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Ep.166: Sue Taylor & David Dinenberg: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.166: Sue Taylor & David Dinenberg: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.166: Sue Taylor & David Dinenberg: MCBA Spotlight

We have the distinct pleasure of being joined by Sue Taylor a California state certified cannabis educator who recently secured a license for a dispensary in Berekely- ICANN Health Center.  We discuss gaining the license but also dive in on potential of cutting that fistful of pills seniors take to just a few. We also touch on race relations and the power of education. But David Dinenberg first joins us to talk about Microsoft.  Yes, he takes us through just how the Kind Financial Microsoft partnership occurred.
Both interviews were done digitally so bear with us.
The MCBA July Spotlight Episode.

Transcript:

So both of these interviews were done digitally, so bear with us. Sue Taylor proceeded by David Dannenberg. Okay, so we've got David Dine

Speaker 1: and Berg from kind financial. You might know him from the New York Times or any paper in the world, I guess from a couple of months ago. Uh, David, what the hell happened?

Speaker 3: We partnered with Microsoft in the cupboard government solution division in seeking government contracts in the cannabis space.

Speaker 1: Yeah. So, um, you know, anybody that I talked to a that doesn't know you says that double that can't be right. There's got to be something wrong there. Um, and then everybody that does know you kind of looks at me and smiles, you know, I don't know what that means, but, but for the, for the folks that don't know you, how do you know, take us through the first kind of outreach to Microsoft or the other way.

Speaker 3: How did this all happen? Fundamentally, I believe that people and companies and ceos are only as good as to people around them. And I've made a conscious effort over the last couple of years of trying to bring in people that can not only invest but can open doors for me and as well as for obviously kind of financial. So I'm fortunate enough to have a, uh, an advisor and partner in a gentleman from Philadelphia where I come from, who had a previous relationship inside of the healthcare division of Microsoft. So he made it very soft introduction for me. Uh, I spoke to the gentleman. I got bounced around internally inside of Microsoft for quite some time. Eventually I ended up talking to, uh, one of the leads of the, uh, you know, the government division of Microsoft and, you know, we had a very open and honest conversation about how we both look at the industry and what the future is.

Speaker 3: Rejection of the industry might or might not be a. But the one thing that we both agreed upon was that compliance is the key for, for every heavy, heavily regulated industry. And, and Microsoft has a business, obviously it's a large behemoth obviously, but you know, they have different divisions inside and do different things and they have a specific division inside of Microsoft, uh, that, that looks at government opportunities throughout the United States. Whether that stays municipalities, counties, townships, whatever that might be a Microsoft as a company that likes to be in a position that if they don't have a software solution, they want to have a partner that has a software solution. So that's really big picture how the conversation internally started with them. It took a long time. You know, it took several months, I guess long time. Not that long. It took probably between six and nine months

Speaker 1: for Microsoft. That actually doesn't even sound like that long of a period of time,

Speaker 3: which is actually why I stopped myself from saying it was a long time. But yeah, for, for, you know, in the cannabis space, you know, six, nine months that it took for them to say yes, you know, cannabis probably the industry probably changed three times since then. Right. But they moved much slower than the industry goes, but you know, they'd look at this as, you know, we don't touch the product, they don't touch the product. We are providing services that are a necessity for governments enabled to push legalization forward and to make sure that the cannabis industry is. If the foundation is a compliant and for the clients compliant foundation,

Speaker 1: and do you think that was the key that, uh, you know, it was the government kind of piece of this. It sounds like that's what it's all about.

Speaker 3: One hundred percent. Yeah, absolutely. One hundred percent. I mean, obviously, um, you know, every business in this industry, we all, we all clamor for, for, for the genesee and credibility, uh, that's something that I take very seriously, you know, from my investors to my advisory board, to my legal team and all that kind of stuff. Um, and this was no different from me, which was a, you know, we're looking for a competitive edge and whatever we can do and quite frankly, we got lucky that I work hard. Sure. But you don't get lucky with were hard work and I understand that, but, uh, you know, they, I in the right place, the right time. But I do think that, you know, our team who's around us, who's inside of our company, how we look at the industry, um, the fact that, you know, I like to believe that, you know, we're very transparent. Incredible company that's doing good things and I think they fundamentally believe that compliance is the backbone of every event, of any industry. And they were very interested in looking at that. Yes.

Speaker 1: Alright. So then let's go, go backwards in time and let's figure out how you got to that point because it does sound like you had a. yeah. Had a warm, a kind of introduction which, which works out well obviously. Um, you know, uh, all the way back when you and I were introduced to each other in 2013, which is about what, 25 years ago, um, you know. Yeah, exactly. So, so go from the initial kind of thought of kind financial up through, you know, accurate, soft up through the whole thing. When you first started a kind financial, what did you have in mind? What did you have in store for yourself?

Speaker 3: Funnier because you and I first met in Denver 2013. My company was called back in. If you remember, and you know, when I lived in Philadelphia and I saw a 60 minutes episode on the emergency medical marijuana, you know, the, the part of that episode that I gravitated towards was the lack of financial services, lack of pranking, all cash, no credit cards, all that kind of stuff. And so I originally being naive back then saw the opportunity, yeah, you know, I'll buy a bank, I'll start a bank and I'll solve the problem that way, you know, I learned very, very quickly that it's very difficult, you know, the United States has an issued a new banking charter at the federal level in over 10 years at this point. Uh, and they were not going to issue their first one for, for cannabis bank, a schedule one substance.

So both of these interviews were done digitally, so bear with us. Sue Taylor proceeded by David Dannenberg. Okay, so we've got David Dine

Speaker 1: and Berg from kind financial. You might know him from the New York Times or any paper in the world, I guess from a couple of months ago. Uh, David, what the hell happened?

Speaker 3: We partnered with Microsoft in the cupboard government solution division in seeking government contracts in the cannabis space.

Speaker 1: Yeah. So, um, you know, anybody that I talked to a that doesn't know you says that double that can't be right. There's got to be something wrong there. Um, and then everybody that does know you kind of looks at me and smiles, you know, I don't know what that means, but, but for the, for the folks that don't know you, how do you know, take us through the first kind of outreach to Microsoft or the other way.

Speaker 3: How did this all happen? Fundamentally, I believe that people and companies and ceos are only as good as to people around them. And I've made a conscious effort over the last couple of years of trying to bring in people that can not only invest but can open doors for me and as well as for obviously kind of financial. So I'm fortunate enough to have a, uh, an advisor and partner in a gentleman from Philadelphia where I come from, who had a previous relationship inside of the healthcare division of Microsoft. So he made it very soft introduction for me. Uh, I spoke to the gentleman. I got bounced around internally inside of Microsoft for quite some time. Eventually I ended up talking to, uh, one of the leads of the, uh, you know, the government division of Microsoft and, you know, we had a very open and honest conversation about how we both look at the industry and what the future is.

