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Ep.164: Eduardo Blasina, Symbiosis & Matt Huron, Good Chemistry

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.164: Eduardo Blasina, Symbiosis & Matt Huron, Good Chemistry

Ep.164: Eduardo Blasina, Symbiosis & Matt Huron, Good Chemistry

Eduardo Blasina of Symbiosis joins us to share what’s happening in Uruguay. In helping us understand the present, Eduardo shares the dynamic history of cannabis in his country and just how Uruguay became the first country on earth to legalize adult use at the federal level. But Matt Huron of Good Chemistry first joins us and discusses the roots of cannabis as medicine in the HIV/AIDS epidemic through caregiving for his father.
So Matt Huron’s up first and then Eduardo Blasina from Uruguay by Skype.

Transcript:

Eduardo Blasina of becomes our first skype guest proceeded by Matt Huron.

Speaker 2: So this was unexpected to say the least. Matt, thanks so much. Uh, you run good chemistry, right? Is that a fair way to say it? Well, me and this fabulous team it takes, it takes a village. Fair enough. Fair enough. What's with the prosthetic ear, Matt? Oh, I was just, I was in a car accident of many years ago and I lost my ear, unfortunately. Crazy. Yeah. Yeah. What, how many years ago? A 2000. I've actually had it been through a 26 reconstructive surgeries and it was quite the asco, but my goodness now, and it's a good bar trick and yeah, you look great. Everything seems to be working. It is. They put, they put me back together, so that's good. Can you hear out of the uh, yeah, a little bit. It's not my, you know, my wife is a by the gets louder and louder and I'm like, honey, it's not going to get any better.

Speaker 2: These are things that she has to deal with. These are things that between age and the era it's happened happening, but it, it could be well a lot worse. It could be. If loud TV is the worst thing here, we'll take it. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, exactly. Alright, so, so good. Chemistry for folks that don't know, kind of tell us about the operation so we get a good sense and then we'll go ahead and dive in. Sure. Um, I guess, well good chemistry was established in 2010. It's Colorado based dispensary and cultivation operation. Um, what can I say? I, I guess I'll just start with me originally. I'm from San Francisco right over here, so I'm glad to be back over this week. And um, I was in the industry for started actually in 2000 right around the car accident time here and got involved with my father and his partner who both had HIV, um, and we started a small co op and grew medical marijuana and distributed to a variety of assisted living facilities, hospice care facilities, things like that throughout the bay area.

Speaker 2: And in [inaudible] nine, um, my father passed away and his partner passed away and you know, the rules and regs and California were especially on the cultivation side of the vehicle. Asian is, uh, was, was not really there and that they're still grappling with some of that here. And I had a good friend in Colorado said, hey, you should come take a look at what's going on. There was dispensary starting to pop up when I did and it just was a, you know, I wouldn't say it was luck, but it was a, it was just a good moment in time where, you know, I had 10 years of cultivation experience. I was feeling a little uncomfortable with the size of the operation here and decided in California not being completely regulated. Exactly. And so I moved that over to Colorado essentially and started good chemistry and a 2010 we have now, we have two stores, one in Denver, one in Aurora.

Speaker 2: We have three cultivation facilities. I think I had about 10 employees and 2010. And now we're north of 100. So there's been a lot in six years. There's been a lot of expansion. I don't know how I'm doing it. But you mentioned the good tea. Yeah, no that's a part of my job is, is trying to just build a great team. Um, and uh, we were recently awarded are licensed in Nevada, Reno. And we actually just had our final inspections yesterday, so that was excellent. So, uh, we have a cultivation facility there as well. All right, well let's take the last thing first because Nevada is medical, correct. We have the opportunity to turn it into adult use, although it's touch and go at this point. As far as that ballot initiative. Yes. As far as I understand. Yes. So how happy or how satisfied would you be if that operation in Nevada had to exist is just medical for the first few years, you know, I'm, I'm fine.

Speaker 2: You know, again, I, you know, really it started with a very medical focus, uh, with my father and everything else. And, and you know, I was in the medical marijuana industry for a decade or longer, you know, recreational was 2012. So, um, you know, I, I feel that there's plenty of market space with patients. I'm happy to work in that environment. I do think adult use will pass. If it's not this year, it will be next year. I think it's really a timing question. I mean, unfortunately these states like Nevada, Massachusetts, uh, there's not really an industry yet and so it's difficult to raise money for these campaigns because folks are building their facilities and so I just, unfortunately, we may have to wait another four years, but I think that's okay. Yeah, let's, let's see how that goes. But, you know, if you don't mind, I'd love to, to talk about your foray into the space.

Eduardo Blasina of becomes our first skype guest proceeded by Matt Huron.

Speaker 2: So this was unexpected to say the least. Matt, thanks so much. Uh, you run good chemistry, right? Is that a fair way to say it? Well, me and this fabulous team it takes, it takes a village. Fair enough. Fair enough. What's with the prosthetic ear, Matt? Oh, I was just, I was in a car accident of many years ago and I lost my ear, unfortunately. Crazy. Yeah. Yeah. What, how many years ago? A 2000. I've actually had it been through a 26 reconstructive surgeries and it was quite the asco, but my goodness now, and it's a good bar trick and yeah, you look great. Everything seems to be working. It is. They put, they put me back together, so that's good. Can you hear out of the uh, yeah, a little bit. It's not my, you know, my wife is a by the gets louder and louder and I'm like, honey, it's not going to get any better.

