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Ep.183: Hempfest 25th Anniversary Recap

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.183: Hempfest 25th Anniversary Recap

Ep.183: Hempfest 25th Anniversary Recap

Viv McPeak kicks us off by sharing the difference between Hempfest 25 and Hempfest 1 as well as all that goes in to producing the inimitable event. We then have a cavalcade of guests including acclaimed actor Eric Roberts, of the Emery’s Jodie Emery, of the Endocanabinoid system, Dr. Bob Melamede, state house candidate Stephanie Viscovvich, Chief Greenleaf  and THE Ed Rosenberg. We finish the episode by sitting down with John Davis who is name checked quite often when we speak of Washington state so it was great to get a chance to say hello and hear what’s on his mind at this moment in time.

Transcript:

Our second hemp fest episode. Enjoy. Is that

Speaker 1: just finished? My brain is. That's it. And you want to go right in there? Oh yeah. See? And that better. All right. Okay. So I'm still going to be louder than you, but that's a, that's the first. That's the guy. That's what. God, I get back up there. I'll be louder than you. Yeah, sure. I mean, so here's Viv mcpeak at. We're at Heb Fest is the 25th anniversary. Have best happy anniversary. Thank you sir. Thank you for having me. My pleasure. Seth. This is only my second hand fast. This is your 25th hemp fests. Correct. Um, congratulations on getting here. How much different was a hemp fest to hemp fest? Twenty five. We know the first hemp fest was at volunteer park here in Seattle, aptly named, uh, and we had Jack Hare spoke at the first one. He spoke, he spoke at every hemp fest except the year he got a stroke until he passed away.

Speaker 1: Um, and uh, we were throwing joints out from the stage. We had live plants on the stage and that was the grunge days, right? It was at its height, uh, in [inaudible] 91. So all the bands were kind of grunge bands, all the whole crowd of like 500 people and we thought, dude, 500 people. It's huge. They all had long hair and wearing black leather jackets, you know, and flannel shirts, you know, and in the summer and cutoffs and stuff. Um, they look like they're all members of Pearl Jam. Sure. Uh, and, and people were blown away. I mean, you know, when we showed up at volunteer park in the morning, we look concerned because there's more homeless people than usual sleeping in the park. As the sun came up, we set up the Ph and we found that they weren't homeless that come from other cities and some from a few other states to be at this crazy hemp best thing.

Speaker 1: We're like, wow, maybe we're onto something. There you go. Um, and it's, we haven't stopped since then. We've been every single year for 25 years. We've been raging without stopping work all year on it. I know you do and it takes a lot. Uh, we're going to get into, um, you know, the money that it takes at the back end of this, um, but you know, as far as, I mean, how many vendors, how many speakers, you know, that, that type of stuff. Yeah. We've got six stages across the one and a half mile of waterfront expanse here in three of Seattle's most beautiful downtown parks, right on the puget sound with the Mt. Rainier and view in space needle road over there. Um, six stages. One hundred and 20 bands. One hundred 20 speakers, 400 arts crafts, food informational vendors will fill a thousand volunteer staff shirts over the weekend on 118 volunteer crews with 100,000 plus attendees.

Speaker 1: Amazing. 100,000 dollars from 500. Yeah, that's a, that's called expansion, right? That's called growth. There is a growth curve that is taking place here. Growth curve. Now you're also, you have a medical card here in. I was a medical marijuana patient for many years. I helped pass [inaudible] 92 in 1998, but I five five. Oh, two came in and then our legislature passes a 50 50 to bill, uh, and another one, a 20 something $28, 50 slash 52 is the one that we want to talk in 50 slash 52. Basically killed medical marijuana in our state have destroyed it and they shut down a hundreds of dispensaries on July third, I think of this month, July first this year, uh, hundreds of dispensaries got shuttered, I think only three or four of them, but I know transferred over to rick stores. Um, and it's, it's, and so I no longer am a medical marijuana patient.

Speaker 1: My doctor and this new law can't even write me a mech medical recommendation because they have a medical in the new program is what they like to say at what their version of it. So talk about that. What do you, what do you think and feel here? Well, my doctor is in spokane now and I can't see them on a regular basis. Um, and, and this, they've made it really complicated, you know, and if you're a medical marijuana patient, we used to be able to grow a 15 plants, now it's down to three plants, I think it is English, you are in the registry and then you can have a few more plants. We don't think there should be a registry. Uh, you know, you don't have to be in a registry to get pharmaceutical drugs or cigarettes. No cigarettes exactly or alcohol. Exactly. Um, and, and so they limited the plant count, they limited the amount of pot you could have way, way down from where we had it fixed.

Speaker 1: They basically fixed something that wasn't broken in any way. They fix something. It was, that was working and they broke it saying that they're fixing something broken because the state legislature doesn't get it and they're about the tax revenue. You shouldn't be taxed for medical marijuana. I don't think it'd be taxed or any medicine. Um, so yeah, so it's been really challenging. Uh, we took two steps forward and one step backward. You know, I, I personally didn't support I five fiber two, but it's done a lot of good. I cannot deny. Well, I mean you can go and work and drive up to a brick and mortar store right now in Washington state and you can buy some nugs and you can get in your car with a half pounds in each pocket, drive away and as long as you don't get pulled over and your blood tested for five Nanogram Dui, which is completely unscientific, you'll be fine.

Speaker 1: Um, so that's, that's huge man. I mean it's, it's big being able to go to a store and buy some marijuana. Wow. But we shouldn't have to sacrifice medical marijuana do that and we should have home grow and we shouldn't have an arbitrary and unscientific dui level of five nanograms blood level, which doesn't indicate impairment in any way, shape or form. They don't even have to prove you're impaired at all. It's just a technical, oh, he's five nanograms convicted Dui. So you don't see, um, because I'm, I'm stuck on this medical thing because that's the thing that just happened. You don't see this new program as proper medical marijuana? Well, no, not at all. First of all, the recreational stores don't necessarily have all of the strains and the oils and stuff that, that the dispensary's did, so people can, can have the right strain, you know, uh, for, to treat their dravet syndrome where their epilepsy or their cancer or whatever they're mounting their brainstem glioma and whatever it is that marijuana is amazingly, uh, effective, uh, at, at a soothing treating, treating the symptoms of.

Speaker 1: And if not, you know, I just interviewed a woman on my show, a cannabis radio, him present, uh, a woman who had a, a deadly brainstem glioma. They gave her months delivery at six children. They said you're gonna die. They had on 23 pharmaceutical drugs. She gained 200 pounds. And this guy told her, have tried cannabis oil. She started taking cannabis oil. And guess what? Her Brainstem Glioma hurt. Her interoperable tumor started shrinking on the Mris. She quit all the pharmaceutical drugs lost all that excess weight and procedures are controlled. And now her Glioma doesn't show up on an MRI. And she was considered to be healed and you know what she did last week? She moved from Washington to Oregon. She left two of her kids behind or tuber oldest kids with her husband and moved to Oregon where she gets to save her freaking life.

Speaker 1: Countless ref where she could get yes. Medical where they actually have medical marijuana is still intact. It's crazy. Yeah. But it, that is a evidence that there is legal marijuana, right? There is legal cannabis. Illegal means different things to different people. Uh, you know, playing with a game of semantics here and you know, cigarettes are legal and just go to the store and you buy them. You don't have to sign some registry or something like that, you know, alcohol. The same thing if you're, if you're 21, you go and you buy some alcohol, man, it's not a problem. You can brew it in your home here in Washington state. You can make it, you can't grow your own pot. So you know, it's decriminalized. I'd say it's in packets. Commoditized. Okay. What I'm getting at are the 25 points of, of Ham fest, right? We're not going to go through all 25, but as far as we know, I hear this all the time.

Speaker 1: Vivian, now, why haven't hemp fest, right? I mean, is it just you're obsolete, right? I mean, is it even relevant, even relevant? You know what I mean? Pot's legal, right? There's that pot legal thing again. Right? And so pot's not legal is federally illegal. The next president, God forbid who it might be, it makes me, it keeps me up at night, uh, could just make it all go away in five days. It could be no legal pot anywhere. They can shut down everything, take them about a week. Um, and that could really happen. Uh, and it's federally illegal, which means, you know, uh, and like I said, they can shut it down. There's people being busted right now all across America that the red lights behind them, their door's being kicked in, uh, and uh, it's all going to change for them. And they may lose everything.