Speaker 3: Rejection of the industry might or might not be a. But the one thing that we both agreed upon was that compliance is the key for, for every heavy, heavily regulated industry. And, and Microsoft has a business, obviously it's a large behemoth obviously, but you know, they have different divisions inside and do different things and they have a specific division inside of Microsoft, uh, that, that looks at government opportunities throughout the United States. Whether that stays municipalities, counties, townships, whatever that might be a Microsoft as a company that likes to be in a position that if they don't have a software solution, they want to have a partner that has a software solution. So that's really big picture how the conversation internally started with them. It took a long time. You know, it took several months, I guess long time. Not that long. It took probably between six and nine months

Speaker 1: for Microsoft. That actually doesn't even sound like that long of a period of time,

Speaker 3: which is actually why I stopped myself from saying it was a long time. But yeah, for, for, you know, in the cannabis space, you know, six, nine months that it took for them to say yes, you know, cannabis probably the industry probably changed three times since then. Right. But they moved much slower than the industry goes, but you know, they'd look at this as, you know, we don't touch the product, they don't touch the product. We are providing services that are a necessity for governments enabled to push legalization forward and to make sure that the cannabis industry is. If the foundation is a compliant and for the clients compliant foundation,

Speaker 1: and do you think that was the key that, uh, you know, it was the government kind of piece of this. It sounds like that's what it's all about.

Speaker 3: One hundred percent. Yeah, absolutely. One hundred percent. I mean, obviously, um, you know, every business in this industry, we all, we all clamor for, for, for the genesee and credibility, uh, that's something that I take very seriously, you know, from my investors to my advisory board, to my legal team and all that kind of stuff. Um, and this was no different from me, which was a, you know, we're looking for a competitive edge and whatever we can do and quite frankly, we got lucky that I work hard. Sure. But you don't get lucky with were hard work and I understand that, but, uh, you know, they, I in the right place, the right time. But I do think that, you know, our team who's around us, who's inside of our company, how we look at the industry, um, the fact that, you know, I like to believe that, you know, we're very transparent. Incredible company that's doing good things and I think they fundamentally believe that compliance is the backbone of every event, of any industry. And they were very interested in looking at that. Yes.

Speaker 1: Alright. So then let's go, go backwards in time and let's figure out how you got to that point because it does sound like you had a. yeah. Had a warm, a kind of introduction which, which works out well obviously. Um, you know, uh, all the way back when you and I were introduced to each other in 2013, which is about what, 25 years ago, um, you know. Yeah, exactly. So, so go from the initial kind of thought of kind financial up through, you know, accurate, soft up through the whole thing. When you first started a kind financial, what did you have in mind? What did you have in store for yourself?

Speaker 3: Funnier because you and I first met in Denver 2013. My company was called back in. If you remember, and you know, when I lived in Philadelphia and I saw a 60 minutes episode on the emergency medical marijuana, you know, the, the part of that episode that I gravitated towards was the lack of financial services, lack of pranking, all cash, no credit cards, all that kind of stuff. And so I originally being naive back then saw the opportunity, yeah, you know, I'll buy a bank, I'll start a bank and I'll solve the problem that way, you know, I learned very, very quickly that it's very difficult, you know, the United States has an issued a new banking charter at the federal level in over 10 years at this point. Uh, and they were not going to issue their first one for, for cannabis bank, a schedule one substance.

Speaker 3: Exactly. So as I, as I met you and other and other executives and people in the industry and you know, really honestly just research and listen to people and speak to people and surround yourself with really, really smart people. What I honestly learned is a couple things. One is if you, if you want to have a company of substance, it's got to be able to pivot and you can always just say, this is what I'm doing and I'm only doing this. And I think one of the positives that is an attribute I guess to me is that I've let this thing go where it's, where it belongs to go, you know, and then probably about 18 months ago without looking at the calendar 15 months ago, you know, I got a phone call one day from someone who I respect in the industry who said, you know, would you be interested in buying Microsoft? And I'm just like, I don't know why, you know, I, I didn't understand it. He said, you know, I think it's worth a conversation. So I had the conversation and you know, still I was like, okay, you know, it's an opportunity. I'd love opportunities, what business guy doesn't, but what's it going to add? What does it do to kind at that point in time, looking at that picture and

Speaker 1: yeah, what the seed to sale tracking have to do with banking. Right.

Speaker 3: It's funny because I was, you know, hot and heavy on time, pay, not going to, now it's taken me a long time to figure this one out, but I always have kind pay in my mind that I was saving no one owning the point of sale can be a bad idea. Okay. And that's how my interest began tonight are soft and then I really did my homework and then just kept reading and reading and reading and I learned or I convinced myself or whatever words you want to use that seed to sale, whether it's [inaudible] or anyone else. Okay. I see the sale is absolutely the backbone of compliance for this industry and it will be whether that's a government contract, whether that's a grower, dispensary, manufacturer, whether that's a delivery service of medical, certain whatever it might be. I get phone calls now everyday, especially since the announcement of all these companies that want to come to market and they all realized if they don't have real lifetime inventory, they can't sell market or, or do anything.

Speaker 3: So I, I been convinced several times after I made that decision. Uh, and so far I've been correct, which is seed to sales, really important for the cannabis industry. So I'm really, really happy. I'm really happy with that purchase. And then out of that we started a, uh, a partner company which were a partner in called linkedin banking and that really is, is, is putting my desire to set this off the bank and problems at ease because what I realized is you don't need to own the bank. What you need to be able to do is bring a compliance component and comfort to a bank so that they didn't truly understand you can bank this industry. It's difficult. It's not like banging, you know, taking a opening, a checking account or business account for and sells widgets obviously, but we've created tools and infrastructure, a weaving went to banking of creativeness to, to, uh, allow banks to be in a, in an over compliance setting, um, and make them feel comfortable with the information that they received. So with those two, with those two companies now are two, the two products that I think we, you know, we're doing really, really well. Um, and I'm filling up all these different buckets of compliance and compliance is compliance and if done properly with the right tools and software, you know, you can, you can, you can solve many problems at the same time, but it all, it does all stem from having the agora soft seed to sale software as our baseline.

Speaker 1: Got It. And so now back to the Microsoft partnership, is that what you call it and let's actually dissect exactly what you expect to happen here. So, uh, what do we call it? Is it a partnership?