Speaker 2: These are things that she has to deal with. These are things that between age and the era it's happened happening, but it, it could be well a lot worse. It could be. If loud TV is the worst thing here, we'll take it. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, exactly. Alright, so, so good. Chemistry for folks that don't know, kind of tell us about the operation so we get a good sense and then we'll go ahead and dive in. Sure. Um, I guess, well good chemistry was established in 2010. It's Colorado based dispensary and cultivation operation. Um, what can I say? I, I guess I'll just start with me originally. I'm from San Francisco right over here, so I'm glad to be back over this week. And um, I was in the industry for started actually in 2000 right around the car accident time here and got involved with my father and his partner who both had HIV, um, and we started a small co op and grew medical marijuana and distributed to a variety of assisted living facilities, hospice care facilities, things like that throughout the bay area.

Speaker 2: And in [inaudible] nine, um, my father passed away and his partner passed away and you know, the rules and regs and California were especially on the cultivation side of the vehicle. Asian is, uh, was, was not really there and that they're still grappling with some of that here. And I had a good friend in Colorado said, hey, you should come take a look at what's going on. There was dispensary starting to pop up when I did and it just was a, you know, I wouldn't say it was luck, but it was a, it was just a good moment in time where, you know, I had 10 years of cultivation experience. I was feeling a little uncomfortable with the size of the operation here and decided in California not being completely regulated. Exactly. And so I moved that over to Colorado essentially and started good chemistry and a 2010 we have now, we have two stores, one in Denver, one in Aurora.

Speaker 2: We have three cultivation facilities. I think I had about 10 employees and 2010. And now we're north of 100. So there's been a lot in six years. There's been a lot of expansion. I don't know how I'm doing it. But you mentioned the good tea. Yeah, no that's a part of my job is, is trying to just build a great team. Um, and uh, we were recently awarded are licensed in Nevada, Reno. And we actually just had our final inspections yesterday, so that was excellent. So, uh, we have a cultivation facility there as well. All right, well let's take the last thing first because Nevada is medical, correct. We have the opportunity to turn it into adult use, although it's touch and go at this point. As far as that ballot initiative. Yes. As far as I understand. Yes. So how happy or how satisfied would you be if that operation in Nevada had to exist is just medical for the first few years, you know, I'm, I'm fine.

Speaker 2: You know, again, I, you know, really it started with a very medical focus, uh, with my father and everything else. And, and you know, I was in the medical marijuana industry for a decade or longer, you know, recreational was 2012. So, um, you know, I, I feel that there's plenty of market space with patients. I'm happy to work in that environment. I do think adult use will pass. If it's not this year, it will be next year. I think it's really a timing question. I mean, unfortunately these states like Nevada, Massachusetts, uh, there's not really an industry yet and so it's difficult to raise money for these campaigns because folks are building their facilities and so I just, unfortunately, we may have to wait another four years, but I think that's okay. Yeah, let's, let's see how that goes. But, you know, if you don't mind, I'd love to, to talk about your foray into the space.

Speaker 2: So, you know, you got to your dad and his partner both HIV, when did you come upon cannabis as medicine for them? Um, you know, my, my dad really, you know, my dad always enjoyed cannabis and it wasn't a foreign plant to begin. I know there was a bag of cannabis on the coffee table my entire life at the time. It was part of course my friends will really enjoyed that. Um, but you know, he, you know, in the late eighties and early nineties, you know, a lot of his friends started, uh, you know, on, you know, and it started getting really sick. It was a really traumatic time and I was in high school at that time and you know, they just started noticing, I mean, they just kind of came upon it that, you know, they're taking all these meds and you know, they're, they're wasting away and cannabis was really becoming something that was becoming very therapeutic for them, you know, I mean, I don't think there was really a day that's like, this is it.

Speaker 2: It's just kind of this evolution of, of understanding that this plant, this is really helpful. And um, and there wasn't really a whole lot of thought past that it was like, this works. It's relieving pain or suffering and so let's, let's provide it, dive in on that because this, you know, cannabis as medicine really did start with the HIV and aids epidemic as a solution. What was the solution when you say relieving pain? Dive in as specifically as you can because if we are talking about your dad. Yeah, I mean I think with um, you know, with really the wasting syndrome in general and I think that, you know, ultimately all the meds they're on and, and you know, especially with the, as you know, at the end where their pain is starting to become a reality for a lot of my father and a lot of his friends, you know, a lot of the opioids and things like that just knocks him out and so there was just a substitute, something that could be used through the day to just ease tension, appetite, you know, all of that, all of that.

Speaker 2: So again, it was a very therapeutic medicine. All right, so you have just demonstrated your bonafide days as far as medical cannabis. You're fine existing in that space. Yes. In Colorado or year on both sides of the fence. Right? Correct. So take us through, you know, in real time we're getting to the second half of 2016. The differences that you notice in the operation, the differences that you noticed in the patients, you know, how did the two businesses compare? Yeah. Um, you know, I think medical is, is, is really, uh, um, what else? They may be more of a heavy user base if you will, and more educated base. There are still a lot of folks that are on the medical side and uh, for medical reasons and everything else. And, and um, what we found with the rack is, is that there's a lot more novice users, a lot, a lot.

