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Ep.178: Lilach Power, Giving Tree & Oscar Velasco-Schmitz, Dockside Co-op

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.178: Lilach Power, Giving Tree & Oscar Velasco-Schmitz, Dockside Co-op

Ep.178: Lilach Power, Giving Tree & Oscar Velasco-Schmitz, Dockside Co-op

Of Giving Tree Dispensaries, Lilach Power gives us an on-the-ground account of the Arizona cannabis economy.  She shares how Giving Tree has grown along with the medical program and discusses future growth to that end. Lilach is kind enough to take us through her military service as she grew up in Israel and every Israeli citizen must serve. She’s brought her laid back Israeli approach to the Copper State.
But first, Oscar Velasco Schmitz has a lot to share about the state of affairs in the State Washington which is great as that’s precisely what we’ve asked him to do. He looks to put a silver lining around the news coming out of the  Evergreen State.
Oscar Velasco-Schmitz followed by Lilach Power.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Lilac power of giving tree dispensary's Lilac power gives us an on the ground account of the Arizona cannabis economy. She shares how giving tree has grown along with the medical program and discusses future growth to that end. Why? Like is kind enough to take us through her military service as you grew up in Israel, every Israeli citizen must serve. She's brought her laid back Israeli approach as you'll hear to the copper state. But first Oscar Velazco Schmidt says a lot to share about the state of affairs in the state of Washington, which is great, and that's precisely what we've asked him to do. He looks to put a silver lining around the news coming out of the evergreen state. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends. And the word economy, Oscar Velazco. Schmidt's followed by my lack power. Okay. All right.

Speaker 1: So Oscar Valasco Schmidt's, uh, one of the most involved names in cannabis. And I mean that based on your advocacy work, as well as the fact that there are so many syllables, quite a few. So, um, you know, you're, you're one of the guys that's been operating in, uh, in Washington state for a while. So I kind of wanted to get your sense of, of what was going on because I know from you that I'm some good, it's happened, some bad has happened and a whole lot of in between. So, um, just give us a sense of what your operation was prior to July first and now what your operation is following July first. And then I'll go ahead and follow up with some questions. How about that? Sure, that sounds great. So, um,

Speaker 3: so prior to July, first the medical, uh, the medical market was being served by a, by collective garden access points and, uh, these access points where essentially a place where a patient could come in for cure their medical cannabis from their collective garden or from a collective garden that they were a contributing their resources to capital being one of those resources. Uh, the law, uh, that went into effect 50 slash 52 and House bill 2136. I'm essentially changed the definition of what a collective garden was, which no longer provided for, uh, for the statute that, that allowed for the collective gardens to exist. And um, and again, this is under policy. This is medical cannabis, a commerce under policy, not a, not state liquor and cannabis board regulation. Uh, so what it effectively did was it closed down an entire market that had been in existence for over five, just over five years.

Speaker 3: Um, and uh, what comes of this, right? Markets shift a one provider changes. It's either the same good or a similar good, uh, but in this case it was a similar good, not the same good, because they're separate supply chains. So the medical cannabis, uh, the medical cannabis supply chain, again, was through collective gardens and since those gardens closed that, that chain essentially stopped existing. What does this mean? Well, it means a number of things on a, on a number of different levels for, uh, for the supply side of medical cannabis. That production just stopped, as I said, nobody. Well, very few people, I guess maybe there are still people operating under under collective garden, a commerce, but, but the risk would be too high I would say for, for the average, for the average business person to go into a simply because there is no shield, there is no statutory shield a or I would find it a very difficult one to, uh, to come to a way where if you're conducting commerce with collective garden that you would be allowed to anyway.

Speaker 3: So productive before. So supply chain production, uh, that essentially has stopped completely. And from that, since the supply is coming through, what does that mean? It means that if you were a, if you're a, an access point, a retailer, you have no more product to be able to provide your market. So it doesn't make any sense to stay in business, which was a, an, and also there was enforcement specifically in the city of Seattle. Uh, the office of financial administration. I think I may be getting that acronym wrong. Far Fas, financial and administrative services. I bigger part was the office. Uh, did a round of enforcement and around, of, uh, of, of reaching out to businesses that were in existence, uh, without a state license that we're operating as collective garden access points and essentially saying, Hey, well, well, I essentially, they would literally say this, but you know, we're going to come and work.

Speaker 3: We're going to come in, bust you essentially if you're open after July one, uh, we decided to close and we actually made our anniversary, uh, the Solstice, June 21st, uh, well before the 31st deadline. I'm sorry. Uh, yeah, June 21st. Not a natural lifers, right? So anyway, what is left. Okay. Uh, and again, what are the ramifications for supply side for the retailers? Now let's talk about the consumers. What happens to the consumer? So the consumer's, uh, for the last, at least five years had been trained into a paradigm of commerce that was this access point or these access points throughout Washington state, specifically in Seattle. So they're used to a specific product you used to a specific experience environment, so on and so forth. So it's a massive shift for the consumer of medical cannabis in, uh, in Washington state. They no longer have this thing that they relied on, that they trust that was, uh, that was, you know, I don't want to make any claims by any stretch, but a lot of people claimed that they were, uh, they were effective for whatever condition they were, uh, they were helping to, uh, to treat or to have some kind of effect on.

Speaker 3: And uh, okay. So now where's the consumer left? Well, the consumer is left with now a paradigm in, under, uh, under the state regulations and those are the recreational stores and potentially some with medical endorsements. Looking to hear some of the challenges to that. Are they the same products or comparable products that are being provided to the consumer on the recreational side? In some cases, yes, I would say half if not most of the cases. No. And you have to look at the big picture. Really, the, the trust that gets into the, the, the, the, the products that were, uh, that were actually being used. No, they're not the same unless that producer in the medical market transition to a state regulated production, a paradigm. If that's the case, and if they decided to port over their production methodologies, their product lines, then yes, the consumer was able to get the same products.

Speaker 2: Lilac power of giving tree dispensary's Lilac power gives us an on the ground account of the Arizona cannabis economy. She shares how giving tree has grown along with the medical program and discusses future growth to that end. Why? Like is kind enough to take us through her military service as you grew up in Israel, every Israeli citizen must serve. She's brought her laid back Israeli approach as you'll hear to the copper state. But first Oscar Velazco Schmidt says a lot to share about the state of affairs in the state of Washington, which is great, and that's precisely what we've asked him to do. He looks to put a silver lining around the news coming out of the evergreen state. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends. And the word economy, Oscar Velazco. Schmidt's followed by my lack power. Okay. All right.

