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Ep.184: Jesce Horton, Saints Cannabis, MCBA Part III

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.184: Jesce Horton, Saints Cannabis, MCBA Part III

Ep.184: Jesce Horton, Saints Cannabis, MCBA Part III

Jesce Horton returns and gives us an update on his new venture Saints cannabis as well as the latest on the MCBA. We go back to episode 78 to get some personal history and  then Jesce and I find ourselves in Bryant Park in NYC having a straightforward conversation about race. We discuss the concept of “other” and what’s presented to all of us through the mass media. As we learn that cannabis is so much more than we initially conceived, we discover the fact that the cannabis industry by way of being marginalized by prohibition has the opportunity to lead the way regarding ratcheting down the concept of other by discovering similarities. An MCBA Spotlight episode.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Jesse Horton returns, Jesse Orton returns and gives us an update on his new venture st cannabis as well as the latest on the minority cannabis business association. We go back to episode 78 to get some personal history and then Jesse and I find ourselves in Bryant Park in New York City having a straightforward conversation about race. We discussed the concept of other and what's presented to all of us in media as we learned that cannabis is so much more than we initially conceived, we discovered the fact that the cannabis industry, by way of being marginalized by prohibition, has the opportunity to lead the way regarding ratcheting down the concept of other by discovery of similarities. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Here's a real conversation with Jesse Horton.

Speaker 1: All right, so let's just track the path to you becoming an Oregonian because if you're maybe not born and bred, but you definitely are now, uh, where were you born and bred? Where'd uh, where'd you grow up? Where were you born? Yeah, the

Speaker 3: path of where I've been sat there will be a very windy road. I started off, I started off in Charlottesville, Virginia, then headed over to Richmond, then to Manassas, Virginia. Um, ended up going down to Columbia, South Carolina and Raleigh, North Carolina, Jacksonville, Florida, Lakeland, Florida, Tallahassee, Florida, Houston, Texas, Baltimore, Maryland, Washington DC. Um, Munich, Germany. Uh, and then Atlanta, Georgia. Also, I can't forget about Atlanta and then found my way out here to Portland to home finally.

Speaker 1: Okay. That is quite a path my friend. So, uh, Virginia I guess in all of those cities. How long were you in Virginia for?

Speaker 3: I was in Virginia for about eight years. Um, I don't, I probably have never lived in one city for longer than three on until I actually got here to Portland.

Speaker 1: Okay. Alright. So Virginia and then Manassas, you bring up and of course stephen stills had a band called Vanessa state did one album and if you haven't heard it, uh, maybe you should or maybe you shouldn't, you know. But uh, so Virginia was just the first eight years. Okay. Find a South Carolina. How long was that? The state,

Speaker 3: South Carolina. Columbia, South Carolina. I was there for about three years as well. And this was all throughout my youth.

Speaker 4: Uh Huh.

Speaker 1: And so then now you're about 11 when you get to Florida. Right. And how long were you there?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's right. I was, um, in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, all the way up until college. So I'm moved around the middle school and then high school I found myself in Lakeland, Florida for a few years and then made my way up to Tallahassee to go to college.

Speaker 1: Alright. So Florida, I mean, as far as you're concerned, I would imagine that's the thing that you remember most from, from childhood. That's where you spent your formative years, if you will. Is that about right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I think so. I'm probably most familiar with, uh, with Florida without a doubt.

Speaker 1: All right. So, um, what, why were we moving around so much here? Uh, what, uh, what were your folks doing for, for work at the time?

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, um, a lot of people ask me if it was miller, if I was a military brat, but I actually was more of a corporate brat. My Dad took a position with his company. I started off at a very, very low position and ended up, um, as a vice president. So have, you could imagine kind of what it took in those years. You have to take every position that you can in order to get up. Uh, we, we spent a lot of time on the road and I think it was a, it was a good thing.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I, you, you know, the, the way that you present a business, we've spoken in the past, um, you know, you, you are truly a corporate brat. That's the first time I've heard, uh, I've heard that phrase, but a arena rather than military broad corporate brat. What, what did your dad kind of ascending, um, you know, through those levels and ultimately becoming a VP? What kind of, uh, you know, um, thought process or mindset did he instill in you a based on that trajectory?