Speaker 2: It's interesting with the sales medicals, a much the purchase, a lot more rec customers typically by a joint or a gram or something like that. Um, but you know, we, we've really tried to do is, is kind of educate as much as we possibly can. These, I wouldn't say new customers, it's more how to smoke weed, college buddy down the street has a, you know, it doesn't really, you know, it's kind of like, yeah, I spoke on the weekends, but a lot of these customers kind of belief, um, I don't really understand the differences in cannabis, don't understand that there's quality differences. A lot of them think it's a commodity. It really. And, and so we've done a lot of work to try to educate and help, um, these customers understand the different qualities, you know, our foundation is production and product excellence, again, cultivating here and highly competitive market in San Francisco all through those years.

Speaker 2: My skillset, uh, improved and it was one of our competitive advantages was actually marijuana quality and we actually put together a book called stats, which is a five step process to evaluate cannabis and what stat stands for his sight, touch, aroma, taste and sensation. Um, and uh, we, that is a book that we're really proud of. It's a free guide and you know, similar to the wine industry or the craft beer industry. It's something we really want that new or old new cannabis users so they can help them navigate the world of new cannabis users to legal cannabis if you will go. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, a lot of, I think there's a lot of people that are Kinda like, oh, we're going to kind of convert. And it's not necessarily a conversion. It's, it's more like, you know, again, my buddy has marijuana. He told me it was good.

Speaker 2: Yeah. So here you go. Here's stats and you just gave me one. So it's, it's, it really is. It looks like it's straightforward, a kind of basic information. Yeah. And you know, this is what it is. This is what you are doing. Yeah. No, this is what you have when you purchase a candidate. Exactly. Stuff. The passport to navigate the cannabis world is shaped like a passport, so that's good like that. All right. So, so you're kind of educating while you, uh, provide a product for the consumer side. Talk about the medical patients. What a traditionally you see now you're, you know, you're running the shop from a high level, but, you know, what do you hear from the front lines about cannabis as medicine in Colorado as we speak? What conditions are being kind of a lot of chronic pain? Um, MS, HIV cancer, again, very similar with my experiences with my father.

Speaker 2: Um, you know, very kind of a therapeutic. Um, again, the opiod addiction and opioids are being prescribed out there is just, it's insane. And it's like there's testimonial after testimonial about you. No, thank you. No, thank you for providing this medicine because, you know, I was eating 20 Vicodin a day and now I'm down to two and so, um, a lot of that going on in the medical, what I see and what is, is that, what guides you? So you kind of came in, you're the son of a guy that needs medicine. You set up an entire operation to solve that problem. You know, from my perspective, maybe I'm overstating attempting to at least participate. Yeah, I mean is that, you know, as we make our way, uh, here, you know, how have, how have you are driving factors changed, you know, because you do have to build a successful business in order to serve patients.

Speaker 2: You know, in order to provide safe patient access, you have to build a business that works. I mean I kind of back to, you know, going back to kind of stats and the thought where this came from was really product and production excellence. I mean, I think product quality, product safety is, is really the foundation. I think it's kind of a piece of the puzzle that seems so obvious yet. I think it gets overlooked, you know, kind of that this is like the powers and the flour and whether it's medical or on the rec side that, you know, the better quality, the higher quality of these products are a cultivation techniques that kind of the craft of cannabis as, as we're calling it at good chemistry now is, is critical to that success that, that is where we think it all starts. So we're in a, a room here with a few other folks so you can start to hear people wake up because it's kind of early.

Speaker 2: I'm going to go ahead and put you on the spot if you don't mind because as we go here, regulations keep changing in Colorado. Um, talk about how you are dealing with the fact that now everything's got to be stamped. Everything's gotta be packaged differently every kind of few weeks. There's new rules cost you money. Yeah, I mean there's money involved, but you know, I, my philosophies, regulation is our friend. Uh, you know, not just from a criminal standpoint, from the federal laws relative to state laws and that policy, but I think if we want to be successful, we need to have products that the public feels safe and public safety is a big topic in Colorado right now and yes, you know, the testing requirements may seem, um, overbearing, overbearing, and, and there's a lot of work to be done in the sense that, you know, the regulators as they've thought through this and, you know, we've, I've been part of work groups and whatnot as well.

Speaker 2: It's hard to imagine, okay, here's a, here's a rule you need to test and then, but how do you put that into practice? How does that work from an operational standpoint? So there is a little bit of a disconnect between, between, um, you know, how the rules are actually written and how it actually happens in real life and, but the regulators are open to working with us. So it can be a little frustrating at times when some of my inventory I can't bring to the garden because it hasn't been tested yet. And yet I need to, sorry to the store and the store needs it and we're staring at it and said we have three more days, you know, the test results are going to come back. But again, the long term view is, you know, as again as especially in the wreck, you know, more and more for folks, you know, and this is not just with cannabis, what they want to know, how it's grown, what's in it are pesticides being used and it is a public safety concern.

