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Ep.159: Tommy Chong

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.159: Tommy Chong

Ep.159: Tommy Chong

We first go back to Hempfest 2015 where we talked with Tommy about his outlook on the cannabis landscape and how he’s happy to see the beginnings of greater society focusing on the benefits of cannabis and hemp.  Tommy goes on to talk about his experience with the George W. Bush administration and even brings us back to a scene from the iconic “Up in Smoke.”  Tommy then joins us by phone to discuss the history leading up to the movie as well as what he knew he needed to do to leave a mark.  Tommy also touches on why we owe a thank you and/or apology to Mexico and Mexicans and his exceptionally non-white experience with Cheech.  And speaking of Cheech, Tommy shares specifically what makes the duo work so well through the “Dave’s Not Here” bit.  Enjoy the ride with Tommy Chong.
Special Thanks to this episodes supporters:
Auntie Dolores: www.AuntieDolores.com, Treatibles: www.Treatibles.com

Transcript:

Speaker 1: As a matter of fact, some very big names that will soon be announcing that they're using Bova from top to bottom. Everywhere flower is present. For more information, go to [inaudible] dot com. The Tommy John, we first go back to [inaudible] 2015 where we talked with Tommy about his outlook on the cannabis landscape and how he's happy to see the beginnings of greater society focusing on the benefits of cannabis and hemp. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Tommy goes on to talk about his experience with the George W dot Bush administration, and even brings us back to a scene from the iconic up and smoke. Tommy then joins us by phone to discuss the history leading up to the movie as well as what he knew he needed to do to leave a mark. Tommy also touches on why we owe a thank you and slash or apology to Mexico and Mexicans and is exceptionally nonwhite experience with cheech and speaking of cheech. Tommy. Share specifically what makes the dual work so well through the Dave's not here. Bit. Enjoy the ride with the Tommy Chong. Mr Tommy Chong.

Speaker 5: My pleasure. Yeah. You know, it's a different world than it was when you guys started off. Uh, you know, in the sixties and seventies, as far as cannabis is concerned, we're sitting here at Ham fest in Twenty 15. Just a first question, the biggest question, what are your thoughts about how far we've come to where we are now in cannabis? What was the question? So the question was, well, back in the day, you know, you smoke a little bit and get stone, then you forget what was going on with the rest of the world. Yeah. And now what? Thirty, 40 years later, I'm still doing the same thing and getting stone sitting here trying to figure out what I'm going to eat next. Right. And that's the beauty of it. Nothing changes. Only difference is, is that the street people who used to fear a pot heads, you know, now their children and their children's children have become potheads themselves. And so we're, we're quietly as simulating the whole world. Eventually the whole world will be nothing but potheads and it'll be very peaceful

Speaker 1: there. There we go. We're getting there. We've interviewed, you know, a Congressman Dana Rohrabacher who

Speaker 6: is not a Democrat, that guy's a republican. He worked with Reagan. How, how crazy that he's going to be speaking here today.

Speaker 7: I think you worked with Ido fiddler and

Speaker 6: uh, I don't know. We'll have to check that. I guess we'll fact check that, but how crazy that he's speaking here today. How crazy is that?

Speaker 7: Well, this shows you the times have changed. I'm going to use the hemp has been going on now. Twenty something years. 20. Yeah. Twenty years. And he's finally catching up to it. I gotcha. So you think he's late to the game? Not early. What it is, it's, it's a trolley that's moving, you know, and it's not stopping for anybody and so you got to run and jump and grab on and that's what he did. He wants to stay in the public eye. He has to go where the public is and this is where they're at.

Speaker 6: This is where the public is. So a welcome. Welcome in to everybody that stood. That's coming. Let's talk about commerce a little bit. You know, you uh, you had a little bit of a hangup with your initial foray into commerce in cannabis, right? Oh, you mean with the bongs? Oh yeah, with the box man. Well that was

Speaker 7: my political, uh, you know, that was, uh, during the Iraqi war and that was uh, George Bush's a diversion tactic, you know, to take the mind off of what he was doing. Yeah, let's go after the bomb people.

Speaker 6: Absolutely. The enemy as far as the Iraq war was concerned was of course Tommy John, yeah. Yeah. But it's all changed. And here we are. What, what, what did you learn from that first kind of foray into cannabis business, into your current, uh, brands, if you will?

