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Ep.170: Bubbleman, Introview w/Landon Long, Infusion Factory

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.170: Bubbleman, Introview w/Landon Long, Infusion Factory

Ep.170: Bubbleman, Introview w/Landon Long, Infusion Factory

Plant expert & Hash Church Host Marcus Richardson talks about his history which is inextricably linked with the history of legal cannabis in Canada.  He discusses early run-in’s with Jack Herer, Ron Hickey, Marc Emery He also talks about Hilary Black who you can find on Episode 150. Bubbleman takes us through Canadian licenses and licensing and the June Toronto raids from his perspective. But first Landon Long of Infusion Factory joins us to discuss literally coming out of the shadows and into the light in northern California cannabis. If you’re into direct communication, or would like to support the show, feel free to send me an email at engage@canneconomy.com.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Bubbleman. When expert and Hash church post Marcus Richardson talks about his history, which is inextricably linked with the history of legal cannabis in Canada. He discusses early run INS with Jack Herrera, Ron Hickey, mark emery, and also talks about hillary black, who you can find on episode one $50. Bubble man takes us through Canadian licenses and licensing and the June Toronto rates from his perspective, but first blended long have infusion factory joins us to discuss literally coming out of the shadows and into the light in northern California. Cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. If you're into more direct communication or would like to support the show, feel free to send an email to engage at Ken Economy Dot Com. Marcus bubble man Richardson, proceeded by Landon Long.

Speaker 1: You know, so special thanks to John Downs, right, a new friend for you or a consistent friend, at least consistent friend is a closer friend. Now that's great for putting us together, Landon, so thank you for giving us a few minutes. All right, so what are you doing? Right? So, uh, we are infusion factory. Okay. What we're all about is providing high quality, consistent and formalized private label and white label manufacturing services for a range of customers that need good services like that. Excellent. You're based here in Oakland? Uh, we're based in the East Bay. That's correct. Yeah, we've been, uh, here in the East Bay for myself for 35 years continuously. Uh Huh. Alright. So 35 years, you know, doing the math that goes back, uh, you know, before everything, before everything. Right. So, uh, when did you, um, kind of first realized what was happening? Well before we had prop to 15, you know, I was a senior in high school.

Speaker 1: Is, is uh, some seniors, do, you know, we support the industry and you know, at that time it really didn't make sense to me that, you know, you could grow something that provided some type of benefit or relief to people even grown in your backyard. And it was illegal and I just didn't really make sense to me. So why is the plant illegal? Yeah, yeah. It just didn't make sense to me. I mean, it's something, it's something you can grow and uh, it's readily accessible and it's taboo and it just never really connected for me. So, um, you know, chose to kind of, uh, just operate in the industry with respect for those laws. But, uh, you know, the patients are ultimately what's most important to us and always has been. When did you first kind of come in contact with a cannabis as medicine?

Speaker 1: We're all due respect to cannabis recreationally on the adult use of it, but as far as cannabis as medicine, you know, as a, as a young boy, actually had a close neighbor that, uh, passed away, fought cancer. She was very young and um, you know, I realized the stages of death and dying and of pain and disease very early and a really high compassionate with it since I was, you know, before I even knew the benefits of cannabis, I compassion for people that needed assistance in different ways. So, uh, you know, I've always been an advocate and um, you know, my history, you know, not to go too far afield, but, you know, my history goes, you know, I've been here for 35 years and um, you know, I'm probably one of the few guys that as a senior I stood up in our mock congress.

Speaker 1: I was the only guy that advocated for medicinal marijuana left school that day, went up to Broadway here in Oakland and advocated for prop to 15, which we ultimately got. So, uh, my history goes back that far and, you know, I've been one way or another, uh, touching this industry involved in the industry ever since. So, I mean, talk about so that you're an activist right in, in one, in one sense of the word when, when you got up on stage and, and did that, what was the reaction from your, you know, some, at least likeminded classmates? Definitely most young people, you know, at the time. What was the reaction you got? Yeah. You know, there was the majority of people. It's kind of laughed it off as some, uh, you know, something that was kind of humorous, but, um, you know, there, there was a huge percentage of individuals who thought it was pretty courageous to be able to stand up in front of your entire senior class and advocate for something like that.

Speaker 1: And did you talk about your internal thought process and kind of the reaction internally and emotionally coming off the stage? Did you feel like you did because you're talking about it now and it sounds like you're always going to talk about that moment. So that's obviously as we know now, a huge moment in your life. Did you realize it at the time? Um, you know, I realized the industry was going someplace and you know, I was pretty gratified with when I was able to accomplish that day and a kind of, some of the movements and actions I've had since, um, you know, there's a lot of people have done a lot of great work in this industry and I don't want to ever take any credit away from the work that they've done. But, um, you know, I've always been there supporting and advocating and doing what I could to provide more legitimacy for, uh, the actions that, you know, some of our colleagues in the industry here go through.

Speaker 2: Bubbleman. When expert and Hash church post Marcus Richardson talks about his history, which is inextricably linked with the history of legal cannabis in Canada. He discusses early run INS with Jack Herrera, Ron Hickey, mark emery, and also talks about hillary black, who you can find on episode one $50. Bubble man takes us through Canadian licenses and licensing and the June Toronto rates from his perspective, but first blended long have infusion factory joins us to discuss literally coming out of the shadows and into the light in northern California. Cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. If you're into more direct communication or would like to support the show, feel free to send an email to engage at Ken Economy Dot Com. Marcus bubble man Richardson, proceeded by Landon Long.

Speaker 1: You know, so special thanks to John Downs, right, a new friend for you or a consistent friend, at least consistent friend is a closer friend. Now that's great for putting us together, Landon, so thank you for giving us a few minutes. All right, so what are you doing? Right? So, uh, we are infusion factory. Okay. What we're all about is providing high quality, consistent and formalized private label and white label manufacturing services for a range of customers that need good services like that. Excellent. You're based here in Oakland? Uh, we're based in the East Bay. That's correct. Yeah, we've been, uh, here in the East Bay for myself for 35 years continuously. Uh Huh. Alright. So 35 years, you know, doing the math that goes back, uh, you know, before everything, before everything. Right. So, uh, when did you, um, kind of first realized what was happening? Well before we had prop to 15, you know, I was a senior in high school.

Speaker 1: Is, is uh, some seniors, do, you know, we support the industry and you know, at that time it really didn't make sense to me that, you know, you could grow something that provided some type of benefit or relief to people even grown in your backyard. And it was illegal and I just didn't really make sense to me. So why is the plant illegal? Yeah, yeah. It just didn't make sense to me. I mean, it's something, it's something you can grow and uh, it's readily accessible and it's taboo and it just never really connected for me. So, um, you know, chose to kind of, uh, just operate in the industry with respect for those laws. But, uh, you know, the patients are ultimately what's most important to us and always has been. When did you first kind of come in contact with a cannabis as medicine?

Speaker 1: We're all due respect to cannabis recreationally on the adult use of it, but as far as cannabis as medicine, you know, as a, as a young boy, actually had a close neighbor that, uh, passed away, fought cancer. She was very young and um, you know, I realized the stages of death and dying and of pain and disease very early and a really high compassionate with it since I was, you know, before I even knew the benefits of cannabis, I compassion for people that needed assistance in different ways. So, uh, you know, I've always been an advocate and um, you know, my history, you know, not to go too far afield, but, you know, my history goes, you know, I've been here for 35 years and um, you know, I'm probably one of the few guys that as a senior I stood up in our mock congress.