Our second hemp fest episode. Enjoy. Is that

Speaker 1: just finished? My brain is. That's it. And you want to go right in there? Oh yeah. See? And that better. All right. Okay. So I'm still going to be louder than you, but that's a, that's the first. That's the guy. That's what. God, I get back up there. I'll be louder than you. Yeah, sure. I mean, so here's Viv mcpeak at. We're at Heb Fest is the 25th anniversary. Have best happy anniversary. Thank you sir. Thank you for having me. My pleasure. Seth. This is only my second hand fast. This is your 25th hemp fests. Correct. Um, congratulations on getting here. How much different was a hemp fest to hemp fest? Twenty five. We know the first hemp fest was at volunteer park here in Seattle, aptly named, uh, and we had Jack Hare spoke at the first one. He spoke, he spoke at every hemp fest except the year he got a stroke until he passed away.

Speaker 1: Um, and uh, we were throwing joints out from the stage. We had live plants on the stage and that was the grunge days, right? It was at its height, uh, in [inaudible] 91. So all the bands were kind of grunge bands, all the whole crowd of like 500 people and we thought, dude, 500 people. It's huge. They all had long hair and wearing black leather jackets, you know, and flannel shirts, you know, and in the summer and cutoffs and stuff. Um, they look like they're all members of Pearl Jam. Sure. Uh, and, and people were blown away. I mean, you know, when we showed up at volunteer park in the morning, we look concerned because there's more homeless people than usual sleeping in the park. As the sun came up, we set up the Ph and we found that they weren't homeless that come from other cities and some from a few other states to be at this crazy hemp best thing.

Speaker 1: We're like, wow, maybe we're onto something. There you go. Um, and it's, we haven't stopped since then. We've been every single year for 25 years. We've been raging without stopping work all year on it. I know you do and it takes a lot. Uh, we're going to get into, um, you know, the money that it takes at the back end of this, um, but you know, as far as, I mean, how many vendors, how many speakers, you know, that, that type of stuff. Yeah. We've got six stages across the one and a half mile of waterfront expanse here in three of Seattle's most beautiful downtown parks, right on the puget sound with the Mt. Rainier and view in space needle road over there. Um, six stages. One hundred and 20 bands. One hundred 20 speakers, 400 arts crafts, food informational vendors will fill a thousand volunteer staff shirts over the weekend on 118 volunteer crews with 100,000 plus attendees.

Speaker 1: Amazing. 100,000 dollars from 500. Yeah, that's a, that's called expansion, right? That's called growth. There is a growth curve that is taking place here. Growth curve. Now you're also, you have a medical card here in. I was a medical marijuana patient for many years. I helped pass [inaudible] 92 in 1998, but I five five. Oh, two came in and then our legislature passes a 50 50 to bill, uh, and another one, a 20 something $28, 50 slash 52 is the one that we want to talk in 50 slash 52. Basically killed medical marijuana in our state have destroyed it and they shut down a hundreds of dispensaries on July third, I think of this month, July first this year, uh, hundreds of dispensaries got shuttered, I think only three or four of them, but I know transferred over to rick stores. Um, and it's, it's, and so I no longer am a medical marijuana patient.

Speaker 1: My doctor and this new law can't even write me a mech medical recommendation because they have a medical in the new program is what they like to say at what their version of it. So talk about that. What do you, what do you think and feel here? Well, my doctor is in spokane now and I can't see them on a regular basis. Um, and, and this, they've made it really complicated, you know, and if you're a medical marijuana patient, we used to be able to grow a 15 plants, now it's down to three plants, I think it is English, you are in the registry and then you can have a few more plants. We don't think there should be a registry. Uh, you know, you don't have to be in a registry to get pharmaceutical drugs or cigarettes. No cigarettes exactly or alcohol. Exactly. Um, and, and so they limited the plant count, they limited the amount of pot you could have way, way down from where we had it fixed.

Speaker 1: They basically fixed something that wasn't broken in any way. They fix something. It was, that was working and they broke it saying that they're fixing something broken because the state legislature doesn't get it and they're about the tax revenue. You shouldn't be taxed for medical marijuana. I don't think it'd be taxed or any medicine. Um, so yeah, so it's been really challenging. Uh, we took two steps forward and one step backward. You know, I, I personally didn't support I five fiber two, but it's done a lot of good. I cannot deny. Well, I mean you can go and work and drive up to a brick and mortar store right now in Washington state and you can buy some nugs and you can get in your car with a half pounds in each pocket, drive away and as long as you don't get pulled over and your blood tested for five Nanogram Dui, which is completely unscientific, you'll be fine.

Speaker 1: Um, so that's, that's huge man. I mean it's, it's big being able to go to a store and buy some marijuana. Wow. But we shouldn't have to sacrifice medical marijuana do that and we should have home grow and we shouldn't have an arbitrary and unscientific dui level of five nanograms blood level, which doesn't indicate impairment in any way, shape or form. They don't even have to prove you're impaired at all. It's just a technical, oh, he's five nanograms convicted Dui. So you don't see, um, because I'm, I'm stuck on this medical thing because that's the thing that just happened. You don't see this new program as proper medical marijuana? Well, no, not at all. First of all, the recreational stores don't necessarily have all of the strains and the oils and stuff that, that the dispensary's did, so people can, can have the right strain, you know, uh, for, to treat their dravet syndrome where their epilepsy or their cancer or whatever they're mounting their brainstem glioma and whatever it is that marijuana is amazingly, uh, effective, uh, at, at a soothing treating, treating the symptoms of.

Speaker 1: And if not, you know, I just interviewed a woman on my show, a cannabis radio, him present, uh, a woman who had a, a deadly brainstem glioma. They gave her months delivery at six children. They said you're gonna die. They had on 23 pharmaceutical drugs. She gained 200 pounds. And this guy told her, have tried cannabis oil. She started taking cannabis oil. And guess what? Her Brainstem Glioma hurt. Her interoperable tumor started shrinking on the Mris. She quit all the pharmaceutical drugs lost all that excess weight and procedures are controlled. And now her Glioma doesn't show up on an MRI. And she was considered to be healed and you know what she did last week? She moved from Washington to Oregon. She left two of her kids behind or tuber oldest kids with her husband and moved to Oregon where she gets to save her freaking life.

Speaker 1: Countless ref where she could get yes. Medical where they actually have medical marijuana is still intact. It's crazy. Yeah. But it, that is a evidence that there is legal marijuana, right? There is legal cannabis. Illegal means different things to different people. Uh, you know, playing with a game of semantics here and you know, cigarettes are legal and just go to the store and you buy them. You don't have to sign some registry or something like that, you know, alcohol. The same thing if you're, if you're 21, you go and you buy some alcohol, man, it's not a problem. You can brew it in your home here in Washington state. You can make it, you can't grow your own pot. So you know, it's decriminalized. I'd say it's in packets. Commoditized. Okay. What I'm getting at are the 25 points of, of Ham fest, right? We're not going to go through all 25, but as far as we know, I hear this all the time.

Speaker 1: Vivian, now, why haven't hemp fest, right? I mean, is it just you're obsolete, right? I mean, is it even relevant, even relevant? You know what I mean? Pot's legal, right? There's that pot legal thing again. Right? And so pot's not legal is federally illegal. The next president, God forbid who it might be, it makes me, it keeps me up at night, uh, could just make it all go away in five days. It could be no legal pot anywhere. They can shut down everything, take them about a week. Um, and that could really happen. Uh, and it's federally illegal, which means, you know, uh, and like I said, they can shut it down. There's people being busted right now all across America that the red lights behind them, their door's being kicked in, uh, and uh, it's all going to change for them. And they may lose everything.

Speaker 1: They lose their home, they may lose the freedom their family. Uh, some people lose their life in the process of these marijuana bus. That's not legal to me, that's not how I say legal. That's fair. And there's a bunch of things in just our own state. We're working forward just a few of them. Uh, you know, for example, people in public housing can't smoke marijuana even if they're a medical marijuana patient. Uh, if you're a gun owner, you can't have marijuana in your home, a certain amount or plants or something where it's a federal crime and you're going to get excess years, extra years put on you. Um, let's see. Uh, there's so many things, children that are sick with dravet syndrome or epilepsy or whatever, children in school can have pharmaceutical drugs administered by the Google tool nurse. They can't take any medical cannabis in schools.

Speaker 1: Uh, there's just, there's 25 point platform agenda of what we're still working on, on our website, [inaudible] dot org on the media page and including another tab of distinctions that show how we are a community values based event as opposed to 99 point nine percent of the profit model canvas events out there. You know, here in fest we have a one and a half mile event and we spend $12,000 with medic one and Amr to bring in ambulances and medics and stuff. And we have of course our own, uh, if you have to get it, you have to get it. We have our own, uh, first eight crew and stuff like that. But the medics that come in bring these ads, their heart's fibrillating. Well, we have such a long event. We rent additional heart defibrillators so that we can happen throughout the event system. He has a heart attack.