Speaker 3: It's truly a partnership. I will be very clear that they did not make an investment into the company. Uh, but there are other ways to be partnered with other, with other people. Um, you know, I can't give away all the secret sauce stuff, but, uh, I, I could walk you through a big picture which is I have a team inside of Microsoft. We, you know, we have the ability now to look at the latest technologies that are not even to market yet, that are just being spoken about, talking about, um, all, all in the idea of making sure that we are truly delivering the most superior technology platform that can be out there. And that's, that's our goal, period. That's always been our goal. But now we're going to get that way to help with Microsoft and aspects. So now I truly believe that we're going to be able to achieve that.

Speaker 3: But what I do get is, uh, so I, I point people, um, I get, I had the fortunate honor of working with their national sales team, uh, which means that obviously Microsoft is, is, is divided into different territories. So I deal with a different account managers for ied, you know, uh, the, the team in California is not the same team in Ohio or Pennsylvania or Texas or Delaware or Maryland or anywhere else. There's rfps out there right now, but I get the personal, you know, I, you know, our, our go to guy inside teams up with the appropriate people. Uh, we called, we collectively strategize on our approach to each individual market. Unfortunately, Microsoft has great relationships with state regulators already. A lot of states already have contracts with Microsoft, whether it be for, you know, office three, 65 or whatever, whatever that might be. Um, so, you know, getting into the right people has become much easier for us.

Speaker 1: What about this from their perspective? So we get it from, from our perspective, I'll even say, you know, from the industry's perspective because kind of makes us all look good. Um, but you know, this red tape, the fact that it's a schedule one substance, I know that they're not touching the plant. I mean, what, yes, of course there are a forward thinking company, but why would they do this? You know,

Speaker 3: once again, I can't speak for them. I believe there were a few quotes in several of the articles ever written. Um, you know, as far as they're concerned, it's legal at the state level. We're going after state contracts, therefore they don't have a problem with that. That's the short answer. Once again, we don't touch the product where we're providing a necessity in the service to the states and local governments as far as they're going to do this with or without us, so they might as well have the best technology out there and do it the right way from a professional standpoint. And I think from my standpoint, and once again, I mean this with all due respect to my associates in the industry, we're all a bunch of startups, you know, I mean some of us have been around longer and some of us have more customers and some of us have four contracts, but at the end of the day, all these companies are only in existence because of the industry. So I, I personally believe bringing this substantive company like Microsoft to a government, um, obviously I believe this should help me in my company, achieved more contracts because we can bring more stability to those individual projects because they are a massive project.

Speaker 1: No, and like I said, from, from our perspective, from the industry perspective to have Microsoft and same sentences, cannabis, you know, kind of really does help to ease the worries of aunt Nancy or whoever, you know.

Speaker 3: I will tell you that my favorite counselor, yeah. My favorite interactions that I've received are from people who unfortunately have children who are sick and need medicinal marijuana and their state doesn't happen to subtle marijuana yet and what are to linkedin or email. I mean it's, they were just so happy of the announcement and the fact that maybe now they're state will take this more seriously and, and you know, and hopefully their children can get the medicine they need, you know, and if I can help, if we, if our company can help one child received medicine that they deserve to have, we already want. That's just how I feel about it. I've also been contacted by entrepreneurs in the marijuana industry who have sent me an email saying, you know, because of your announced me and I was able to close my round of financing and you know, I've got to be honest for points on that or this has been the most humbling time with my life and I'm being honest when I say that, which is I knew it was going to be a big deal.

Speaker 3: I guess selfishly I thought it was gonna be a big deal for our company. Right? That I knew it was going to be news in the industry, but this thing took on a whole life to its own. And I think when I saw you in Oakland a couple of weeks ago, we spoke about that, which is, you know, there's always a part of you that hopes something's going to be as big as you think it is. But very rarely in our lives does it exceed any of our expectations. And I must admit this absolutely exceeded anything I could have thought about or hopes for her as far as the impact. And I really just hope. I mean, selfishly, I hope it pushes my company forward, but honest to God, I, I really, really love that this is something that helps the industry move forward. And I think it will. I absolutely think it will. And this is something. And once again, I'm not being self serving, I'm trying to be a real lesson when I say this, but this is gonna be a in time, in 10 years from now when, when, when the legalization of marijuana was taught in college, you know, I think that Microsoft entrance into the space, it's going to be part of that story. And I'm just so proud to be part of that. You know, I don't have the words for it.

Speaker 1: No, that's it. It's at least a, a, a sentence in the textbook will, without question, if not a paragraph, if not a chapter, it's jeopardy. Jeopardy answer could be anytime soon. Um, so speaking of chapters, uh, let you know, let's go ahead and get back to the beginning. Why you have what I know a very, uh, very perfect Philadelphia accent, you know, I know you're, you're an la guy now, right? But, um, let's, let's talk about, uh, back on the farm in Philly.

Speaker 3: I mean, I grew up in Philadelphia. I went to Penn State University. I worked in, I moved back to Florida. I'd never left Pennsylvania until I moved to California.

Speaker 1: And so say nittany lions and the is for us so that we understand how we're supposed to say that. There you go. There you go. Alright. And what was it like growing up in Philadelphia with, uh, with your flyers, with your eagles? With

Speaker 3: I, I still to this day loves Philadelphia. It's the biggest little city in the country. I feel like it's a family, you know, we're all there. We were all raised there. Um, I have great friends there. But the thing about Philadelphia is the history is incredible. It's incredible to be able to walk on the oldest street in America, to go see the Liberty Bell, to see what the constitution signed. It's so walkable. I mean, you literally can walk from river to river in 45 minutes. Um, and the restaurants are incredible. The food's great. Culture's great. It's easy. It's an easy city to live in. It's easy to commute to just like it's a great city and if there's one thing I miss, whether, if there's two things I missed, one really, one the history, um, you know, in California, especially in Los Angeles, you know, how far, how old is it really?

Speaker 3: Right. Compared to the east coast. Yeah. I didn't miss the history component, but um, I miss my family and my friends, but you know, it's a great place to visit and we have an office there by the way. We haven't, we are sales and marketing right now or run out of Philadelphia. I'm from two of my partners, one that I've done my whole life and the other one was my college roommate. So, uh, you know, uh, it's a great place and you know, my, a lot of our investors are from Philadelphia, especially our lead investor, Lincoln Snyder. And you mentioned the flyers earlier. A tremendous association with the flyers obviously. So I'm, I'm a die hard for my. Me and my family. We are die hard. Fans are diehard Penn state fans on Saturdays and Sundays, even in Los Angeles and we are somewhere watching our hometown teams for good or for bad.

Speaker 1: Fair enough. As far as, uh, maybe another thing you missed, it would be the local broadcasts on w y s, p, right?

