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Ep.161: Jazmin Hupp, Women Grow. ‘Introview’ w/Hempfest’s Viv McPeak

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.161: Jazmin Hupp, Women Grow. 'Introview' w/Hempfest's Viv McPeak

Ep.161: Jazmin Hupp, Women Grow. ‘Introview’ w/Hempfest’s Viv McPeak

Jazmin Hupp joins us to discuss WomenGrow at a pivotal moment in the organization’s history. Jazmin shares her background in the theatre and how that experience served her well in building WomenGrow. The conversation with Jazmin took place at the CannabisWorldExpo in NY. But to get things started, we check in with Viv McPeak who for the 25th consecutive year is putting together Hempfest in Seattle.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: yes. That jasmine Hupp joins us to discuss women grow at a pivotal moment in the organization's history. Jasmine shares her background in the theater and how that experience served her well and building women grow up. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. I should let you know the nominations for the third annual account awards are open. We've updated the regions, the categories, and the illustrious advisory board. The category itself is an actual sledge hammer with a three pound head and a three foot handle emblazoned with the cannabinoids logo. Nominate those deserving at [inaudible] dot com. The conversation with Jasmine took place at the cannabis World Expo in New York, but to get things started, we check in with Vivek Peak,

Speaker 1: who for the 25th consecutive years putting together hemp fest in Seattle. So bibs up first and then jasmine hot. Viv Mcpeak, Vivian Mcpeak. You might know him from hemp present, which, uh, is the long form version of a hemp fest. Is that fair?

Speaker 3: Uh, well, I guess, yeah, it's fair. Might not be accurate, but I certainly will.

Speaker 1: It's been going on for a long time. We've got a big anniversary coming up, so we'll talk about that in a second. But hemp present, hemp present is your, uh, what, what do you call it? A radio show

Speaker 3: because that is my crazy, crazy cyber internet radio show on canvas radio. Your source for the force of freedom where I expound linguistic verbiage, Tory aperture to stimulate the sensitive cerebral capacitor. You know, I just basically like to talk a bunch of Baloney. Um, and uh, and fortunately I get to meet with all kinds of people smarter than I am in my are huge, vast, luxurious virtual studio.

Speaker 1: Yeah, it's a, it's endless. Your studio. I've heard about it and congratulations on that.

Speaker 3: Thank you. Thank you. And I can hear you echoing through the halls right now.

Speaker 1: That's it. And you know, it is, uh, for, for guys like you and me. It is a, well, let's, let's call it reassuring that we get a chance to talk to people that are smarter than us. Right?

Speaker 3: Absolutely. I'm doing it right now. Atlanta. And so mine, doesn't that say enough? Well, you know, great minds think alike. So two ours occasionally. All right, so let, let's get down to brass tacks here. What the heck

Speaker 1: is going on with the big anniversary? Hemp hemp fest. What's, what's the deal? What's happening?

Speaker 3: We've been on this crazy, a 25 year journey to justice, uh, with him fast and uh, you know, we have every year 120 bands as many about an equal number of speakers, guest speakers on six stages, 400 arts crafts, food information vendors, 100, one and a half miles long, right on the Seattle waterfront down there. Um, and so over the years, of course, 25 years, so 25th anniversary this year, we virtually had thousands of people and speak and millions of attendees come and celebrate and prove not only that we're a demonstration against the laws were also a demonstration of what the cannabis community and what cannabis enthusiasts are capable, capable of pulling off a year after year. So we've got another 25th anniversary coming this year with our huge symposium tent where we have 100 by 400 foot circus temp panel discussions and keynote speakers. Stuff like that. Big Vip Party on Friday night got all that going on this year and celebrating the victories that we've seen in the region over the last several years. And also trying to remind everybody that we're just getting started. I mean, they were really young. We, we've, we've seen some victories, but we're no way in any way, shape or done in the struggle for equality and, and, and, and of course building new emergence and growth industry.

Speaker 1: Yeah. No, uh, as far as not being done, we are far far from it, but as far as, uh, you know, that the hemp fests train, it keeps on chugging along. Um, there was a little bit of a Snafu or are we all over that? Uh, you know, I, I want to make sure that we do our best to, to throw support a hemp fests way if it needs it.

Speaker 3: Well, you know, it's, it's always a producing the seattle hemp fest is always equal parts, a leap of faith, act of love and call the action man. It's just, there's existential threats that every single year it just seems to never let up. And, you know, endless regulatory and permit battles and obstacles. And then of course the usual annual financial challenges it takes from a producing at $850,000 event with production tag 18, 850 grand. But it's free event to attend to the public. So we've employed all of our business acumens degenerate revenue from a very, a variety of sources including a seller spaces. Sponsorships, attended contribution's memberships to sell with web and event program adds raffles, merchandising of all kinds. And of course we operate a small boutique and head shop in Lake City area of Seattle. But the costs keep rising and hemp test a operates on razor thin, two percent profit margin.