Speaker 1: We can save their life. I can guarantee you go to some cannabis cup. Yeah. They don't have heart defibrillators. They don't have extra. They don't. They don't have first aid. Right, exactly right. A lot of them don't even have water because it's a, it's a profit model event. This getting make your money. You're out. This gets into how much hemp fest costs. We're going to send people to a hemp fest.org to donate. Please. You know, it's a lot, man. Talk about the finances. He wasn't bucks to throw this free freedom festival, we can't charge money, were constantly protected. Free speech rally that you cannot charge a turn anybody away for any reason. We're on public property. If we were to free speech event, we wouldn't get a permit. The only reason they made and they make it hard and work all year to produce this event.

Speaker 1: We have, like I said, we have 118 crews volunteers here, man, we have to train those people. We have to jump through so many hoops. You have to have a traffic plan, evacuation plan, a parking plan, a security plan, a everything, you name it, you know, and I mean, the food's got to be this temperature. You have to have three been hand washing stations for the kitchen. I mean it goes on and on and on and on. Right? And, you know, like $12,000 per port a potties, you know, 20,000 for fencing. That's what kind of bills we have. Um, and you know, they shut down the dispensary's right? They were one of our principal advertisers and sponsors with a medical marijuana dispensary. And then we thought, well, this will survive because you got the rec stores. Well guess what? Their legislature just did this, made it illegal for the registrars to advertise on public property or a thousand feet from apart.

Speaker 1: Gee, where's that hemp fest? Right? So man, the killing is death by a thousand cuts. Last year we paid $17,000 just in this park behind me, uh, for graffiti removal and stick removal and broken sprinklers that charges $130 an hour because they can, because they got us by the short curly. So we need. So we need to. And everyone knows where those are. We need to donate to [inaudible] dot org [inaudible]. This thing costs a ton. Anything, please also, they can go to a, a go fund me.com, uh, slash keep him festa alive. Dope magazine saw that we're in a bind. It rained on us last year. So bad accustomed 108,000 bucks, right? You can't just make that money up somewhere. Where do you make it up here? Know we're doing everything we can. Uh, so a gofundme.com/keep him alive. Keep this freedom festival, man, keep the fire burning, keep those nugs turning. Here's the first 25 years. So the next 25, Viv, Mcpeak Adler, my man, cannabis economics. Well, cannabis economy, chronic, yes with, with a mix with the economics of the economy and the two mikes economy hasn't mixed and we have two mics right here. I think that basically says it could elect to expound linguistic verbiage from my oratory aperture to stimulate the senses of cerebral capacitor and the central Adestra Bro Mcpeak man.

Speaker 2: This episode is also supported by Gateway Gateway is the business accelerator of the cannabis industry. Born out of Silicon Valley. They find the best startups and top tier founding teams and then provide them with seed capital. A structured curriculum proven in silicon valley. Beautiful Office space partnership deals worth over $100,000 and custom curated mentorship through an amazing network of top experts from both silicon valley and the cannabis industry. Gateway is now accepting applications for their next cohort beginning in October. If you have any questions or want to apply, visit gateway incubator.com.

Speaker 4: That'll be for another day. Right? That'd be friendly. That's it. Is this, is this Eric Robertson? This is Eric Roberts. Yeah. How we doing ham fest? This, this is my first hemp fest, so I'm just thrilled. Yeah. My son's playing here, Keaton Simons and uh, with, with this new band called backbone. Okay. So I'm here to, uh, to support him naturally. Sure. But also because he's the best thing you saw him running of his generation. But besides that, besides that, I love marijuana. Do you? Yeah. It's a great thing that, uh, that God gave us and we should all act accordingly. Okay. Do you have a stance on the drug laws as they are or you know, like how, how far in to this whole cannabis thing do you get? I've ignored the laws on cannabis in 1969. Why should I pay attention? I do not. I smoke dope. I have smoked dope forever.

Speaker 4: I gave it a year off your nine months there, but I smoked pot, you know, and uh, I, I, I do not drink at all and um, love the reefer dude and uh, and I approve of it. I mean, if the whole world smoked pot in place of drinking, yeah, you'd be a much nicer planet and there would probably be no war. There'll be less war. You would imagine if everybody had a bit of cannabis going. Absolutely. I most recently saw you never seen me, but I've seen you lots, right? That you get this a lot, I'm sure. Sure. So I most recently saw you in this new PT Anderson thing. Uh, which was great, you know, uh, I very much appreciated it while we're here talking. What was your favorite role? What has been your favorite role to date to play? You know, you're talking to a guy who has appeared in over 400 projects.

Speaker 4: That's a lot of stuff. I have like a favorite doesn't. Okay. All right. They would be king of the Gypsies Star runaway train. It's my party poker, Greenwich village lovers, a gun, a purgatory, and about four or five others. Sure. Star 80, 80 was a, you know, at that time was just gigantic. It was Bob Fosse, his last film. He had won best picture on his own son before that. All that jazz. So he was the Creme de la creme star in Hollywood that season. Right. And uh, so he made that movie and he put me in it. That's it. And it was cool. What was it like working with him? It was a dream come true because he's a tough guy is what I have heard, right? Sure. He's a tough guy. But all the things you dream about as an actor that you can ask the director of hard question and you're going to get a very intelligent answer.

Speaker 4: All the things you dream about happen when you work with a man like that and they don't happen when you don't. So, so, uh, he was a dream come true. Excellent. And he was a cool guy, man. I love this company. So. And when you say cool guy dot relaxed, right? No, he wasn't reliant. In fact, he's dead because he liked methamphetamine. So he was not a calm, cool cat. No, no, but cool. Nonetheless, he was, he was, he was an artistic example. But to be a woman in his life. No, no, never. No, no way. And it never did for it. What have you learned from relationships? If we're talking about relationships? Well, I've learned through the one I have for the past, past 25 years of my life. I've had graduate, had a wife. Actually, it'll be, it'll be 24 years this August 16th.

Speaker 4: Happy Anniversary. Thank you so much. And uh, uh, we've, we've, we've, we've been together primarily everyday for 25 years and about 15 years ago I fired everybody and I made her the boss. She's the agencies and manager. She's everything but the lawyer. Yeah. And I have a lawyer for that. And uh, and uh, because agencies don't tell, don't tell you about him fast, right? They don't, they don't, they don't tell you about the small step that you want to do that doesn't pay. They never tell you. They won't tell you that. So you don't get, they're not getting paid off that. Why would they tell you? Exactly. So, so I, I like, I like, I like camden, everybody who ever kept anything from me, right. And now I have my wife who tells me more than I need to know. Sure, sure. What do you think she puts up with, if, if that's what you're putting up with all my wife?

Speaker 4: Uh, I, I, I'm a calmer version of Eric Roberts these days, but I wouldn't want to be married to me. No, no, I not. Even now I'm always. No, now it's good. It's better. Okay. The past like 10 years it's been a dream come true. Okay. But for the 15 years before that, I was always on the road and I was always. I'll call you tomorrow. Sure, sure. And a lot of people don't like that. Are you married to? Sure. And also, you know, I, I'm 40 right? And so I know stuff that I didn't know when I was 30. I think you were a couple of years over 40 just based on when your films came out. Right? I am 42 years. That's okay. Fair enough. What a, you know, that, that, that calming that, that happens. It does happen and it happens the day their prostate slows down is the day that you get calm as human bank because you figure why fight this?

Speaker 4: My God, my prostate says I'm old. Okay. I submit and so you do and it's Kinda, it's Kinda hand in hand what now? Now you're wise. But before you realized what you used to set you off, in other words, I know Eric Roberts from the screen stuff, you set them off on screen. I'm sure. So stuff would set you off on the street. The only time I've ever played myself was uh, uh, I don't even want to say what it was because then everybody will make fun of me. But, but I don't play myself. You don't. So all these guys who are insane and who liked and new like killed women, that's not me. Well, sure. I mean sure the murder. No, no, no, but I don't, I don't even want to kill women and you don't even have that as a. and I have an ex, I mean, you know, like, you know, I'm, I'm okay with that.

Speaker 4: And uh, yeah. So okay. So then that, that, that um, you know, uh, I saw a very good friend who did pretty well with his film, the wrestler. He mentioned you when he was mad. He mentioned you a couple times. What is the, the, the strength of that relationship? Why, why? Well, Mickey and I is Mickey. Mickey and I went through, uh, the hardest project to go through cause we're playing. We're playing cousins who were actually brothers and how we were about each other and we're doing it in a place that we both were not from you. Both are not Italian. We both are not from New York, right? We're playing in tie ins from the literally, right. Who were cousins, right. Bonded. And we did bond. We bonded heavy and we, we kind of fell in love with each other as guys. I mean, I love that guy.