Speaker 1: I was the only guy that advocated for medicinal marijuana left school that day, went up to Broadway here in Oakland and advocated for prop to 15, which we ultimately got. So, uh, my history goes back that far and, you know, I've been one way or another, uh, touching this industry involved in the industry ever since. So, I mean, talk about so that you're an activist right in, in one, in one sense of the word when, when you got up on stage and, and did that, what was the reaction from your, you know, some, at least likeminded classmates? Definitely most young people, you know, at the time. What was the reaction you got? Yeah. You know, there was the majority of people. It's kind of laughed it off as some, uh, you know, something that was kind of humorous, but, um, you know, there, there was a huge percentage of individuals who thought it was pretty courageous to be able to stand up in front of your entire senior class and advocate for something like that.

Speaker 1: And did you talk about your internal thought process and kind of the reaction internally and emotionally coming off the stage? Did you feel like you did because you're talking about it now and it sounds like you're always going to talk about that moment. So that's obviously as we know now, a huge moment in your life. Did you realize it at the time? Um, you know, I realized the industry was going someplace and you know, I was pretty gratified with when I was able to accomplish that day and a kind of, some of the movements and actions I've had since, um, you know, there's a lot of people have done a lot of great work in this industry and I don't want to ever take any credit away from the work that they've done. But, um, you know, I've always been there supporting and advocating and doing what I could to provide more legitimacy for, uh, the actions that, you know, some of our colleagues in the industry here go through.

Speaker 1: So. Okay, so, so that brings us kind of to today and you know, infusion factory is a new brand for folks that pay attention. That's correct. Um, and you know, some of that's by design being that, you know, the Steve de Angelo comment, uh, out of the shadows into the light, here comes the land and into the light. What's this process been for you? You know, it's been quite rewarding to be honest about it. You know, we've operated in other consumer goods industries and um, you know, every time I walk into an art viewer, an MGC and I see the faces of investors and brands and all of that. And I reflect back to the first day is where I first advocated. Um, you know, it really is almost a feel good moment. It really tugs at the heartstrings for me because at the end of the day, you know, there are patients that are receiving benefits for what we do and seeing all these people come from New York, Colorado around the world to support this industry and, and embrace it and bring their resources either through, you know, chemistry, Ip or funds.

Speaker 1: It is great to see that and see them just so openly discussing this industry and being really bullish on it. I mean, I thought that this would happen in my lifetime and I'm really glad that it has before I'm 40. Oh Wow. Look at that. You're aging yourself specifically, but I guess you did with prop 2:15 year old in high school. Yeah. We already knew the math or we already could have done the Mac and extrapolate it. Yes, exactly. All right. So then in terms of extraction factory with a, you know, you've got a history, but let's not talk about that as far as what you're doing now. You know, what fun, interesting, different things, you know, are you attacking in the shop? You know, what's really interesting about us is that, you know, we've been stockpiling a wide range of chemistry for basically the entirety of my adult life, so you know, being, working on let's say this chemistry set or this product set or another and advancing the workforce but not releasing the product.

Speaker 1: So it's kind of unusual in that most companies say they cope with the better Brownie, they get out to market that week. Us, we had the ability because we are operating in other spaces to stockpile the IP. So today we're sitting on a huge, huge stockpile of intellectual processes and Ip and going through the patent process and some of those that are unique and novel and it ranges from, you know, full recreational intent all the way over to real clinical benefit for people that are in medical environments. And what I love is that my lifetime of exposure to this industry and to the plant has allowed us to further a body of work that is going to and does provide benefit for people with both clinical and recreational need. And it's just, it's very humbling. At the end of the day, we know if we sell 20,000, 50,000, 100,000 units, that those are 20, 50, or 100,000 patients at the end of the day that chose to benefit themselves, treat themselves or impact their life with the products that we've spent my lifetime, uh, creating.

Speaker 1: So as far as stockpiling Ip, uh, without giving away trade secrets, what can you share with us? Yeah. You know, we, um, we have a lot of customers that come to us, you know, the, the crux of what we do is we provide oem and contract manufacturing services for people. So there's a wide range of customers that bring their product classes to us. We help them to formalize it and we helped them to move their body of work forward and bring their products commercial from our product classes. I mean, they range from things that are like, you know, in general, you know, hunting products. We have vapor products. The first chemically stable TCAC liquids that are not oil based, their water basing actually atomized tablets and um, you know, Syrup's and advanced tinctures and fast acting formulations. And, um, there's a lot of cool products that, uh, are just on the edge of being released, uh, either through us or through some of our customers.

Speaker 1: And, you know, I've been in a lot of formalized a industries I've, I've worked throughout startup world here in the Silicon Valley and this is the most exciting work I've ever done. Hands Down, absolutely love with the plant. I'm in love with the work that we're doing and the people I get to work with out of those applications. And you spoke about that. What that sounds like is a ton of stuff. What are you most excited about that you can maybe speak to specifically? Maybe something that's kind of out the door or on the way out the door? Fortunately, you know, fortunately and unfortunately and unfortunately we were constrained by our ndas and things we can and can't discuss. Sure. Um, I would say that some of the clinical work that we're involved with, there's some people that are doing a global clinical trials in, around kind of dial in the cbd and um, you know, other pain relief trials and things like that, that work of course, because of my love and affinity for patients that have come and gone, that's the work that most excites me.

Speaker 1: And if we can bring, in my opinion, if we bring clinical level solutions and they're viable and accurate for the, uh, there'll be viable for the medicinal and recreational markets as well. So, you know, for us it's all about extreme dose accuracy. It's about superior chemistry. It's about having superior process and having the wherewithal to, um, not just throw the first piece of thing that works out the door. So, you know, speaking in generalities, that's the stuff that really excites me is really the clinical envelope of work that's being done right now. You talked about global, uh, uh, a global network there. Um, yeah. In regards to say, hemp, hemp based CBD, a lot of our work too is not only with a cannabis marijuana but also with a hemp based CBD and um, you know, there's a huge body of work that's being done from Israel to Switzerland, Germany all around the world, uh, with regards to cbd and that work is extremely exciting.

Speaker 1: And um, the fact that our Ip and knowledge can kind of cross borders in that respect and we can contribute to projects like that. That's just, it's amazing. It's nuts, right? Yeah, it's nuts. It really is cool. And um, you know, it's what I have dedicated my life to sit and say, like [inaudible] 96. I was in it in 2006 and I'll be here in 20, 26 working on this. Okay, great. So hopefully we'll get a chance to talk to you before then. That would be the hope. But, uh, but let's do the three final questions here. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of your life? Land. And what does one track, one song that's got to be on there? The only other land, and I know by the way, just to take a tangent.

Speaker 1: He's Landon Donovan. That's right. US soccer or US football fan. What have you. Have you met Landon Donovan? I've been in his presence. I haven't met him specifically. Um, I think maybe I was landon first. I think he's a little younger than me, but Kudos to him for his work and what he does. It's amazing. Which is rough because he's retired, you know what I mean? Anyway, so yeah. What has most surprised you in cannabis and cannabis? Um, I can't say that I'm entirely surprised of the overall progression of the industry, but the level of formalization and the types of players are coming to this industry from abroad. That's surprising to me, but wholly expected that eventually we'd keep pressing hard enough and we keep fighting long enough that eventually we're going to get to a point where others going to recognize that there's something tangible here.