Speaker 2: yes. That jasmine Hupp joins us to discuss women grow at a pivotal moment in the organization's history. Jasmine shares her background in the theater and how that experience served her well and building women grow up. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. I should let you know the nominations for the third annual account awards are open. We've updated the regions, the categories, and the illustrious advisory board. The category itself is an actual sledge hammer with a three pound head and a three foot handle emblazoned with the cannabinoids logo. Nominate those deserving at [inaudible] dot com. The conversation with Jasmine took place at the cannabis World Expo in New York, but to get things started, we check in with Vivek Peak,

Speaker 1: who for the 25th consecutive years putting together hemp fest in Seattle. So bibs up first and then jasmine hot. Viv Mcpeak, Vivian Mcpeak. You might know him from hemp present, which, uh, is the long form version of a hemp fest. Is that fair?

Speaker 3: Uh, well, I guess, yeah, it's fair. Might not be accurate, but I certainly will.

Speaker 1: It's been going on for a long time. We've got a big anniversary coming up, so we'll talk about that in a second. But hemp present, hemp present is your, uh, what, what do you call it? A radio show

Speaker 3: because that is my crazy, crazy cyber internet radio show on canvas radio. Your source for the force of freedom where I expound linguistic verbiage, Tory aperture to stimulate the sensitive cerebral capacitor. You know, I just basically like to talk a bunch of Baloney. Um, and uh, and fortunately I get to meet with all kinds of people smarter than I am in my are huge, vast, luxurious virtual studio.

Speaker 1: Yeah, it's a, it's endless. Your studio. I've heard about it and congratulations on that.

Speaker 3: Thank you. Thank you. And I can hear you echoing through the halls right now.

Speaker 1: That's it. And you know, it is, uh, for, for guys like you and me. It is a, well, let's, let's call it reassuring that we get a chance to talk to people that are smarter than us. Right?

Speaker 3: Absolutely. I'm doing it right now. Atlanta. And so mine, doesn't that say enough? Well, you know, great minds think alike. So two ours occasionally. All right, so let, let's get down to brass tacks here. What the heck

Speaker 1: is going on with the big anniversary? Hemp hemp fest. What's, what's the deal? What's happening?

Speaker 3: We've been on this crazy, a 25 year journey to justice, uh, with him fast and uh, you know, we have every year 120 bands as many about an equal number of speakers, guest speakers on six stages, 400 arts crafts, food information vendors, 100, one and a half miles long, right on the Seattle waterfront down there. Um, and so over the years, of course, 25 years, so 25th anniversary this year, we virtually had thousands of people and speak and millions of attendees come and celebrate and prove not only that we're a demonstration against the laws were also a demonstration of what the cannabis community and what cannabis enthusiasts are capable, capable of pulling off a year after year. So we've got another 25th anniversary coming this year with our huge symposium tent where we have 100 by 400 foot circus temp panel discussions and keynote speakers. Stuff like that. Big Vip Party on Friday night got all that going on this year and celebrating the victories that we've seen in the region over the last several years. And also trying to remind everybody that we're just getting started. I mean, they were really young. We, we've, we've seen some victories, but we're no way in any way, shape or done in the struggle for equality and, and, and, and of course building new emergence and growth industry.

Speaker 1: Yeah. No, uh, as far as not being done, we are far far from it, but as far as, uh, you know, that the hemp fests train, it keeps on chugging along. Um, there was a little bit of a Snafu or are we all over that? Uh, you know, I, I want to make sure that we do our best to, to throw support a hemp fests way if it needs it.

Speaker 3: Well, you know, it's, it's always a producing the seattle hemp fest is always equal parts, a leap of faith, act of love and call the action man. It's just, there's existential threats that every single year it just seems to never let up. And, you know, endless regulatory and permit battles and obstacles. And then of course the usual annual financial challenges it takes from a producing at $850,000 event with production tag 18, 850 grand. But it's free event to attend to the public. So we've employed all of our business acumens degenerate revenue from a very, a variety of sources including a seller spaces. Sponsorships, attended contribution's memberships to sell with web and event program adds raffles, merchandising of all kinds. And of course we operate a small boutique and head shop in Lake City area of Seattle. But the costs keep rising and hemp test a operates on razor thin, two percent profit margin.

Speaker 3: So we got rained out real bad last year, another year like that would be a real existential threat for us. Uh, so what we're really open to remind everybody, uh, to put some donations, uh, and the donation bin come in, uh, on the way into the event or on the way out, uh, and this year don't magazine stepped up unprecedentedly with a gofundme campaign to show their support and appreciation for all the trailblazing, pioneering that our organizations thrown down in this part of the United States. Uh, and so people can search that out as well. Let's go fund me.com/invest the lab.

Speaker 1: Okay. All right. So that's a direct way to go ahead. And as you say, keep it, keep him fest alive. Of course, a sponsorship opportunities and all that. What, uh, is there an email for that type of thing if I'm interest?