Speaker 4: He's really good to me and he's playing. He's my brother and uh, you know, we, we have a little bickerings down them, but that's going to happen with brothers, you know, that's it. But we love each other. You know, as a New Yorker, the energy from him, the energy from you. I wouldn't know that you weren't from New York if you told me you're from New York, I completely believe you. And that is of course a compliment coming from a New York. And I take it as one. Thank you so much. I love that because my favorite people are Brooklyn Jews. There you go. So they haven't said they're my favorite people on this planet. We, uh, we asked three final questions. Traditionally, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order if you don't mind. All right. So the, the three questions are, what is most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 4: What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of Eric Roberts? Life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. So, you know, first things first as far as what has most surprised you in cannabis, right? The lifelong user. Basically I started smoking dope as a kid in 1969. Good year by the way. You could buy. How old were you in? Nineteen 69? I was four and a half. Okay. Uh, you, you could buy, you could buy $5 worth of pot. That was a bag the size of your fist. Sure. And it was bud, right? And it was not great. But. But it got you stone. Okay. What surprised me was acapulco gold or what? What is it? At the time it was, it was, it was Mexican. Done, but. But the point is what surprised me most about cannabis is how it's gotten where it's honestly medicine now you can, you can take it in increments that you can measure and it does so much more so much more.

Speaker 4: Or, or, or, or effects this or that if you use this much as it were. So it's now. It's now become medicine. It is strong stuff now. It is not to be played with. I'm sorry. Yeah. No, we all do. From 1969 to 1999 to 2016. This is a different product. It's a whole different ballgame. Yes, he really is. That's what surprised me the most is how it's changed. What has, what has most surprised you in life? The fact that I have a marriage I'm in love with after 25 years. Who knew that was going to happen? It's working. I know and she's just my hero. I love my wife. That's, that's my biggest surprise in life. That's fantastic. Final question. Soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on their beautiful pain by Keaton Simons. Wow. I don't know that one. Well, you go to my website and Eric Roberts, actor.com. That's what we'll do is we'll link to keith assignments. Find that tune. It's got beautiful paint. It will take your life away. There you go. Eric Roberts. Thank you so much. In a pleasure, dude.

Speaker 5: I mean, you know, it's American

Speaker 4: and there's an emory is by definition. It has to be jody, him.

Speaker 6: I am here in Washington where it's illegal. I have bought and consumed legal marijuana legally. That's kind of fun. It's wonderful to see that in the. Definitely. The vibe here is great. It's one of liberation. There's no edginess that Reno breaking the law by smoking on a joint, so that's pretty awesome. It's great to see that. It's in full force and I'm very happy I'm here. It's too bad. Marks can't be right. But getting all of these criminal records erased and allowing everyone to travel freely. That's part of the end goal. So we're still working on it.

Speaker 4: We're getting there. Exactly. And so that, that's the first question, does it feel different here in Washington in relation to cannabis than it does in, in Canada in? Well let's, let's zero in on British Columbia, on NBC, on Vancouver.

Speaker 6: Does it feel different? Well, many people have been buying marijuana for a long time. So buying marijuana is like the same as it always has been and we have nice shops in Canada and in Vancouver, Toronto. But the fact that it really is fully legal and that's really, you feel it, you know, it, you can tell like it's just liberated and so everyone's treating it like a normal product. And that's probably what overwhelmed me so much of when I went to my first shop here are the only one that I've been to so far with just how professional it was in terms of branding and marketing. And you can't smell the butter, see the button, touch it, but you can get it. And there's so much of it is just like any other products that go into a coffee shop, you know, starbucks has never going to run out of beans. It's just endless, endless stock. On the shelves, and that's really impressive, but you start to see how a normalized marijuana market leads to marketing and branding and that's how one product really succeed.

Speaker 4: That's it. And you know, the grass is always greener. So we see the federal a medical program that you have, uh, and we're, we're envious, but of course that doesn't include dispenser.

Speaker 6: Right. And the medical program right now we just had the government introduce a new medical program that's almost like the old one that was found unconstitutional. So there's all sorts of problems still. And the government only gives the least it can. They were forced to introduce any medical marijuana program by the courts. So doing what they can, but it's all wrong. I mean, Canada, I'm very concerned about everyone thinks it's going to be legal and if you know, prohibition is just being called legalization that okay. It is. But that's the problem they still arresting. They're still telling the police to enforce the law. The mental health experts and the, and the addictions experts and the police, they're all the ones talking to the government both about how to legalize it. So when all the prohibitionists are drafting legalization makes you a little nervous. So we got a lot of work up in Canada still to do

Speaker 7: and and you just said a bunch. So I want to make sure I caught everything. They just updated MMPR and put in some mma our languages. Did I hear you right?

Speaker 6: It's like the old program where you go to a doctor and you get his permission to grow for yourself or designated grower. Now the problems with that program before was that many patients can't grow for themselves. It's difficult and time consuming and if they don't make a good product, it's not good medicine. And then the designated grower program was a problem because finding a great grower who's able and willing to produce for you can be a struggle and there's always the incentive to have just trying to make money, selling it in all sorts of ways. As always, that people find ways around the laws of the language is always going to be a problem. That we're not just free to grow and for you to consume as we choose. And that ultimately is the end goal. So the government is introducing this temporary medical program, they introduced it and said it will only last until legalization is formatted or whatever, but that's still many, many months away. That's still a lot of patients and a lot of people being arrested. A lot of suffering that could be avoided in the meantime.

Speaker 7: Yeah. In the meantime, as you say, people being arrested, rates happening now, from my understanding, the razor only happening in a Toronto or Ontario not happening in BC. Am I wrong?

Speaker 6: The small towns through BC that have been rated in the last year or two, maybe even more recently. Vancouver though not in Vancouver directly know the Vancouver police have always set the model for tolerance policing towards marijuana. So that's good. Right. But you know, then the city government just decides that hey, red tape can strangle someone just as good as you know, instead of handcuffs. Ken. So unfortunately we have a lot of overregulation and bylaw officers and tickets in my shops are experiencing that, but we've always struggled against them and the government is always been working against us. So we just, you know, mission goes on, same as usual, you know, the US government came and took my man away to prison. We survived. So yeah, my man, Mark Emery, you know, taken in prison for legalization activism because of his civil disobedience and using activism to change the law. That's what we still have to do it. So we'll always have to do and I'm still proud to be an activist and that's my job.

Speaker 7: I mean how much has changed. We figured that there was gonna be a change with Harper and Trudeau and I, I can hear you on the ground. It doesn't feel like a change. Have you noticed any bit of change as far as you know, the, the, the longterm outlook or not necessarily?

Speaker 6: Well, we've never had as many rates. We've seen. So that's bad. That's worse than Harper. We have the licensed producers who are under harbor. Yeah. And they're gigantic and inexpensive and they need to make money. But what I really enjoy seeing is how even they are getting frustrated with the government over regulation because they want to advertise, they want to expand into store front. So everything that we, the activists have been complaining about, they're now starting to go away. Yeah, we agree with you guys on that. This sucks. Let's get, let's change the rules. So we're seeing people who used to be. It's Kinda like the enemy of my enemy is my friend or stranger. Yes, exactly. And that's the way every industry really get gets to be when it's normalized. So we've got a lot of bumps ahead. We've got a lot of stuff to figure out.

Speaker 6: And like always with every part of our lives, overregulation is the death of business and the death of freedom if it's not going to just be by guns. So we stopped the fight against regulation because it's just a form of prohibition. Alright. So those shoulders are broader than I think. Right? You keep on. I do keep on fighting and you know, people. But then it got big balls too. So you know, it takes guts to be in this industry. I mean they rate our stores, we reopened the next day. You know, I hold press conferences that take over the police chiefs press conference that continue or activism because we have to be strong. We have to demonstrate what legalization looks like. That's the only way we've ever made any progress was breaking the law to change the law and so Michigan goes on. Jodie Emery, thank Mitch. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Take care.