Speaker 1: So Oscar Valasco Schmidt's, uh, one of the most involved names in cannabis. And I mean that based on your advocacy work, as well as the fact that there are so many syllables, quite a few. So, um, you know, you're, you're one of the guys that's been operating in, uh, in Washington state for a while. So I kind of wanted to get your sense of, of what was going on because I know from you that I'm some good, it's happened, some bad has happened and a whole lot of in between. So, um, just give us a sense of what your operation was prior to July first and now what your operation is following July first. And then I'll go ahead and follow up with some questions. How about that? Sure, that sounds great. So, um,

Speaker 3: so prior to July, first the medical, uh, the medical market was being served by a, by collective garden access points and, uh, these access points where essentially a place where a patient could come in for cure their medical cannabis from their collective garden or from a collective garden that they were a contributing their resources to capital being one of those resources. Uh, the law, uh, that went into effect 50 slash 52 and House bill 2136. I'm essentially changed the definition of what a collective garden was, which no longer provided for, uh, for the statute that, that allowed for the collective gardens to exist. And um, and again, this is under policy. This is medical cannabis, a commerce under policy, not a, not state liquor and cannabis board regulation. Uh, so what it effectively did was it closed down an entire market that had been in existence for over five, just over five years.

Speaker 3: Um, and uh, what comes of this, right? Markets shift a one provider changes. It's either the same good or a similar good, uh, but in this case it was a similar good, not the same good, because they're separate supply chains. So the medical cannabis, uh, the medical cannabis supply chain, again, was through collective gardens and since those gardens closed that, that chain essentially stopped existing. What does this mean? Well, it means a number of things on a, on a number of different levels for, uh, for the supply side of medical cannabis. That production just stopped, as I said, nobody. Well, very few people, I guess maybe there are still people operating under under collective garden, a commerce, but, but the risk would be too high I would say for, for the average, for the average business person to go into a simply because there is no shield, there is no statutory shield a or I would find it a very difficult one to, uh, to come to a way where if you're conducting commerce with collective garden that you would be allowed to anyway.

Speaker 3: So productive before. So supply chain production, uh, that essentially has stopped completely. And from that, since the supply is coming through, what does that mean? It means that if you were a, if you're a, an access point, a retailer, you have no more product to be able to provide your market. So it doesn't make any sense to stay in business, which was a, an, and also there was enforcement specifically in the city of Seattle. Uh, the office of financial administration. I think I may be getting that acronym wrong. Far Fas, financial and administrative services. I bigger part was the office. Uh, did a round of enforcement and around, of, uh, of, of reaching out to businesses that were in existence, uh, without a state license that we're operating as collective garden access points and essentially saying, Hey, well, well, I essentially, they would literally say this, but you know, we're going to come and work.

Speaker 3: We're going to come in, bust you essentially if you're open after July one, uh, we decided to close and we actually made our anniversary, uh, the Solstice, June 21st, uh, well before the 31st deadline. I'm sorry. Uh, yeah, June 21st. Not a natural lifers, right? So anyway, what is left. Okay. Uh, and again, what are the ramifications for supply side for the retailers? Now let's talk about the consumers. What happens to the consumer? So the consumer's, uh, for the last, at least five years had been trained into a paradigm of commerce that was this access point or these access points throughout Washington state, specifically in Seattle. So they're used to a specific product you used to a specific experience environment, so on and so forth. So it's a massive shift for the consumer of medical cannabis in, uh, in Washington state. They no longer have this thing that they relied on, that they trust that was, uh, that was, you know, I don't want to make any claims by any stretch, but a lot of people claimed that they were, uh, they were effective for whatever condition they were, uh, they were helping to, uh, to treat or to have some kind of effect on.

Speaker 3: And uh, okay. So now where's the consumer left? Well, the consumer is left with now a paradigm in, under, uh, under the state regulations and those are the recreational stores and potentially some with medical endorsements. Looking to hear some of the challenges to that. Are they the same products or comparable products that are being provided to the consumer on the recreational side? In some cases, yes, I would say half if not most of the cases. No. And you have to look at the big picture. Really, the, the trust that gets into the, the, the, the, the products that were, uh, that were actually being used. No, they're not the same unless that producer in the medical market transition to a state regulated production, a paradigm. If that's the case, and if they decided to port over their production methodologies, their product lines, then yes, the consumer was able to get the same products.

Speaker 3: W what are some of those pro, you know, not to, not to product drop, but uh, shout out to some of our, some of our partners marries medicinal. They were in the medical market. They are a, a, they are a topical product, a transdermal, a product that is now available in the state licensed businesses. So those products did poured over. I, you know, I don't know, I have no insight into, uh, into the funding and capitalization or even business savvy besides that, they, besides the front of what I see the products that they provide, um, but I'm assuming that they had the, uh, they had the resources to be able to do that or we're very, very lucky in how they were able to do that into the regulated market. So, you know, you look at barriers that are veteran place, uh, for, for production to come in and again, this is, this is to speak to what, what products our consumers able to able to access now in the new, uh, in the new licensed a paradigm in Washington state.

Speaker 1: Yeah. We've had Nicole Smith on. So we'll, we'll maybe ask her exactly. Terrific. Absolutely how that went down. But um, what, what sense are you getting your, you're doing a good job and thank you about, you know, sharing the supply chain right down to the consumer and how all of this has really dramatically changed. Um, what about, uh, anecdotes from your colleagues in the space that are now I'm still operating versus those that aren't because you, you kind of toggled the line. You had a shop that did close but she's got a shop that's open, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah. And so, uh, the shop that closed was our medical co op. Sure. And the shops had stayed open. They were state licensed at the time. Yeah. And so those, you know, it's a completely different paradigm. Again, a separate supply chain, a separate set of licensing for the medical co op. We did have a city license to operate. The city of Seattle was very, very forward thinking in 2011 and, uh, together with a couple of other industry colleagues and uh, and these not only compassionate policymakers on city council, the city attorney's office in the mayor's office, uh, we managed to put together an ordinance that provided for, um, for safe access to medical products by the medical markets in, in the city of Seattle. Uh, again, you spoke to you, you know, we were able to keep two of the shops open that we have because they are state licensed,

Speaker 1: so that gets to this, um, you know, uh, remember way back when, when we had the, uh, the lottery system for that state license system. So you as an operator in the medical space for a number of years, um, had no leg up on anyone else in the lottery system in getting those new state licenses.

Speaker 3: That's correct. Yeah, that's correct. It was a pure lottery. Yeah.

Speaker 1: So talk about the loss of property from the medical shops that have been running for the past five years or so. Uh, that simply cannot operate based on the fact that they did not, uh, you know, uh, get in on that lottery.