Speaker 3: Well, I'm glad you pointed that out too because it's an emerging to changing landscape and Washington state as it is in the other states, some more than others that have seen some serious reform. As you know, the state legislatures are moving rapidly and their idea of, of regulation and legalization might not line up with all the this in the world. Um, so it's hard on businesses to know exactly what's going to happen here in Washington state. Medical marijuana just is going to get asked in a couple days and all those medical marijuana dispensary, do they have to make up a large conversion or here? Um, and then of course the market's changing nationally, rapidly. Um, yes, it's a great year for sponsorship actually. The, uh, and it's, it's a great year so far. They're going fast. We still have some opportunities available and that's [inaudible] dot org and people can always send them an email to seattle, hemp fest spa, excuse me, smudge sponsorships at Seattle, hemp fest Dot Org.

Speaker 3: Um, and I think it's important to point out that [inaudible] is both a five slash onc for federal nonprofit, but also Seattle. Hemp fest is a community values based event. Uh, and we don't just operate on a profit model event the way most of the other pot rallies do. We have several aspects of the event. They were intended to support a certain set of values that we believe to help empower our community, our voter registration cruise registered for 3000 people to vote. Just to the last couple of emphasis. We annually sort recycled compost and divert over 500 yards of trash every year. We raise the raffle. Several thousand dollars had been placed on the commissaries potters. Prisoners do we like for cannabis, we have a train, internal safety patrol and a first aid, a patrol with defibrillators in the whole shop in our event. So people supporting him faster, supporting kind of a, a very unique one of a kind a cannabis event, which is some ways it's kind of set the bar for a lot of other rallies I think. Hopefully.

Speaker 1: Yeah. No, absolutely. And it sounds like with all those bells and whistles, and that sounds trite, it's much more than that. Sounds like you've been building that thing for 25 years.

Speaker 3: It's been a great endeavor with, with, you know, we're in a tremendous city that has a, a long, uh, this region has a long history of a respect for descent. Going back to the wobblies, uh, you know, in the early twenties, thirties here in this area, it's always been kind of a freewheeling, a wild west kind of place. Um, and so we've been very fortunate, a lot of ways to be in this kind of progressive region of, but we've also worked really hard trying to keep it real and try to always come from, from a real place in our hearts of goodwill and fairness and personal responsibility. And I think, uh, that's why we're celebrating our 25th anniversary. Uh, and, and this thing is still rolling is as large as this. We expect to 100,000 people this year.

Speaker 1: That's it. Well, I will be there again and uh, I very much enjoyed it despite, despite all the rain last year, you know,

Speaker 3: still drying off.

Speaker 1: It's still drying off. That's exactly right. Or drying out as they say, right? Well, yes, yes. But that's a different story for different time, Viv, and I know we only have it for a few minutes, so

Speaker 3: I think so much, Bro. Thank you so much. You know, I, I love your podcast and listen to it all the time.

Speaker 1: Perfect man. And likewise. Uh, I will see you down the line.

Speaker 3: All right, take care.

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Speaker 4: was nobody. Yes, we found a place here. We're at the, that cannabis thing in New York. And uh, we're with jasmine hub. Jasmine. Hello. Hello. So finally we are talking. We're doing the whole podcast thing. This is, so, uh, this is a long time coming to say the least. Um, so we're both here in New York, but, you know, I guess as we make our way into the third quarter, um, you know, what is the latest with women grow, you have created this Bohemith,

Speaker 5: a whole Shebang you might say. So we're currently in 45 cities in the U, s and Canada, uh, bringing together women and men on the first Thursday of every month. And we've got over a thousand women joining the cannabis industry every month through our events every month, every month.

Speaker 4: So that's at least $12,000. So at least one slash 4,000

Speaker 5: that are, that are in there. And they're doing such amazing work. It's also really great to be in so many cities in so many states because we really get to see the diversity of the cannabis movement. And the cannabis industry and all of the fresh faces who are coming in and you're going to create the new diversity we're going to see going forward.

Speaker 4: Yeah. And that brings up why you started the whole thing to begin with. And about two years ago you kind of took me through it. Um, you had done this in another industry and then you came into this industry and said, oh, no, no, this is the one that's always one of my secret hacks to being successful in a new industry is take something you did really well in a minute,

Speaker 5: different genre and, and move it into the new hot genre. Um, but actually women grow was not my idea. A women grow is Jane West Idea. They are based out in Denver, Colorado. Uh, they had a great community of women who, who saw the of the cannabis industry for other women and just there weren't many access points. How did you get in, you know, you would go to these shows and they'd be 95 percent men and you may not see the type of companies have the type of colleagues that you as a professional woman, we're really interested in working with. So we wanted to create a space that was safe and welcoming to women so that they knew that the cannabis industry was the right place for them and that now was the right time to join. And so the origins of the organization really is that Jane stood up on Stage two years ago and said there's going to be this thing called women grow. I was sending the audience, I'd be like, wow, I used to do this thing. It was called women two point zero and the technology industry, we can definitely do it here. And that's how women grow was born.

Speaker 4: And you have shared with me that it. Avi, well, you don't have to share with me that it's been successful kind of anybody in the industry and out of the industry knows that. But, uh, what do you think the factors of success in this industry versus the, uh, the tech industry has been?