Speaker 3: That's a good question. I think um, I learned a lot from him I think would probably the main thing that I learned from my dad was just looking at the bright side of things, always being an example of what you want to see. I'm never complaining, um, you know, or at least complaining as little as possible and doing it to yourself and in a quiet room if at all possible and just out really showing what is good. I think there's so many positive things about what's going on there. It's not really hard to do that.

Speaker 2: Jesse Horton returns, Jesse Orton returns and gives us an update on his new venture st cannabis as well as the latest on the minority cannabis business association. We go back to episode 78 to get some personal history and then Jesse and I find ourselves in Bryant Park in New York City having a straightforward conversation about race. We discussed the concept of other and what's presented to all of us in media as we learned that cannabis is so much more than we initially conceived, we discovered the fact that the cannabis industry, by way of being marginalized by prohibition, has the opportunity to lead the way regarding ratcheting down the concept of other by discovery of similarities. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Here's a real conversation with Jesse Horton.

Speaker 1: All right, so let's just track the path to you becoming an Oregonian because if you're maybe not born and bred, but you definitely are now, uh, where were you born and bred? Where'd uh, where'd you grow up? Where were you born? Yeah, the

Speaker 3: path of where I've been sat there will be a very windy road. I started off, I started off in Charlottesville, Virginia, then headed over to Richmond, then to Manassas, Virginia. Um, ended up going down to Columbia, South Carolina and Raleigh, North Carolina, Jacksonville, Florida, Lakeland, Florida, Tallahassee, Florida, Houston, Texas, Baltimore, Maryland, Washington DC. Um, Munich, Germany. Uh, and then Atlanta, Georgia. Also, I can't forget about Atlanta and then found my way out here to Portland to home finally.

Speaker 1: Okay. That is quite a path my friend. So, uh, Virginia I guess in all of those cities. How long were you in Virginia for?

Speaker 3: I was in Virginia for about eight years. Um, I don't, I probably have never lived in one city for longer than three on until I actually got here to Portland.

Speaker 1: Okay. Alright. So Virginia and then Manassas, you bring up and of course stephen stills had a band called Vanessa state did one album and if you haven't heard it, uh, maybe you should or maybe you shouldn't, you know. But uh, so Virginia was just the first eight years. Okay. Find a South Carolina. How long was that? The state,

Speaker 3: South Carolina. Columbia, South Carolina. I was there for about three years as well. And this was all throughout my youth.

Speaker 4: Uh Huh.

Speaker 1: And so then now you're about 11 when you get to Florida. Right. And how long were you there?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's right. I was, um, in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, all the way up until college. So I'm moved around the middle school and then high school I found myself in Lakeland, Florida for a few years and then made my way up to Tallahassee to go to college.

Speaker 1: Alright. So Florida, I mean, as far as you're concerned, I would imagine that's the thing that you remember most from, from childhood. That's where you spent your formative years, if you will. Is that about right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I think so. I'm probably most familiar with, uh, with Florida without a doubt.

Speaker 1: All right. So, um, what, why were we moving around so much here? Uh, what, uh, what were your folks doing for, for work at the time?

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, um, a lot of people ask me if it was miller, if I was a military brat, but I actually was more of a corporate brat. My Dad took a position with his company. I started off at a very, very low position and ended up, um, as a vice president. So have, you could imagine kind of what it took in those years. You have to take every position that you can in order to get up. Uh, we, we spent a lot of time on the road and I think it was a, it was a good thing.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I, you, you know, the, the way that you present a business, we've spoken in the past, um, you know, you, you are truly a corporate brat. That's the first time I've heard, uh, I've heard that phrase, but a arena rather than military broad corporate brat. What, what did your dad kind of ascending, um, you know, through those levels and ultimately becoming a VP? What kind of, uh, you know, um, thought process or mindset did he instill in you a based on that trajectory?

Speaker 3: That's a good question. I think um, I learned a lot from him I think would probably the main thing that I learned from my dad was just looking at the bright side of things, always being an example of what you want to see. I'm never complaining, um, you know, or at least complaining as little as possible and doing it to yourself and in a quiet room if at all possible and just out really showing what is good. I think there's so many positive things about what's going on there. It's not really hard to do that.