Speaker 3: It's an interesting. Um, that is a very interesting question. I'm going to preface this with I am not an attorney. Sure. Shake. Take inspiration from your colleagues and take advice from your lawyer. Then it is your job to evaluate whether that is good or bad advice. We're just looking for inspiration from you. Exactly. Here's the inspiration. I think it's going to be a function of how, of what the intellectual property was structured as a to begin with. And I'll leave it at that. For the folks that are business savvy that understand this, they'll know what that means for the folks that are just coming into this. I encourage you, talk to an attorney and do a lot of reading yourselves about, uh, uh, there's, there's no better input than your own eyes and ears and the wisdom that you may have from a friend to be able to guide you in a right direction. So get that wisdom, guidance and do your own homework. Um, uh, again, you know, to answer your question, it's gonna be a function of how the intellectual property was structured. Did it live a, did it live in the entities that we're undertaking a, uh, this medical cannabis commerce worthy in some other vehicle that's going to be the real defining point of or, or I think it's going to be one of the, of the thresholds of the intellectual property crossover to a different paradigm.

Speaker 1: Sure. And that's, I mean, you know, you are not a lawyer, you stated that, uh, but you did a good job of giving the lawyer answer, um, as, as far as the softer side of intellectual property, just, you know, bud tenders and a operators that aren't helping patients were, as they were before. Um, you know, what are your thoughts on that being on the ground in Seattle?

Speaker 3: Okay, so here's what we have, uh, and, and this is a great segue to, to be able to finish what I was, what I was talking about with consumers. So currently, if you do not have a medical, uh, medical medical cannabis consultant, a certification as a bud tender, uh, you are not allowed to talk about the medical benefits of cannabis. And even so, there are some limitations. Uh, the, the, the Department of Health together with, uh, with the liquor and cannabis board here in the state of Washington have rolled out a program, uh, by which a medical cannabis patients authorized medical cannabis. Patients who have, uh, who have authorization forms from the Department of Health through their doctor, uh, can register at the retail shops, uh, with the Department of Health. What does this do? It allows them, it allows them to have access to medical cannabis. And I'm going to put this in quotes and I'm going to explain what those quotes mean.

Speaker 3: Okay? They're allowed to have access to medical cannabis and discuss medical cannabis in these retail shops. Okay. In quotes, what is medical cannabis? At some point you have to realize that a plant is going to grow and it's going to provide some set of, uh, uh, some set of molecules which are cannabinoids that a human is going to ingest and they're going to have some kind of effect with their endocannabinoid system. Okay. What does that all mean? I'm either going to get, I mean, they're going to get. You're going to get high from this, right? I'm just speaking in a, you know, a cultural nomenclature. I gotcha. I'm going to get high when it gets stoned for. I'm going to have some kind of a palliative effect from this. I'm going to have some kind of a relief from this. Those are two very, very different intentions of using cannabis, but it was the same plant, potentially was the same plant.

Speaker 3: Right? So at the end, you know, I'll give it, I'll give you an, uh, an analogy. I can use a Napkin to either write a note, write in that thing has now become a, a, a bound contract that, uh, that, uh, that sue ellen and I signed and there you go. And somebody recorded it. It's now at the clerk's office, you know, Sue Ellen and I are now business partners. Okay. The napkin can be used to wipe my whiskers, you know, because I just had a delicious veggie dog, you know, whatever. It's just, it's, it's the same Napkin, right? So, medical cannabis is cannabis being used as a for medicinal purposes. So in theory you do have access to medical cannabis. Is it the same production? Is it the same strain? It, is it the same cannabinoid compound? Uh, those are just the, uh, the physical production, supply chain, uh, constraints.

Speaker 3: What are the regulatory constraints? Okay. There are a, there are different sets of regulations for what the liquor for, for what the state, a regulatory body deems can be called medical cannabis and can be talked about as medical cannabis. These regulations come with separate cost structures, higher cost structures, a smaller lots to be tested. Larger test sets to be tested. Um, some would argue this is safer. Well, as a consumer of any kind of product, shouldn't you have similar cross structures? Shouldn't you be allowed to have very, a similar safety checks? What are these safety checks a threshold? Again, you know, I, with a consumer, with your listeners, with you even, you know, this is, this is going to require patients, you know, this is an entire new paradigms that is being a defined. It's still being defined here is there are a number of barriers including regulatory barriers, uh, economic barriers, um, and as this normalizes both within society, within the Market Vale, you know, they, they will become, if there is pain right now, I don't want to, I want to make that very, very clear.

Speaker 3: There is real pain from real medical cannabis patients who no longer have access to the, uh, to the products that they, that they knew and that they trusted and that they went to, whether it was a store, whether it was the garden, where they got it from, or the baker that they got it from, or whoever it was. Um, there is pain there and there is a gap, at least for us with dockside co op transitioning, transitioning the offering that we had to the medical cannabis patients that we both served and to new patients and to other consumers that are using these products. We try to do our best by providing a mapping or at least a comparable mapping of medical product or have a collective garden, Washington state collective garden, medical product, you Washington state regulated product. And I'll have to be honest, they were, there were times when we didn't have a direct mapping that we could provide to folks.

Speaker 4: I'll give an example.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. This is it as the perfect example. There was a firm and I am not remembering their names and I apologize to them for that, uh, that they provided a, like a chewable type of, uh, uh, of a modality. It was like a, it was like a, a, a, a chewable hard candy. Uh, that was, uh, a, a, a hard gelatinous chewable.

Speaker 4: And I understand the term that you understand the term will come up with something better. But for now, uh,

Speaker 3: it was that. And we haven't been able to find, we haven't been able to find a, a, a producer that is providing the same product. Why are these things important? Well, there are aids patients, uh, that have a very, very difficult time swallowing. Okay. For whatever reason, whatever they are, whatever. They're not just states, patients, a number of different folks where they're going through chemotherapy, uh, some kind of a, a radiation treatments. Um, whatever the ailment. Maybe they had a hard time swallowing and these, uh, this modality enabled them to suck on this thing and uh, and draw out the cannabinoids that they needed from it. Right. Okay. That's really difficult. What do you do, you know, how do you substitute these things? Um, you know, some folks were coming online, folks with, uh, with, with access capital, they're able to bear the costs there. They see that it is a good market to get into long term. They want to establish a brand, uh, for medical products and, and the medical market.

Speaker 1: So where, where does that put you in? I mean, where does that put us

Speaker 3: at both of our shops, both in shoreline Washington and in the Sodo neighborhood of Seattle. We both have medical endorsements and we have over half of our staff that have certifications. What this has meant is that we, as a, as an, and this is partly why we got into this to begin with into the indicator is to serve cannabis, both patients and general consumers, you know, is this wellness overall. Yeah, absolutely. Um, and uh, and so we made, we made this a quite sizable investment to get our folks registered as, as a medical consultants. Good. And yeah, exactly. You know, because why not? Why wouldn't we want to serve them? You don't want to put it, you know. Yeah, yeah. No, no. What are you, you don't want to use a medical patients as a stepping stone that that's just wrong, you know.