Speaker 5: Mm, so that's a really good question. Um, and I mean also there's also hold their conversation we can have about what, what is the meaning of success, right? Because I think what we've done splendidly is get this message out of, uh, making sure that there are female role models in this industry from the beginning so that our understanding of this brand new industry is much more diverse than any other industry that's been created in, in recent history. Um, so, so that's been really important to us is, is to make sure we have that messaging out there. But to be honest, you know, everyone in the space struggles, you know, all of us are creating new business models where we're dealing with changing regulations. The sand is shifting beneath our feet. So I think our real success is in creating those spaces for women and uh, and, and we're building the business and everything else under it as well. Yeah.

Speaker 4: No, and just to again, make the parallel between cannabis and tech. Um, you know, I think both of us, uh, were, were there in the late nineties and that was all dudes and it's, it's a lot of, still a lot of dudes, you know, there, there are some great women in the tech industry in cannabis. Um, but it is, I mean, if you look out at any event, to me it looks 50 50, you tell me the stats, but I mean they're, there. Women are equal in cannabis. Yeah, absolutely. The women are doing amazing freaking thing.

Speaker 5: Um, and they're out there raising money and they're out there in the spotlight and that, um, you know, it's so different doing this now as opposed to where we were in the tech industry because we have all these amazing world changes that are happening on. One is of course the rise of the feminine and the revaluing of the feminine. Uh, the second is this new focus on entrepreneurship and an entrepreneurship that's open to a lot more than just guys from Stanford or guys from Harvard. Um, and then you have the whole cannabis industry, cannabis trend candid was movement fueling us. Um, and so when people say, oh, what's the magic of women grow? How, how are you the successful? Well, we, we took people who were really good at doing this, we brought them together and then we fuel them with the trends that are really, that are there fastest growing internet or fastest propelling. So you just mix really good talent with really good propellant and you get something

Speaker 4: really big, really fast. Yeah, no, absolutely. Give them, give them the tools, give them the, give the right talent, the tools. And then you've got something. What are, um, some of the, you know, some of your happiest successes, you say, well, you know, what is success to happiest successes over the past couple of years with women grow? Where, where have you seen, oh wow, look at, look at our, uh, you know, kind of fingerprint there maybe.

Speaker 5: Oh Wow. So my favorite is that, uh, for the most part, every business conference I go to in the cannabis industry, we've kicked the booth babes out of the business conferences in the cannabis industry. So we went in and said, you know what, we want an industry that is literally welcoming to women and we're not going to stand for, I'm lazy marketing, uh, putting skimpy girls in skimpy closing as a way to attract people to our product. And so something I invite everyone in your audience to do is when they see a booth with some booth babes who are, um, is to ask the owner of the booth, you know, what is it about your product that needs girls in skimpy clothing to attract me? And just that simple question has completely changed the atmosphere of the different shows that are held in this industry. I don't know.

Speaker 4: No if the word is attack, but I saw betty aldworth approach a booth in this same vein and to great effect because all of a sudden you have a stone face looking back at him. Obviously there's a soundcheck happening here backstage or whatever. But, um, so that is, that is a big difference because we, you know, out on any exhibit floor, I don't see that. I did see it a couple of years ago and I don't see it now.

Speaker 5: Yeah. So that's one of our, just really easy wins. Um, the other thing that we try really hard to do is to create safer spaces for women. Um, you know, when I entered the cannabis industry, my first meetings were in strip clubs and I have, I have nothing. I don't mind strip clubs, honestly. I just don't think they're the best place for business around wellness, um, for, especially if, you know, we're talking about female customers, it's, it gets a little confusing. We're also talking about medicine and why would we do that? There are, um, so I, I really loved, um, being, for example, being in Las Vegas and having a space that was safe for women where I knew that the women in our community, we're going to be able to network and be taken seriously as women because without that stronghold, without us there to the party and make it a 50 slash 50 gender split. What we saw is, is

Speaker 4: old old, old behavior, old sexism old. I had one man come to me and said, oh, well you can't be the CEO, you're a girl. No, that didn't happen. It happens. Oh my God. Cheese. Alright, well, word video. Breaking through as they say. Right. Um, all right. So what, how did you get to this place though? You, you mentioned Jane kind of just exclaimed we're going to do this, you know, how did you find Jane? What were you doing sitting in that audience?

Speaker 5: Uh, so I come out of entrepreneurship, uh, I was in New York doing various things in tech and community building, um, retail wellness, et Cetera, et cetera. And so I showed up into the cannabis industry with 52 different business ideas on a spreadsheet and uh, and, and went to Denver for four slash one weekend and I said, all right, I'm going to go experience everything that's going on and see what I would do differently. And uh, so I started a topical brand. I started working with w for women grow. I started, um, you know, all these different projects and it was really women grow that took off. Uh, and so, so that has been my full time Gig, uh, here for almost two years and uh, and now we're going to do a little transition.

Speaker 4: So this is a little news worthy, I guess. So what the Hell's going on? What are we doing here? It sounds like, uh, like I said, but we myth, right?

Speaker 5: It is a behemoth, uh, you know, I think one of the greatest signs of leadership is knowing when you are no longer a, the top leader for, for the community. Um, and knowing when it's time to welcome in new leadership.