Speaker 4: Nurse Heather. Oh my God. Here we are seeing you here. So it's the emphasis a week early or whatever or whatever because of like seven days in the lunar eclipse or I don't know, but that's why it sounds. Sounds astrological to me. Very confused by it all. Makes Sense. What sign are you? I'm a libra, so I try to keep things in balance. That's about all I know. Welcome to hack fest. How's it going? Good. I'm keeping my endocannabinoid system fully and check. The system is fully engaged in functioning well, so all is good here. It's another way of saying your shocker is a balanced. Those are two. Those are lines and Meridians and energy flow, which getting into all of this, I really have to introduce you to my good friend who I love dearly, Dr Bob Melamede and anyone who's out there who hears this, you're going to just start freaking out because you know how special he is, and he told me today that he has new information and I thought I have to go listen to this panel. And he started speaking and I went, wow, I've got to know more about this because he's talking about energy and Chakras and astrology are. Let's do the quick primer for whoever doesn't know Dr Bob the quick, you know, the, uh, they call it the, uh, the elevator. Uh, well I guess I'm

Speaker 8: a longterm cannabis user. I'm an old Hippie, so that actually encompasses my spirit, although I have education. I was the chairman of the Biology Department at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs and I taught a course, endocannabinoids in medical marijuana, the only one in the world for many years. I started I think in 2002 and I think kinda catching up on it. Well, that's why Colorado lead the way. You see, they got educated early. That's the reality right now, and the reality is that we all make marijuana light compounds, endocannabanoids, and they literally regularly everything in your body from conception until death. So, uh, they do a little bit. They do a lot. It's the oil of life, you know, I have, I have my religious Coptic friends in Jamaica and they say it's the sacrament. And as a person who spent my life learning about what life is and the role of the endocannabinoid system in life, I now fully understand that they're correct.

Speaker 8: I understand it from science, back based religion. My religion is science, I call it evolutionism and they're more conventional in their thoughts, but we both worked from the same principles of basically helping people move on in life and improving ourselves socially or families or communities, etc. And cannabis promotes that because evolutionarily we've always used more and more. It's the most evolutionArily advanced areas of our brain. It's the major neurotransmitter in our brain and we don't teach it in medical school. So besides the last 18 years, we've reduced it, right? Yes, but now because of what we know, a particular what I know about life, uh, it's central role has become all the more dramatic. It is an anti aging drug. I'm 68 years old, I've used it for 52 years and this guy looks 23.

Speaker 8: I start my morning with 100 milligrams of high concentration, good oil and it just changes the way you think. But because of this evolution, every truth basically when we today are getting high, what we're doing is we're experiencing how we will naturally be in future generations and because we're engaging on that, no, because we always activated that's what evolution selects for adaptation and as we adapt, we change the world around us, which means we have to adapt more. so half the population is naturally more cannabinoid endowed with respect to openmindedness, etc. Then the other half, and there are consequences to that. Yeah, the, the half that's deficient, which basically represents a more primitive humanity. They are because they don't have enough cannabinoids, they can't deal with change. Well, change is stress and if you can deal with it appropriately with enough cannabis activity, then you avoid it.

Speaker 8: So what the white and blips back we're looking people, the evolutionarily cannabinoid deficiency, backward looking people. What they want to do is they want to control everything because then they're not subject to the stress of change and then you have the cannabinoid in doubt. People who embrace change because they love riding on the wave of creativity which is the unfolding of time, which is our alive so, so if I'm paying attention here, sciences, your religion, so that might make origin of species, the old testament to your new testament. Well, origin of species. It was very limited. What I've done, I'll give you an example so you understand the severity of my mental illness on my computer. I've got 26,000 peer reviewed articles and out of those 13,000 our cannabis related and the other 13,000 or to verify my concepts with respect to the cannabis ones and to the overall understanding that I have as what is life and what is the role of cannabinoids and how do we restore health and how our existing pharmaceutical medical industry model is completely wrong on fundamental principles.

Speaker 8: The fda is insanity and uh, you know, we're looking for a revolution where people have the opportunity to express themselves by choosing what they want, not what the government tells us. You must choose from a, b or c rather, screw you. We're going to choose to start as a fundamental platform the use of cannabis because that's how we got you in the first place. So then where do you operate or some sort of a business structure to a, to your dr bob doesn't know what I've done. I retired a few years ago from the university that was a founder of cannabis science, but unfortunately they didn't do the right things because I gave them the ability not only to cure cancers, but also to fully control hiv and hiv associated illnesses like kaposi sarcoma, which is a viral induced cancer that kills the people when they have uncontrolled hiv, so we can regulate all of that.

Speaker 8: We've done it now. I have one friend, he's been using it now for four years. He's had hiv for 26 years and is an hiv drug development activist. He brought the 40,000 people at the nih when they took over the nih back in the nineties to get the medicines. Anyway, he, he had, uh, he was fully drug resIstance. He had a viral load of millions, yet virtually no t cells. 30 six dysliphidemia from using, of course the antiretrovirals. So for four years now he's off all antiretrovirals. he's only on high dose cannabis, oil and appropriate nutrition based on my understanding of what life is. And he now has an undetectable viral load. Even with the spinal tap, he's gotten rid of his dyslipidemia. His t cell count is normal, but a lot of energy meaning nonresponsive. He's healthy.

Speaker 4: I might, you know, I might be hearing things, but I do hear a little northeast and dr bob. I grew up in New York. Where? In New York? Manhattan, Washington heights. There we go. Okay. I noticed, I thought you were also exact, like the little italian in there right now. just. Alright, close. They're close enough. Close enough in New York. They're the same, right? That's exactly right. So, so, uh, when did you go to, to Colorado? Well, I went from New York to Vermont and I was in Vermont 13 years then I went to Colorado for 13 years and now I'm back in Vermont. Alright. So, uh, again, no, no, a necessarily a business structure to talk about, but do you have books out or what I have are about 80 videos on youtube and other places, all educational so that people can understand their own lives and make intelligent decisions as to what to do to help themselves be more alive because that's what cannabis is. Makes you more alive. that's it. All right. Dr bob. Thank you. So my pleasure. Take care.

Speaker 9: Das guys. We'll see you again to make the wild. Why? Why, why, why can't we now can we.

Speaker 4: Your middle name is actually hard. Yeah. Okay. So on your campaign materials, there's a big heart and so that's for your middle name. What else does the heart for it? So our slogan for the campaign, which is get your heart on a. Okay. This is your first campaign. This is my first campaign. It's a little easier to remember. My parents weren't super happy about it, but uh, you know, you got to use the word definitely. Easy to remember. I'll give you that. Stephanie vista. Vich. Yes. Running for congress

Speaker 10: but running for state representative in the 46th legislative district, which is most of north seattle

Speaker 4: and a little bit of a kenmore, juanita running for state legislature. Correct. Okay. And uh, how are we doing on the pulSe?

Speaker 10: Uh, so far so good. This is my first time out and I pulled about 13 percent going past the primaries into the general. So I'm pretty happy about that. Just learning a lot as I go. What have you learned from the electorate? You need a team, a large team of people to stay on top of it all because there's so many different groups of people in the community. It's not just the cannabis industry, there's, you know, hundreds of niches and being able to reach all these different individuals and these groups and stay on top of what they're going through. It's a full time job. It's not just two months or three months out of the year. You need to be in your community active in these social groups all the time.

Speaker 4: Excellent. And so it sounds like you're interested in doing that. You mentioned cannabis. What are the issues? What I voting for fiscal pitchfork.

Speaker 10: Wow. So, um, I started out as a citizen activists because I was a medical cannabis patients. I saw several thousands of patients use cannabis to their medical benefit. And in this last legislative session, um, Washington state passed verbiage that basically merged medical and recreational 50 slash 52. Yeah. And a really sneaky way that actually redefined medical as anything less than point three percent thc, which is a catch 22. So it's medical so long as it's not marijuana, right? So medical cannabis isn't actually even available to anybody by what they're calling it. So there is no tax breaks for patients. Um, it's all smoke and mirrors right now. And that's not how you treat the weakest. A demographic of your community. You need, we need people standing up for the terminally ill and the permanently debilitating because they can't, they don't have the energy to do it for themselves.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. I think that they are working on a tax break on the state side. So not that excise tax, but, uh, you know, to take about whatever it is. Not percent off, but uh, uh, you know, that isn't enough. Um, you're a medical patient. I want to talk to you about that. Where were you? You were getting your medicine, I would imagine from the pre. July. First dispensary's.

Speaker 10: Yeah. The all the cannabis that I had access to prior was under a collective garden model implemented by Washington state before that show patients through for patients and more patients for more patients. It was a very, um, like community pee patch, garden style feel and vibe for it and you know, some of these patients were farmers and been doing it for a while and we're very good at what they did and people knew what worked for them. So we have that established medical actually existed for 25 years before [inaudible] was implemented. So things were going pretty smooth before the carpet got ripped out from underneath.

Speaker 4: we had 25 years of everything being a going. Okay. And then we decided to rebuild the plane as we're flying it. Yes. Okay. So, uh, that's obvious, obviously one of your issues, uh, and obviously your take on what we've done here is ridiculous. Can I be so bold as to ask you about, uh, you know, the condition that you might've had or do have? Absolutely.