Speaker 3: Well, yeah, I listened to

Speaker 1: the radio in the office sometimes on the Internet and we have direct TV at the house. So you know, my son, my older son who's 14 team lives and breathes Philadelphia Sports. So I got home last night and he was watching the Philly's. It was, it was the CSN broadcast, you know, indirect fee base. That's amazing. And I'm not sure it feels like he actually left other than anywhere. Shorts everyday. Maybe we'll find out in the fall. Right. Alright. Let's do the three final questions that we traditionally do. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most no, no prep whatsoever. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of your life named one track one song. That's got to be on there. First things first. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: The people in the industry are absolutely brilliant. Um, I find that I find that growers and processors to be probably the smartest people in the industry, but um, and that's just one word. The other part of it is a true belief into a marijuana as a medicine. Um, I'd be, I'd be naive to tell you that before I left Philadelphia, that I fully grasped the medical medicinal value of the, of the flower. And so the intelligence and the actual use of medicinal marijuana in two things, I suppose.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, absolutely. Those are good ones. What about life? What's most surprised you in life?

Speaker 3: If you work hard enough, you can get a second chance.

Speaker 1: Okay. Maybe even a third chance to. Right. And then on the soundtrack, I mean, you know, one track, one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 3: No rolling stones. You can't always get what you want. There you go. Extension of song, you got to believe in. You got to try. I fundamentally believe that you actually, and I'm a great example of this, by the way, I'm a guy who has always believed he can do whatever he wants to believe, and I have one. Some of those fights that I've lost a lot of those fights, but somebody very close to me before I left. Philadelphia said to me, what makes you think you can do what you're setting out to do? And I just said, I believe I can do.

Speaker 1: There you go. You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you get what you mean. David Dannenberg, thanks so much. Congratulations man. You know, like you said, you're doing this for the industry, you're doing this for the patients and you know, hey, if you get a little scratch on the side, why not right? There we go. Good talking to you, man. Thanks.

Speaker 2: This episode is also supported by incredibles. By medically correct. Medically correct. Producers of incredibles are focused on quality and consistency because they want you to rely on the product medicinally. They see you as receiving the direct benefit of their medicinal mindset, whether taking incredibles for qualifying condition or doing so recreationally. Either way medically correct, knows that you're getting therapeutic value from incredibles, Colorado based incredibles are now available in a growing list of locations. If you're looking for high quality, consistent infused cannabis and extracts go to. I love incredibles.com. Okay. So, uh, it is, uh, a distinct pleasure and honor to have a suit tailor with us. Sue, thanks so much for giving us a few minutes

Speaker 4: so very well. So, I mean, you know, the big news is that there's going to be a new dispensary in Berkeley and Sue Taylor is going to be running it, right? Is that about right?

Speaker 5: That's about right.

Speaker 4: So we want to make sure to kind of get a sense of, you know, how you're approaching the dispensary and um, you know, also of course, how, how we got to this point where were you were awarded that license. So I guess let's, let's do that first. You know, I'm not, it's not easy to get a new license, but a Berkeley put one out there. Um, and you secured it. Do you want to take us through, if you don't mind the, you know, how, how that occurred?

Speaker 5: Well, I spent a long process, we've been seven years at this trying to secure a permit really somewhere, and we've been actively, actively doing this in Berkeley, trying to get the Berkeley pro for it, I would say four years. Okay. So it's been, it's been a lot of hard work and diligence, uh, and offering something different.

Speaker 4: Yeah, that's a key. Let's take that tangent. Um, you have very specific target market for your cannabis dispensary, don't you?

Speaker 5: Ah, yeah. It's to serve what service everyone. I said sure. Everyone, anybody that comes to our door, but our club is noted for gearing to the needs of seniors. There we go. Yeah. And so you don't see seniors. We are the largest demographic take that millennials, cannabis can help almost every ailment that seniors can have. And most seniors, and I am a commissioner on aging for Alameda County, so I'm very much aware of the needs of seniors, how much medications that they're on, the side effects of those medications. And more importantly to the deterioration of those side effects that's causing the quality of life to diminish in the senior population.

Speaker 4: All right. And so you speak of that, uh, you know, as an administrator and with personal experience, I'm sure as well, right?

Speaker 5: Yes. I've, I've worked for five years for harborside health center doing a senior outreach and have been working with seniors directly and so I have firsthand knowledge of how many medications seniors are on and how they're just getting sicker and sicker and how cannabis has actually helped [inaudible] many of them get off pharmaceutical drugs overtime. Get off of. Get off of. All right. Well let's go ahead.

Speaker 4: Yeah, no, let's, let's just kind of take a couple of examples. Um, you know, uh, have a patient, obviously not by name, but maybe a specific element and how you helped a, a help that patient through just to kind of put, you know, um, folks, uh, give folks a better understanding of what we're talking about.

Speaker 5: Okay. Mainly seniors. Well, many seniors, a lot of times they are against the cannabis. Yeah, they come in, I, I educate them on what the cannabis does and does not do. They'll try it and my number one rule is I just tell them, I don't care how many medications you're on, I don't care what you do with, with the cannabis, when you started taking the cannabis, you're not to eliminate any of those pharmaceuticals unless your doctor tells you to understood. Okay. So senior in particularly that I'm thinking of was on a walker with 15 drugs, taken them, started the cannabis in a three months time. Over half of those medications were eliminated and, and, and the Walker and the cane was eliminated. That come to me. Ms Dot sue. Mrs Sue, I only used the cannabis. I don't use so much of the drugs anymore. I'm on the road to recovery time and time again now I, I, I was one of those people that was totally against cannabis. Uh, I've never smoked cannabis and I was afraid of it. I thought it was a hardcore drug, like a, like heroin or something.

Speaker 4: Well that's how it's scheduled, but that's a different story.

Speaker 5: Go on. Okay. But I believe that I believe the reefer madness, and so, uh, I am able to help seniors, we allies and see, I know what to address because I was once like them. Yeah. That.

Speaker 4: Yeah. Let's, let's go ahead and continue on the tangent. As far as you're concerned. What, how did you, when was your enlightenment for you personally?

Speaker 5: I'm Steph. It took time for me to, for me to believe it, but what? Let me tell you this. This is what I know. All right?

Speaker 5: I was drawn into this industry by divine intervention. You hear me come, I never would have come into this industry on my own. The universe use my son Jamal, to, to bring it to me as a mother, as a good mom. And every parent can relate to this. We will do anything for our children. I thought I was losing my son. Jamal call me and told me. He says, mom, I see how you can open up your metaphysical holistic center. I said, okay, how? He said, uh, you know, through a cannabis dispensary. I say, cannabis dispensary. So you're talking about that marijuana stuff? He say, yes, mom. I found out it was a healing medicine. I said, oh my God. I said, what did you learn about this? All the time staff. I'm thinking, he's on drugs. He's crazy, right? Yeah, and he's on drugs, right.