Speaker 4: Well, but how do you mean that because for a lot of people, jasmine hub and Jane was our women grow. I mean, that is women grow. So what do you mean by, uh, I, I don't remember the specific words that you said, but not the perfect leader. What do you specifically mean?

Speaker 5: Uh, so women grow was built as a platform to empower women. And, and that's a cycle. We want women to enter a, to gain confidence, to set the agendas and their own communities. And then we want them to essentially exit and make space for the next generation of women to come in after them. So as much as Jane and I and Julie [inaudible] is the third co founder of women grow, uh, were intricately integrally involved and we're the face of women grow in this startup period. Now it's really time to welcome the next generation of women to take, take those places and take those seats and take those leadership roles. So what we're hinting at, that's a good job. So we have Julie [inaudible], who's our vp of membership, she segwayed into a new company that she launched the end of March. And so we have a new membership director, vp of membership named Shannon Melik, who's amazing at based out of Denver. Um, and then uh, Jane West recently replaced herself hiring a new national events director named Ashley Piccolo. And so we're onboarding her. Um, and finally we're in the process of onboarding a new CEO for women grow to take my role. I'm Leah Heiss based out of Baltimore is going to take on the CEO role, CEO role of women grow and really grow us to the next phase,

Speaker 4: the women grow growth that we've been hearing about. So, you know, you, you mentioned it to me just before we started that and you did mention it here, that you're an entrepreneur and you're into building businesses and you're into thinking of new ideas. So, you know, take us through a little bit more about the transition and, you know, um, you know, what, what you're well suited for what this CEO is well suited for or the incoming CEO will be well suited for, et Cetera.

Speaker 5: Uh, one, I think that's what's so fascinating about the startup process is that the skills that you need to launch are so different from the skills that you need to build and fortify and the skills that you need to then scale this thing that you launched a while ago. And, and so when we started the organization, um, you know, I am a great chief everything officer that is my ceo sweet spot when, yeah, when you need someone who can set up a business, launch the website, do the branding, do the messaging, you know, find the customer, blah, blah, blah in 48 hours that I'm your girl, uh, and, and for our foundation, for our launch, that was the absolute perfect thing we, you needed is, is women who could do it all. And, and now we get to go to that great place where as we've all fortified our skillsets, we can now bring in women who are more specialized than I am.

Speaker 5: Um, and so leah highest is a regulatory compliance lawyer based out of Maryland. She's been through the Maryland application process, so she's really familiar with obstacles and the challenges that a lot of the women in our community are facing. Um, and, and now that we're of a certain size, um, you know, you just, we can't operate the way we use it too. That was, you know, I, I, uh, I will look back on the slapstick kind of, you know, you just pull everything together out of a hat last minute kind of days and uh, at some point you've got to move away from the. Oh my gosh, we did it. We got it done too. Oh, we have procedures and policies and, and, and were more formal, yeah,

Speaker 4: this is how we do things as opposed to, holy cow, do you believe we did it? So what as, as we go into a, as I said, third quarter to 2016, you know, what, what is the goal, what are the goals for, for women grow.

Speaker 5: Uh, so we've got a couple of big goals. The first is we're a new program which are called wellness weekends. We'll do one in Lake Tahoe in August, and then another one on the North Oregon coast in October. We really wanted to create a space that was cannabis consumption friendly for women. And so we're focusing on states where we can really create a relaxing. I'm a jovial, amazing everything environment, um, with cannabis integrated into that. Um, which is of course brand new out here in that ecosystem to be able to do networking or wellness events with cannabis included. Um, and so we're really looking forward to seeing that program launching and giving women new options for how they want to connect within their community. Um, you know, we, we love conferences and being on the show floor that, that's definitely one thing, but we've, you know, the women in our community also said, you know, what, it'd be great to not like get dressed up and go on a show for.

Speaker 5: It'd be great to show up at a nice dinner and then, you know, sit in the hot tub together and shared joint and I'd rather do my networking that way. So we're going to experiment with that. Um, and uh, I can't wait for those personally hot tub and a joint sounds pretty good. We also are discovering that, um, women especially, they benefit from, uh, from the time off as much as they benefit from the time on. I think men do too. I will. Have you found that as well? There's something where we don't give ourselves permission to take that time to see what you're saying. You know, we, we say, you know, we all get together like, Oh, you work 12 hours yesterday, I worked 13 hours yesterday, you know, w, w, w, W, we play that game and instead of saying, you know what, I took the weekend off and I just journaled and I came back with clear thinking and more resilience and better alignment with my team than being at the office to do in 36 hours.

Speaker 5: The email. Yeah. My mind feels amazing type of thing, you know, because we have so many challenges in the industry. We have the regulatory challenges, we have the scientific challenges. Uh, and so what was amazing is to see that people are hitting their personal challenges just as hard and that the self talk and the, the mindset that we go through, this is actually more important than what the regulatory decision is because we'll all bend and weave and make the regulatory stuff work. As long as we're clear in our mind and our goals and we're ready for it, our mindset, that's a great way to put it. And that makes a ton of sense. All right. So how did we, what's the jasmine hub where you're from? New York? Yeah. The origin story as though you are wonder woman from New York, right? Yeah. Yeah, I know it. No one knows where I'm friends. Very, very confusing. Um, so that's going to change right now. Yeah. That's gonna. That's gonna Change. Um, so in 1983, my dad could not live a Reagan presidency after Reagan governorship. Alright. So there's California there, I guess. Uh, and so, uh, he and my mother absconded to Victoria, British Columbia.