Speaker 1: So what, what is the feedback from the front lines? Do you know those, those newly kind of a, a certified medical, uh, folks, you know, on those front lines, what are you hearing from patients? You know, it's not perfect, but what, what is, what is the bright side?

Speaker 3: I think, uh, I think you have mixed, uh, mixed feelings. One is, you know, it's very emotional to go away from a, from a retail experience that you knew and loved and trusted, right? This is winning the hearts. This is really winning trust. So consumer, um, and some people who, you know, maybe have the luxury of being more flexible, they're very happy with the offering. So it really ranges, you know, you have, you have lots of pain, you have, you know, I'll, I'll, I'll, I'll be quite honest. A lot of what we've heard from folks is, hey, I don't want to be on a, a, I don't want to be on a database of any sort because maybe they have a, you know, maybe maybe they have, they have the right to privacy and they want to maintain that. Right? And this is, you know, philosophical, not just a to cannabis but to uh, the information age in general.

Speaker 3: Um, and I can see those arguments perfectly fine. What does that mean for them? It means if they are not registered with the state, uh, they don't have the tax break and it's a, I think it's a modest tax break, uh, as you know, the tax structure in Washington state for the regulated markets are 37 percent excise tax and then the sales tax, which depending on which jurisdiction you live in, the state is somewhere around 10 percent. So what the, what the patients in Washington state now get for registering with the state is they get a sales tax exemption. Uh,

Speaker 1: but they still don't pay that 37 percent, but they don't have to pay the 30,

Speaker 3: which is really, I, you know, if, if I had my, most people I think a would say if they're really, if they really are patients that are registered with the Department of Health and have a department of health documentation, they should also be exempt from that 37 percent. It's essentially a syntax. The way that I see it. And, and going back to this, the intention of cannabis of cannabis use, whether it's need or whether it's want. I think you should provide that subsidy. It's essentially a subsidy of, of those that are using it as a need. Um. Anyway, that's my, uh, that's my soapbox.

Speaker 1: Yeah. No, I mean, that's, that's a, that's why we brought you here.

Speaker 3: The other, uh, the other thing that the medical patients get when registering is that they get access to higher dosage products. The products that they need a state license store. Again, well, are those products being produced right? Well, are the producers are incentivized to produce? No. The cost structure is higher for them versus recreational producers. So that needs, that needs to be reconciled.

Speaker 1: A post haste in Olympia. That's breast please. Yeah. Alright. Well listen, you know, uh, that, that, yeah, that gives us a good overview. I really appreciate it. And I'm coming up to a, to Seattle to kind of check it out for myself and talk to more folks. But in the interim, I'll guess I'll ask you a final question. Uh, you've answered this before, so it could be the same answer. Could be different on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 3: You know what? I think a strange fruit by Nina Simone.

Speaker 1: Oh Wow. That's good to check it out, man. Absolutely. Oscar Velazco Schmidt's. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it. Looking forward to seeing you in Seattle a couple of weeks.

Speaker 3: Thank you seth. Take care. CCS.

Speaker 2: This episode is also supported by hoping and feel open and feel is the nation's original cannabis law firms since 2008 established in Colorado. They've since expanded into 13 states, Central America and Puerto Rico. They serve as industrial hemp, regulated marijuana and ancillary businesses. Hoping to feel is truly a one stop shop for cannabis businesses. They focus on regulatory compliance and General Business Council services. They have lawyers in house who can serve all business needs. Go to [inaudible] dot com for more information.

Speaker 5: Okay. Lilac power

Speaker 2: giving tree Arizona. How many of these things are true? So.

Speaker 5: Okay,

Speaker 2: so you, I mean, you have one of the best surnames, the best last names in the business, but uh, this is, uh, this is a married name, if I'm not mistaken. It is. Which is the only reason

Speaker 6: I agreed to change my name because they. Because you got power and my first name is lilac. So, um, I'm a flower power. Our power. Look at this. It's perfect for the industry. Right?

Speaker 7: All right, so it immediately folks who are tuning in to the fact that it doesn't sound like you're from Arizona.

Speaker 8: I'm not, I've been here for 10 years now. So almost. But. No,

Speaker 6: but no. Where, where are you from originally? I'm from Israel who are bright days. So yeah, they don't know that I know that, but we're going to come back to that.

Speaker 7: I want to make sure to, to cite it. And uh, let's get to giving tree, you know, um, Arizona, you guys have two locations, uh, things are going well for folks outside of Arizona or even inside of Arizona. It gives a sense of what the operation is.

Speaker 8: So in Arizona, we've been a medical cannabis program for about five years now. We are vertically integrated, so we do everything from grow, extract and dispense. We have now almost 100,000 patients in Arizona when we opened three and a half years ago there was 30, so growing and uh, in a good way we have about 90 something dispensary's operating right now. I'm all over the state and they're about to give you more licenses and hopefully you have a great panel and November. Okay.

Speaker 7: So let's start with the last thing you said. Hopefully go recreational. How much are you paying attention to polling and what's happening with the uh, you know, with the ballot initiative for adult use? It is currently when we're talking about August of 2016.

Speaker 8: Right. So I am paying attention but try not to get too much into it. I think Arizona will be one of those states that it's 50 slash 50 percent that it will pass. We're going to be those watching it, you know, a couple of days after really waiting for the last votes to come up. It was the same with medical, but I think people have seen how it works so well. And they're gonna it's gonna pass.

Speaker 7: Okay, good. All right. So as far as the polling, it's 50 slash 50, that's a little too tight for my comfort. Uh, so we'll try to get somebody on from the, uh, from the ballot initiative to, to speak to that. But in the meantime, let's talk about a medical. You say you do everything from grow dispense to extract. Um, has that been for the past three years or did you add pieces as you went along?

Speaker 8: We started with growing definitely. Um, we start growing few months before we opened the doors for, for uh, the dispensary, but extract was follow the but a later. So it took us a little time to get the trend, to get the knowledge, to get the funding to breathe a little. Yeah. So, but it's been good. I mean we don't do edibles, but we do capsules and oil and sprays and suppositories and hash as dry surf. So everything around it edibles we have left, we buy from other companies.

Speaker 7: And at what percentage of your business, if you're uncomfortable and don't want to share, don't. Uh, but what I will ask the question, what percentage of your business is coming from as extracts now that you do have that up and running?