Speaker 5: That's what I saw and so he told me is I've been going to. Oh Damn, I've been learning is a medicine. I said, send me all the information. I got the information. Hold up the phone and Safa. I said, Oh my God, I've said this sport to Catholic school all of his life. Sent him on to college and now he's calling me to tell me he's going to sell weed. I said, Oh heck no. I flew home. I came home. I was living within Georgia at the time. Not that I thought I would be doing interviews like this or being a head of a cannabis dispensary. I came to save him from drugs and as I got more into it, as I did the work, I learn, but let me tell you what really got me because you see, because I was doing the work term, I learned trying to save my son. All of this. What really got me was the healing I experienced. I have walked wit and MIT patients who've had stage four liver cancer and are thriving now. I've met and worked with people who were this one woman in particular here to a tumor the size of a lemon in her left lung.

Speaker 5: It shrunk it, the cannabis shrunken and so things like that I couldn't talk back on you see, that's when I really, really believe when I saw it at all, but much of what people say, I watch their actions. When you say healing like that, you cannot from within, you cannot turn your back on him.

Speaker 4: Well, let, let's get to that. So the, the, the lemon size tumor, how do we know? How can you attribute cannabis use to that? Too much drinking? Yeah,

Speaker 5: I got it. Let me tell you, it was her mother. Okay, a personal friend, his mother, I went to visit her and she said, sue, my mom, uh, has a, a cancerous tumor. And so, you know, of course I was apologetic and sympathetic, uh, talk to that same friends. About six months later I said, how's your mom doing? She said, well, uh, my mom's cancer free. I say, I'm cancer free. I, so how did that happen? She said, well, my mom was diagnosed. I went with her that Kaiser, and I told them, I don't care what you do, uh, with my mom, you do all the things that you do, the Chemo, radiation, all that. I'm going to give my mom to, of the CBD capsules every day. I just want you to be aware of. That's what she told the doctors. So they said foreign.

Speaker 5: Okay. So when I went to her and in six months, that's what she said to me. So she said, I say, well, so it was the cbd tablets. She said, yes. I said, how do you know it was a when they did you know, how do you know it wasn't a chemo regimen? She said, listen, she said, because the doctors called me and said, what would those tablets you gave your mother? They sent six patients to that cannabis dispensary where my friend worked and the doctors told them, we're not recommending that you go. Right, but this is a suggestion and you didn't hear it from me, but go. That's what they told her.

Speaker 4: So it was the doctors basically acknowledging it without officially acknowledging it essentially.

Speaker 5: Yeah. Because they afraid. See, doctors are afraid of their license, their jobs, of course. All that. That's, that's why I know it works for people that I trust. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 4: So let's get back to that. A friend that had a fistful, I think you mentioned 15 pills. You subtracted that in half and got the person off a walker and a cane at. What was the ailment, what you know, and what was the, you know, uh, if it was cbd or otherwise, how did that all happen? Let's, let's get into the specifics there.

Speaker 5: This, this, this, this is how, this is how it works. Yeah. Well, you know about the endoccanabinoid sure. Okay. Look, got most seniors have on 15 to 2016 drugs, they start taking some form of the. Of the. Of the cannabis. Okay. No, the pharmaceutical drugs, usually a senior seniors go to their doctor for. Maybe they have two things wrong with them. Maybe high blood pressure and cholesterol. Okay, sure. Dr Papa. Pop them with appeal. A couple of pills. They. Those two pills have a chain we get to the 15 or the 20. Sixth is the side effects of those of those pills. The high blood pressure pill cause the thyroid to go off, so they give them a thyroid pill. The thyroid pill makes deliver, go out of whack. They give them a live with pill pill and the list goes on and the patient is not getting any better and they know it.

Speaker 5: Right? You see, once they start taking the cannabis in any form, because of the endocannabinoids, it begins to cause a balance in their body. Sometimes that's all they do is is the candidate, so they able. When they go back to the doctor in three or four months, the doctor will say, Oh gees, your cholesterol is down, or I can lower your blood pressure, your appeal. Uh, and so they say, I'm going to eliminate this one, this pill because you, you're fine. And when they asked, well, what are you doing? Nothing but the cannabis. And then some of the patients that don't even tell the doctors that they own the cannabis be afraid. So they just eliminated. That's why I tell the seniors, don't eliminate, let the doctor do it because it does two things when the doctor will see it, if you tell him Mr Cannabis still see the powerful nature of this plant, the medical benefits of this plant you speak. And so they are able to eliminate it and they figured out that's the only thing that patient is going. Yeah, but the doctor, the doctor needs to do that. Not the, the, the, uh, the patient themselves, right. As with any fee as. Yes, exactly. So, so. Go ahead.

Speaker 4: No, just I have a sense that they're going to be a few more seniors in a few more boomers listening to this episode than, uh, than usual. So as far as the endocannabinoid system, you know, go back and listen to the doctor Rachel Knox episode, but as far as CBD is concerned, why don't you take whoever's listening now through cbd versus Thc and, you know, because if I'm a senior and I've never, uh, taken cannabis before, I probably think I'm going to be sitting on the couch vege doubt. So just, you know, take folks through seniors through cbd and what that means.

Speaker 5: Most painful of my age. We just think cannabis is just weed, right? What's happening is there's certain strands of the cannabis plant that helps certain ill, that's my others. And the CBD versus the thc. The CBD is the cure to forms of the plant that laws or eliminate the to activity. The high part of it, what most people are no is no, uh, with the, with the cannabis or marijuana. And I don't use marijuana because they have such bad connotations. I use cannabis because it puts it in his natural realistic form. What it was meant for cannabis is a scientific term as a medicine, as a healing component. Yep. Okay, so. So you rarely hear me say marijuana or weed right up. Want to keep it clear. The teenage c is to high is the high is what most people, most plants back in the day to day would grow just for the TAC because most people just wanted it to feel good and feel high.

Speaker 5: Right? So once when I'm doing my senior presentations, I tell the seniors to things, you don't have to smoke it. We can take the high out. All of a sudden their eyes open. It's a healing component. Sleepy d is less the high that this activity is eliminate. The highest is gone sale. Seniors don't want to get high. They want to get well, right? So and then the Ta Tech. Now one thing is very clear that, that I've learned. You can't just do cbd alone because the thc and the CBD works synergistically. You have to have some tea to make that CBD really works. You can't just have plain cbd, I don't want no high cbd. You gotta have it together, but you get a high am I just like when you're reading labels on a food item that you buy. The first ingredient is the one that's for your best.