Speaker 2: And I think the more we can do as an industry to say, hey look, this is, this is transparent, this is tested, that's going to just encourage more folks to feel comfortable about the products that they're consuming and to allow the industry to have a good brand, if you will. A good image. Yeah. No, absolutely. So, so, uh, unfortunately we don't have a ton of time so I have to ask you the three final questions right now. So I will tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of your life? One track one song. So first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? Yeah, I heard you asked that question before. And um, you know, I mean, there's just been, it's been a lot, I mean, 16 years in the industry, um, veteran.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Yeah, a reasonable vet, you know, I, I guess I, you know, I, I know everyone that feels like it's moving really fast right now and it is to a certain degree, I think it's moving a little slower than what the newspapers like to believe, but no one says that. Why? What do you mean by that? Well, I mean, if you look at Massachusetts medical marijuana was passed in 2012 and there's six dispensary's sure. No, uh, you know, it's just, yes, laws are passing, but what's happening in individual states are completely, you know, there's, what's happening in Massachusetts for examples not happen is not what's happening in Colorado. So, so there are, it's just from that perspective, from a national perspective. Um, so, you know, I want to say that recreational passing, quite frankly, is what surprised me the most. I mean, being in medical for so long and, and also in California for 10 years where, uh, again with the back to the rags, you know, as I call them my friends, you know, I mean, there was a time where I couldn't imagine that I could, you know, come out of the cannabis closet, if you will.

Speaker 2: You know what I mean? It was, you know, we had gardens that were secret and you're looking over your shoulders. And so that was a long time, 10 years living a life like that. So I think the coming out of the closet, you know, regulations and recreational is what surprised me most. Cannabis, I like it. I like what, uh, what about life? You've had a couple of things along the way here. So, you know, um, what has most surprised you? Time. I think now how fast time goes and, and that time is really our most valuable asset. Uh, you know, I mean we're all, you know, we all want to be successful and, and everything else, but it goes by, you know, 2010 good chemistry 10 employees was yesterday and, and you know, so just kind of staying deliberate with what we're doing and not chasing after shiny objects and just trying to really stay in the moment and enjoy time, enjoy where we are right now and we go, I like it. I'm in the process of doing that as we speak. How about that bringing it in? My shockers centered. Exactly. Alright. Soundtrack time one, track one song.

Speaker 2: I don't know. I mean you, you, you know what music is, right? Well, I do know what music is and I'm just going to tell you what the first thing that came to my mind, and this is positive or negative, but you know, Nas, life's a bitch and then you die. We will take that bad here on. Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

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Speaker 3: being contacted, you said?

Speaker 4: Absolutely. All right, so we're our very first skype so we'll see how this all goes. But uh, as far as uh, the two licensed producers, we want to go through the, uh, that the process of, of how you were able to secure one of the licenses, but you know, let's start where we are right now, which is, uh, may of, of 2016 as far as the program is concerned. What is happening right now as we speak?

Speaker 5: Okay.

Speaker 3: The two facilities, the plants are there that we are just waiting the biological cycle to complete and after that the flowers will be harvested and we'll be going through the pharmacist at some time. In near you're saying probably in what is our spring, your autumn.

Speaker 4: Okay. So, uh, you just shared a lot and as I understand it, you're looking to your first harvest soon and we understand that you've been, um, you've had the program in process for, for quite some time. So for us to hear the first harvest coming now we wonder what has been happening?

Speaker 3: Well, it wasn't very long process. Um, the government offer to give between two and five licenses, more than 20 projects. A duke bars on the contest. So after standardized today just only do, were admitted that the, I think that the government prefer the only local capital at the beginning. Both theories from to a computer. And uh, so we presented our project, it's a receipt that it is the, for the production under a greenhouse with bonds and we need to produce the dose per year. That will be, that will happen next year.

Speaker 4: Next year. You'll get to two tons, right. Okay. So that's a. that's a tremendous amount and that's an exciting number and basically what you're saying as far as production, up until now, we've been dealing with bureaucracy, so that's something anyone in the world can understand without question.

Speaker 3: Yes. I think that also the fact that by being the first country in the world doing these needs for all of us to be very careful about what is that we the only thing that we need to show to the world that these words are the weekly. We try to go slowly and avoid mistakes. So I understand why the process has been very slow. If you take account of that, that the law legalizing cannabis is now three years away, but our pharmacists to arrive on the step by step is that we all agree

Speaker 4: a country in the world. This was a good time to focus on the fact that this is adult use cannabis that you're talking about. This is not medical cannabis, correct?

Speaker 3: This is absolutely use this call with is named here, recreational use with a low dac and uh, and with the goal of providing a cheap good organic flour that takes away from the illicit trade, a product that is not a drug, it's just a plant our. So, so the goal is to provide a very competitive price, good product, uh, that is not very high dac. It's between five and 10 percent, only do strengths and then to begin anew stage, what we believe is that medicine economics have a huge potential that we are really anxious to see develop here.

Speaker 4: When you mentioned between five and 10 percent and only two strains, is that what is mandated by the government?

Speaker 3: Yes. The government provides, provides the genetics.

Speaker 4: Okay. What, what strains? Strains are there out of interest.