Speaker 7: Well, the reason I got into business was that people were bootlegging my name and my likeness. And so rather than have someone else salvage Chong Bong, I decided to sell our own and uh, it's a great business because, you know, it's a growing and it's growing bigger every day. And the great thing of a weed is that you smoke it, then you need more, you know, and it, it's like food is a food, food is food for the brain. But uh, for, for commerce, it's going to save the world. It really is. This is, you look at what happened in northern California during the great plains, you know, the Great Depression, the pledge of, Oh, eight. Nobody in northern California was effective. You know, they skated through. Their mortgages were paid, they had their new cars. Gee, how did they do that when everybody else who were losing their homes and jobs and know homeless northern California managed to get by and it was a plant that miraculously did it and there's nothing about commerce northern.

Speaker 7: We've been, we've been selling pot since the beginning of time basically, but since when they made it illegal, pot went underground and it became the biggest cash crop in the world because of. Because it was illegal because of prohibition prohibition, when prohibition did, was gave us license to grow anything we wanted. Anyway. We wanted to to create the plant, how we wanted to create it, and then to get it to the people that need it because it's a medicine. Absolutely, absolutely. By making it illegal, they took off all the restrictions. There's no restrictions to how this plant could be drawn. Now we are not only developed a super plant that does everything. I mean you can eat it, you can, it cures so many diseases are there. They're still counting, you know, they're still looking. It does it. You can build with it, you can share your animals with you.

Speaker 7: It's, it's the magic plant now. Seattle in American that now they're trying to figure out ways to, to, to own it so they can get all the money they can get all the money, you know, they tried demonizing it didn't work. That's not gonna work either. All these restrictions, you know, that they're doing with Washington and Colorado, you know, all that. Yeah. And Alaska and Oregon now comment, all those restrictions are there going to be laughable because once, because the black market is still here, it didn't go away just because you can get a medical license and grow pot, you know, that black market is, it's a biggest cash crop in the world and it's been that way for as long as I can remember. So we can, we can

Speaker 6: try to put any restrictions on it that we, uh, that we can. But it's not going to work basically with the,

Speaker 7: were they in Colorado? They're trying to tag you. Ever plan to know where that plant was grown here. De who's going to check and who cares? So the plan's been in Colorado. It's the same plane you can get in California. You can get an India, you can get anywhere in the world. And so and so the restrictions like that or like a. yeah, that's a good idea. Yeah, let's do that.

Speaker 1: As a matter of fact, some very big names that will soon be announcing that they're using Bova from top to bottom. Everywhere flower is present. For more information, go to [inaudible] dot com. The Tommy John, we first go back to [inaudible] 2015 where we talked with Tommy about his outlook on the cannabis landscape and how he's happy to see the beginnings of greater society focusing on the benefits of cannabis and hemp. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Tommy goes on to talk about his experience with the George W dot Bush administration, and even brings us back to a scene from the iconic up and smoke. Tommy then joins us by phone to discuss the history leading up to the movie as well as what he knew he needed to do to leave a mark. Tommy also touches on why we owe a thank you and slash or apology to Mexico and Mexicans and is exceptionally nonwhite experience with cheech and speaking of cheech. Tommy. Share specifically what makes the dual work so well through the Dave's not here. Bit. Enjoy the ride with the Tommy Chong. Mr Tommy Chong.

Speaker 5: My pleasure. Yeah. You know, it's a different world than it was when you guys started off. Uh, you know, in the sixties and seventies, as far as cannabis is concerned, we're sitting here at Ham fest in Twenty 15. Just a first question, the biggest question, what are your thoughts about how far we've come to where we are now in cannabis? What was the question? So the question was, well, back in the day, you know, you smoke a little bit and get stone, then you forget what was going on with the rest of the world. Yeah. And now what? Thirty, 40 years later, I'm still doing the same thing and getting stone sitting here trying to figure out what I'm going to eat next. Right. And that's the beauty of it. Nothing changes. Only difference is, is that the street people who used to fear a pot heads, you know, now their children and their children's children have become potheads themselves. And so we're, we're quietly as simulating the whole world. Eventually the whole world will be nothing but potheads and it'll be very peaceful

Speaker 1: there. There we go. We're getting there. We've interviewed, you know, a Congressman Dana Rohrabacher who

Speaker 6: is not a Democrat, that guy's a republican. He worked with Reagan. How, how crazy that he's going to be speaking here today.

Speaker 7: I think you worked with Ido fiddler and

Speaker 6: uh, I don't know. We'll have to check that. I guess we'll fact check that, but how crazy that he's speaking here today. How crazy is that?