Speaker 5: That's more active, right? So you get it. You get a 10 chair, a Po for with the cannabis in it, with cbd first and Tac a second. That's it. Okay. Yes, and so another thing that most seniors don't know it is, is about, I talked about the different strands, is a sativa and indica. Those are the plants and a person that's depressed you would use a sativa. Sativa is with this real, real part of the brain. It helps. It helps with with that. The endeca plant is more for pain. Most seniors go to a cannabis for pain relief, pain and for sleep. It has terrible side effects. People have no recollection of things that they do, like they all drive cars off cliffs of. Sometimes they hurt people, sometimes they get up and cook full meals, burn up the kitchen, do things of that nature, and that's one of the Saturday and have no recollection of it. And so it's, it's very, um, it's very definitely. And it's also very expensive to get to get hold of those pills. And so if they use the cannabis, the endeca cannabis that could have a, a relaxing sleep would literally no side effects. It will have to take a foreign substance and put into, to their wonderful holy body.

Speaker 4: There you go. Now let me ask you this though. If I'm listening and I heard you say, I've got to have a little bit of thc along with my cbd. I'm still worried maybe that I'm going to have psychoactivity as far as you know, trying to get to sleep. I, I, I'm still worried I'm going to get a little high. What would you say to that?

Speaker 5: Well, you might feel a little, but trust me, it has. You all feel as high as you are. If you're on Vicodin, Oxycontin, that message that will deteriorate your heart, your kidneys, your liver and all of that. It's a natural plant would literally no side effects. And so if you can tolerate and Oxycotton, which is what most seniors are on, I can't tell you how many friends who are on Oxycontin, uh, if people feel more comfortable being high off of five, get in and actually cotton, but we have been taught seth, that cannabis is a drug so it works with your, you have to take control of your mind because the little bit of high thc that you might get with the cbd is nothing compared to what they have experienced with oxycontin and Vicodin and is and is not harmful.

Speaker 4: Yeah. If you could take that high, you can take this side type of thing.

Speaker 5: Exactly. Yeah. Alright. Excellent.

Speaker 4: So I want to do a, I want to return and we might be repeating ourselves, but you know, I kinda liked the thought of it. I've got these 15 pills in my hand and what you were saying is that one pill leads to another pill which leads to another pill. That's why I have 15 pills in my hand. It's not to kind of take care of 15 different ailments. Is that about right?

Speaker 5: That's exactly right. They usually only come, go to the doctor with one or two elements, but they end up with more pills and feeling worse from those pills staff from the original reason why they went to the doctor in the first place. You see? And so and, and I don't want to give the doctors a bad rip. No, no, no. Speak. Let's be clear. Most people will go and say, tell, tell, tell, tell, tell the doctor I have high blood pressure and cholesterol. So the doctor say, okay, well change your diet and start exercising. And they'll say, I have a brother. They said this. He says, Oh, you don't have a pill for that.

Speaker 4: Instead of exercising.

Speaker 5: Yeah, eat right. You don't have a feel for that. So the doctors treat our lifestyle. Right. You see, so it's up to us.

Speaker 4: Some of it's on us, right?

Speaker 5: Yes. No, no staff. All of it is on us.

Speaker 4: Thank you for the clarification. That's perfectly all

Speaker 5: of it is on us. We get to choose what goes into our body. We get to decide if we want. All the pharmaceutical approach to healthcare is not working. And that's what, that's what, that's what seniors are face with, is the pharmaceutical approach for health and wellness. That is, there's something wrong with that. We've been given the wrong dose, the wrong message. And um, we have to choose a different way. So if I don't take a pill for anything, I take supplements. I take vitamins. Um, you know, I, I don't, I pop a Cayenne pepper pills, you know, I take things to build my immune system. Things I exercise daily and meditate daily. I mean good health physically, mentally, and spiritually. That's why I'm able to do this work and pass, pass this message on because seniors deserve a better quality of life is not about life's a bitch and then you die.

Speaker 5: Or when you turn 50 years old down, he'll heck no. You supposed to be having the time of your life right now. Book, you know, I'm having. My son says, mom, you don't need to go sit down somewhere. I went to toastmasters last night to hone in on my skills. Right. When did you do that? Last night? You need to sit down somewhere. When I pass over to the other side, that's when I'll sit my butt down. You hear me? I'm having a time of my life. I mean, look at you. You all the way in New York. I'm here in San Mateo, California right now, but I'm. I'm loving it because I'm active. My mind is is functioning. I'm doing good work. I feel good about the seniors who are open to the cannabis to listen, educate. I'm not trying to convince anybody to use cannabis. My only job with you with this interview is to give knowledge, is to give information for the people who are ready to receive it. That's it.

Speaker 4: All right, so. So let's get back then into the suit tailor story. Jamal comes back from Oaksterdam. He says, my, you got to get a, you know, you to check this out. A take dot the line for us. From that conversation to the first a moment where you started to try to get this license for the dispensary seven years ago.

Speaker 5: Okay. Say it again. I didn't get it.

Speaker 4: Well, Jamal Kinda turns you wise. Right? And then from that moment to saying, okay, I'm going to open up a dispensary. Take us through that time period in your life.

Speaker 5: Oh boy. I tell you, it hasn't been easy, right? All of my, all of my retirement money, all of my family's little meager money that everybody tried to help with this through this process, over this, over this seven years. And by us being a people of color, it was even more challenging, uh, because the rules are not the same, you know, for, for, for us.

Speaker 4: What do you mean? Let's stop you there and let's make sure that we talked through that. What do you mean the rules aren't the same?

Speaker 5: Well, we have friends. When we were looking before Berkeley even came up, friends would come to us and say, who? Who are not people of color. So why don't you just open up. We've opened up, we've been in business for five years. I said, yeah. I said, we can't do that. Uh, Joe is, that's just the name. I said, we can't do that, Joe. I say, because if Jamal tried that along with other black people, I said, we will be the people that police would target. Oh yeah, those black people over there, I'm sure they're doing something wrong. They will target as an I, I wasn't willing to put my black, my African American son in that limelight, you know, I. So I'm the perfect face. They'd have a little harder time coming to get me, you know, [inaudible], you would come after him and people like you, although all my supporters would come, but it.