Speaker 1: That is fair. It's not really hard to do that if you're well practiced in it. I would say Jesse, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah. Yeah, I could agree. I would agree with that. Without a doubt,

Speaker 1: we, we, we, we know that it is not easy for everybody that we know to, to show what is good, as you say.

Speaker 3: Right. No, without a doubt, it's, it's a struggle, especially, especially in the industry, you know, they're, they're, you know, there's a lot of hurdles, a lot of things that we can look at that need to get better and that will get better and it's easy to focus on those things. But I mean by Gosh, we have a cannabis industry right in front of us and I never thought it would happen, so I just kind of relish in that each and every day.

Speaker 1: That's about right. Exactly. Um, so if your dad was kind of doing the corporate thing and ascending from position to position and, and uh, the family was kind of coming with them, what was your mom doing along the way?

Speaker 3: Uh, she was lucky enough to have one of those positions where you, uh, you could always kind of find your way. Um, there's a few out there, you know, nursing and um, positions in corporate human resources where, you know, do really doesn't matter what industry you're in, that kind of background can conserve itself in, in any kind of capacity in any industry. So she did that. She was a lifetime human resources professional

Speaker 1: and uh, a good hr person is hard to find. So, uh, it's good to hear that she was able to find work basically at every stop. Right.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, you know, that, that, that, that one is how good she is. A, she had to leave every two years. I don't know if I like my employees leaving all the time, but I don't give her a hard time about it.

Speaker 1: Yeah, it is ironic actually. Is she being the HR person? That's, that's true. So, so tallahassee, what school was it that you, uh, that you went to for a, for higher learning, if you will?

Speaker 3: Oh Man. The most amazing school in the world. The Florida State University.

Speaker 1: Okay. Alright. So you are a seminal thing.

Speaker 3: Yes, I'm a very proud seminar.

Speaker 1: Okay. And so you know that Burt Reynolds, uh, played, uh, on the, on the football team there, right?

Speaker 3: I do, I do. Um, I stayed in his, uh, his dorm, the dorm named after him reynolds hall

Speaker 1: for a little while. There you go. And uh, it is, uh, we are on the precipice of the NFL season this evening is the beginning of the 2015, 20, 16 season. And uh, your, your most recent quarter. Jamis Winston I believe is a now a shepherding the Tampa Bay buccaneers. Is that right?

Speaker 3: Oh man, if you want to get me excited about a subject, we can talk about cannabis, but I do want to give me really, really excited. We can talk about the Florida state seminoles. Great. James, Winston and anything regarding our that, you know, the football team. So yes, I'm extremely excited to see that first game.

Speaker 1: Alright. So we're going to have to finish this up in time. But uh, and that's by Sunday by the way. That's when they play. But whatever. I'm at Fsu, I, I don't, I don't think you were on the football team. What, what were you majoring in?

Speaker 3: Got there. And I measured in engineering. So it was industrial engineering. I actually had a focus to start off with physics and mathematics because I thought I was really smart and I realized that I wasn't quite that smart. So I ended up, I'm minoring in those subjects and majoring in industrial engineer.

Speaker 1: Okay. And, and what can can, can you, uh, take us through when you realized that, uh, oh, wait a second. I'm not, this is not my path as far as physics and math. When, when, when did that realization hit you?

Speaker 3: Wow. You know, I never quite thought about that. I think probably after I got my first couple of, a couple of c's and you know, I missed that Dean's list a few times. I was kind of really nerdy kid and I felt like if I couldn't be at the ultimate top of my class and maybe I should find something else. So it's kind of the battle corporate Jack Welsh mentality. If you can't be number one or number two, you probably need to find another, another subject.

Speaker 1: There you go. See You Jack Welsh, yourself.

Speaker 3: Exactly. I did, I did it. I ended up starting off with starting off with that, with that GE mentality whenever I was in an engineering and actually started off with that company when I, when I was there as an internship. So I kind of got a good bit of Jack Welsh, a type of understanding as it relates to business.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Talk about that. I think you were there for a few summers in a row. Is that right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, yeah, that's correct. I got a good bit of my, uh, my first, uh, my, my engineering feat with at a, at a great company, General Electric Throughout College. Um, learned a good bit about operations. Um, I was over in Atlanta at the, uh, energy facilities, so just a really great experience and I really kind of a, a great touch into the engineering world and you know, what I had in front of me for the next six to seven years.