Speaker 3: It's a secret of states. We know that it's a fast train and the train, but that's all the Info you've got and what the government wanted. The government is interested in industries that are not available in any way in South America, so they can track. The DNA, doesn't go to the market.

Speaker 4: We can be sure of is that the strains have not been in South America before.

Speaker 3: Yes. Everything has traceability. So the main goal is to be sure that the flowers do not in, in the hands of the bad guys.

Speaker 4: Okay. The bad guys. No one likes the bad guys. Um, as far as two tons. And let's talk about the entire supply chain. You mentioned pharmacies. Uh, this is something that's a certainly of interest. I know that Israel is going to a pharmacy model, at least that's what they'd like to do. What has the government shared with you about how this is all going to work, knowing that you are in the process of growing?

Speaker 3: Was there that the government's overlooks everything. The responsibility of the Pyramids is to harvest, to vaccine and to do the distribution. So we need to take charge of, of all, all the steps in the process.

Speaker 4: Okay. And so what pharmacies are you going to be working with?

Speaker 3: That is the government that will provide us with a list of which pharmacy goes for each a that, that has a license. Um, and they promise to be friend. Not, not, not providing for the pharmacist to the members. Here is the cost of reaching pharmacies that far away from, from our foundation is so they will provide us with a list of, of pharmacists

Speaker 4: and you and I had discussed that earlier, that it is within the government's control of who exactly you're going to sell to. And that of course is something that we don't understand here in the United States. Uh, but as far as the pharmacies that, um, that you've spoken to or that have been written about maybe in the newspaper or on television. Well, what are you, what sense are you getting from the pharmacies? What you know, how many of the pharmacies are interested or not interested as anyone come out for or against

Speaker 3: one pharmacist? I'm not sure about the process. Like everything that is new to a lot of concerns. There are concerns about the security issue because security's an issue here and the friend that these will be an attraction for people wanting to get the flowers even though they have much more valuable products that are already either says, but this is something of concern. So there has been a lot of discussions and I'm probably there continue to be a dialogue between the government and the pharmacists too, because the ones to get the more quantitative pharmacist possible disease step and I think that that process is still going on.

Speaker 4: Okay, fair enough. So if we don't know the number of pharmacies that are going to be selling cannabis, how was the two ton a kind of mandate, uh, arrived at, is there a certain number in terms of cannabis consumption currently? How did we figure out what to produce? How much to produce, you know, a, how was that a kind of algorithm arrived upon?

Speaker 3: I, I really don't know because that was a, a government decision. My guess is that they want to be sure that the supply is 100 percent by the demand. So that's probably one of the reasons why they only gave two licenses to be sure that the four doors are solid because the price is so cheap that if you don't, so all your production, your number will be red. So you will really working very near breakeven price. They've kind of given. And so they wanted to be sure that everything is manageable. I'm all, what is sent the pharmacist is song is it is very difficult to estimate the demand, the exact amount of something that has been forbidden for so long and also new way. There is a culture emerging about planting yourself. Now he's very popular. Even you can see fathers recommending their songs, uh, to plan not to buy because you don't know what you are buying.

Speaker 3: A, you grow your organic plant on your house. So you can see a run, debbie, they have plants on the balconies, the most of the people that smokes blend themselves or take part in a cloud. It is good find that there are three ways of, of reaching cannabis in your way. Under the new law, you're allowed to plant six plants. You can take part on a club. Travel can have 99 plants for 45 people and not. So this will be the third way of reaching. When you don't, you're not able to clot or you don't take further club, you will be able to buy it from.

Speaker 4: What about the integration between you, the licensed producers and the clubs is a, will you interact, are you prohibited from interacting?

Speaker 3: You are not prohibited in terms of we a very small country so we all know people that is involved in and we will have friends, uh, because we all love the plant, but there is no interaction cause this is just a big scale crop for anyone that is scripted as a user. You need to, to do an inscription before you buy in a pharmacy, but there is no interaction is like the interaction between yourself and taking a crap. If you register yourself as a writer, you are not allowed to order so they aren't on the clap.

Speaker 4: So yeah. So if you're a producer, you can't sell to clubs basically it's,

Speaker 3: Oh, I'm club is not allowed to sell, only produced for the members of the club. They think in any club to be part of the club, but they don't buy or sell cannabis.

Speaker 4: Got It. So, so a subscription model as they say. Alright, perfect. So, you know, as far as, uh, the, the infrastructure, there you have it, there's the three different ways. You mentioned a culture of, of beginning to grow your own. There's the, there's the club, uh, outlet that's all since legalization. What about before legalization? Can you give us a sense of what the cannabis culture was in order I, before this happened?

Speaker 3: Yes, of course. The Arts are with rock music. I think when he was in the beginning, in the sixties, we didn't have, um, a group that they're shipped from 1973 to 1985 so that they take their. She also was like wiping out all the kind of, it's too dangerous to have a plant or to smoke or even to have no hair during the dictatorship. So when democracy returned in 1985, it was also the return of Canada's culture. Um, there was a, a, um, a very strong culturally in the beaches. So people went on summer into Brasil and smoke their, uh, the product began to arrive as well as always like are random quality product, usually a very poor quality product. But it began to grow, um, and so people began planting the seeds that came with the product y and product and it was just a very gradual process at some point.