Speaker 5: And so let me give you an example. Uh, we have friends that, that goal from Mendocino county to La with pounds and pounds of cannabis in their car and there's never gotten stopped. I could tell you that at least three or four of friends and relatives who have had a pound now has a felony, was incarcerated. Um, uh, when, when the other races are stopped, they just, they get their cannabis taken away, slapped on the hand, don't do it anymore, and they're gone. They'll take us, they'll take. This is a two story with, I'd have to remember anonymity here. Uh, this young man got a felony, uh, in incarcerated and now he can't even be associated with a, with a cannabis dispensary. And then what they'll do is if, if an African American male gets arrested, oftentimes they'll, when they go into the police, they'll them they in and they say, Oh yeah, you look like that black guy that robbed the liquor store last week. And the only criteria is, oh yeah, he's black and got curly hair. Why that fits every African American person.

Speaker 5: Yes. At least most of them, you know, you know, oh yeah, you fit that description. So they get railroaded not only for the cannabis but other things are pinned on them. Then they go away for 10, 20 years. So you have to, you have to think, you know, you have to be very mindful of, of, of, you have to do things. If you a person of color, you better make sure you do it by the books, by the city. That's why it took us so long because we had to have a permit, we had to go through the right channels so they couldn't mess with us. You see many. Even even in Berkeley, we are the W, we were the first permitted club. All these other clubs had been operating without a permit for years. You hear me for years, 15 years, we were the first one. We had to do it because when people of color, you see.

Speaker 4: Yeah, I do. And, and so let me take you back to a comment you made. You basically what I heard you say, and correct me if I'm wrong, instead of putting Jamal as the face of your organization, you said, no, you know, he's a young black man. Let's put a, you know, baby boomers, sue Taylor, you know, a female suit, tailor, professional woman's who, Taylor as the face of the, uh, organization. Let's let them try to stop me. Is that about right?

Speaker 5: That wasn't a conscious decision. It kind of happened that way, but when we were in meetings and things of that nature, I'd say Jamal speak. He said No. He said he would keep quiet. He would keep quiet. He wouldn't say much and he knew he didn't want to come across as an angry black man or be the face because he said here he, he knows he's been experienced. They call it driving while black. You don't know how many times he's been stopping and this is a clean coe, college educated young man, you know, he but he's been not treated like everybody else who has those same kind of, um, credibility. You see?

Speaker 4: Yeah. I'm a college educated man, probably about the same age and we're, we're have very different experiences is basically your point.

Speaker 5: Exactly. Yeah, exactly. So you have to be, you have to just be mindful of it and that's why it's taken so long because we have to do it the right way. We have to, we have to do it. Um, uh, where the city. And hopefully the state would, would back us if, you know, if, if anything went wrong, even in the Berkeley dispensary, uh, and, but I don't know if I shouldn't be saying this, but anyway, Jamal and, and so the, the, the, the African American males that, that's gonna be in the, in the, in the business, like our core team, they're going to be in the back, you know, they won't be the face because I'm so sad that you got to think along those lines. But I'm going to keep them safe. Um, w we have to and we have to just be mindful.

Speaker 4: I want to talk about the business and, and opening up and all of that. But I

Speaker 1: feel like it's important and necessary to have a conversation about what's happening right now. You know, there's a, a lot of racial unrest as far as my lifetime is concerned. The only other time I can remember something like this is the early nineties with Rodney King and all that, that, that set off. What's your sense, you know, as we talk about this, of, of what's happening now and you know, what is the solution?

Speaker 5: No, you, you referring to the African American in the, in the cannabis industry.

Speaker 1: Oh No, no. I'm going big picture now. And I'm saying, you know, obviously there's an, there's an issue. We've got a black lives matter movement on God. Um, you know, policing, uh, issue. Uh, we've got, you know, not cool heads, cool, cooler heads have to prevail here. And I wonder what you would say from, from your experience, what, you know, what's the solution here?

Speaker 5: And you know, what the solution is, is, is education education in the um, uh, especially in the police force, uh, educating them that they, it happens more. They do a lot of, uh, social, uh, educating and enroll playing in the police departments here in California. Uh, because like, uh, being sensitive to, to, to other races, being sensitive to domestic violence, being sensitive to how you approach a circumstances. So that's, that's number one, right? That's also, that's also with the cannabis as well. Um, and with the, the, and, and, and, you know, the, the guys that are shooting the policeman to Rome. So I'll make a right two roles. Do not make a right, you know, it is totally wrong for you have to judge people by their character. You judge them by who they are. Um, you can't, you can't just take a whole race in judge him, you just can't take the whole police force and judge them. You have to, you have to be more, more pointed at.

Speaker 5: And where were we going with this? And I think it begins in the schools, uh, in the organizations and it's our job to do the education and the have the sensitive awareness of, you know, have a, uh, they call town hall where these things are. Got Six in Berkeley all the time when they had some police activity shooting or something. So Berkeley had meetings that I attended where we talk with the police chief, that the community w, w is those kinds of activities that will bring rest is up to the city to have the town hall meetings where the community could come in and discuss and talk. We don't talk anymore. We don't anymore, uh, about what's going on. A gun doesn't shop, solve anything and it's not the guns. Guns don't kill. Get up and kill people. It's the people who used to do it.

Speaker 5: You have to keep it. We'll it out because you know, what'll happen, all the crooks and criminals I know with the guns and that's honest. People will be left over with a bat, you know. So it's, it's, it's not the guns, it's, it's us, it's, it's, it's the people. And we have to educate the people and begin it in the schools. You know, and you know, I'm a former Catholic school principal, right? So, so it begins in the school educating early or something. She'd be in the Keelan, uh, for the kids to learn about issues you've had to deal with the bullshit. They've incorporated that in many of the curriculums. Well, we need to talk about social justice, you know, we need to talk about having empathy in different races. Uh, and that's where it begins is it's in the educational component of the Organization of the police force to fire A. Everybody has to come on board with this, you know,

Speaker 4: education, community dialogue, those sound like two good suggestions at least to get the ball rolling here, right?

Speaker 5: Yes.

Speaker 4: All right, so let's get back to business here. Uh, you know, I, I can, uh, we've talked about the fact that it's not open yet, but it's getting open soon. Where are you in the process of opening the dispensary in, in Berkeley?

Speaker 5: Well, we're doing the four plans, dealing with architects and in the process of rebranding, re doing the building to our needs and specifications. What does that, so that. Well, when we get to decide like I, I definitely want to have like a per a rooms where I can do senior education for anybody who wants to be educated, educated about the candidates out there. That's what I do. You know, I'm also certified by the state of California to teach their medical cannabis programs to nurses, administrators, directors of senior care facilities, as well as give them continuing education unit towards their certification that they need each year.

Speaker 1: You, you are certified by the state to teach candidates.