Speaker 8: It's growing every month, which is very exciting. I think people are very excited about capsules for example, just to have the right dosing, no dietary restrictions and no calories. So, uh, I think people are getting more and more into it, especially people that are used to like take this once a day. Um, but right now we're about 10 percent for extract.

Speaker 7: Okay. And, but it is on its way up exponent. Definitely. Yes. And so, uh, I heard this rumor that a in Arizona there are indoor grows. So are you one of those?

Speaker 8: I am a, I am, unfortunately, I am a little embarrassed to say, but you know, we, we kind of uh, a growing in the street and we are learning from our mistakes and we are working on a fabulous greenhouse in northern Arizona as we speak. So

Speaker 7: not for long. So you are going greenhouse?

Speaker 8: Yes, we are. Okay. I mean that's when it's Arizona, look at the sun.

Speaker 7: That's what I'm saying. So when, when, when, what's the goal? I know, you know, as far as construction and everything in between, uh, you know, timelines change. But currently when are you hoping to start growing in the, uh, in the greenhouse?

Speaker 8: So I'm hoping plants in the facility in January. Okay. Yeah. Right.

Speaker 7: And you have to separate grows for each of the dispensary's or is it one girl? Currently?

Speaker 8: Currently we have one. We have the indoor facility and now we're working on the second one.

Speaker 7: And then you'll keep the indoor facility and add the greenhouse or you go 100 percent greenhouse.

Speaker 8: No, I think we're going to keep it mostly for a more of a research facility. Uh, just, you know, doing different experiments on plants and a really tight environment is a very easy way to do it. So we'll keep it right. But not for production,

Speaker 7: not for production. Will go to the greenhouse and enjoy that. Beautiful, Wonderful Arizona Sun. Can't wait. It's a dry heat. Lilac. It's a dry heat.

Speaker 8: It is, yeah. It's a good place to grow.

Speaker 7: How does the, you know, uh, weather patterns? How does the, uh, how does it all stack up the climate, uh, to, to Israel, to your homeland?

Speaker 8: So Arizona in a weird way. It's kind of reminds me of Israel. The north of Israel and north of is actually snows or rains. It's, it gets cold. There's four seasons. It's more green. And then the south of Israel, which is kind of I guess not the south of Arizona, but where we are in Phoenix is dry and desert and not fun.

Speaker 6: Yes. Which part of the country are you from? I left them Haifa before

Speaker 8: I moved to Arizona.

Speaker 7: Haifa is beautiful, right? All right. On the water.

Speaker 8: It is, it is. So it's right on the water, but it's also on a, I guess he'll, what you would call it here. We call it a mountain in Israel. Uh, so you don't get the humidity. Just get the amazing breeze and the grid view.

Speaker 7: So why would anyone ever leave such a beautiful place?

Speaker 8: Hm.

Speaker 6: Now I just, I, uh, I

Speaker 8: military. I actually went to New York City where you're from and loved it and stayed for a little and then uh, met my now husband in New York City.

Speaker 7: All right, well before we get to New York City, you did just a let us know that you were in the military and for those who don't know, men, women alike need to spend at least one year in the military. Do I have that right?

Speaker 8: Yes. It's mandatory for men and women in Israel, but women's serve close to two years and men do three.

Speaker 7: Oh, excuse me. Has that been updated or do I just have it wrong? You just have it wrong. Okay, good. So this is why I tell every Israeli woman that without question, she is tougher than I am because I have not even approached any sort of military service. I appreciate those that have. So give folks a sense as much as you can. Um, you know, you're a young person, right? You coming out of high school, when you do your military service, what is that like for such a young person?

Speaker 8: So I think because it's in an Israel, it's mandatory for everybody, it's part of life, it's part of what you think about doing. If in the United States that talk about prom, we talk about the testing you had to do for the military and where you want to go and what you do you want to serve in and, and it's, it's just part of what we do in Israel. You can't get a job if you didn't serve in the military unless you have kind of a physical mental disability. It's, it's, it's high. You pick people to work for you of what they did in the military. So

Speaker 7: yeah. And how much, how much reporting? Is there another words, you know, I did x, Y and Z in the military. How open is that conversation?

Speaker 8: It's very open. Um, you know, I don't think there's, especially when you're applying for a job in Israel, people will know by the units you serve and kind of what, what you did already. And some people will not say much, but you'll know that it's because they serve in a certain unit.

Speaker 7: Got It. Alright, well then go ahead and share with us what, what, uh, what type of work did you do in the military? Not that we're going to know what's what,

Speaker 6: um, I was like if I wasn't

Speaker 8: the air force and I trained the guys on singer muscle, which is a shoulder ms dot o against their plane.

Speaker 7: Okay. So you know how to fly a plane.

Speaker 8: I know how to shoot the plane down.

Speaker 6: So no, I do not know how to shoot an airplane, but I

Speaker 8: do know how to shoot a missile to take it down.

Speaker 7: Got It. Alright. So you were, you were on the ground do, you were nodding like. Yeah, right, right. Okay. And when you said you taught guys how to do that, do you mean people or do you mean men?

Speaker 8: You know, when I was in the military, which I won't tell you how long ago,

Speaker 6: um, it was, it was, there was only guys in that service, so

Speaker 7: in that service. So that makes you even more bad ass is what I would say.

Speaker 6: Okay.

Speaker 7: It was like, come over to come over to flower power over here. Let me, let me teach you a thing or two. Alright. So, so you did that and I mean, what a lesson, um, did you take from your military service? You know, I'm sure there were many or at least a few. Um, what did you leave there with that you didn't have before? Whether it be mentally or physically.

Speaker 8: Hm. If I choose one thing is that people follow you much better if you say follow me instead of go do it. So it changed the way I manage or work in a team or tackle anything I do. If it's even with my kids, you know, it's kind of like, hey, let's do this together. We're all on the same boat and it works.

Speaker 7: So communicating, leading by example, but also communicating the fact that you are leading by example as you do it. Right? Correct. Uh, because leading by example is not enough. People need a little bit more, is that what you're saying?

Speaker 8: They do. I definitely think they do. I think people need to actually see you do it to kind of tested that you're capable of doing it, especially as a female. And any industry definitely, but and military or our industry to show that you are capable of doing it and that you're not afraid of doing it. And then you know, you're here for the team. I think it helps.

Speaker 7: Right. So prove by example and then go ahead and make the ask as they say in sales, I think. Yes. Yeah. Okay, cool. All right. So that's the military. Why did you come to New York? Did you tell us then?

Speaker 8: So I graduated, worked for the little and the plan was to go travel. A lot of Israelis will finished the military work and then backpack somewhere. And my parents like, well you're going to love New York, so you know, I decided to try it out and I got stuck for a while and loved it. So I spent two and a half years in New York City on and off.