Speaker 10: I'm definitely not shy about that. I was injured in a car accident when I was living in southern California. Um, I was actually ran off the road by a semi truck. My car went off of a 60 foot cliff and shit. Yeah, I crunched my spine and all three positions through my hip out of place. It was really bad, you know, it was difficult for me to walk. I would lose sensation of my legs. I would fall on my face. Not, you know, you can't predict that, you know, it's no, uh, there was no like pins and needles as a warning or a precursor that It was going to give. So mine is neurological spinal damage and I looked like an able bodied individual, but you know, I suffer from chronic pain and spasticity from it as well. And most people think that you have to get high to use cannabis as medicine, but you really don't. There's a lot of alternatives to the alternatives that actually are way more common sense for people that want to get well and not want to get high. So coming up to seattle, it was like opening up pandora's box is all of these different options were available and people are so creative in this community with topicals and non-psychoactive, thca patches and all of these different things. So, um, yeah, it, it's been really interesting to see it evolve.

Speaker 7: I gotcha. I'm with you. It certainly has. Let's get back to the campaign. You know what, uh, what else do folks need to know about a bitch?

Speaker 10: Oh, I'm, I'm young. I've got a lot of vigor and vim, I, and I'm, I'm really ambitious, you know, this is my first time out. I had four days to prep running for office and I was just outraged, you know, I've, I've jumped through all the hoops. I followed all of the laws. I'm trying to get ahead. I've been trying to help people in this community for a very long time and the way that our system works right now, it makes it so difficult for mom and pop shops to survive and get by and people are threatened to be in a place where they need to lie, steal and cheat to get ahead. And you know that that doesn't mean that the person is broken, it means that the system that they're working within is broken and that that needs to be reevaluated. And so if, if we're not getting listened to anymore, I figured, oh my god, I gotta run and nobody else was running in the 46th district against the incumbents that were there. I had two open seats that I could have ran for it. And people think that politics is to the point where it's beyond our control. We can't do anything about it. Well, nothing's gonna change if nobody runs. So let that wild hair getcha and do it yourself or support other people who do that have similar viewpoints as your own that you can get behind and you'll go for it.

Speaker 7: Go for It. I love it. The how you got in. I took it as general. Was there a moment in time where you said to yourself, okay, no, no, no. This is the moment. In other words, did something particular happen to push you over the edge? It sounds like this is a general philosophy.

Speaker 10: Yeah. This is funny. You know, like when you get into politics, it's kind of like iffy about having a sense of humor or not and I've always tried to keep a sense of humor throughout the campaign. Slogan has been, if I'm not laughing, I'm losing. Right? But you know, I'm sitting in, I'm thinking about, okay, well, what am I going to really do? You know, cannabis advocacy has been a huge thing for me, but really it was about taking care of my community and the I got to know so many people in all seattle from, from this movement and I want to see better for them and you have to start somewhere, right? So I was sitting on my back porch going, gosh, what am I going to do when I grow up at 30, at 30? What am I going to do? And I was like, you know what, screw it.

Speaker 10: I'm going to run for office, right? You got to get your feet wet. It's a sink or swim type of thing and you know, I'm still breathing. I'm just treading water here, figuring things out and uh, you know, taking it one day at a time and like I said, if I'm not laughing, I'm losing some, having a really good time with it. And uh, yeah, see where it goes. Here we go. Look up stephanie viscous, which we love it. Final question for you on the soundtrack of your life named one I went to in this. Got to be on there one tune that's got to be on it. Oh gosh. There is a song called cat people by david bowie. Okay. It's really inspirational. Or we will look that up. I know bowie, I don't think I know cap people. It's really unique. Kind of like I'm a carioca holic. So that's one of my faves. Go cap people. Stephanie waskiewicz. Go get him.

Speaker 3: Yes.

Speaker 4: So viv, viv says if we interview anybody, we add an interview. This guy chief green button is what it is. Yes it is. And you, you were just on stage. You've got songs like, uh, what songs do you have? You have songs like fired up and I bake and big pharma. I think I heard big farm farmer today. Yes. Actually I started out with fired up today because it's the fast. Yeah. I got to get everybody going right off the bat just to give us a sense. What's big pharma? Big pharma is just, you know, there are a lot of, there were a lot of diseases and conditions that people have that cannabis can actually help. Yeah. Or cure. Yeah. And they don't need to take manmade pharmaceutical drugs. You know what I mean? It doesn't work for everybody, but it works for a lot of people.

Speaker 4: I've seen the results myself. There you go. Now you haven't been chief green bud forever, right? New? No, no, no, no. I was arrested for simple possession of cannabis and for paraphernalia because you know, if you got a bowl you got to charge. Right. And I wasn't treated with dignity and respect. Okay. You know, after I got done, I went home and I start. I'm a songwriter, so I started writing these little, you know, screw you type songs and put them up on a, on my space back in the day. Right. So you've been doing it for at least a little bit. Yeah, totally not eight years. And uh, some of the normal organizations heard some of the songs and they were like, well, we're having a rally down here in Texas. Sure. Up in Kansas city, we'd like you to come and play for us it was like, okay, yeah, I'll do that.

Speaker 4: And then one thing led to the other, now I'm at the 25th annual seattle him fence. That's it. That's the main stage. So it was kind of easy for you to, to just kind of figure it all out. Singer songwriter to begin with. How long you been playing music forever. Oh, since I was a kid, I started out on mandolin when I was probably eight or nine years old. My parents were musicians and they played a lot of bluegrass festivals, so they were always dragging the kids along. And so mendelian, you'd know a david grisman name, right? Yeah, totally. Alright. Who else? Who did you study? Sam bush is. He's the guy ricky skaggs plays mandolin and shorthand is he's a grasser from way back. And then of course he had fame in the country round, right. And uh, went back to his gospel and bluegrass roots.

Speaker 4: Ricky skaggs. Not to be confused with boss scaggs. No. Two different guys. two different guys. So as far as the music is concerned, this, uh, this happens to you, you know, you have a, uh, a little bit of a run in with the law and here's a new career for you. Amazing, right? It really is, you know, marijuana arrest leads to new career would be the headline. so what's chief a greenbelt stand for chief actually means to smoke. A lot of people come up and they assume automatically it's native and they're like, why aren't you native american? Right. And I'm like, well, why couldn't have been like a, you know, a chief financial officer. He's not american chief or the fire department chief of police.

Speaker 9: Ooh,

Speaker 4: no, we don't want to say that. Yeah, that's what it is. Chief of police sitting out here, like in Washington, it's like, oh great man, he liked your job, but in Tennessee they're like, oh fuck, I got weed on me. Oh, can I say fuck on the year? Sure, you can do whatever you want. I mean, people's lives are changed every day, you know, over consuming cannabis. You're approaching a serious subject through humor. Yes. You're the daily show of cannabis music. I have a parody called. It's only a weed. And in the song this guy gets arrested, thrown in jail. His parents don't get. I'm an attorney. he doesn't make his bail. They don't pay his bail. He loses his job and in the little bridge or the chorus. Well there's a guy named baba looking after him. Okay. So I mean it. And now I'm hearing the humor, but that's what I'm hearing the humor.

Speaker 4: Well, what I'm saying is that sounds like a, just a regular story. It is. Yeah. And it's a sad story. Yeah. And then at the end it talks about how, you know now anytime he goes to get a job on its application, you know, are you a criminal? I got caught with a little bit of pot, right. Well, chief screen, but we will certainly check out. Seth, I appreciate you taking time with me today. Absolutely. Ended up live long and prosper. How about that? Oh wow. You're going to do some star trek references. I'm a big saifai guy. I do. I do like science fiction stars. Go onto the planet. You go green, but enjoy your travels. Thank you so much. We'll talk to you soon.

Speaker 3: Alright. Long as you asked.

Speaker 7: Okay. Okay. We've got. We got together. You couldn't be more perfect. I know that she tells me that all the time. Does she know this is your wife? Yes. Okay. How many years? More than three. More than three. So it's either less than three or more than three. I like it. I like it. So it's more than three on this. All right. You've also been cultivating for more than three years. Is that fair? That's true. Alright. Have been cultivating for more than three years. The question is what do you ask ed rosenthal and so the, the. I think the answer to that is definitely what is the best piece of advice that you can give a nation grow.

Speaker 11: The best piece of advice that I could give anybody before they start any endeavor is to get the wisdom and information of those who have already gone through either that experience or that project either by doing something successfully or unsuccessfully, and that saves a lot of time, effort, inventing the wheel and many other problems and never think that you're a master if you're studying your subject. Oh, he's realized that you're a student and that there's always people who know more than you or no more than about another subject than you that you're interested in. And who knows. And there are always ways of finding out information. So before you may go into any kind of project, that's what I would do and that's what I do do.

Speaker 7: I appreciate that. And I, that begs the question, who were your guys and gals who, who did you take in before you began?