Speaker 5: I've been having that certification for three years now. All right. So I, I want to have a space where they can come to me, you know, where they take the certification or not get that. I educated about what the campus does and I'm certified by the State of California to do that.

Speaker 1: That's excellent. We probably should have mentioned that a little earlier, but that's okay.

Speaker 5: Yeah. Sorry.

Speaker 1: No, no, that's, that's my fault. No. So as far as doors being open, you know, you're, you're dealing with floor plans now. It sounds like a little bit. What are we talking about? Three months, six months, nine months. What, what do you think

Speaker 5: were thinking at the beginning of the year? We'll be open if, if not sooner, it'll take at least four months. Four to five months. And we still have to get permits because everybody says, Oh, you open yet? No, because we just, we just received the okay to, we just got the permit so we didn't do anything because we didn't have to make sure we got it right. And so now it's the. Okay, let's, let's get the building in shape. But we have a nice facility on the corner of Alcatraz and Sacramento in Berkeley and it's right across the street from over 60 clinic. So it's a, it's a, it's a great look at. And there's 4,000 square feet.

Speaker 1: Right? And that's, if, if I remember you telling me it's, it's just over a Oakland, right? We're coming out of Oakland into Berkeley. That's exactly where you are, right?

Speaker 5: We read on the corner where Berkeley and Oakland meet perfect weight. When you cross the street from where we are you in Berkeley if you go to the other side of the street. You in Oakland. Yeah.

Speaker 1: So, so where can folks find you in the meantime as far as you know, what you think, what you're saying, your education and all that?

Speaker 5: Well, I have a website, a suicide etailer Taylor.com. Um, so that's the best place we haven't received. We haven't put together. I can help center, uh, information and website and all that, but that's in the process, but right now is just me as the senior consultant for medical cannabis that the test did face and stuff. I just have to say this. Um, uh, I guess one of the things I want everyone in all of your listeners to know is that in, in working in this industry and with the population that I, with the seniors that I so deeply devoted to

Speaker 5: is that I genuinely care. I genuinely care about improving and bringing information to the lives of seniors because of what I've witness. If I've met so many young people that don't want to get old, you know, they fear the 50 and 60 and 70 and 80 and 90. And I want to tell them, you don't have to fear it anymore because life is wonderful and cannabis isn't the only way. Cannabis is just one way. And for them to look at and they get to decide. I use my doctor as a tool, you see as a tool. I give him information he gives me. I said, I want, I want my blue where I go once a year, check out my blood work, make sure everything is functioning correctly. And he said, oh, like one time I went. He said, oh, your potassium is. Damn. He tried to give me a pill.

Speaker 5: I said, that heck with you need to take it. I took the dern a prescription and went, went home, ate a banana. Every day, went back to him. Two months later he say, Oh, I see you, your prescription at work. I said, I threw it in the garbage. It was with me. He says, well, have you won't do a. So it's things like that, but I do know it's my mission. It was from the divine. I never would be doing this. That's why I'm so driven from within and it gives me great joy. I could see that Joe, I'm happy doing it. It keeps me thriving. Um, and I get to meet people like you.

Speaker 4: There you go. All right, so we've got the three final questions and I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. So the first question is, what has most surprised you in cannabis? The second question is, what has most surprised you in life? And then the third question is on the soundtrack of sue Taylor's life named one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, as far as cannabis is concerned, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 5: How, how healing it is, the medical benefits and how I've, I've, I've seen it help cancer patients and that component, that healing has just been amazing to me because I was such a nonbeliever, you see, and it's all the healing that I've witnessed that has been more surprising than anything because of where I came from.

Speaker 4: Well, I'm, I'm sure that as a Catholic school teacher, you can tell me that the nonbelievers, once they're a transformed over those are the true believers after. All right?

Speaker 5: You absolutely right. Absolutely correct.

Speaker 4: So, uh, what has most surprised you in life? Now? This is a big question, you know, and uh, got a little bit of experience to go through, you know.

Speaker 5: Yeah. I guess what has really surprised me in life is that how, how we give our power away. How do you mean? We as divine human beings, uh, have a lot of power. If you connect with that source and we give it away, we follow. We almost like, you know, how cattle walking the line and just go all together. Sure. That's, that's how we do. That's how we do it. I, I made a conscious decision if I see everybody going one way, like all our seniors, because I was one of them just going one way. I go the opposite. I look for other ways. Most people don't go within and see what needs to be done. They go without. They go without. They look out there for the solutions when the answers are within all the time. If you allow it

Speaker 4: reckoned with the within.

Speaker 5: Yes, yes. We are more powerful than you realize and we have a source that guidance, but we have to tap into it. Yeah.

Speaker 4: All right, so you've done a fair amount of tapping as far as we can. Well, well here, uh, this, this final question, it's either going to be easy for your tough on the soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 5: When you mean a song, you mean a physical song?

Speaker 4: Uh, yes ma'am. I mean, uh, uh, produced song that you might've heard on the radio or on your phone or you know.

Speaker 5: Oh, so that's how it. Let me tell you I have many and let me tell you why I love music and I love to dance. That's what I do. My brother came over yesterday and he says, Oh, well you have a party in woman says, I'm not a party in one adult party. I love music because he came over yesterday. I was doing my exercise to music. Most People Watch TV, I listen to. I love all kinds of moves. But guess what? Kind of like the best Zydeco music. I left this out of it, you know, that's my heritage. Yeah.

Speaker 1: Alright, so you got a buckwheat Zydeco. You Got Clifton, Shel Shinier, right?

Speaker 5: Because he's a relative, he's gone now, but he was a, he was a relative. He was a relative. That's fantastic. Yeah. And paypal in my shoe. That's it. Maybe that's probably one of my favorite songs. It's like paper in my shoe.

Speaker 1: I think we found that song. So,

Speaker 5: uh, this is my grandpa. My grandpa used to play it. He played the accordion and uh, and you know, they all spoke that French. Right. And so he would play that. Got a paper in which you don't know what to do, you know. Oh, it's just great. And this is music that just turns you on.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Try to be in a bad mood when you're listening to decide to go. I dare you.

Speaker 5: You can't, you cannot, cannot,

Speaker 1: uh, so tell her. This has been a pleasure. I will check back in with you as you, you know, kind of get closer to opening a very much appreciate your time. And it's, it's just a pleasure to know you.

Speaker 5: It's been an honor. Thank you for considering me.

Speaker 1: Of course. And there you have suit, tailor

Speaker 2: procedure by David Dannenberg. Really great to hear. David's take on the Microsoft partnership, but come on, sue Taylor, please more than delivering on a number of topics, so very much appreciate the conversation with sue. Very much appreciate the conversation with David. Very much appreciate you listening. Thanks so much.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.