Speaker 7: Well, what kind of parents are these that suggests that you go to New York City on your backpacking trip?

Speaker 8: My parents that were kind of afraid I would go to India and spent three years there.

Speaker 7: Got It. They're like, just go to the big city. We kind of figured, well, did they, did they know New York? I mean, what? Give us a little bit of background on that.

Speaker 8: I, yes. I have an aunt that lives there for probably 30 years and my parents were there and I guess just new. I'm going to love it. And I did. I love New York City. It's what did you do here? What kind of work? Uh, I was bartending just.

Speaker 7: Oh, oh. So you really got to see the city where, where did you bartend?

Speaker 8: Um, the upper east side. The bar is no longer there, but that's not really that. Well, you know, I think, well, you know, it was a second and 72nd, but before that I worked on Tansen 43rd

Speaker 7: bit more. Exactly. That's something,

Speaker 8: you know, that, that is something that's true. That's true. Yeah.

Speaker 7: Describe how about this. It rather than us just having this conversation, describe the personnel or the clientele in the, in the midtown west location versus the upper east side was a sense.

Speaker 8: Well, um, you know, hell's kitchen was a lot less proper but more friendly and the upper east, um, I guess, you know, it wasn't a fancy bar so I didn't get, oh, the fifth avenue or park people, but definitely more of the young bankers Kinda got it. Yeah.

Speaker 7: Yeah. I think that you've, you've placed it perfectly and it, it, it almost doesn't matter which decade you were bartending. That is, that remains accurate. Although hell's kitchen is now kind of, you know, starting to turn over. So whatever A. Alright. So you were bartending and then this guy. Well wait a second, was he somebody that walked into the bar and you were the bartender. You gotta be kidding me if that, if that's what happened.

Speaker 8: That is, that is exactly correct.

Speaker 7: And he was upper east side, wasn't he?

Speaker 8: He lived on the upper west. He wanted a car show with his friends and randomly just walked into the first bar they saw.

Speaker 7: Wait, he, he walked into the hell's kitchen one. Alright. So he's cooler than we thought. Okay, great. This is fantastic. And so then how does no one picks up the bartender? How, how did this happen? What happened? How did he do it?

Speaker 8: Um, that is very true. And till this day my roommate will tell you that the next day I was like, I think it gave them a number to this guy. It was, it was pretty shocking, but um, he was just cute and shy and didn't ask for my number. He just stayed. They got in at 2:00 and stayed through my whole shift and was pretty drunk at the end but still was a gentleman and, and walk me through a taxi and I gave him a number and here we go.

Speaker 7: So I'm Arizona. Really cute. He must have been really tricky with. Yes, right. Yeah, exactly, because I'm just trying to remember any of my, uh, you know, the affairs in the bar and you know, that that kind of thing didn't happen to me, but that's okay. That's okay. It takes all kinds. Where she said, did you say that he was from Arizona originally?

Speaker 8: No, he's from Dallas. So he did his friends. Yeah, he did his residency in New York and actually left New York City six month after. I met him so

Speaker 7: and he went to Arizona for his whatever.

Speaker 8: Yeah. He got the job here and you know, it was too hard to New York city to try to get out of debt and live life. So he decided to go to Arizona for a couple of years just so he can breathe again. Yeah, yeah. That was 10 years ago.

Speaker 7: Oh my goodness. All right. So obviously you guys were kept on dating and then eventually brought you out there. But why not go back to Dallas? Why go to Arizona? That seems odd.

Speaker 8: I think at that point has friend was moving here and there was a good job opportunity and he knew that if he's gonna move back to Dallas, he's never gonna try it. Anything else again? So he just wanted to try something not realizing that this is gonna be it

Speaker 7: and that is how the Israeli military bartender makes her way to Arizona, to Arizona. When, when does cannabis come into this whole picture?

Speaker 8: So yeah, that's kind of funny. So my husband is an er doctor and uh, who I call my wife, which is my business partner, she used to be, I'm an er physician and she worked with my husband and we never really had any connection until I got pregnant with my first one because before that I lived the restaurant industry and she already had two kids so it did not mix and when I got pregnant we kinda got together and my husband said you guys are gonna get along so well. And I guess we did and we were working on a different business blend, but it was a lot about kind of uh, therapies for people that Western medicine failed them and have to introduce different therapies for them to just try it out. You can't lose. And once we did the business plan, we realize that is not going to happen. So we put it aside and moved on onto other crazy ideas we had. But then one day she's driving back from work and she calls me and she said, turn on the radio. I know how we're going to do it. Do you want to open a medical marijuana place with me? And I'm like, what? Well yes, of course I do and this is how we get into this.

Speaker 7: That's amazing. So it's, it's almost like you had the business plan for a cannabis business lined up without the cannabis and then they legalized cannabis and so you just applied cannabis to what you already wanted to do. Is that a

Speaker 8: fair, very fair statement? It's exactly what happened. It is so odd because we're like, this is how we're going to pay for this. We're going to, you know, it's enough for profit model and Arizona. So we're going to take the money and put it back into the wellness center so we can offer this to patients. Like just come over here and try yoga, try massage, try, you know, meet or not your bad. Never picked up the.

Speaker 7: So. So Israel has a very specific relationship with cannabis. So maybe share what your relationship with cannabis was before the radio ad a. In other words, how is it so easy to just say? Oh, sure. Because it's not so easy for everybody.

Speaker 6: Um,

Speaker 8: yes, I think, I guess, you know, being from Israel and seeing the research, I've definitely help seeing that there is a medical benefit to it. I didn't know much about it. I think I always believed in it but never was a, an advocate like I am now seeing patients coming in and this is changing who they are and how they feel and how they function has definitely made me a true believer. But I think it was always in me. He was always like, yeah, I think it's got something in it. Let's find out why, why it's just, it's unfortunate that we can't really do that in the United States. So we're involved in Israel, the research portion of it.

Speaker 7: Well, and so, you know, we've, we've spoken to, we've spoken about the uh, Israel cannabis economy, uh, give us a sense though of cannabis culture and how it's viewed on a base level for just the populace. Just the regular people, you know. Yes. Okay, fine. We've got this science. So it's a different thing in the, in the mind's eye for, for society. But how does everyone know? How does the General Society view it if, if we're able to paint with that very broad brush.

Speaker 8: So I think everybody's kind of shifting the way they think. Even people that weren't believers or thought everybody's just wants to get high, someone knows someone at this point in Israel is such a small country. That's right. What's happening is happening on a larger scale because people here and people talk and they know the cases that has been working. So it turns them into believers and the media has been very aggressive about it and in Israel to talk about it and there's conferences and people publishing things and it's been very open. So I think in Israel there's, it's just, it's happening, but it's a lot quicker because it's a smaller community. And then on the other hand, everybody's very laid back and would want that also as a recreational option.