Speaker 3: Um, um, uh, and there's Indian writer came here and she has theraplants, she's named Alisha, Alisha, and she was very, she was in her sixties and she came here just to be calm in her own right, her books, and she was put in prison for having her plants on her house. And I think that that triggered a very huge reaction of people that so that, that's something unacceptable. And in her case, there were cases of very calm, peaceful people that only for having one or two plants on their house, they were jailed. Um, so that made the movement grow. And every year the, the concentration of people are demanding, the realization was bigger and bigger. And so we did have a very,

Speaker 3: a typical precedent that his name was Samuel quicker. That was like, and are keys to being president. Something very unique, uh, let's stop buying. Whereas acuity, the providence as few as I mentioned, was very high and the person was killed. Uh, they, the, uh, emerged about legalization as a way of also moving away or being more focused on attacking the crack. A business was growing very, very quickly. So you did have young people going to buy. Kennedy's had the other place where they were also offered cocaine and crack and mainly crack. That was really a huge problem at the moment. And so that's the idea that's going down this, taking this away from, from traffickers and promoting that you can get candidates from a legal point of view, uh, with everything clear and regulated. And I think that there's also cultural battles to demonstrate that the cannabis is not a drug, should not be seen as a drug and it shouldn't be seen as a medicine. I think that's the next cultural identities to develop that part of the cannabis culture. So that was a process. I think that democracy gang with a strong desire of freedom of personal freedom will also legalized. Gay Marriage was legalized abortion. So we, I think that many people in your way, a demands from this date to be treated as adults and decide what they use or what they don't, but not under the Schwartz of abbreviation, just under good quality information. I think that that's the challenge at this time.

Speaker 4: Yeah. No, absolutely. And it, let's just get into it for a minute because you brought him up a unique individual in order create an anarchist and, and also someone running a country, not two things usually taken together. Um, take us through that, that process of, you know, when you did legalize it kind of was a shock to the world. Was it a shock there as well or was it a long time coming? So to speak?

Speaker 3: A long time coming. But we began working on our project near one year before the, the law was approved because we knew that the government did have the numbers on the parliament. So it was really something that could happen. And also the public opinion was changing to, not to agree, but a position of related let's give this a chance. So it was not a shocking surprise for us, although of course it was at some point, unbelievable. You look through the dictatorship times where you didn't have any kind of freedom from that to being the first country in the world to be legal. It was something really shocking and you lose your life to the back and you remember yourself with 18 years saying, well, we did to ever believe this and my lifetime where it was. So that's really a strange sensation on the very stimulating one there. So those of us that have always been advocating for this to be legal and regulated now we wanted to succeed, to do, to demonstrate that being legally it's better for the health of the people, for the security, for the economy, and for the wellbeing of everybody.

Speaker 4: You you. You presented that perfectly because you've, you've now noted that not only are you a business person but you are an advocate and it sounds like maybe even a little bit of an advocate, an activist from from way back when. So let's get into your personal history a little bit. You mentioned, will this ever happen? In my lifetime, when I was 18. Now you mentioned you're from older guy, right? Where did you grow up?

Speaker 3: Yes,

Speaker 4: that's the capital, right?

Speaker 3: I always liked plants and growing on my house I'm always like, yes, music, great bands of the seventies. So I think that's, those things go hand in hand and are they always believe that first of all, freedom was like a, something that was very important. Uh, I grew up with during the day their shape, um, so hiding for doing something that we never perceived that as something that was bad or a world my friends and I have also always been interested in having both health and dealing with life and we want to do have a long believing. So it came naturally and I always also thought that prevention was something that was more related with political reasons on the business, but business reasons that the capability of some of doing loving related firms and also in that story of Vietnam and Nixon and I think that kind of is, was pretty important in ending that war.

Speaker 3: So I think that that really it was something politically motivated and not with a scientific basis, but I never thought about being part of this. Um, I, I work on, come on, come on ricky. Analysis. I love working with the economy and with the trends of that they seen the world and how to adapt those strands. Uh, the, as I mentioned one year before the loan was approved, when the discussion began, a friend game and say, well they want to go to make a project I need that are grown on me. And they say, boy, I really, I'm not an expert on cultivating on, on high scale that because they won't buy. They have an expert that really knows so you can work together. So I ended with this. I'm trying to make a museum in Montevideo to promote a scientific culture about galleries and all the properties that are being now that it's legal are being researched and are being discovered.

Speaker 3: So I think that we have the challenge of making now a big cultural change. Not the only worry about the all over the world. We have a world that is really with huge challenges between climate change and violence and I think that for both kind of is, can, can do a lot of things. It's a very kind of on positive plant. I think that has a lot to do in the paper industry and the textile industry. But I also think that, uh, in the same way that tenor is, was part of stopping Vietnam War, it has the chance of, of stopping of the, this huge clash of civilizations that we have nowadays. So if we can make in the south, uh, have for the most, for, for showing this to the world united country of only 3 million people and we can connect with the process that's going on in your United States, in Canada, in eastern Europe. I think that the sensation is as you can be changing the world in a way that makes it more visible and more sustainable. So that's how I'm here. Why, why am here?

Speaker 4: There you go. Cannabis as a weapon of math instruction. How about that? Right?