Speaker 7: Well, this shows you the times have changed. I'm going to use the hemp has been going on now. Twenty something years. 20. Yeah. Twenty years. And he's finally catching up to it. I gotcha. So you think he's late to the game? Not early. What it is, it's, it's a trolley that's moving, you know, and it's not stopping for anybody and so you got to run and jump and grab on and that's what he did. He wants to stay in the public eye. He has to go where the public is and this is where they're at.

Speaker 6: This is where the public is. So a welcome. Welcome in to everybody that stood. That's coming. Let's talk about commerce a little bit. You know, you uh, you had a little bit of a hangup with your initial foray into commerce in cannabis, right? Oh, you mean with the bongs? Oh yeah, with the box man. Well that was

Speaker 7: my political, uh, you know, that was, uh, during the Iraqi war and that was uh, George Bush's a diversion tactic, you know, to take the mind off of what he was doing. Yeah, let's go after the bomb people.

Speaker 6: Absolutely. The enemy as far as the Iraq war was concerned was of course Tommy John, yeah. Yeah. But it's all changed. And here we are. What, what, what did you learn from that first kind of foray into cannabis business, into your current, uh, brands, if you will?

Speaker 7: Well, the reason I got into business was that people were bootlegging my name and my likeness. And so rather than have someone else salvage Chong Bong, I decided to sell our own and uh, it's a great business because, you know, it's a growing and it's growing bigger every day. And the great thing of a weed is that you smoke it, then you need more, you know, and it, it's like food is a food, food is food for the brain. But uh, for, for commerce, it's going to save the world. It really is. This is, you look at what happened in northern California during the great plains, you know, the Great Depression, the pledge of, Oh, eight. Nobody in northern California was effective. You know, they skated through. Their mortgages were paid, they had their new cars. Gee, how did they do that when everybody else who were losing their homes and jobs and know homeless northern California managed to get by and it was a plant that miraculously did it and there's nothing about commerce northern.

Speaker 7: We've been, we've been selling pot since the beginning of time basically, but since when they made it illegal, pot went underground and it became the biggest cash crop in the world because of. Because it was illegal because of prohibition prohibition, when prohibition did, was gave us license to grow anything we wanted. Anyway. We wanted to to create the plant, how we wanted to create it, and then to get it to the people that need it because it's a medicine. Absolutely, absolutely. By making it illegal, they took off all the restrictions. There's no restrictions to how this plant could be drawn. Now we are not only developed a super plant that does everything. I mean you can eat it, you can, it cures so many diseases are there. They're still counting, you know, they're still looking. It does it. You can build with it, you can share your animals with you.

Speaker 7: It's, it's the magic plant now. Seattle in American that now they're trying to figure out ways to, to, to own it so they can get all the money they can get all the money, you know, they tried demonizing it didn't work. That's not gonna work either. All these restrictions, you know, that they're doing with Washington and Colorado, you know, all that. Yeah. And Alaska and Oregon now comment, all those restrictions are there going to be laughable because once, because the black market is still here, it didn't go away just because you can get a medical license and grow pot, you know, that black market is, it's a biggest cash crop in the world and it's been that way for as long as I can remember. So we can, we can

Speaker 6: try to put any restrictions on it that we, uh, that we can. But it's not going to work basically with the,

Speaker 7: were they in Colorado? They're trying to tag you. Ever plan to know where that plant was grown here. De who's going to check and who cares? So the plan's been in Colorado. It's the same plane you can get in California. You can get an India, you can get anywhere in the world. And so and so the restrictions like that or like a. yeah, that's a good idea. Yeah, let's do that.

Speaker 6: Alright. I know we don't have much time with you and you're starting to talk about strains and I guess a good way to end with you is to talk about, uh, the first strain that I really learned about which was part Labrador part Maui Wowie. And if you could say that into this microphone.

Speaker 7: Did I say Labrador? Yeah, man. Definitely. Labradors. Labrador the dog. The dog ate. So then you scooped it up and it's part Labrador, part Maui Wowie. I've written three days with the baggy before he got it back. Tommy Chong. Matt, thanks so much.

Speaker 8: Okay. So, uh, it's true, believe it or not, Tommy Chong is back. Tommy, it's good to be talking to you again.

Speaker 9: Yeah. Nice talking to you soon.

Speaker 8: So you've been busy and uh, I want to go kind of get into that because you've got more than one thing going on in terms of the cannabis economy, but, you know, as far as putting cannabis, uh, on the map and kind of taking it out from the wall of prohibition, you should get credit for that. You know, you guys really approached it differently way back when.