Speaker 7: Yeah. You say everybody's laid back. Um, and, and that's your way of saying that Israelis are cooler than Americans and I, I can take that. But, um, you know, now let's talk about Arizona and the cannabis culture there. Um, you know, it's not necessarily really out, you know, in the open, right. How would you describe it as it compares to what we were just talking about?

Speaker 8: It is probably almost complete opposite, right? It is. They really convincing and showing people that we're not a bunch of potheads setting and the back smoking joints and, you know, working on our dreadlocks, we are business people and these are patients that are coming into our facility and you know, we're very responsible growers and we're part of the community we're giving back and oldest thinks that it is important that people that are operating in this space right now will be part of, but it's, um, it's still, people don't believe they see the ad of this is the gateway drug and it's hard to get to convince them even with numbers and Colorado that it's not. So it's, it's, it's a battle, but we're winning, right?

Speaker 7: Yeah. No, uh, well, at least a kind of, uh, as, as far as the ad that you were just referencing, is that a billboard or what, what were you, what were you referencing there?

Speaker 8: Um, yes there is in Arizona and there has been a few very interesting billboards about how marijuana is the gateway drug. Have your baby's just going to eat the APOC cookie because it's going to be recreational and yeah, just

Speaker 7: do they have, do they have the tide pod? Um, billboards as well. A warning, a warning parents about a baby's eating tide pods. What is that? Yeah. So like when you go to the grocery store, you can buy tide, you know, like, um, uh, for your laundry and then you take the, the, the little packet out which is very colorful, and then you throw that packet

Speaker 6: until Andre because that looks

Speaker 8: like it looks like candy. It doesn't look like candy and still apparently parents are smart enough to not let their kids eat it, but they're not smart enough to not let their kids eat their medicine.

Speaker 7: That's weird because I would think that they would keep the cannabis in a place that was hard to get to for the kids. Whereas they keep the laundry detergent just, you know, out in the open. I'm so sorry I'm being smarmy and I'm being sarcastic. And I'm being ridiculous because it is ridiculous. The whole thing confounds me how we can have one conversation about pot cookies or whatever. Uh, and we don't see the same exact thing in terms of laundry. So I apologize. I was just having a conversation with myself.

Speaker 8: You know, I, I do have conversation about that with people, you know, people are all worried about about edibles and I don't blame them for being concerned about edibles. They do look appealing and us as people that operate in this industry, it is. Our responsibility is to talk about it to Warren about it and to talk to parents to say this could look like, you know, a gummy bear, please put it in a safe place. And I think every parent that use this, we'll, we'll think about it by themselves, but this will just be a reminder. So it's okay to have it as a discussion. It's not okay to think that anyone that's using cannabis for medicine or for recreational is just dumb and will give their kids cookies.

Speaker 7: Right? Well, yeah. And just kind of striking that narrative of, hey, take a look at this packaging, hey, take a look at that packaging, um, you know, and take a look at what we're telling our customers about this packaging and what, uh, you know, you generally do in a grocery store. So you did start to talk about how, how you share information and how it's really not as open in Arizona as it is in other places. Um, talk about some of the patients because it is only medical to date, um, that have come through. I don't mean specific patients. I mean what kind of a recognized qualifying conditions that you are treating and what folks are saying to you?

Speaker 8: Well, I think that the number one best best experience that I had was a person that is a little older than me that had a, went through a car accident about a year before he started coming to us and has been on pain medication for a year pretty much. And he came with his wife and they were on the verge of, of, of just losing it. He could not function, him and his wife did not have a relationship anymore. He was outside of the society because he was a Zombie and still in pain and not functioning and they decided let's do it, let's give it a try. Not, never used it before. And the, the gradual improvement and this person and now he's back into work functioning all good to see how it changed him, you know, and it could start with just, hey, you need some sleep, get some sleep.

Speaker 8: Your body will get energized and it could be let's control the Spain so you can, you know, function with your kids and whatever it is that has been reading, improving crones is another one, you know, are Crohn's patients have been coming and just saying things like, you know what, I ate an apple today and for us it seems okay, well whatever. But then you hear, well, for 11 years I could only eat white bright. I'm just rice and chicken grilled chicken and never have any vegetables or fruits. And I've been eating apples. It's, it's an exciting thing for them. It's, it's the small changes that makes the quality of life for those patients so much better at PTSD is another one. You know, there's those kids that I call them kids just because they're soldiers, but they're not kids. It could be any age that haven't slept in years and if you ever go through a phase that you're not sleeping, you will see how it changes your personality or emotional. You're angry or frustrated and just to be able to close your eyes and breath, let your body risk and can really do such big things and it's, it's been great.

Speaker 7: You might have, I might lean too hard here on the whole military thing, but um, you have a unique background in that you were in the military and can understand that. Whereas I simply cannot. I have no insight whatsoever. Um, can. How far can you take us through ptsd and what patients might be grappling with might be battling with. You did mention lack of sleep. Um, what else could you share from a soldier's perspective?

Speaker 8: Because I think it actually, the United States, it's even more than in Israel because in Israel this is a society of people that are soldiers, so you get out of the military and everybody has similar stories and you sit at the bar and people have combat stories to share and it's kind of black humor. Okay. Stories around a beer and here it's, they come out of the military and they have no one to talk to because you know, civilians don't understand what they went through. So talking to soldiers here, even though in in Israel I also use for ptsd, but these are kids that have seen things that it's very hard to just get over and close your eyes and not see your friend, you know, dying or, or whatever battles you've seen to be. To close your eyes and not see that running in your head and not wake up from nightmares about it and be able to just shut off and rest. And then of course they have pain as well because they so many got injured and Ken, you know, they have to live with, with opioids or some kind of pain medication that doesn't let them function and be part of society. And this allows them to do that.

Speaker 9: Yeah.

Speaker 7: Yeah. It's an interesting point. Uh, you know, of course the pain, but uh, the fact that a 100 percent of society essentially, uh, an Israel has been a soldier a. whereas it's, it's minuscule as far as percentage here. And so no matter how empathetic I am, I see. I, like I said, I simply can't understand by definition.

Speaker 8: Correct. Right, right. So this is, it's a big difference. And I think this also makes them kind of a community because it's, they're very passionate about using cannabis for, for, for military, for vets. And it, it makes them close to each other. You know, if you, if you look on facebook, they have groups for veterans, for cannabis and cannabis for warriors and whatever it is to really tell each other because there's, the suicide rate is so high and it's, it's a lot of all those things in your head that is very hard to get over and they try to share, share the news, like, try this, this is working. Don't find yourself in a bad place.