Speaker 1: And, you know, the fact that so many people have come on board and they're supporting this, uh, that's expected, but definitely surprising. And I embraced that. I love it. Let me ask that differently. Uh, let's say 2016, Landon takes the bill and Ted Elevator back toward the telephone booth back to 1996. I'm, I'm using the anecdote appropriately. I think what would 19, 96, landon say to 2016, Landon when he said, hey, we're in a, you know, a legal industry. This is what we're doing. This is what we're working with. What would that guy say? Holy Shit, you're still in the industry first. That'd be the first thing that surprised in 1996 land end. Um, but back then we were concentrated. I mean, Keith was the cutting edge of extract science in 96. Right? And to see the development of all the chemistry that we're involved with and all the work that's being done, I'm 19, 96.

Speaker 1: Landon would be impressed and honored to even be aware of that little alone participating in that and that, that's, that's so beyond being baffled, uh, impressed with the science type of thing. Yeah. Yeah. Just impressed with the science. I, I love where cannabis has gotten to the point where, you know, we're pharmacologically compounding things now and you know, fractional science and kind of splitting all apart, putting it back together and, you know, doing very creative things to have very, very specific, uh, effect on patient conditions or recreational. Um, orientations. There we go. Yeah. What has most surprised you in life, whether you're young or role depending on, you know, if your own perception, you know, uh, kids, I have kids and I, you know, I, my, my kids and uh, just how much of your life that, uh, takes the manage appropriately and kind of balanced between professional life.

Speaker 1: Say, like gray life and the kids, um, you know, if you say great life, uh, yeah, Kinda like, you know, the industry before kind of gray. Yes. Operating in the gray. That's correct. Yeah. Kind of like a balancing, you know, full corporate life. And a full kind of, you know, great life which was compliant, but uh, you know, the feds would probably have a different perspective on that. Sure. Um, previously. And um, you know, kind of balancing the family life as well. Um, you know, just being a family man in this industry and I'm trying to balance all that, that's a pretty surprising. I'm able to accomplish it and still get more than hours sleep per night or more than one if more than one four as a surprise. So that might be the most depressing thing. Yeah, right. That's right. That's right. Uh, all right. You know, biggest question on the soundtrack of your life.

Speaker 1: What Song? One track. Oh Man, I'm, you know, I'm kind of a Surf punk type guy. Oh Wow. But you know, I'll, I'll, I'll bring it back a little more modest. Anything. Wait, wait, hold on one second. You can, you are. Please give us a Dick Dale track if you wanted. No one has yet. I'm, no, no, no. Dick Dale, you know, pretty much anything from a slightly stupid. That's the soundtrack to my recent years, you know, or that's extremely extended some of the bands of recent years. Um, you know, that, that general genre 2:00 AM is one of the good songs. If it's a, you know, just pulling through a slightly stoopid slightly stupid 2:00 AM, I'm going to hold you to that one. How about that? Go ahead. And anything from sublime, you know, get burritos in there from sublime, you know, that's uh, uh, you know, it's cool with me. That's about what I listened to. Thank you for the conversation. Thank you for introducing us to a new genre. I appreciate that. And thanks for the time today. It's really an honor to be here with you and obviously everyone that's out there and, uh, uh, digital land listening to this today. So there you go. You might protest too much, but we appreciate it. That's fine. That's fine. Thank you very much for your time. I appreciate it. All right.

Speaker 2: This episode is also supported by hoping and feel hope, hoping that field is the nation's original cannabis law firms since 2008 established in Colorado. They've since expanded into 13 states, Central America and Puerto Rico. They serve as industrial hemp, regulated marijuana and ancillary businesses hoping to feel is truly a one stop shop for cannabis businesses. They focus on regulatory compliance and General Business Council services. They have lawyers in house who can serve all business needs. Go to [inaudible] dot com for more information. Okay, so we've got the famed bubble man, Marcus Richardson. How are you? I'm doing really good. Thanks. Thanks for having me today, seth. Absolutely. Um, you know, we got a chance to spend some time just a tiny bit of time in Vancouver a few months back. I didn't see you in Toronto, uh, for,

Speaker 1: for the lift expo, but you're a busy guy, you know, you've got a hash church and a couple of things going on. So we want to make sure to talk to you about all that, but you're also ingrained

Speaker 3: in the history of cannabis as far as Canada is concerned on, I guess the rest of us. Uh, so we want to talk about that as well. What do you think about all that?

Speaker 4: Yeah, absolutely. We can cover the gamut of how I've come to be so busy here 20 plus years later after sort of starting this journey, uh, back in my city of origin, which is Winnipeg, Manitoba. That's where I sort of got into a, well, I mean really first smoking cannabis. That's how it really all started. And from smoking cannabis I got more and more into it sort of in an exponential manner. It was sort of, you know, some people would smoke a joint when they were 14 or 15 or 16 and they might not smoke another one anytime soon or they might smoke the odd one every other week. I kind of jumped in with both feet and you know, it was by, by a gram a by a half ounce, by a quarter pound, buy a half pound by pound. Uh, so it, it, it, it was very exponential for me in my learning experience of dealing with how to get cannabis in a prohibition a province, uh, how, how to, how to use it properly.

Speaker 4: Learning the effects of inhaling it more so than just feeling euphoria. But it was, it was simultaneously teaching me that there was more to meet the eye, the about this plant. And I started doing research and at a pretty young age, I'd say I became, you know what, today we call a cannabis activist, um, my father, I remember my father telling me very straightforwardly, uh, at 17 or 18 years old, listen, if this is what you want to do, then do it right? Okay. If this is, this is what you want to do, do it right. Because there's all sorts of wrong ways to do this. And I'd hate to see you get caught up like that. So I took his information to heart. We became a, a small group of us who were likeminded, very, very much loving the cannabis aura. We were using it almost excessively, I would say we were just absolutely in love with, with, with using cannabis.

Speaker 4: And it was teaching us and it was exciting and it was a journey. And what we did was we found Jack Herrera's book, the emperor wears no clothes. We had devoured it from start to finish. Uh, we eventually went to a cannabis cup in Amsterdam and met a Jack Herrera as well as some other key people and that led us to do some activism in regards to hemp in our province. We realized that we were in a province that was very much in the Bible belt in of Canada. It wasn't necessarily going to be a place where we would try and get like cannabis legally allowed to grow, but we thought, you know, apparently there's a thing in the narcotics drug and treaty act that says that if you grow for medicine or for commercial industrial purposes, there's, there's little rules that cannabis can still be grown.

Speaker 4: So we applied with our government in [inaudible] 94 for a license to grow hemp. And they were like, well no one's even applied for anything. There's not even a health. Canada at the time had no structure whatsoever. Only three people in total had applied to grow cannabis in the, in the previous 20 years. And they were literally people that wanted to grow like a plant on their balcony or something. So it was, it was quite a, quite a thing for a young group of guys that were literally just kind of getting into cannabis by simply using cannabis. It was, you know, I'd say if someone from society had looked at us at that time, they would have seen the stereotype of the negative aspects of cannabis. They wouldn't have liked what we were doing and a lot of people didn't like what we were doing, but that didn't stop us from within one year convincing our minister of finance and our Minister of agriculture that this could potentially help the prairies and the farmers of the prairies.