Speaker 11: I studied, uh, uh, a horticulture a lot. Okay. And I both, uh, experimented with a little bit but more than I read about it a lot and so I was able to use the information that I had from my knowledge of actually working in it as well as reading about it.

Speaker 4: And then how does a guy like ed rosenthal fine cannaBis if he's in a horticulturist, a pure horticulturist. How did you find this flower?

Speaker 11: I found this flower in college. Okay. What'd you go to school? Uh, I first went to. Hunter college is now lehman college in New York city.

Speaker 4: And so I know your accent. It's a New York accent. That's right. You're from. Where are you from in New York to the bronx. So the buggy down. I don't think it was called the boogie down when you were in the bronx or was it, what's that? Oh yeah, that's the bronx. Yeah, exactly. All right. So 100 college. Well, and you were studying there? Yes. Okay. And then where did you go after?

Speaker 11: I love through various other schools. And then I followed tim leary in 1967 and he said, turn on, tune in and drop out. So I did.

Speaker 4: That's what you did? Yes. You were one of the guys. That's right. Now, did you go towards him? No. Okay. He wasn't political enough. Who was too spiritual? I joined dops. Okay. All right. So the yippies the fame drps let's, uh, let's, let's drop some names. I mean, you know, abbie hoffman of course. And, and who else was on your list?

Speaker 11: Well, those weren't. The people that I was really involved with. I was involved with the zippy faction. Includes dana, bill, tom for sod a ha. Weberman. People like that,

Speaker 4: right? yeah. Uh, do, do you like talking about politics? Yes. All right. Who you got in the race, excuse me? Who do you have in the race and the presidential race?

Speaker 11: Living in California, I don't have to have anybody because no matter who I vote for clinton, who's going to win California? Right. So that gives me a privilege that people in a lot of states don't have. That is fair, but this isn't an ordinary election and as bad as hillary might be and whatever you might think about trump is not an order ordinary candidate. He's more like an authoritarian, like south american dictator or authoritarian dictator or berlusconi in Italy or something like people in running fallen and uh, he um, is very important but you not win.

Speaker 4: Yeah. that's fair. That's totally fair. It seems seems slightly dangerous.

Speaker 11: yes. Yeah. And you know, I don't think hillary has any agenda about pot, but the people that are supporting her for the most part of not having a totally benign attitude don't have a dangerous attitude, but the people that I don't think that trump has any attitude about it either, but the people supporting him a violently opposed to it. For instance, chris christie, who may very well become as attorney general. So for that reason and for the reason of trump's supporters, uh, I think that, uh, that it's important that trump be relegated to the ad ashcan of history.

Speaker 4: I appreciate that. As far as California politics, as far as prop 64, where do you sit with that?

Speaker 11: I'm opposed to prop 64.

Speaker 4: And. And why come? How come?

Speaker 11: I it because it doesn't a civil. We regulate marijuana. It's regulated and it used using the police department in the criminal justice system and that at an eighth material what civil regulation is all about and the other thing is that a fractionalized is California. How do you mean instance, one county can have one set of regulations and one set of laws and then you go to the next county and it's totally different. So you illegal in one county and illegal in the next county. It's totally crazy. And then the third thing about it is that this law is a cartel law. It's built the way the cartels are going to be is in the distribution center section and they are basically going to control distribution and have most of the profit because when you have that district distributed setup, the money is going to come out of mostly out of the farmers and a little out of the vendors, but that money wasn't being distributed that way previously and so it's going to hurt a lot of farmers. None. There's an other minor things or minor in terms of bureaucracy but major in people's lives. For instance, let's say a particular, a dispensary or a particular dispensary has built up a relationship with a particular grower to get a particular variety that helps particular patients that that dispensary has and that that dispensary has accumulated because it has this material.

Speaker 4: well, the definition of the current kind of a supply chain as we know it,

Speaker 11: right? Yeah. Yeah, but, but under that, if he goes through a distributor, then that dispensary may not be able to get access to that kind of thing. The grower and the dispensary don't build up a personal relationship.

Speaker 4: Why would you do that type of thing? Why would you? Why would you put in a middle man type of thing?

Speaker 11: Well, that's where the cartel comes in, so it's going to be limited number of distributors and those distributors are going to take a major portion of the profit.

Speaker 4: Yeah. You know, we're, we're sitting here, we're talking about

Speaker 7: the way that legal cannabis is going to be structured. Can we just pause for a minute and realize that that's the conversation, you know, did you conceive that this could possibly be the case 25 years ago? We're at the 25th hemp fest. It isn't this all crazy to begin with or no?

Speaker 11: Rephrase your question. Which part? Which part do you get? It's becoming semi illegal or that it's not becoming legal.

Speaker 7: what I mean is we are able to parse language now. Whereas if you and I were to talk 25 years ago, all we would say is legalize it and so now we're in a very different conversation. Are you surprised about that or are you annoyed by it? It sounds like. Right.

Speaker 11: I think that this conversation and what's going on now and this parsing of legalization and everything like that, if it had become legal years ago, we would not be going through that, that this, this artifact. This is still an artifact of prohibition that we have this fight against it and where the cops want it as a criminal justice system still wants it's piece of it. are these so called educational things. Oh, educate people about the harms of marijuana. Right. You know, like I would do that. I, I'm going to run one of those clinics like, like sociologically, well, whatever people get together with a marijuana, they were all those knife fights, right? You always see that when the killings, the, it's right. People talking about disrespect, you know, and you just read in my foot or something. You're right. That's right. You see that all the time.

Speaker 11: Or should we or should we talk about all the accidents that people get into when that by not drinking alcohol and driving with marijuana and you can see all those statistics about the marijuana statistics about driving. So yeah. So I'm going to run the. I'm going to apply to run one of those educational campaigns for these marijuana addicts. And you think that there aren't marijuana addicts? Probably, but I know as a matter of fact that there are many of them are right here. Not in this room of course, but within, within this park. And here's what it is. It's not the ones who use it internally. I mean like smoking it or eating it or something. It's a growers.

Speaker 7: Those are the addicts. Those are the.

Speaker 11: It's questionable whether using marijuana internally. He is, is addictive, but there's no question that growing it is.

Speaker 4: How do you mean take us one level deeper just so we get it?

Speaker 11: Well, the level is to plant the seed in the ground one level deeper.

Speaker 4: Yeah. I gotcha. Yeah, that's the level. But why is the grower the addict and not the patient so to speak?

Speaker 11: Well, do you know people who used to use it and don't use it anymore but still grow?

Speaker 4: Uh, nah, I don't think I do. You probably do. Oh, I do.

Speaker 11: Probably do like a. I've met any number of people who are growing who say, oh, I take a toke once in awhile, but that's it. But I'm a grower. Right. I see. So that's why I say that.

Speaker 4: I gotcha. So they're addicts or addicted to growing it. There addict. That's the addiction, right? Because you can't really overdose on something. You can rely on those that hey, I hear you. You can't really overdose on something. You can't be. Excuse me. You can't be addicted to something you can't overdose on. Right. Is that fair? Or can you be.

Speaker 11: Well, have you met growers who their entire life revolved around just growing

Speaker 4: without question 100 percent. Well, the good ones. Those are the people. Nothing. Alright, three final questions for ed. all right. I'll tell you what they are and then Alaska them in order. what has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of ed rosenthal's life named one track. One song that's got to be on there. First things first. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 11: Uh, well I can't say it really surprised me, but I came up with this. It says a lot. I think I know the difference between marijuana and politicians. I don't. Good marijuana. Never told a lie.

Speaker 4: That's the best quote. I had a 177 of these questions are more. That's the best answer that I've gotten with that question. I thought you might say lipstick, but it turned out to be better. what has most surprised you in life and rosenthal? A vibrant 28 year old.

Speaker 11: Well, here's what surprised me. I plan to retire at the age of 30. That didn't happen. No. And then at the age of 40 or around then maybe just a couple of years after that, somebody told me that I was retired.

Speaker 4: Uh huh. How so?

Speaker 11: Well, I started doing only what I wanted to do, like even, you know, even if was lucrative or something, if, if it didn't have some like positive fun thing or novelty or something like that, I wouldn't, uh,

Speaker 4: forget it. That's fantastic. That's, that's an amazing uh, it's amazing that you had the foresight to be able to do that, you know?

Speaker 11: Well, you know, I started doing it and then I realized what was happening, what you were doing.

Speaker 4: That's fantastic. Alright. Either either the easiest question are the toughest question on the soundtrack of a ed rosenthal's life. One track one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 11: Well, there are a group of songs, but I'm in relationship and relationship to marijuana. I was just listening to it earlier today. It's it, rick, rick, james. I'm love with mary j.