Speaker 3: Yes.

Speaker 4: You mentioned that you're a commodity analyst. Um, take us through that. And how you see, um, cannabis from a commerce perspective, you, you, you mentioned, you know, the, the philosophical point of view that you have, which I appreciate commercially though, a cannabis as a commodity. Give us your analysis. That's what you do for a living.

Speaker 3: What did we say my why not blend that can provide more value to be on? I think that being utilized an agricultural country, it can provide a huge saturdays to the country, although the government is still, we know, we learned, we don't have anymore. We have a different president now. These much more cautious about this. But I really think that cannabis is a huge plant is the more diversified in its uses is very plastic plant from the genetic point of view. You can do with that elastic elastic on. Do you want to do it? Uh, for, for growth, we want to do it for energy. You do it for energy, you want to do construction materials, construction materials, or you want to compose music and will also help you in that way. So it's, it's amazing. Um, so on the other hand, I think that as a country that has been in the band world of, of legalization, we need to move quickly because it wouldn't be legal everywhere soon and the price will go down very quickly.

Speaker 3: So if we want to take an advantage of our courageous attitude about legalization, we should be confident about the below. All these are doing all of the audiences that we can with people that is doing research, trying to develop these. Because with time it will display. We grow with the price. Really. Oh that is not, it is still not a commodity, but it really be. And in the meantime we should, we should do our own research and our own development to try to escape of the commodity. We need to be more and more sophisticated in the products we made. Mainly limit this part and not only because of the, of keeping a good price for our products, but mainly to be more precise. Helping the child with a resource or helping people with all the kinds of problems that we all know that cannabis can help, but we need to develop science to prove it, to do a better work every day to those people.

Speaker 4: Yeah, absolutely. The scientific benefits, uh, we try to talk about those as often as possible. We've talked to Dr Seuss, Sicily, and we've talked to paige figure who has, uh, her daughter, Charlotte, who has seizures and doesn't have seizures as much anymore because of cbd. You, you had mentioned maybe, uh, you at least alluded to so much competitive countries or oncoming competitive countries in South America in regards to import export, um, who, who do you see a developing? Um, you know, as you go, who, who else is is kind of looking at you or who are you looking at?

Speaker 3: Is there a breast with the speed that Columbia is developing, developing some type of facilities and they have the big plantation nowadays in South America. I've been at Columbia for my work with, with agriculture. I think Columbia has a potential because they will reach this soon will be a very important issue and the accountant with potentially in every other area, they are very intrepreneur people and very professional and I think that in Colombia and Mexico is where the legalization can make a huge change because if they saw that problem of our drugs, uh, that will change society from like mean our drugs are not a huge problem in terms of violence of our gangs or things like that. But there, if they solved that legalizing, that will really be a, another era for them. So my, my, I think that Columbia, I will hope Dubai to be found to be the country that leads, but if we don't move faster, Columbia and Sheila will be before us.

Speaker 4: Interesting. And you know, Canada is making news in Germany just was in the news the other day. Spain has their own thing going on. Israel, of course, rich in research, um, you know, all of those countries are active. Uh, as, as an American, I must ask, what is your sense from Uruguay of our, uh, cannabis. A kind of, you know, uh, economy, what do you see us doing?

Speaker 3: Oh, on California. And Colorado was really, I, I went there on January and I returned full of hope. I really, when you talk with common people, uh, Denver, they say, well, my violence is going down, the economy is growing and the only problem is that property prices are rising because a lot of people, calves, every one is employed. So it really was like seeing that, proving them, seeing that, that it works. Of course every time you solve a problem, new problems in marriage. And um, certainly there will be some of the details and maybe a lot of things I didn't see that are new problems emerging, but I was really impressed about the development, but more than the development, the improving the strong, how strong the economy was on both places in Oakland and then cut it out. I've been at Oaksterdam, um, uh, I also.

Speaker 3: So things that really impressed me a lot and we're being authentic for me honestly, they weren't the bandwidth sample I do. You always read about Timothy Leery and all the movement and was finally becoming truth. They are having a green economy and renewable energy. Uh, the organic agriculture and cannabis legal. It's like where in the end the thing happened. The was streamed in like 50 years ago. It's now coming to earth. That's very emotional for me. I'd stayed, I hope Chemo to was, was alive on many people was alive to see a willingness and he's alive. A lot of people is alive. It's really, it was. It was possible to be made out of California soon, makes it fully legal and I think that you are the federal level will make it full legal soon and that will change the world because you're a reference for, for good and bad. You're a reference while inspecting your elections to see, you know, if, if at the federal level that it finally changes. Has it been with the gay marriage? I think that freedom is, is advancing. I think that there will be no dominic back.

Speaker 4: I certainly agree with you that there is no turning back as far as our federal elections at this point. I'd rather not get into it

Speaker 3: a little worried. We expect that the historic, uh, friends will not turning back.