Speaker 4: And we were growing hemp, uh, about a year later under a commercial license. And that was called experimental. And so that means you were not, you were not allowed to make profit growing hemp in Canada pre 1995. But the next year in 1995, the first commercial licenses came through and they had actually changed the word experimental, which meant no profit when they changed that to commercial, which is, you know, why my partners just recently in the last couple of months, my, my old partners from the hamp a alliance and the, uh, the hemp, the hemp store that we had there called the hemp exchange, uh, they just sold that company a Manitoba Harvest for I believe, a hundred and $30,000,000. Whoa. Yeah. Less than 25 years. That was 20 years ago that, uh, it all really started. And now that's, that company was one of the first really big hemp sales in, in, in the hemp industry. That was, you know, it was, it was many digits, many digits. One hundred, 100 plus million. So that was the start of it all for me. Hemp, hemp activism, Manitoba,

Speaker 3: I, I've got a few questions because you say if we were to look at you at the time, we would see the stereotype, but you, you clearly were activated intellectually, you know, reading books and such. And specifically obviously Jack Herrera's, the emperor has no clothes. What, what? You know, what do you remember taking from the book?

Speaker 4: Well, I mean the book blew us away. It was like, imagine you're into this thing and no matter how much you like it, you still kind of are fitting into this platform or this, this level of propaganda that says it's a bad thing. It's not good. It's definitely not good. So we were Kinda like, all right, it's not good, but we like it. Whatever people do things that are not good. So then suddenly we started realizing, well, you know, maybe it's actually not bad, you know, first it was not bad, the first few pages and then it turned into, well this is pretty good. And then by the end of the book you're like, well this is a, this is unbelievable. This, we should be screaming this from the rooftops type of thing. And even back then, keep in mind, Jack had idea that you could put cancer into remission using Fido cannabinoids that, that, that other diseases such as Crohn's could be fully remission with the use of cannabis.

Speaker 4: Now, that's not to say that's a guarantee and most doctors, you know, what the risk of losing their licenses won't say that to you, but it is a fact. It's true. We can, we know from the Work Christina Sanchez has done on a pop ptosis and the Mitochondria of unhealthy cells being affected via thc at the University of Madrid. We know that there is a reality that says thc can shrink tumors. Doctors are just really, really, really afraid to say it and I understand where they're coming from. They have, they have that licensed to lose. Uh, but, uh, maybe we should create a sort of healthcare that doesn't put a license in front of a patient.

Speaker 3: Well, I think that, uh, we're, you know, slowly but surely baby-steps working our way towards it. A mark is, aren't we? You know what I mean?

Speaker 4: Absolutely.

Speaker 3: So I wanted to ask you about, you, you, your dad kind of had that key key thing that he said to you, which was do it the right way. I've got a couple of questions there. My first one is, what did he mean do it the right way?

Speaker 4: Well, my father was the fire chief of Ottawa Fire Department. My mum worked for nine slash 11. She was the head of nine slash 11 chief operator. My sister was a nine slash 11 operator. Her husband was a detective. There dog was a dog cop that was retired. So he meant don't break the law. Don't you know, to, to a degree of, you know, if you have to break the law, make sure it's a level of civil disobedience that you can stand behind. Don't get in trouble for something that's going to take away the power of your message or that's going to dilute you in your message or fall victim to the stereotype that others may be trying to project upon you.

Speaker 3: Andrew, what do you think that, uh, he have. Did he come upon that way of thinking? Tell us a little bit about, uh, you know, about your parents and how they were brought up.

Speaker 4: Well, both my parents were born in the fifties and they came from a pretty straight upbringing. My father was an only child. He had a twin sisters that were born, still born when, when they were born. So they, they obviously didn't, didn't make it into life at all. Uh, so he grew up alone with just a mom and dad. They were substantially older than him. They had him a little bit later on in life, uh, in their forties. And so he had that sort of 19 fifties upbringing by the time he was 20, he was a full time firemen with one kid already out and one on the way. So he started his life very early on. My Dad was very, I'm always professional and proper, uh, in everything that he did. He, for instance, was the youngest fire chief in Canada. He had not even finished high school.

Speaker 4: And in a very short period of time, he went and got his ged. He went and got his bachelor of science. He went and got his degree and he did all of this while being a full time firemen while being a father. And while of course every fireman that you would know has a secondary job. So he also had a fencing company, a construction type company that he built fences and decks and garages and such. So I saw his work ethic as a young man growing up and I thought, wow, that's, that's the kind of father you really want because you get exposed to this incredible work ethic. And although I didn't choose to plug it into the world of, you know, I guess the Joe Straighty world, my world was a little bit more alternative. I still took those lessons to heart and applied them

Speaker 3: in my everyday life. Yeah. So let's get back to it. You, you come back from a cannabis cup and you know, how did you make your foray into the business side, uh, of, of cannabis. I will let you know that I'm. Hillary shared the story of, of how you and she got to know each other. Um, I think she called you a prospector. I, I don't know if that's the word you used, but that's essentially what you were doing, but get us the, uh, from the path from Manitoba to, to, uh, working with Hillary at bccs.

Speaker 4: Well, you know, one of my partners in Manitoba was Martin Muravchik, he's one of the founders of a Manitoba Harvest and fresh foods, and he was kind of a mentor to me back then and it got to the point where, and I mean in all, in all honesty, this is exactly how it happened. I moved in, I moved into a nicer house in Manitoba and it had a beautiful basement and my mentor, another mentor of mine, Ron Hickey, he was like, oh, well, let's build you a beautiful grow in the basement. You know, we'll put a secret door and nobody will know it's there. We won't go too big. It'll just be a nice little thing that will be, will be helpful for you. This was back in the days of, of allowing, um, of making money off of the prohibition of cannabis, which I don't really suggest people do.

Speaker 4: It comes with a karmic debt that is a, it's, it's very hard to pay back when you make profit off of a plant that is based on people going to prison and having their lives destroyed. It's not an ideal profit margin. I do welcome the ushering in of this new system that is based on quality and access and availability and pricing and those are good things to make a profit margin off, but people rotting in prison certainly isn't. So we built this grow room in my basement and Geez, it was within the first month of finishing the grow room and it was about a 14 lighter, uh, that it was gonna be. And it was all really beautiful and professionally done, uh, with professional electricians in the whole nine yards. And uh, basically the owner of the House said, oh, we need to send someone in and do some suit, some measurements.

Speaker 4: So they immediately came into my basement and was like, that's weird. There's like half the basement is missing. And I was like, oh no, there's. I'm like, no, there's a room over here. So basically I had to move out of this house immediately and not only out of the house icon, I kind of felt like, man, I'm just done with this. And Martin at the time was like, you know what man, why don't you go out west? Like bcs calling your name, you could, you could kind of go out there and plant the flag for us will come in behind you. And he was really one of the big inspirations that sent me out this way and I only knew hillary out here. She knew us as the Manitoba Hamp guys. We would come visit to mark emrys MPC in the early nineties and Hillary was a young teenage girl working there and of course she was extremely kind and gracious and, and always took time out for us.

Speaker 4: Which the other people that work there didn't really do. So it was, she kind of made us feel like we were visiting a friend and that's how we sort of. And that's how we sort of met. So, um, yeah, it's just, uh, it, it happened the way it happened. It's a, it was what, how did you then did become a business relationship? That's at least the way that she tells it. How would you say that you kind of worked with the compassion says, well, I came out to bc and I was kind of trying to make my living out here. And I was brokering cannabis, buying and selling cannabis, and I knew a lot of people, so it was very easy for me to succeed in a, in a very quick way in the sense that because I knew all the right people, uh, and I also knew people who were interested in purchasing cannabis.