Speaker 1: Well, besides what we've already discussed, what else did you take away from, you know, from those summers with, with Ge, what did that teach you and, and stay away from energy and I'm talking about the corporate philosophy.

Speaker 3: Hm? Yeah, I think, um, I think what it, what it taught me was just always strive for the best. I think that's what I learned through so many people, uh, you know, whether it was my fraternity whenever I was in school or mega sapphire or if that was a, you know, after my corporate and I'm the and my corporate experience even in the community and a lot of leaders that I learned from him, it was really about just doing your absolute best and never, uh, never coming into a room and just being a member, but always trying to come in and, you know, be be a leader or at least help to help the leaders.

Speaker 1: Excellent. Now let, let's talk about, uh, what you were doing with the energy, you know, those summers in Atlanta. What exactly you know, you obviously, you're, you're an intern, you're a kid, but, uh, where were you? What, uh, what were you doing within the unit?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I think at the time I didn't get a chance to dive down directly into the energy and sustainability as it relates to the inner workings and the engineering behind it and things like that. But when I was at ge during that time, that was when they had their, they lost their first campaign, eco imagination, now you may remember where they had a really great commercials with the elephants singing in the rain and you know, really started kind of transforming, um, the, the mentality of the engineering world and start thinking about how, what they did and how the things that they created every day affected the environment and how, you know, it will be so much greater if it affected it in a positive way. So I think that's when I started to just think more about that and it really helped me as I started to get further in my career.

Speaker 1: Yeah. And as you graduate, you, did you go directly to Siemens? Is that right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's correct. That's correct. I went right to Siemens in Atlanta, um, and we did a little, a rotational program, so I got a chance to travel around and learn a few different things there.

Speaker 1: Well, and what, what, what are the highlights for us so that we understand, you know, you graduate and then you're doing this rotation. What were some of those highlights?

Speaker 3: Yeah, sure. So, um, so I joined the rotational program. It was the project management leadership development program that was really focused on just, you know, just that project management, how do you come into an engineering a project or coming to an engineering company, a grab a project, you know, started from the beginning to the end from the planning all the way to the tracking and the metrics to make sure that, you know, it was a success and then improving for the next project. So that was the overall idea of it. So I started in Atlanta. I was a six month rotation where I learned a lot about finance and things of that nature. Uh, went over to Houston, Texas where I got a chance to spend time in the, uh, the polst automation division, um, and also in the oil and gas business unit. And just giving me a really broad spectrum of what it took to learn, you know, about this large company.

Speaker 3: That was Siemens. After that I moved up to Baltimore, Maryland, where I got a chance to really focus on operations. I'm working everyday with field service engineers and control their schedules. I'm going along on call to them to help fix equipment to help commission I, you know, installed and commissioned equipment. Um, and then moved back down to Atlanta and that's where I got my first, uh, delve really into the hardcore energy efficiency world where I joined the new business unit that Siemens had a that was called Siemens energy efficiency. Uh, so we really focus heavily on going into industrial facilities, auditing their processes, identifying areas where they could save energy, where they could reduce their overall environmental footprint. Um, luckily, you know, we had a lot, have a great suite of products that we were able to implement and a lot of those projects and then also a suite of projects that suite of products that helped us to track all the metrics because that to me is one of the most important things is making sure that after you implement that solution, whether that's something in a grow room or whether that's something in a big huge automation facility, if you're smart about it, if you're a true business person, you happen to know whether or not that is going to help you or whether or not you need to improve upon it again, or whether or not you need to just scrap it and start over.

Speaker 3: So that's a big piece, um, that, that I think really a lens way to the cannabis industry.

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Speaker 5: I also have the facebook. Perfect. It's perfect for the radio. That's it. Jesse Horton. You were at one Bryant Park. You said you're coming to New York. I said, listen, let's do it. Let's do it in the park is beautiful, right?