Speaker 4: Cool. Cooler heads will prevail. Hopefully. So as far as order. Why you guys are coming to harvest for the first time and you know, we're figuring out the, you know, which pharmacies little it will be in. Do you have some sort of just rough timeline of when you expect this whole thing to kind of come to be

Speaker 3: difficult. If I was to put September issue that the pharmacists, pharmacists are angry with the government

Speaker 5: because

Speaker 3: business issues, the government put some limitations on their business. So they, the big pharmacies are angry with the government and they are saying, well if you don't give me this, I don't want to give you that. The bargaining and there's more pharmacies are worried about security because they are small and anyone can get inside and take the flowers away. So for one reason or another, now there is an issue with the pharmacist that I don't know how will be solved. So uh, is not in my hands. I just haven't gotten to know that that is a new issue that with the big pharmacies against the government or in trouble with the government, everything can be booth on a, on a standby for some weeks. So we went as for so long that I wouldn't be surprised if we need to wait a little more about if you come to the summer, usually December, January, and I think that you will be coming to the first. Absolutely. Although you not being used where you will not be allowed to buy from pharmacists.

Speaker 4: Interesting. Well I'll have to stay with you and we'll have to spend some time as well as what it sounds like. Oh, there we go. Thank you. That's called inviting yourself here in the U. S I don't know if you do it there in Uruguay. Okay. So, uh, now the final three questions, right? We've gone through. Have I missed anything as far as uh, what's happening?

Speaker 3: No, I think you've covered it.

Speaker 4: Plus I have a place to stay in December. This is great. All right. So, uh, as far as the final three questions, I'll tell you what they are. And then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? And you kind of answered that one, but we'll get another answer. What has most surprised you in cannabis? That's the first question. What has most surprised you in life? That's the second question. And then the third question I know you'll be able to answer on the soundtrack of your life named one track or one song that you, that must be on there. So first things first. First things first. What uh, what has most surprised you about cannabis

Speaker 3: evolution as an issue? I wrote a book about Charles Darwin. So what were these for me more interesting about cannabis is how a plant can involve with the human being in on this date. She's always trying to give you anything more. If you, if you, if you do enough research, so will provide the solution for something that you can not expect for the museum. I bought some guitars made of him, for example. So it's if you need a solution for building cars, it could be handy if you need a solution for anything you think it could be hemp. That's the answer. So that's what surprised me the most.

Speaker 4: No, that's a fantastic answer. And I liked that you, uh, use the proper pronoun, which is she, because those are the only cannabis plants that matter of course. Um, as far as what has most surprised you in life, what might be the answer there?

Speaker 3: Two things from a personal view, as I mentioned, being a country that is the first country in the world and being part of this is something that I wouldn't dare to dream my, he, my young years, although I dreamed about better world, I couldn't have dreamed that I would be part on the first legal licensed in the world, so that, that really surprised me. Life. Another thing that continues to surprise me everyday is technology, technological change. I mean the fact that we can be talking by an skype and relation without ever being embarrassing contact. I think that it's such a huge opportunity that I'm astonished. I, I didn't dream that when I was a child reading science fiction was something that I liked. I never thought that things like this could happen. Um, and I, because of this issue I had of made a very strong friendships with people on California and Colorado, so it's very interesting and be amazed at the time.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. The good science fiction that, that's a, that's winning out hopefully as opposed to the aldous Huxley kind of George Orwell,

Speaker 3: they're doing battles they make us aware of on the risks in these cars. Certainly weren't being controlled probably now, but someone that science fiction provides good advice about what not to do.

Speaker 4: Indeed. Good. Well put. Okay. So, final question, Eduardo, on the soundtrack of your life named one song or one track that must be on there.

Speaker 3: Oh, it's difficult to them. Only one, but I would say that one song that changed my life was close to the edge by. Yes, it was a huge years fun, uh, close to the, as is a record that changed my life. And that song really is, is, it's a very important one for me. Yes. He's not being impaired too much nowadays, but I hope some of the people that remember that, a historic, uh, progressive band,

Speaker 4: I was going to say as we are on Skype, I can see that you are the precise right age for. Yes. And this was a very specific band, you know, at the time. And if you were tapped into it, you were tapped into it.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. I can talk to you about every record of yes, but also deep flaws. Geneses on many cream. So many more to choose. One is close to the edge. Yes.

Speaker 4: Fair enough. And I just want to check you on genesis. That's Peter Gabriel. Genesis, I would imagine, correct?

Speaker 3: Yes. Yes. There is some guys survive. Not The pubs. Geneses, foxtrot or selling England by the pound or the type of fragrance that really made fire of my life at that moment. That continues to be with me.

Speaker 4: There you go. We'll have a whole different conversation on just music next time. How about that?

Speaker 3: Well, I would love to do that. I love music and to be with the. Oh my, my soul moved by music.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. Eduardo. Thank you so much for your time, very much appreciated. And uh, once we do kind of work all this supply chain stuff out with the pharmacies will check back in with you. How about that?

Speaker 3: I wait for you in your way in December. In the meantime, I will keep the informer just ask me whatever you want, that it is a pleasure to be in contact with you.

Speaker 4: Sounds like a plan. Absolutely. And likewise.

Speaker 3: Thank you very much.

Speaker 1: Edwardo bless ina very much appreciated. Speaking with both, enjoyed each conversation. Uh, if you are in industry executive, you must go to Cannes award sod com. Make sure to send in nominations for those deserving and no matter who, you are very much appreciate you listening. I really do.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.