Speaker 9: Yeah, yeah. Well, you know, we were doing it for, for, you know, committee reasons more than anything, you know, when occasionally got together and we started, when we first got together, we were working in a strip bar, right? And we did a lot of tinny jokes, but then when we got on the, you know, when we got into the mainstream, the one thing that unifies everybody was pot marijuana, you know, we're fresh out of the woodstock time, you know, and uh, and we're. Here we are, uh, you know, that was the only, the one thing that unifies everybody, everybody, all our audiences regardless of age or their, you know, their sexual, who they were, men or women or kids, whatever. When we did park jokes, it was the one thing that unifies everybody. So that's how we got into it. However, uh, during that time, you know, other up smoke especially, it broke so many rules in the movie industry itself alone, you know, like, uh, we, we, we pushed major movies, you know, $100, million dollar movies, the, we just obliterated the book. Do you know if it was made for less than a million, uh, was on the number one for almost a year. It was ridiculous. And so that changed the whole culture, you know, the entertainment and culture especially.

Speaker 8: Yeah. And yeah, it, just to jump in as far as counterculture, you know, and why there were things like laughing, there were things like smothers brothers and they were definitely approaching subject matter, but you guys were, it was with a wink and a nod, you know, through, through those mediums. We, you guys with open. Go ahead.

Speaker 9: Really, that's it. Then everybody else who were commenting on other people that smoke pot that themselves, brothers and all those, all those Comedians, you know, none of us. They said, you know, like even Lenny Bruce, you know, it was him smoker, reaper, you know, he, he alluded to it but he alluded to it in such a way that it was always somebody else while we were the first ones to come along. We were the guys and so we weren't only advocating but, but we were the ones that were doing it and we showed everybody, you know, a culture, what went on, you know, in, in a, like a house back or you know, garage band kind of setting. We couldn't play. We got stone and then we went on the hunt for the weed and all the adventures happen. So yeah, we were the first reality pot head

Speaker 8: wait and you know, kind of to that end, did you realize that? How much. Because you know, I know that you guys wrote, and I know that you guys took that performances, but you, you mentioned the in-person performance stuff that you did, you took that seriously and you didn't have a set, you know, how much did you know, you know, that you were actually doing something different versus how much of that was just natural?

Speaker 9: Well, I'll tell ya, I was trained as a backup, the jar player by a fiddle player. And he told me two things says keep it simple, get the people what they want to. And I've lived by that all my life. And so, and then the other one is if you got a good thing going, don't fix it. And so when, when I instinctively see, I've been through like two careers by the time I met my third career, I started out as a musician, then I became a club owner. I owned the nightclubs. And then, then I met cheech and uh, and then I become a comedian. So by the time I met Cheech, I had basic business instincts, you know, and, and I knew just from my travels in that, that when you come, when you affect everybody, the way we were affected people, you got something good going, you know, and so, uh, and so I just use my instincts and when, like for instance, I turned on a television show, we've got offer offered Chico and the man from NBC, in fact, the reason they called him Chico and the man was that Jimmy Coolmax who produced and wrote the show, followed us around for three months, uh, you know, growing, going to all their shows to get a field for us because he wanted to write for us.

Speaker 9: And we had a bit called Pedro and man and, and so, uh, he, he changed the Chico and the man and he called us up and we. So I turned down, literally it was me. I turned down, you know, big, big bucks because I knew that TV spend on tv on this year, you know, a Saturday night live, you know, it very short, you know, the years and then you're done. You know, I knew that we had to do movies, I instinctively knew that we had to do movies because nobody else was doing it. And then when you do a movie, you and you own it, you know, if you do it right. So that's, that's what happened there.

Speaker 8: It becomes what it is and then it always is what it was. And as far as, as far as television, Richard Pryor obviously had his own battles with, uh, with NBC. Had you seen that and is that what a or or is it more of an instinct?

Speaker 9: And when I met Tartikoff I met these people and there was something very, very superficial, you know, there was no depth. They weren't looking at the depth, they were just looking at the numbers of people that, uh, that, you know, the kind of people that liked the graphic does they call it,

Speaker 8: how can we repackage this to the audience that we know will, will watch it and yeah.

Speaker 9: Yeah, to Hollywood mindset. It didn't matter if you're an actor, you could play anybody, you can play a Mexican, you can play a Filipino, you play a native Indian, you know, if you love it, you were an actor. And, and, and here we are, cheech and Chong, totally a white, even though I'm half white and, and no one had really shown the Latino culture the way we did.