Speaker 4: So I was brokering cannabis. And at the time, of course the BC compassion club was just about to start. I was a grower. I was one of the first growers for the BC compassion club, along with another friend Romulan Joe. And we would sell our cannabis at a loss to hillary because we couldn't buy cannabis that good for the price. We were selling it to her. Uh, so it was kind of, the relationship always was like that with the club. It was, it was never something that you keep in mind. The back then the club was for terminally ill patients. It was if you had headaches, if you had arthritis or even like a multiple sclerosis or a glaucoma even, you were not getting a licensee. We're not getting the ability. Sorry to go to the Compassionate Club. The compassion clubs stood up in the beginning really just for terminally patients, so there and there was a lot and there was a lot of sick, sick people, so the vibe was the vibe was pretty serious, you know, to try and make profit off of that just seemed like, Ooh, that's, Oh man, you're going to go to hell if you do that.

Speaker 4: Like you just can't make profit off of this. So my relationship from day one was to not make profit off of the compassion club. Hillary of course, introduced me to a, not a ton, but definitely some key people that I ended up working with in the following years with cannabis and cannabis sales and I just felt like the way the business was an introduction like that was invaluable. Often people charged $100 for every pound that was moved between the relationship to make a, to introduce people like that, but Hillary refused any type of profits on cannabis whatsoever, which was another sort of real sign as to the level of high integrity that this woman has. She comes from a nice family in a very nice area, west Vancouver, and she moved to East Vancouver in a not so nice area and didn't live in, in, in, in a nice home or have a even a car or, or extra money, and she chose to be selfless and to give so I could really get behind that. So I always felt like the prophets that she was saying no to a through relationships that she had introduced me to, I made a point on making sure that a lot of that profit was, went back to the club. She obviously always thanked me for that, but I kind of would always put it right back on her and say, really, this is, this is your generosity, not mind. So please, please understand that.

Speaker 3: So and, and we're talking about kind of the early days of MMA are take us through, you know, understanding that a significant portion of the audiences is American. Um, give us a sense of cannabis culture gives us a sense of the cannabis economy. Uh, during those days, you know, kind of late nineties in British Columbia and BC. Well, I mean the MMAR program,

Speaker 5: I was just in the late nineties, early two thousands people like remote God on it right away. I think it might've even been called exemption 56 before it was called mmar. Um, it was very, very, very few people knew about it. It was mostly dispensary's. Very few people like remote or growing their own cannabis. And I would say that the majority of the people that the compassion club was set up to help. We're incapable of growing for themselves. They were, they barely had a house or a place to call home. Some of them were borderline homeless. They were unable to even take care of themselves, let alone try and grow this plant. That takes a lot of nurturing and caring for many months to, to see it through to the end. So, you know, the club was essentially, even though that this program was developing, it was, it was really the social disobedience, civil disobedience of Hillary black, you know, alone, who decided that she was just going to be like, you know what, I'm not.

Speaker 5: This is ridiculous. Like, and, and look at her now like she's just, she's grown into this, you know, beautiful woman that is representing both sides of the community. Very few people represent both dispensary's and licensed producers and because she's the only one because she represents truly the patients and the patients. If you represent the patients then you support the lps and you support the dispensary's. You cannot possibly pick one over the other if you support the patient. So let's just remember that if you're choosing one side over the other, then you, my friend are not choosing the patients.

Speaker 3: That's exactly right. It's all about access. That's a, that's it. Have said that myself. Yeah. You know, we had as far as. Sorry, go ahead. No,

Speaker 5: you, you please. Well, I was just going to mention that we had irving Ervin Rosenfeld. He's one of two surviving federal exempt. These in America. It's a very almost closed program. Him and lv Moussaka are the, are the two survivors. Um, we had him on Hash Church not too long ago and it was interesting because, you know, he gets the Mississippi 300 joints a month and they're absolutely low quality four percent plus. They used to grind the stems and the seeds and the buds, everything into just grind ground stuff. And then roll joints that are joint rolling machine. He's been getting these tins for 30 years. I think he just went through is hundred and 30,000 government to joint and he's allowed to travel. He can travel federally all over the place with this. But the important factor was that we were all like, oh, it's so terrible that you're not, you know, that you don't have the goods that you have this garbage and blah.

Speaker 5: And we're all sitting there like we're snobs of cannabis. And he just said, hey guys, but don't forget this works and it's worked for me for 30 years. So this is what I want it. Just because it isn't what you want doesn't mean I should have what you want. And he really kind of blew us all away in the sense that that's what people need to think. If you love dispensary's, that's wonderful. And I'll fight for your right to purchase from the dispensary's and support dispensary's, but I certainly won't get behind you bashing lps because lps are going to supply cannabis to a whole other dynamic of people that aren't comfortable going to dispensary's.

Speaker 3: Yeah, no, that's exactly it. Let's, let's, let's kind of bridge the gap because I do want to talk to you about mmpr and the lps and in what your thoughts are here. Understanding that those initial thoughts are, it's about the patient. Let's not get involved in, in any kind of bickering. Um, talk about your early days of growing. You know, you mentioned that you started to grow and NBC, you're, you're a well known for your knowledge of the plant. Talk us through how you, you know, how you kind of came upon the really the kind of key knowledge that you have.

Speaker 5: Well, you know what, and it's from people you know, from people. When I initially moved out on my own at around 17 years old, uh, I moved in with a friend, jason knocked decal, and he was a friend from Winnipeg and he had been growing all sorts of plants hydroponically in the basement of his mom's house, legal plants. He even was growing legal mushrooms, so I knew right away that if I could get a house with this guy, he had the right knowledge. He didn't really have the personality to do all the other things that would be required, but I was fitting into that. So Jason really helped me out with. He taught me how to grow mushrooms, both a food and psychedelic. He taught me how to grow. He taught me to grow cannabis to a degree. I also read books and did my own research.

Speaker 5: But then of course I couldn't not mentioned Ron Hickey. Now, Ron Hickey was my original cannabis mentor. This is a man we have to spend a few minutes on. His story is so unbelievably, first of all, he has spent 11 years in federal prison for cannabis and nothing more than cannabis. Unbelievable. Stony Mountain Penitentiary for 11 years with extremely dangerous people for cannabis. This is a guy that has never weird away from cannabis. If he, if he has something to share with you, he will share with you. And he used to own a couple of hydroponic stores called nature's nutrition in Winnipeg. And when you would go in to talk to him about tomato plants in quotations, he would take you into the basement and say, listen, we don't have to talk about tomato plants. Tell me exactly. And not only that, he ended up going to your house, taking care of your plants, get doing whatever. Bending over more than backwards. I mean, the level of, beyond bending over backwards he would do for people just showed what a kind, generous, a human being that he was. And he really, he taught me how to grow cannabis. Uh, you know, in a real ocd level that sort of started me off on this whole road. I don't think I could have ever become bubble man. Uh, if it wasn't for Ron Hickey.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, well, two questions there. You, you say ocd, but you mentioned your dad's work ethic and how you have kind of that same tenacity, if you will, um, you know, what is it, where is it? Does it come from your parents or does it come from Rhonda? Is it a composite of everything? Because you know, you're intense man, right?

Speaker 5: Well, it, it comes from. I always say this about people that need like a clean space. There are people that want to clean and there are people that have to cleaned and how to have to is the OCD and I have a little bit of that half do and in the way that I get my message across in the way that I do my work, it's super intense. It's super passionate driven and it's what I think people connect to and why that I'm sort of gaining a level of popularity or at least my show, a hashed church, which is much bigger than me. It involves a beautiful panel of, of wonderful cannabis, uh, experts and efficient autos. So it's A. Yeah, it seems to me that the time is right.