Speaker 6: It's hot though and that's okay. It's summer. It's supposed to be a relative for where you are. I'm from Florida. I spent a lot of time there. So this is not, this is perfect. But you, uh, reside in Oregon now. Saints. Cannabis. What's the, what's the latest was saints? Yeah. Yeah. So I'm in Portland, Oregon. I'm St. this is our opportunity to bring my cannabis dream to the people on the retail, indoor cultivation, greenhouses. Um, and greenhouse. Exactly. Research and development processing as well as, um, an event space in the lounge. Look at you. All right, so event space in the lounge. We kind of went over this a little bit, you know, maybe there's going to be some of this and some of that. We'll see. Yeah. Yeah. I think that it leaves open a lot of opportunity for us. I'm looking forward to it.

Speaker 6: What I love about Oregon is you can pretty much, you can do whatever you want. Everything is fine. And then there's no problems also. So it's like the opposite of Washington. It's the Yin to Washington gang. There you go. Um, you can pretty much do whatever you want. That's a sacs of the way it's written out in the rules. Uh, believe it or not. Um, no, I mean it's, it's a, it's definitely a more focused on the small business entrepreneur. I'm making sure that Oregonians have a real opportunity in the industry and because of that you see lower barriers. Uh, we were able to learn a lot from a Washington and Colorado tripped up on. So, uh, you know, really thankful for them, kind of showing us the way and maybe not the way to go in some areas, but I think we'll continue to see those issues come up until we get it right across, uh, across the country.

Speaker 7: Yeah. It's, uh, it's interesting because. Yes, Washington, yes, a Colorado you guys were able to learn from those two spots. You already did have the cannabis culture in Portland though, because you think about New York, it's New York's learning from those two states as well, but without any intellectual property of their own type of thing.

Speaker 6: Yeah. Yeah. I think that the cannabis culture is extremely strong in Oregon, the Pacific northwest. Um, and I think without a doubt having the culture is so strong, showing up to talk about different policies, different initiatives, the way things are being, the way things are being executed as it relates to the rules. Um, when you have so many people behind those efforts that really kind of understand the practicality of certain things and what patients really want a definitely going to have more of an effect on the actual regulations. Yeah.

Speaker 7: You're also running mcbs, we will know minority cannabis business association from Portland, but it's kind of, it's a, it's a national network. I know from the calls, right. You know, Justin Borland, how, how, how, uh, how happy with you or with the way things are going,

Speaker 6: you know what, I'm extremely happy. I think um, you know, when we got into it, we didn't quite understand everything that was needed of us and that was part of the reason that we were kind of active for about a year as I'm bringing on board members, understanding where we needed to focus. Um, and even then after we did have an understanding of the programs, are there still things out there that people really need in order to feel like they're getting what they need out of the industry or what they really want out of the industry and um, you know, I would like to be for us to be further along there, but I think we've made a lot of great strides with our small group. We're at about a thousand members right now. Um, yeah, it's really amazing over about two months and still adding everyday, uh, so I'm extremely happy and looking forward to what we're going to be able to do by way of not just helping more people of color get into the industry and benefit from the industry, but looking at how that is going to improve the industry as a whole and that's what we're all about.

Speaker 7: It just give it that actual community feel, you know, we, we all look different, we all sound different and you know, that opens up a vast array of possibilities.

Speaker 6: Yeah, exactly. Right. Staying true to the plan, just like cannabis, right? You can learn a lot from the actual plan that looks different, comes in so many different diverse colors, smells, efficacy levels, whatever it may be or just teaches us a lot about that. Um, and I think we know that the people that consume cannabis are, are very similar. Yeah. Similar in that they are diverse. Yeah. And they have different efficacy levels and smells as well, just like handling. That's exactly right. That's exactly right.

Speaker 7: That's when you get to really know somebody when you get down to the smell level, but you know, in all seriousness, you know, this, this conversation is setup to, around, you know, hopefully a conversation, hopefully a dialogue. Hopefully I'm finding some sort of answer, some sort of solution, some sort of pathway and you and I both think that cannabis might be, um, a, a counterculture certainly, but, uh, you know, a specific culture, a specific group of folks, of business owners that can maybe kind of help solve the, the current issue that we've got going on. So to set the stage about what I'm talking about, you know, when you and I were both kids because I like to think of you as the same age as me now when 1991 you had the rodney king thing and at that moment in time a race in the United States of America was an issue.