Speaker 4: Look at that. Oh my goodness. Arts. So that is a definite cannabis economy at Devon and campus culture.

Speaker 5: We were just in Vancouver year go together. So how, how long did you stay there? Not just about nine months. Uh, I was, I was, uh, you know, repatriated secretly. Um, so I do have dual citizenship, which is kind of fun that women grow, operates in both these countries and I very much operated by these countries, uh, and I spent my childhood, uh, with uh, falling my parents, my dad's a musician. And uh, so I went to 13 different grade schools. I grew up in a motor home. I lived in every state west of Texas and uh, it wasn't until high school where I said, okay, parents, we've done the moving around thing. I've been to every national park, I've camped everywhere. I've been every festival, um, we're going to pick one town for high school and we're gonna stay there because, uh, because I want, I want to have a great college application, very upstanding. Uh, and so we moved to Ashland, Oregon. And so I'm from from quote unquote, from Ashland, Oregon more than anywhere else.

Speaker 4: And I, I have met your dad. That's a cool guy right there. My Dad's real cool. I really like, is a musician's musician

Speaker 5: that is very, very cool. My Mom's an artist. Uh, so I, I grew up in hippie culture and in cannabis culture and I was being talked to you about cannabis from age three. I was seeing responsible age, a responsible cannabis consumption from age three. At Age Fourteen, my dad offered me cannabis and I tried it and I was like, well, this is lame. This is what my parents do. I'm not interested because that's what you do as a teenager. Right. And so it wasn't until my friends started smoking cannabis at 16 that I chose cannabis instead of alcohol for my Friday night and that it, that it was instead of grabbing a case of beers and driving around the hills, what my Friday night was was, you know, me and a couple close friends, we'd go buy snacks, we'd go rent a movie and we'd hunker down in the living room and enjoy ourselves and, you know, fall asleep.

Speaker 4: So Oregon in the nineties, right around there. What are we talking about? I mean, how accurate is Portlandia, I guess is the question for you, right?

Speaker 5: Let's just say that my first experiences with cannabis, we're medical grade Oregon and California kind. But of course, and so when I moved to New York City, uh, to be the good theatrical stage manager that I was at the time and I got to college and everyone was like, we're going to smoke pot and go to class. I was like, that's weird. We're going to smoke pot. Drive around, like why? Uh, and, and then I tried, of course, uh, the cannabis available to us in our New York campus. I was like, oh, that's fine.

Speaker 4: You can do this and do anything you can really. Exactly. Experience Kinda like Benadryl. So not quality, I guess. Yeah. So how did you get to New York then? What was the.

Speaker 5: Yeah. So, uh, I, uh, the reason that I wanted to live in Ashland, Oregon was because the largest system that they would let a 12 year old girl run was a theater. So, uh, so I was running theaters

Speaker 4: from age 12 inch 12. You can go jag. It's pretty,

Speaker 5: that's creating websites and nine and theaters at 12. Uh, and uh, and, and so I worked for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. I was the youngest stage manager at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, um, and then I moved out to New York City to become a theatrical stage manager and it turns out they don't need any more theatrical stage managers.

Speaker 4: Well, no, I mean the theater community in New York is a burgeoning always. Let's say that. Yeah, no, that, that talent is here. However, I do want to key in on this a stage manager that is a very specific skill. So for folks that don't know what a stage manager does, inner theater take us through it. Take us through what twelve-year-old jasmine hope was doing because it's expensive. Well, and it's very much with the e owing and in a lot of ways is what the stage manager is knowing a bunch of hippies, knowing artists. Everybody.

Speaker 5: Yeah. Uh, so, so the job of the stage manager is very much the management of the production, meaning you had these amazing artists of all sorts of different temperaments that want all sorts of different things and have all sorts of different ideas about how to make them happen. And then you have like the realm of possibility and science and physics, uh, and with, with our crew. Yeah. And, and so the, the, the great joy of the stage manager is really translating, massaging. I'm leading these amazing artists in trying to get what they envision in their head live on a stage before 8:00 PM that evening. Right?

Speaker 4: That's right. And that's before the show. And then during the show, it's minute by minute by minute by minute.

Speaker 5: Yeah. So, you know, people will say I really enjoy the time, dilation of, of some of the substances we consume. Um, and the reason is because I have a ticking clock in my head constantly because I grew up with a stopwatch in my hand because during the show you are literally calling the shots and that the stage manager is the one communicating behind the scenes and telling everyone what to do at every single second of the show, which makes you amazing at telling people to do and, and timing things and all those things. But also the skill that was really the best part of it for me was that it taught you how improvisation and it taught you how to react to changes or things not going the right way. And I think that is the skill that we don't teach enough of is putting people in a place where they can improvise and they're safe to fail or they can try something new and so many people are afraid to improvise and that actually makes. I'm also afraid to, to go into entrepreneurship or afraid to speak or a free to lead a meeting and you need to be fearless around all of these things.

