are there any truth to the rumors that you're actually going to a sleep at all?

Speaker 1: I have, since the legislation's passed, I, I sleep better, um, than I than I did, but I still, I still definitely need help a ticket to get the bed and I still get up, you know, uh, pretty early in the morning. But that's just kinda how I'm wired.

Speaker 3: How's, uh, how's things, because we talked all about your family last time. What, uh, what's the latest on that front?

Speaker 1: Thanks. Good. I'm actually going to a TV interview tomorrow morning and Peoria and then I was planning on it and actually spending the weekend with my kids for why I haven't spent a solid two or three straight days with my kids and uh, probably shoot months. So looking forward to actually having a good weekend with the kids, go out on the boat and uh, actually get some sun because I looked like a transportation solution at this point.

Speaker 3: Like some of your products I guess sitting in an office all day long. So I guess, you know, before we get to the last question, you know, we've got an election coming up and I know that you have a particular way of looking at things. What would you, uh, what would you like to share about what you're thinking man these days about presidential politics? A Gary Johnson? No, I. So, uh, I'm sorry the. Because I know you, I knew that that's what, uh, your answer is. I can you divulge a little bit more about, about what you're thinking and why.

Speaker 1: Well, I think that, uh, Donald Trump is a damn near a cartoon character and it ranks up there as far as con men go. Peter popoff like a faith healer or he arises, we have a televangelist aura. There's just a, I don't know, there's so little depth to that guy. Uh, any subjects, it's, it's, uh, it's amazing. And then, you know, Hillary is just more of the same. I mean, that's just an entrenched just old school democrat that's beholden to big Pharma, big the big prisons, you know, whoever else. I mean, you can't, you can't be a career politician anymore and not be a sellout. So you're always choosing the lesser of two evils. But to me there's really not much difference between Hillary, between trump and Clinton when once you get to the actual policy your point. Yeah. I mean, they were both going to spend huge amounts of money.

Speaker 1: Uh, they're both going to overseas and, and elsewhere and they're both going to support big banks and uh, you know, somebody who supported them. They're the people that are still going to take care of their friends no matter what. So I'm about liberty and anybody that comes in and says, I want you to make your own decisions is my kind of guy, but these, this is just an authoritarian versus authoritarian is what Clinton versus trump is. And uh, what, what, what has Gary Johnson shared, uh, over the past couple of weeks that, uh, you specifically like, or is it just the general platform? It's just general platform. I mean, let's be real. I live in Illinois, so my vote matters not, we're not going to see your vote really? Well, it doesn't, it doesn't matter because, because, because of Cook County, because it's so heavily democratic because of the Electoral College, it doesn't matter where you live in Illinois, your vote doesn't matter. You're just, it's Democrat. So, um, so I will, uh, I will be a very proudly at wasting my vote for Gary Johnson.

Speaker 3: Good. Enthusiastically wasting your vote.

Speaker 1: Yes. Enthusiastically. I would literally, if there was a third choice that was like a, the or something, I would vote for him before I would.

Speaker 3: We are, we're certainly quoting you on. You prefer hamlet, hamburglar new Hashtag McDonald's guy. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Or maybe Burger King. Who Cares? But uh, you know, it's like Hashtag I'm with hamburglar because. All right, so the final question, uh, you, we, you gave us one initially, but we need a new one for today on the soundtrack of Tim Mcgraw's life named one track one song that's got to be on there as we speak.

Speaker 1: Oh boy. You always come with a really, really difficult ones track. Um, I mean we do ask it every time, Tim. So, you know, I think you switched it up for me actually because I. Did I not ask that because I was sitting, I was sitting there listening to all the end of the last interview and you asked that and you said you were going to change it up for that reason. Otherwise I'd have been prepared with a song. Well, I, I, if, if, if we hadn't gotten any legislation in Illinois probably would have been something like fade the black, but the fact that Illinois is about to go through with explosive growth period here.

Speaker 4: Katy Perry song or something far more upbeat,

Speaker 1: but uh, well, why don't we, why don't we go? Have you ever seen the light by creedence clearwater revival? You can never go wrong with a CCR song. So there you go. The other side of fade to black. That's why kind of give it to you.

Speaker 4: Thanks. Thanks for all the stress and hard work here is about to finally come to fruition after a bunch of bs politics for, for well over a year or so.

Speaker 1: Good things you put the work in. So take a nap and then get going again. How about that? Yeah, we'll be back out in the morning, but uh, thanks for. Thanks for reaching out to me and we'll do this anytime, man. Of course. Of course. Tim, good talking to you all. Just bye. By Tim Mcgraw.

Speaker 2: I mean that's a hard working guy and it goes without saying, although I will say you gotTa love that accent. I mean, come on. Is that guy from Illinois? Hell yeah. That guys from Illinois, no matter where you're from, I very much appreciate you listening. Thanks so much. Engaged at Cannacon [inaudible] dot com. If you'd like to share.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.