Speaker 8: What is your, uh, your heritage, if you don't mind? You say halfway

Speaker 9: Chinese. I'm half Chinese. A Chinese. I'm Chinese. Scotch Irish.

Speaker 8: Oh, that's, that's unique there. Thomas.

Speaker 9: That's Chinese doesn't show.

Speaker 8: Okay, what do you, we can hear it in the brain. That's the brain. And We, speaking of the brain, you know, you had mentioned that you were a businessperson and you know those who have come in contact with you and speak to you for more than a minute. I know that obviously you've got that business brain. Anybody that just knows Tommy Chong and the character is not going to, it's not going to think that that business mind is it in there? Um, how, how much of that came from childhood?

Speaker 9: I've always said when I discovered I'm trained as a backup guitar player and Guitar Player, your job is to keep the rhythm and keep whoever you're backing up, give them support. And so that sort of trickled into my life. You know, when I would meet people I would like singers, for instance, he would hire me to back him up on, on guitar. They were the singers. I was a backup guitar player. And so when I met Cheech, same thing, you know, we became comedians. I was still supporting guide. I could write the bits but I could write for him. I could easily, I could easily see what other people are doing as opposed to what I'm doing and what I do. I would do whatever it took to make the other guy look right. You know. And so when she said I got together, he was so quick and funny and then I.

Speaker 9: So then I automatically became slow, slower guy and, and, and, and so that dynamic works so well because he was so fast and I was so slow that he had to stop and explain shit. To me, that's his explaining what would be so committee because his outlook on everything, he would take it to the Chicano low-rider approach and so that's, it was a little trick like that that really resonated with people because when you're so fast that sometimes people don't get it. But when I like our first bit, Dave's not here. It was supposed to be. I was supposed to use both of the fields, supposed to go to knock on the door and I was going to open the door and let him in and then we'd do the bit. But when I got them on side and he knocked on the door, the door's locked and you couldn't get in.

Speaker 9: I had him at an APP by birth, so it was a. I was going to see how long I can keep both there, but being stupid and, and, and that really became the genesis of the cheech and Chong a team, you know, and, and, and, and what it did, it allowed everybody to get the job. No matter who you are, where you've got the job, we created tension and, and that's what you need. And everything you need tension, you need conflict. Conflict. We had tension and then we had a beautiful payoff, which we never ended up like. He never got into the room.

Speaker 1: Right. That's the whole

Speaker 10: dave, Dave, Dave,

Speaker 9: Dave's not here.

Speaker 9: Beautiful. And that's, you know, that's what we did with teaching charm. We never put a button on anything. We never finalized anything. Did up in smoke. The one at the, the first, uh, you know, Lou Adler, you know, the director and the editor, they try to put a button on the bit by by saying it was all a dream, you know, that it all happened while we were parked out at car, you know, what? We were parked and it was the worst ending ever. And, and, and so then I took over and that's when I really asserted myself as a director and I said, no, I'm going to rewrite the ending. And I did. I wrote, we wrote the ending so that these guys would continue their, their, their adventures not ended. You know, what we were doing, what we were doing was so important to everybody, to the culture, to us, to everybody know that this guy you live, they live on, they got more uh, ventures because that's just the way it is.

Speaker 1: We're not ending this here, but you have Lou Adler who's obviously renowned business guy, you know, running sunset strip at the time. Uh, and after how, how were you able to put your foot down? I, how were you able to do that?

Speaker 9: Uh, uh, I just did it because, you know, I was really, I was not only the writer but I actually directed a lot of the early step only because we were writing as we always wrote, as we went along, you know, much like the reality shows. No, you know, you figured out a premise and then you, you let the actors go at it and see what happens. And then when you find a little area where you can end it or you can send you one, you did it. But what I did was with Lou, you know, it was just a matter of life or death. Edwin, I'm not changed, the ending of the movie would have died, it would have been, it would have died on the bank. And so by changing the ending and then realizing that I couldn't just write the ending and give it to Lou and that loop, you know, be my surrogate, you know, so what I did, I had to tell zoo and that was the beginning of our split up with Luke when I said no, I'm going to direct it myself. And so he was, he wasn't too pleased, but, uh, but, you know, that's the way it was bad. I had control, I was the actor and I was the ringer and so he had no choice. And so, and that, that really was starting to split up. I mean,

Speaker 8: you had the audience. I think that's the key, right?