Speaker 4: Yes. Or, or simply adjust. I mean it's, it's good for simply adjusting in real time type of thing. Alright. So stage manager Jasmine have from age 12 to sounds like twenties. And then how did you find tech?

Speaker 5: Uh, well my computer broke and I needed a new one. I like, I don't know if you noticed, but apple technology is kind of expensive. Yes it is. And so I started working for apple for the discount free genius bar. It was during. Do you working at the genius bar and the um, and I worked working for apple and apple, Annapolis, of course, a really big system. Uh, and I was like, okay, I want to be promoted. And they're like, you know, it's two years out for the next promotion. I was like, fuck that. I'm sorry. No, that's fine. That's fine. So I went and worked for a, what would a lot of people consider the original apple store, which is a company called [inaudible] are based in New York City on 23rd street. And they were, before they were apple stores, they were the independent apple store.

Speaker 5: So it was amazing playground to be an entrepreneur. And I'm in that. I bought to a teach in higher. I got to create their ecommerce department, we got to Redo their phone sales department, we got to build out their professional services department. Um, and so I would spend my day job creating new businesses at texts or that kind of serving that intersection of what artists needed from technology and what business needed from technology. And then at night I would be starting some other random company and we have some real winners and some real losers in that pile. That's what'll happen. Right? And so that was how I cut my teeth as I had this great a playground where we were resourced and have budgets and we created new things. And then you would use bootstrap at night and you're recreating new companies at night.

Speaker 4: So when was it at tech serve, I guess, or in, during that experience that you realized that you were one of how many women

Speaker 5: in the technology, because you could count them, you know, we all knew each other, right? Uh, yeah. So that was, uh, that was 2008 where you're like, wow. Um, and that's when I went and joined a women to point out who has a very similar mission to women grow, which was women. Two Point, oh, was getting more women to become a venture backed founders. And it's so fascinating because women two point, oh, is operated for 15 years and has done amazing work and gotten amazing. Women started. But women are still only receiving about six or seven percent of venture capital funding out of Silicon Valley. You said six or seven? Six or seven. Yeah. So we're nowhere near that 50 slash 50. And uh, so why does that matter? Well, the reason that it matters is because we're, we don't get technology that women were not having any technology that really serves like older, older people.

Speaker 5: Like we're not getting technology that serves a lot of different types of people. The, I, it, it's, it's, you know, when you only fund a certain type of people's ideas, you only get solutions for, for those people in front of those people. Um, so we've got a million great ways to compile code, but we don't really have more than like two good ways to schedule daycare. Right. Uh, and, and so we see that ever apparently in the technology industry is that instead of technology being this amazing tool that activates and invigorates everyone, it's something special that only some people get to use and some people understand and everyone else kind of feels more like a victim than a, than an activator of technology. Interesting. Uh, and so that, that's what we've created with our venture back system and we can't afford to do the same thing in cannabis. We can't leave women out of cannabis. You can't leave boomers out of cannabis. We can't leave children out of candidates, which means we're going to need a system that funds ideas from a wider range of people so that we have solutions for all those different audience.

Speaker 4: And you, I mean, you can see it, it is a extremely apparent to anyone that walks into any cannabis, a group it is, you know, it's pretty equal. Like I said, you know, we, we need to keep our eye on it, but it's pretty equal. So congratulations on that. But we did say, you know, in a couple of weeks, which by the time this will go up, it probably already happened. So now what, where do I get my jasmine hop? What happens with that?

Speaker 5: Oh, I'm not going too far away from your uh, yeah, I get to step back into, away from chief everything into the strategic, uh, and into more speaking and more consulting, which is really my great pleasure. And my great joy, uh, to take kind of this collective knowledge that we've been building and creating and to activate a great women coming into this space to reinvigorate women already in this space. Uh, so you'll be seeing me do lots of speaking, some writing, some consulting very much still on the same mission.

Speaker 4: Yeah, that's fair. All right, so I, I have a four final questions for you. I'll give you the three traditional ones after this. In 12 months, which we know is seven years dog years, right? Where do you think the industry will be now? You can answer that in any way. It's a huge question, but in 12 months, what do you expect considering where we've come for the past? Well, 30 years and then the past two or three

Speaker 5: [inaudible] yeah. So I just can't wait for November and these elections coming up. Um, you know, I, you voting for,

Speaker 4: that's your answer. I get it. That's good. Yeah. You just laugh.

Speaker 5: I keep telling everyone that the women of this country will not elect a bigot. Right. So, you know, where our only messages women vote and we'll be fine. Yeah, there we go. And so will, you know, in 12 months we're gonna have a real California market,

Speaker 4: an actual market with actual regulation.