Speaker 3: It does seem that the time is right and I think you are a, you are right that uh, you know, passion is going to, going to open up people's eyes and minds to a two year message. Um, you mentioned, uh, the moniker bubble man. He said I never could have become bubble man without Ron. Take us through. How you, how you gained the moniker?

Speaker 5: Well, you know, I, I gave the moniker myself, but I guess what I meant by that, like when I named my company in 1999, there was already a bad company called isolator. So I wanted to make sure I didn't use any of that type of ice. Oh, later name in any way. So I noticed that the bubble hash or the hash was melting and bubbling and it was something very different from Third World and port I'd ever seen. So I wanted to distinguish the differences and I named it bubble basically because it was bubbling in the bowl that led to the bags being called bubble. And then I needed an internet name for overgrow in cannabis culture and all these websites. So bubble man seemed like it certainly wasn't a very cool name to choose. I'll tell you that much. People thought I was like 60 and like overweight, just from the name they always just picked.

Speaker 5: They were like, wow, I never pictured you the young and skinny. Like I picked you kind of an old fat guy. And I was like, oh, I guess it's the name bubble man. It's got to be. That's the second time you, you, uh, you mentioned cannabis culture and Mark Emery, um, you know, talk us through your, uh, you know, maybe the early days with mark and, and why, you know, your take on, on his voice. Well, yeah, you don't mark. I have a very unique take on all of this because I, I, I've been intimately close to that whole community for this whole time since literally since hempy see since the nineties when mark first started and I got to watch and meet Dana and Chris and all of these guys have known them 20, 25 years. And so for me, I always thought that I loved mark's tenacity.

Speaker 5: I loved the way he just would not be silenced by anyone and I loved the way he funded his own projects. He started this whole new thing of funding activism. Activists were being paid because of mark emery. When mark emery threw a party, it was epic. It was like the greatest cannabis gatherings you could ever go to where mark is because he would blow so much money to make sure that that party was an and people of course lost sight of it. They would say, oh, he's ripping people off. He's charging. It's like, yeah, well he spent $50,000 on lawyer bills for Americans last month. He just send money down. If people got busted, he just send money down. No questions asked. 10 grand, five grand, 15 grand. I watched him give away millions of dollars and never like he, he never bald. He was never a baller.

Speaker 5: He never had a fancy car and a ball or apartment and he was always like humility. That guy. He would. That's not. I don't know. I don't think he would know what to do with a nice car. No, but what I'm saying is a lot of people assumed that's what he was doing, you know, oh, he's making millions of dollars. It's like, yeah, for the community, you idiot. He's like putting it into decriminalization and legalization and a movement. His magazine was the first that recognized my photography. I was trying to sell my photos to high times and people are like, ah, nobody wants to see closeup tricombs. And Mark Emery was like, I'll take them all. You know, he, he, he gave a lot of money away. He stood by his convictions. He went to prison. So Michele and Greg wouldn't have to. Michelle obviously passed away as she would have passed away in prison, which is what she told the judge had they put her in prison. She ended up with cancer and she died while mark was in prison. It was all really just a tragedy. But uh, he stood by his convictions. He never ran. And you kinda gotta give him props for that. Hmm. Absolutely. So, you know, back to you, because we're talking to you and

Speaker 3: you know, we talked about old mma or days and, and you know, the, the MMPR comes along, um, you know, the past couple of years. Um, what was your initial sense when, when this was starting to get talked about and, and it looked like this was going to happen?

Speaker 5: Well, you know, I'll tell you, my initial sense was I need to get my mma are licensed immediately and I got my mma or license right at the end of the whole mma, our license. I got mine literally like I think there was 12 days left and then you couldn't get them anymore. And I, I, I could have gotten my license many, many years prior. It was just a very lazy thing and they made it, they made it easy to be lazy because doctors didn't want to support it. They made it difficult. They made it feel like you were doing something that was wrong. Most people don't want to feel like they're doing something that is wrong. And that's why still to this day, a lot of people, you know, like my own mother, she's afraid to go get a prescription to use mmpr because she knows her doctor won't get behind it. And I think that between, between Health Canada stifling these lps with ungodly rules and the doctors a stalling the whole process by not, you know, it's, you took a hippocratic oath to do no harm. So you're not going to prescribe a medicine that literally can do no harm.

Speaker 3: Well, there's a lot a kind of linkedin there though, based on, you know, them and their license and uh, you know, Health Canada and not being a 100 percent behind, um, you know, cannabis as medicine specifically, which is ridiculous. Right? So it's like, it's so ridiculous. It's like them making like a new, uh, oh, we're going to have gay marriages, but only super homophobic people can, can do the ceremonies, were going to get the most homophobic people to marry these gay. It's like I don't get it, I just don't. Yeah, I mean it's clear that, uh, that, you know, the, the, it's being worked on. And we talked about it on, on, on the panel there at, uh, at Lyft Expo. Um, you know, they're, they're going to do the rewrite it in August. Let's get to, uh, to your thoughts on Mmpr, uh, what, what, what do they have, right? You know, from bubble man's perspective. Let's do that.

Speaker 4: Okay. Well, I mean, I think it's right to have great companies come in and purchase a license and, and have, be forced to, to abide by standard operating procedures that Health Canada puts into, you know, this is a profit margin that's based on protecting the end user. So I'm, I'm totally for the LPS and I'm totally for the MMAR program. I'm totally for people growing their own cannabis. Now unfortunately we've left out the, the middle and that is why this black market isn't kind of coming over and there's this weird sort of gray area and there's this division of fence that's been built, uh, an fence that's created this. Oh, lps on one side. And dispensaries on the other side. We need a tertiary, we need a tertiary licensed. We have a mma are licensed personal license that gives you a license not to put patients in front of you so you can pay your mortgage, but to grow cannabis for yourself, it's not, it's not to sell anything.

Speaker 4: You don't sell anything when you have an MMA. Our program, and I'll tell you all the people that wind about that program getting, getting closed, I said, well, why do you think they're closing it? You're all selling your weed. You're supposed to be using it and, and, and it, it really affected all of the marketplaces. So let me have my personal license with no operating procedures forced on me because I'm only using it for my own person. Perfect. That's one type of license. Then the far end of the stick. LPS, major rules, microbial testing, bacterias, pesticides, the whole nine yards. Excellent. Absolutely. Those are going to be sold through high end for a, um, a dispensary is like a, um, pharmacies. Now the tertiary license that I would engage in would be the people who are a part of the MMA are, who are exceptional growers and want to grow more than just for themselves, allow them to enter into the game, whether they're going to be growing cannabis that's being sold, uh, to um, lps or sold to dispensary's, give them a license that somewhere in the middle, like a craft cannabis type thing where they, they're still abiding by the rules, but they don't need to have $8, million dollars invested to play in the game.

Speaker 4: That's a cuts off access. We don't need to cut off access. We need more access.

Speaker 3: So when we need safe, safe patient access. So we've, we've talked to around dispensary's during this, this whole conversation. Um, you know, BC has a regulated dispensaries at the city level and they, uh, the dispensary's though are not part of the MMPR. Toronto obviously just had a bunch of dispensaries get rated. Um, so, uh, number one, um, do you, when you mentioned that tertiary license, you're not including a dispensary or you were saying you were going to sell to the dispensary. What's your take on specifically the BC, the BC, I and I, I, I think that you're medicating, but as a BC dispensary, the BC dispensary's what uh, what is your take on how they can fit into mmpr? Well, I think they should be a part of the tertiary license that, that third license that's not mma are or mmpr would be the d are the dispensary one or whatever. So you're going to need people to be able to grow under that license and you're going to be able to need people to distribute whether you want to separate licenses or whether it's one license that gets both things. I don't know. I'm not worried about that. I just say give us more, give us,

Speaker 5: give us more.