Speaker 9: Yeah. I mean my ending made the movie, but it is,

Speaker 8: that's it. And it's a, it's a, it's a historic piece of, uh, not only entertainment a but of a culture, you know, and you've done a good job of, of staying in, um, you know, staying within the culture. We, you and I talked about what happened with, uh, you know, the, the bongs and going to jail during the George W dot Bush years. Um, so let, let's not rehash that for, for Christ's sake, um, with all due respect to jc, but in terms of, um, you know, what you're doing now, what you've come out of and what you see now, you know, we, we did talk about it, but talk about it again, this, this landscape is completely different. We're talking about cannabis as medicine, number one. I mean, you know, what are your thoughts on that?

Speaker 9: We, we have to give a big shout out to Mexican people because they were the ones that showed him you could not only make a, all these things with him, but you could use it as a medicine and as an intoxicant and, and when the government found that out, they use the Mexican term marijuana to demonize it. And, and, and so that's how we got the, you know, it was a racist law in it. You still got the racist law period because now we've proven everything good about it. And, and we're finding out even more things that are good for, you know, that it's good for, for instance, him. There's a thing called the Canada Creek Canyon Creek. Like it's concrete only. It's made that a cannabis. Have you heard about that? Yeah. Well that's going to revolutionize the building industry. You know, to first of all, you're going to get a, a, a healthy, um, uh, what do you call it?

Speaker 9: A dry wall right now. You've got to dry now if you get, if it gets moldy in that it can create diseases, legionnaires' disease and shit like that. You see, because of the building, uh, the material in the building stuff. But when you, the great thing about the hemp, a concrete is that it doesn't mold. It doesn't get moldy. And so you can get, it's like waterproof. That's why the hemp rope was so great because it was like a improvement to all the, to the, to the, to the, uh, ravages of nature, you know, of the atmosphere. And that's why him, you know, you still got him a canvas, you know the paper that was the Bible was written on with champ. And so we're just scratching the surface of this magical plant that's going to solve our, our, all, our problems, our problems are everything.

Speaker 9: For instance, for instance, you know, like deserts in that if we get the wider and we grow him, they have will revitalize the forest, the ground. Other plants will grow things to him. And then the hip itself provides food for birds. And when you got food for little animals, that means bigger animals can survive because they can eat the little animals and, and, and it's. And it's a cycle. And then once you get treated, you're going to get rain and when you get rain you're going to get life, you're going to get wider. And so the hemp is, is going to be beyond just getting high and watching a funny movie.

Speaker 11: Alright? So the last question is in three parts. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of your life, what is a, you know, the, the song, the track that's got to be on there. So what, what's most surprised you in, in cannabis?

Speaker 9: Cannabis are fixed brain. It affects the thinking part of the brain. It makes you more creative, it makes you calm, it comes in and when you're calm and you can think and then you can read, your body can heal itself. So, so this is what I learned. And, and, and as, and also when you're calm and you're peaceful, the body doesn't age the body ages to stress. When you see people that are really old, they had a hard light and usually the hard light is because of the, of the, uh, the medications and the kind of food that we're eating and the, and the top light that they're chasing. And cannabis will eliminate all that. That's why my wife and I look as young as we do. There you go. I'm almost 80 years old and I just got off a show where, where I eliminated the young people in a dance contest. I mean, can you believe that I'm touching 80, that's why I had all these old people, uh, my fans because I represent them and, and my wife and I both, we represent the new age of, of people that live our lifestyle because I do everything. I do everything that I want to do, but I don't but, but I, but I have a buddy and my motto was always been, if you're going to abuse your body, have a body to abuse,

Speaker 11: what is most surprised you in life?

Speaker 9: Power of the power of forgiveness.

Speaker 11: The power of forgiveness.

Speaker 9: Yeah. That's most surprising thing.

Speaker 11: Interesting. All. Well, we'll talk more about that later. But the last part of this last question is on the soundtrack of your life, Tommy John's life. What is one track? One song that's got to be on there?

Speaker 9: Uh, what's going on?

Speaker 11: Oh my goodness. Yeah. Marvin gay, of course. That's fantastic. Tommy. I know you got to run. It's been a pleasure. Tommy Chong, very much appreciate it.

Speaker 9: Thank you.

Speaker 1: And there you have Tommy Chong, a great conversation with a cultural icon without question. Thanks to Tommy Chong. Thanks to our supporters and a dolores treatibles gateway and Poveda and thank you to you for listening as as we go. As we grow, we very much appreciate your time, so thank you.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.