Speaker 9: Okay.

Speaker 7: Amazing. All right, well, if, uh, we do have anybody that served in the military looking for answers a go find a dispensary in a medically, you know, correct state, so to speak. Um, all right, so, so there we have it. Um, you know, the, the last thing I do want to cover is, you know, you mentioned the explosive growth that a Arizona is going through in terms of patient count and dispensary's alike. They're more licenses that are out there now, uh, you know, that application process is just happened and you know, those will be rewarded soon. Um, you know, if it's so in the, you know, kind of in the dark, uh, but it is growing so much, what information can you give us about why that might be the case?

Speaker 8: So, you know, Arizona has been medical since 2010, but we only the first one opened in 2012. So we are very, very new in this, in this market. So recreational be great, but if it doesn't happen we're still fine. We'll still growing. We're still learning so much about this industry. Colorado was 10 years medical before they moved into recreational [inaudible]. So the growth is, is, is still there. I think patients more and more patients are volunteer. Try it again. More and more patients are meeting people that have tried it or their neighbor neighborhood have tried it or the mother. I've tried it. So it's, it's definitely a movement that is happening. That's more and more people are trying it. Then Arizona is, is it, you know, even when all the licenses will be given at this point, there will be 126 in the whole state. That is still a good market for a business and being vertically integrated, you know, for us it was important because we want to control the quality and the consistency, but it's also means that your manufacturing and you're selling that, that's, that's a good business model.

Speaker 7: So as more people, uh, you know, kind of get used to it more and more people know, people that uh, are involved. And uh, there, there goes the stigma just crumbling away.

Speaker 8: Right? Exactly. You know, when we started talking and I started this business and you can see our in our mission statement, it was to remove the stigma people have on, on cannabis. And I think we're, you know, we're part of, hopefully we're proud of the change.

Speaker 7: There we go. You of course you are. So I've got a, I've got three final questions and I'll ask you, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. Uh, but first I will say thank you for the work that you're doing because every patient that you help obviously is a patient helped, uh, and it's also, you know, a one step closer to, to everybody understanding what the, what the heck's going on here. You know what I mean?

Speaker 8: Right.

Speaker 7: All right. So the, the three final questions, uh, what has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of Lilac powers life, what is one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 8: Oh, I got so many things that surprised me in this industry. I think the most surprising is how much people don't know about cannabis, but still judge it. So. Sure.

Speaker 7: Well, that's, that's people with anything.

Speaker 8: It's very true. It's very true where we're easy to judge, but it's, it's, it could be even us as operators, people judge about the way you grow or the lights that you picked or the nutrients or this soil, even though there's no standards of operation, we're all trying to do our best. We're all trying to hire people with knowledge and bring people from, you know, agricultural world into what we do and still trying to figure it out. It's very interesting to be in a, in a retail space that you serve patients. Those two are really contradicting each other, but we're trying to operate in the best way. So I mean we don't know so much if it's, if it's really about the plant or the medical thing or, or growing or just dispensing it to patients that are your clients. See we don't know so much, but we judge each other is as business operators and people judge our patients. It's just so much. Instead of let's embrace this and see that it's going the right way and help each other. There's a lot of judging.

Speaker 10: MMM.

Speaker 7: Oh, you're using those lights. Good luck with that.

Speaker 8: Exactly. Yes. So you see you can hurt it. It's, it's, it's amazing.

Speaker 7: It is. I just think, I mean, what I like about that answer, Lilac quite, you know, being honest is it could be for any industry. You know what I'm saying? So

Speaker 8: true. That's true. That's true. I come from the restaurant industry and I can tell you that chefs are exactly like growers, they are artists, they're hopefully brilliant at what they do. Most all of them are, and they always think that the other shift doesn't know what they're doing.

Speaker 7: Right. It's this month and you're using a Rockola. Interesting.

Speaker 6: Right? Exactly. Yeah.

Speaker 7: Anyway. All right. So what has most surprised you in in life? We've Kinda gone through a few iterations there. You've certainly come across a few different things along the way.

Speaker 8: You know, I never thought I would live Israel. Never, never. I mean I love New York City and thought it would be fun, you know, beginning of my twenties and it was fun. I always thought it was gonna go back to my home country. I'm very close to my family. It's, it's a different culture. So it's a, it's hard to live in a, in a different place and I never thought I would. And here I am, I'm trying to. I have a great husband and family and a great business then I'm very passionate about and I'm happy, but it's still away from home.

Speaker 10: Hmm.

Speaker 7: Well, that's amazing and it sounds like you're doing well where you are, but if you are saying that there's a bedroom available in Haifa, I'm happy to take it.

Speaker 8: I like it. Now, next time I go. Are you good? Yeah, I'm going to be there in March for the conference.

Speaker 7: Oh, sure. Okay. I might, I might actually. Yeah, a be there. We'll, we'll see. We'll see how that all goes. Um, yeah. All right, so final question. Most importantly, uh, you know, ending on a light note, if you will. I'm on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there,

Speaker 6: like my favorite song. Sure, yeah. It could be your favorite song, inspirational song. Um, Ooh. Um, I did it my way.

Speaker 7: This, this is a for how you shouldn't say that there's been an onslaught, but there, there have been more than a few or, or at least a few that have a suggested my way as their song now. Uh, I would imagine that you are, you know, down down the middle. Frank Sinatra. I did it.

Speaker 6: Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Now,

Speaker 7: do you have a, there's a, a live recording of him at Madison Square Garden where he's in a ring. They did a boxing ring and so, uh, the name of the album is the main event and Howard cosell the old a announcer, he, he announces it, so he kind of points out all the celebrities that are in the front rows, you know, as though it's a boxing match. And then brings in Frank Sinatra. Have you heard by any chance that album?

Speaker 6: No, but I'm, I, I wrote it down. I'm gonna have to.

Speaker 7: Yeah, the main event. Frank Sinatra. Yeah. That's, that's where you and others will find out that I'm a. It wasn't him that wrote a, my way. It wasn't Elvis Presley for that matter. It was Paul Anka.

Speaker 6: Yeah.

Speaker 7: That's something that you can't make up. You can't say Paul Anka and have that really be. Why would that be true? Unless it was lilac power. Thank you so much for your time. Keep doing the work and uh, you know, next year in Israel. How about that?

Speaker 6: Amen.

Speaker 7: Definitely. And there you have lilac power.

Speaker 2: Really enjoyed the conversation with Lilac. She a dove in on the personal side of things. I always love when that happens. Very much appreciate Oscar Velazco Schmidt's charming in from the state of Washington. Very much looking forward to finding out for myself what's happening up there. Thank you so much for listening. Very much. Appreciate your time. As always. Can't say it enough.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.