Speaker 3: Yeah. So. All right. So here's, here's what, uh, what I want to talk to you about. I obviously I'm coming from the US. I came up to Toronto, I happened to be in Toronto, uh, just hours after the dispensary rates. And I came up with the understanding that you guys were federally illegal medically and everything was fine. You know, we have our dispensaries in BC. No one really worries about them and we've got a community that works. We've got an economy that works, a couple of economies and coming from theU , s with Colorado having different rules. Then Washington having different rules than California, you know, we all just get along and everything's fine. It's not perfect, but it's okay. Yes. Here's what my takeaway though was whereas the BC dispensary's are regulated at the city level, the Toronto dispensary's are not regulated and that questions that safe patient access. What are your thoughts on, on what happened with the rates there?

Speaker 5: Well, I mean, you know, keep in mind it's like, it's like when you call out the dispensary's, you can't lump them all into the same category. I'm brushing with a broad brush and I followed or paint. No, no, you're not. I'm just saying myself. I'm just saying when I see it, it's like, same with the lps because you know there was the one lawyer that went on and said a bunch of terrible sound bites and he basically ruined it for all the lps. Now everyone thinks the lps are lobbying the government to bus dispensary's. I'm trying to explain to people, listen, if you think that Toronto Police are listening to licensed producers, you are on drugs, they health candidate. That's that. Those two things can be mutually exclusive, but, but go on. They have no sway is what I'm saying. I've been at lps when Health Canada shows up for one of their secret, we're going to check out your facility and trust me, it's not a buddy buddy situation.

Speaker 5: They do not have the sway that I think that dispensary people think. So I think that a lot of those dispensaries were started up probably in the last 30 days. They were profit driven. If you look at the price on the menus, I didn't look at all of them, but I guarantee you they're probably making 100 percent markup. So that means they're buying a gram of shatter for 50 to $75 wholesale and they're selling it for 100 to $150. They're making double their money and that's not very compassionate, especially when the whole activist dispensary argument is that Lps are too expensive.

Speaker 3: Precisely. So, you know, how, uh, what are you doing, um, you know, in your day to day to kind of educate the cannabis culture community to, to make that important distinction? You know,

Speaker 5: I just have conversations, I have conversations with them. I spent like most often people are surprised and people think I'm super pro lp and that's really not the case. I'm just super pro cannabis. So I've been to lps like when people are bashing on them, I'm like, listen, all it is is like a dream grow. It's like a dream situation. If you could have one of these licenses you'd be doing back flips. I don't know why you're upset about this, you know, this is an amazing thing. So it is talking through it. What about folks on the ground? I mean, is, is it, um, how black and white is it dispensary versus LP? Um, with Toronto Dispensary's being wrongly lumped in with BC dispensary's because those are two different things. Well, keep in mind, yes and no. 100 of the, of the 200 dispensaries that were in Toronto, a 70 to 100 of them were were people from BC who went out there in the last two months and opened them.

Speaker 5: They were very, very recently opened in a huge majority of them were opened by people from BC. Now I also don't think it's bad like what those guys want to do is just sell cannabis and hash products at a profit and I don't think that's bad. I think that they should just do it under like a recreational store, like stop putting patients as your shield in front of you, like stand up for cannabis and your belief in it. Like it's not a bad thing. You don't have to be sick to use it. Absolutely. But, uh, don't. I'm in the same respect. Don't say that you're selling medicine if you're not really just in that record, very recreational market. Just be in the recreational market as well. And this is the, this is the problem with the lack of medical or Saudi recreational allowance in our country right now.

Speaker 5: California is going through Oma, au , m a, and now a lot of people like we must fight Oma. It's just prohibition and then the hardcore is like Chris Conrad, that people that go and our expert judge witnesses in court to try and help families from being destroyed and ripped apart by jail time. They're saying, listen, this medical defense is no Bueno. It's only good for people who have a medical defense and all these other people are plugging and clogging it up. We need to have an adult use. We need to have six plants, a small amount of cannabis that people do not get fined or jailed for. And so that's what [inaudible] all about. And it's amazing to see how many people are saying, say no to it because all it is is a foot in the door. It's better than worse. It just change it in the next year if you don't like it.

Speaker 5: But for God sakes, it's better than not being allowed to have those six plants. Yeah, no, absolutely. All right, so you know, you're, you're this, uh, this kind of, this advocate and you're kind of this activist, but you're also this kind of this businessman, right, to talk about, you know, what you're doing with the brand. Oh, okay. Well the brand, you know, obviously I've been wanting to sell my brand here in Canada, but there's no mechanism in place for me to do that. Like my father said properly, a lps aren't allowed to really advertise, so there's no use on them signing a brand name like myself to make their product because they can't advertise it. The dispensary's would love to sell my product, but I don't feel comfortable in that market because there's no mechanism in place that protects me, federalists federally. So here I am down in the US where there are mechanisms in place.

Speaker 5: So my brand signed with united cannabis. They're are partners with me in another venture that I have going in Jamaica called cannabinoid research and development. That's a, a company that we've applied for licensing down in Jamaica for a variety of things, from research and development to herb houses, which are dispensary type places. Uh, to, uh, growing and breeding facilities as well as processing facilities. So we've applied for all of that with crd. We've signed a deal with united cannabis. This is all public on their website. You can check it all out and I've also signed personally with my brand for America with United Cannabis and they represent my brand down there. So I take care of the quality control and I make sure the right people are getting hired and I make sure that the sop is being followed and that my tools are being used. And Tony, my, my partner basically he, he's down at harbor side running the lab. He's extremely busy with united cannabis. He's got their pronoun that they do a which nurse? Heather and I spoke about a cannabis culture that day and he's got his blue river terpene. So we're also, which I'm doing up here in Canada now, blue river turn blue river extracts Canada, which is pure terpene, isolation's. Not Pure Turpines, but sorry, terpene profiles. So a complex profile of 15 to 20 or more turpines that uh, you know, that has that beautiful cannabis smell.

Speaker 5: So you a relationship with harborside, that's obviously a good one. One of the story dispensary's and in the U. S yeah, I thought it was great. I thought it was a great dispensary to start with. That was the first dispensary in the U S to release the bubble man brand. And so we have, we have Roslyn, we have full melt, uh, we will have dry sift soon and then we have a variation of collaborations between the bubble man brand and the Blue River turpines where we add these, can these terpenes back into the product. So we have terp sift, uh, and terp melt and Terp Rosin. And these are, this is some next level stuff in the world of cannabis extracts. The flavor profile of course, the importance of Turpines and how turpines modulate the effects of phytocannabinoids is just being really learned papers or just being written by different scientists. But, uh, we'll see a lot of great information come out in the next five to 10 years about terpene, a modulation of phytocannabinoids. What, what's your take? Let's say you're talking to someone that has never heard of a terpene before. How would you it, how would

Speaker 3: you describe it in what you're talking?