Speaker 5: Wow. I don't even know if we'll have those yet, but yeah, it's been voted in and yeah. Um, so I can't wait to see the brands and the product in California. I'm on handcuffed essentially

Speaker 4: quite literally in some cases. Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 5: Absolutely. I can't wait to see Canada figure out how are they going to integrate their historical base with their new national system

Speaker 4: as, as we discussed. Actually, I'll, I'll, uh, hopefully integrate that into this a posting. You and I discussed the fact that the dispensary's and BC are absolutely legal and everybody in Canada kind of looked over at us all crazy, like we were crazy. Excuse me. So maybe we are.

Speaker 5: Yeah, exactly. I'm, I'm finding the changes in, in, in business procedure and policy, fascinating, uh, as, as we all come together as cannabis companies and we have different needs. So for example, I was discussing a morality clause in an operating contract the other day, and you know, what's going to be in our morality clause is very different from a traditional corporate. If you're caught with drugs, you know, you're out. Which we obviously can't have that. We're not doing that policy. We can't, we can't even say if you're arrested, you're out because you know, many of us commit an act of civil disobedience every day. Exactly. So changing. I'm changing corporate culture around that. It's really interesting changing your drug testing policies. If you had a drug testing policy, we don't have a drug testing policy here at women Cro. To be clear, uh, we asked you what your favorite strain is on the job application, but as a test in a way. Yeah, we'd like to know. Um, so that's really fascinating to me. Even even, uh, what I'm most looking forward to in the near near future is like companies coming together to get their own insurance policies out there because right now, uh, my community members in Colorado, they're getting classified as tobacco smokers on their insurance for being cannabis consumers. Not True, which we know are not the same risks and shouldn't be the same cost. Yeah. Amazing. So those, those are some of the little things I'm looking forward.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. All right, so the three final questions, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. First one is what has most surprised you in cannabis? Second is what has most surprised you in life? That's the big one. And then it's either the most difficult or the easiest one. The last question is on the soundtrack of Jasmine hops life. What is one song on track that must be on there? So first things first, what is or what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 5: I think what most surprised me and, and, and you've worked with a lot of different industries and I,

Speaker 5: I think what most surprised me was how genuine and authentic everyone is at the top of this heap. We, you know, when I was just researching this industry from my laptop, kind of peeking in, um, you, you kind of get this hero worship or the star worship thing. Like, oh my gosh, these people, they've been doing it forever, they're amazing and they are amazing, but they're not egotistical about it, right? They're not divas about it. And it's so refreshing to, uh, you know, I'm considered a top expert fortune named me one of the top five most powerful women in cannabis. Um, and it's just so refreshing to that. That doesn't mean a whole lot, which means what means a lot is like how we treat each other and how we interact in person. Yeah. And, and what's been so surprising is the graciousness and the humility and just the overall wonderfulness of, of the people at the top of this. This is quite special.

Speaker 4: Yeah. No, it is. We do have some great people. That is true. Uh, I put our people up against any industry. How about that? Just for kindness and that's not upon. So what has most surprised you in life, jasmine?

Speaker 6: Mm.

Speaker 5: Well, it surprised me to figure out that the patriarchy is real. It really did well. And you're kind of destroying it, which is good. But, you know, I, I really did grow up in a, in a super secret special universe where I as, as, as a girl was told you can do anything. I really, really do believe that. And uh, so it was amazing to start hitting the institutional bias and start hitting the expectations of what you owe. You can't be the CEO, you're a girl. I'm like, I just, I was very protected from it in my wonderful hippie upbringing.

Speaker 4: Oh, you're 12 and female. Yes. You can stage manage the Shakespeare festival. That's not a problem. Alright. So the patriarchy, but whatever we're, we're dealing with that arm. We were changing it. Exactly. And then the final question on the soundtrack of your life. One track one song that must

Speaker 6: beyond there.

Speaker 5: Oh, you're asking musicians. Daughter too. I know.

Speaker 4: It's why it's way if you have musicians, blood. This is a tough one.

Speaker 5: It's a tough one. Like I want to like get out my um, my phone, you know, but actually I want to, I want to give a shout out to new Americana from Haley. Uh Huh. Um, and she's a young songwriter. We're getting more and more of these female songwriters who wrote these songs for someone else. They didn't want to be on stage, but people wouldn't do the music and so they had to get out there. That's literally carole king. It's the same. Absolutely. I feel a lot of residents, I'm happy to be backstage but at some point like we needed someone on the stage so it had to get on the stage and that's how I learned to be on stage and so I love reformers like that that really started cutting their teeth and then like they just couldn't take it anymore. They had to get out there and do their music and new Americana by Haley has some great lines about, you know, being raised on Biggie and Nirvana and you know, we get the city to ourselves is everyone goes to the hamptons. So. So seeing the new voices of new American culture and the new women coming, I'm really excited about.

Speaker 4: Alright, well we will have to check that out jasmine. A long time coming. I feel like we've done our job here. Here's two quarter, three, quarter four and the beyond. How about that? I love it. I love it. Thank. Thank you. Thank you.

Speaker 2: And there you have jasmine hub. Really appreciate the conversation that we had a. it's been a long time coming so it's great to sit down with her. Great to chat quickly with Viv mcpeak as well. Check out hemp fest either through a digital interfaces or actually in person and of course [inaudible] dot com if you've got a nomination for those deserving. As always, thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.