Speaker 4: You can't fake the funk and rosenthal. Right? Right. You're a legend in your own time, my friend. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it. my pleasure. All right.

Speaker 11: Yeah,

Speaker 7: so, so here's the thing, it's him fest. It'S seattle. It's John Davis. Hey, great to be here. As always. I mean, you know, by the way, you definitely are the record holder as far as a number of times being a guest. So what, we'll have to tally them but to congratulations. Yeah. Second Michael Phelps. Right, exactly. That's exactly you. Are the Michael Phelps of the cannabis economy podcast. Be so 25 years of hemp fest. Can you believe it?

Speaker 12: Guess on some level, you know, people, people often asked me did you expect things to change? And I'm like well I must have or wouldn't have done this stuff that I did, but you know, it's still kind of seems odd to me, you know, when you get here. Yeah. Twenty five years. Wow. And, and viv was saying went from 500 people to how many this year? Oh god, that's, that is a number under, uh, under much controversy, but it's definitely north of a 100,000 and probably probably double that.

Speaker 7: Amazing. Amazing. So, you know, it's $100,000, it might even be $200. Yeah. Oh yeah. And uh, I, I witnessed it for myself, still a great relationship with the police, uh, here, you know, uh, at the grounds, uh, as far as permitting and all that. How easy is it or is it getting harder as

Speaker 12: far as the police are concerned? The police are our best friends, you know, and we'd never have any problem with them. We went over there, they served us hamburgers, right? I mean, really the relationship is one of mutual respect over many years. So I mean, uh, they consider us brothers and we consider brothers. The other bureaucracies involved can be challenging, you know, and there's always the new guy that's thrown into the mix this year. It's the liquor and cannabis board. But, uh, I'm not sure if they actually showed up. I'm still waiting to find out, but you know, it a permitting still is, it's still complex, but uh, you know, more and more as we're an institution, um, and have the credibility people realize that you can fight against it, but we're still going to get a permit. You're still going to get a permit for the 100,000 people that are coming through here.

Speaker 12: Right. No matter what the guy on the bicycle thinks. Right. Exactly. Exactly. so from that standpoint, people I think pick their battles a little bit more carefully and that they realize that it's not a slam dunk to get rid of him fast, you know, if you're going to fight the fight and you're gonna be, you're gonna have to put it in the resources. There are 25 years of experience here that we're dealing with. RighT? Yeah. You know, and the thing about it is as we've gotten better at what it is that we do, and we're still the same people, but there's a lot of turnover on the bureaucrat in. And so we, we've, we've done the strategy and we've done the strategy for years and years, years and sometimes people come in, they don't even know what the history is or what the game is. And so you have to kind of educate them, well, this is actually what you're doing.

Speaker 12: Yeah, it's breaking in the new guy and it really is, you know, a new agency will come along and they'll decide that they're, you know, they're interested or that they should be involved and you know, and sometimes they come on at grow and we have to show them that it's no accident that we were able to pull off 25 years. That includes the bad years, that includes a years where marijuana was roughly equal to them. So, uh, you know, uh, if they wanted to knock us off, it would have been then. It would have been then. Yeah, no, absolutely. I mean, uh,

Speaker 7: it's nice that things are changing. It could be better. The way that they're changing here in Washington is what will say about that. Um, as far as [inaudible] dot org is concerned, the reason I give the website is because last Year was a tough year and this year we're actually not making as much money as we need to. So we need folks that are listening here to donate, right? Absolutely.

Speaker 12: Absolutely. You know, if we're in this kind of a awkward time of quote unquote legalization where, uh, uh, there's things that haven't really formed yet and a lot of times the new guys that are getting into the industry and becoming retailers are growers, they don't know what the rules are and they're afraid to get in trouble by the lcb and the lcb can be vague and have multiple answer to the same question. And so a lot of times and trying to get sponsorship even out of the fledgling industry is tough. So we, we started out this year about 70,000 down and it's going to be a struggle to come up with 26, but you know, we've uh, there's a reason we're around 25 years, you know, we never stopped fighting, but we sure could use some help in it. Yeah,

Speaker 7: no, absolutely. All right, so hemp fest.org is what I'll say again and again, you, you, you kind of explained exactly what it is, you know, if you know, what is the answer to, can I do marketing on public land? And if the answer is I'm not sure, then I'm not sure. Right,

Speaker 12: right. and there's some, you know, the, the, the issue is the gray areas in there and you know, so we of course as an event had to do a better job at reaching out and saying, look, this is what you can do, this is what you can do. And hopefully as people get better at it, they will be educated in how to do it and how to avoid the pitfalls which are really simple, really. Um, but, uh, you know, for, at least right now, a sponsorship is a little bit scarce. A little bit light. Yeah. You know, in the medical operators that have been around for a long time, if you have issues and gone away. So they were our allies for many years. And uh, we're going to have to, this is going to be the new generation.

Speaker 7: So we'll either leave this out or leave it in a, based on what you're telling me, but you just mentioned yourself. So, uh, I goT, I got to ask the question and again, we'll leave it out or leave it in, but you know what, with whatever you want to do, what, what are your thoughts now? A nwp arc. Doors aren't open as we speak now. That is not a final thing, at

Speaker 12: least in my mind now. but what are your, what are you thinking? Well, you know, the thing about it is, is the liquor and cannabis board acted illegally. It's not hard to show they, uh, they acted arbitrarily and capriciously. So I believe that the law and the actions are on our side. The, the, the thing about it is, is all court systems are made by man and staffed by man and therefore fallible. So we're, we're very optimistic that once we put the thing on the table and say, look, the liquor and cannabis board did not act lawfully in, in, uh, in the way that they, uh, uh, allocated licenses. I think that we will prevail. But then again, you know, the liquor and cannabis board, part of their strategy is we're going to make this take as long as possible and if you die in the meantime, awesome.

Speaker 12: Right, right. So be it. So be it, you know, and the, their, their lawyer is the attorney general and my lawyer costs money. Right? Right. And I don't have any revenue, so, uh, but I'm determined I'm going to take it. he told me I'm not going to go down without a fight and anyways, I mean what they did was completely arbitrary contrary to the law. Um, and, you know, just wrong and not just for me, for many of the medical providers. And this of course affects the patients involved and uh, the entire ecosystem of what Washington was before, you know, [inaudible] the farmer to retailer to patient is gone basically. Yeah. I know it's changed so radically that, you know, the players are entirely different and you know, everyone. Yeah. I mean, this is a startup industry now to a startup startup industry and say, you know, an industry of people that, you know, what they, what their skill is being able to be artful on a, uh, an application process, but not really much in the cannabis industry.

Speaker 12: So we've got a date in november, we've got a date november. Yes. And I will be in court and I am hopeful about it, but, you know, uh, I fully expected the lcb is going to try to progress it, stay at, make it take longer than that. That's where I think that they could be most effective. And so I fully expect that. I'm hoping to get some resolution, but you know, um, uh, just press pressing on, you know, I'm not looking to get out of this industry and shit. I've been in this industry in this movement for more than tWenty years. Yeah. You had to say movement because you've been in the industry before. It was an industry that was in the industry before as an industry. But like, yeah, exactly. But like, you know, uh, in the industry only since 2009. But in the movement and uh, knowing the industry, you know, and the various stages of the industry and uh, and working in a policy for more than 20 years, I mean, I, I know Washington, I know a cannabis in Washington that's such a.

Speaker 12: Listen, you're an important guy, uh, to me as my friend also in the industry and we are behind you a thousand percent. Well, I appreciate shit it and my feelings are the same deal with you. I've really enjoyed, uh, talking with you and uh, you know, I appreciate the support and now you really appreciate you coming out and seeing this crazy thing we put together. Absolutely. I'll be here until you stopped making them promise. Okay. I promise. Absolutely. That's on the record. You have always got a backstage pass here that seattle have said. I'll take it. Alright, last question. Uh, you know, a soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there today. How about it's over because we're getting close. That'll do quite over. We got another day, but I politically, I think that we've worked out most of the bugs and everything. And uh, it's been pretty, uh, fair sailing, knock on something, you know, but, uh, I, I think we're, they can't really stop us on the last day, right? No, I don't think so. He missed the point if you do that actually. So I think we gave coast past sunday and so I think we're going to have a successful a 25th anniversary. I love it. John davis, we will see you if not before then

Speaker 4: in november. Absolutely. And there you have the 25th anniversary of hemp fest. great to get a chance to sit down with John Davis. He keeps plugging along and you can hear them. They're talking about just taking a hemp fests through the, uh, the final day. So he's excited about that and more excited about figuring out what's going to happen with him in november in terms of figuring out what's happening with you. Just keep doing what you're doing. Thanks for listening, very much. Appreciate it.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.