Speaker 5: I would say that, you know, you could get into the science and mentioned that they're hydrocarbons and this, that, and the other thing, but real simply what I said I would say is they are the beautiful smells and flavors that you smelled daily in the forest, in your food, on the vegetables and the fruit. All of these things are turpines and they create the smells that we, that we have the relationship with all of these different things. When you smell something, generally it's going to be a terpene and whether it was a secreted out of an essential oil secreting gland or whether it's growing right in side the, the, the fiber of the actual would like some cedars excretes or oils in there. Would they are essential oils. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Alright. So thank you for taking us through that. As, as, as far as the, there are a few, uh, you know, I wouldn't say there are many, but there are definitely some that have been in this for 20 years. You're one of those people. Um, you're also mentioning firsts as you go here. It's the first dispensary to have the bubble man, Brent. So, uh, in, in many ways we're at the very beginning in many ways. You've been doing this for 20 years. Where do you think this whole thing is a on a, on a timeline, you know, you've, you've been in it for so long, but you're also just starting in many ways. And here in Jamaica you mentioned what's your sense of time and, and uh, and where we are with cannabis.

Speaker 5: I think we are right at the end of prohibition, much like the way the Seagram's family were a bunch of gangsters who were running from the law for decades. And they were, they were the, the time that is right now is the time that you are no longer considered a criminal. There is no stereotype about you being a criminal and the fact it's going to be quite the opposite. The success and whether it's a monetary success. I'm not so much worried about that, but I know that the success will be explosive in the form of radical openness, of sharing these ideas and getting this knowledge out there and getting people to realize that this is a good thing. I, I prophesize in less than 10 years, that we will have the word essential placed in front of Fido cannabinoids because essential oils, a story, essential amino acids. They're essential because we require them.

Speaker 5: We need them for the building blocks of life, and coincidentally enough, we use them to endogenously produce cannabinoids inside our body. Um, those, those two things, essential amino acids and canabinoids. They both exist in the cannabis plant, in the secreted seed oil and the resin as well as in a woman's breast milk. And not just a woman, but any female animal of any type on the planet produces a endocannabanoids and essential amino acids. So the fact that the cannabinoids didn't get the essential name put in front of the word, the way amino acids did, I think that that was a mistake. It was a very good mistake for them because it helped them almost outlaw this plant across the world.

Speaker 3: Uh, almost at, well they did for quite some time. But, uh, it seems to be a, we seem to be turning the page. It's a, as you just mentioned, right? Yes, absolutely. All right, so we, uh, we do three final questions, marcus, unless there is something that you, uh, that you have to say that we haven't discussed just yet. Is there anything that I missed, do you think?

Speaker 5: Hi, I'm not quite sure that we missed anything. I mean, we mentioned Hash Church. That's a big thing that everyone should be checking out on bubble man's world. Other than that, I think, I think we're good to move on to the three questions.

Speaker 3: There we go. All right. Final 30 questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. The first question is, what has most surprised you in cannabis? The second is what has most surprised you in life? And the third question is on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what is a, what has most surprised you in cannabis? You've got your 20, 20 plus years in. What has most surprised you?

Speaker 5: Oh, that's an easy one. I'm about seven years ago, I photographed stunk men. Sam's infamous dry sift. Now this was the dry sift that I first smoked in 1995 with Robert Clark at the Cannabis Cup in Amsterdam. And right before he licked the bowl he said if it don't bubble, it ain't worth the trouble. And then when he lit the Hash, it turned to a liquid and drip through the screen. And I had never seen anything like that. And it really kind of led me down this road. And in fact, when I finally started my company, the logo that I used, my motto was, if it don't bubble, it ain't worth the trouble. And that's actually how I met skunk men, Sam, because he wrote me an email and he said, hey, where did you hear that logo? And I said, well, I heard it from your friend, I know who you are based on your email and if you want I'll stop using it or give you credit or do whatever you would like.

Speaker 5: And that was sort of the beginning of our friendship and he was another mentor to me. Very big inspiration. Obviously we, I mean, you could talk about that guy for, for. He's forgotten more about cannabis than most of the cannabis community collectively will ever know. And I don't say that lightly. Yeah. And so, you know, years ago he discovered a technique to produce 99 percent gland heads, which is what bubble bags do. But they do it with water. He figured out a way to do it without water. So it's like a, like a dry method. Uh, it's very secretive method. He's never shared it with anyone. And about four years ago, he just, out of the blue decided he was going to share it with me. He asked that I don't share it with anyone because he's, he's literally given so much of his self to the cannabis industry, uh, with all of his cultivars that he developed from the skunk and on all of these different breeding works that he did.

Speaker 5: Of course, he was responsible for the breeding at Gw pharmaceutical. Uh, a lot of stuff this guy has done. Uh, he showed this to me. It by far was the most shocking thing I've ever seen in cannabis. It blew me away. It blew the back of my head right off. I can tell you that it made me look at life completely differently because I realized that if a secret like that could exist about cannabis, than even deeper, more profound secrets could exist on esoteric meanings of life that could drastically affect the lives of people. It really, it was almost frightening because you just think, you know, most everything and I can assure you, seth, that you do not and that there are things out there that are, that would blow you away if you could learn them. I am totally with you, which is, you know, a great foray into the, uh, or Segue, if you will, into the, into the next question.

Speaker 5: What has most surprised you in life? Oh, most surprised me in life. Well, I guess what's most surprised me in life is that as I learned about manifesting my reality, what surprised me most in life would be the fact that when you're manifesting in your life and you're trying to create your reality, the manifestation that you are trying to create very rarely comes in a recognizable form. Instead, it often shows up as an obstacle and this obstacle is disguised as an obstacle. It's actually an opportunity. And so I think that's what surprised me most is that this, these opportunities show up as obstacles and if we can recognize those obstacles as opportunities, you won't miss the manifestation that you've worked so hard on. So the final question, uh, then, uh, and, and, uh, you know, I'll have to listen back to that, uh, to make sure I understand concretely how profound you just were.

Speaker 5: But the final question is, um, on the soundtrack of your life on a named one track one song that's got to be on there. You know what, I'd have to pick one of the most recent ones I've, I've been working with some reggae artists and sort of trying to inspire, um, some of the updated cannabis lingo to appear in some of their latest songs. And so I have a producer friend down in Jamaica by the name of Tim Dub and another friend by the name of Mitch and Montreal and they've hooked up some great artists with some, a couple of articles that I wrote over the years and they're teaching them about the try and the CB one and CB two. So it's hard to pick one because I mean, you got richie spice, you got lieutenant fire, you got rest slick, you got John Mason. But recently they all did. Well. Three of them did a rhythm called the full melt rhythm, written being Patois for rhythm. And probably one of my favorites out of the three would be luton fires, sweet tri combs. And I'm telling you if you'll want to end your podcast with a song, I have

Speaker 4: no, no problem either sending it to you or playing it right now. It really is a nice little track. Well then a kid. Do you think we can find that online? Just to make sure that we abide by any licensing issues? Oh yeah. I have permission to use it from Luton fire. That's why I offered it. I have difficulties with my youtube channel. Obviously I can't use any music that is, uh, where, where you're not allowed to. Right. So, uh, this was one that we would be allowed to, um, to. Oh my goodness. Oh, we'll definitely put it on. We'll absolutely send it my way and we'll put it on a right about now. Marcus a bubble man. Thank you so much for your time. Really appreciate it. The conversation. Hey, thanks for thinking of me Seth. So sweet. Tricombs is coming up,

Speaker 2: but first we've gotta thank Marcus Richardson bubble man, appreciate his time, his history, everything that he's done and is doing a appreciate Landon Longstein from infusion factory. Interesting to hear him again. Coming out of the shadows and into the light. So very much appreciate your time. Thank you so much for listening and now enjoy some tubes.

Speaker 6: No, please place to rush this because it's got many, many years. Monday.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.