Speaker 7: Like a real issue. Like, no, we, you know, there were sites that hadn't happened in my lifetime before that. And after that, not until now, with what's going on with, you know, um, I don't know, things coming out on video, uh, you know, um, black lives matter, blue lives matter, all lives matter. I don't know why those phrases happen, you know, um, there's a reason why the first phrase happen and then there's a reason why the second and third phrase happen. Um, but I think you and I agree, we shouldn't have to need those phrases. That's the issue.

Speaker 6: Yeah, yeah, yeah. Without a doubt. Yeah. I think it's, it's really, um, it's really deep and I think some of the things that we're seeing now on video and, you know, we're hearing a lot or a lot of it's being brought to the forefront are unfortunately things that, at least within the black community we have experienced before. Rodney King, we did have those discussions, right? My parents did tell me at, around that time how to handle police officers in order for to not get shot, don't reach for anything really fast. Those were things that we were taught, you know, or we're talking about back then. And now I think what we're seeing is with the, um, the prevalence of videos, uh, the smartphones, all these different things we're seeing, um, we're seeing it brought to the forefront in a way that forces everyone to talk about it. I think in a lot of ways, um, from what I've seen in growing up in white and black communities, a lot of, you know, and even in Portland, Oregon is one place where people don't really like to talk about those types of issues. Right? It's not, um, it's not always as ugly. People don't want to face the truth and the effects of it. Um, and now we're, we're, we're at a point where, you know, we have to talk about it. We can't, we can't ignore it. You

Speaker 7: said a couple of different thing. I want to kind of tackle both of them when you were a kid. Um, so I feel like we kind of grew up the same way. You just pointed out a, a stark difference in the way that we grew up because my parents never had to take me aside to say, you know, when, when you're innocent type of, when you're in a situation with the police, this is what you should do and this is what you shouldn't do. The assumption was that I would never be in the company, felice, and

Speaker 6: um, I think I was once or twice and I probably had a different, uh, uh, you know, outcome than you did talk about that conversation because it's called the conversation, right? Yeah. The district parents had with. Yeah, without a doubt. It was certainly a conversation, maybe a conversation that I had more with my parents than sex. Right, right. You know, it's something that you think you have a conversation with your parents or by maybe somewhat often some. Not as much. I maybe had one conversation with my father about sex. I can remember and probably about three or four or five about, you know, how to handle law enforcement and make sure that you're, um, that you're always going to be in a position of being a safe if you ever come in contact. Uh, and so my father actually was a, he was a victim of the war on drugs.

Speaker 6: So he spent years of his life in prison for possession of drugs. Years. Yeah. Year seven years, I believe. What, what drug, if you don't. Uh, I believe it was cocaine. I'm actually also candidate. So it was, it was both cannabis obviously scheduled worse than, uh, than cocaine. Cocaine scheduled to not, not that big of a deal. Cannabis schedule one. That's the issue. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And I think, um, we look at both drugs now differently than we did back then. So, uh, yeah, without a doubt it's, it's pretty crazy how cannabis is deemed worse than cocaine and our sitting president just to kind of go ahead and smooth over cannabis. Cocaine, our current president has admitted to cocaine use, so just, let's just put that out there. Yeah, he's not the first either or maybe he's the first to admit to admit it. Yeah, exactly. So, all right, so that's the conversation that you have with your dad, your dad, um, obviously, uh, gets caught up in the war on drugs doing stuff that will, maybe not my dad would have done, but maybe my uncle actually, definitely my uncle. Um, but let's, let's get into, um, you know, maybe some history that you have with police and some history I have with the police because you're a black guy. I'm a Jewish guy and I'm a white guy until you leave the room and then I'm a Jewish guy again.

Speaker 6: So, so, uh, talk about, uh, running with the police that you might have had early on. Yeah, sure. And you know, I, I guess, you know, I want to preface this first was saying I've, I've had a lot of experience with police officers. I've had some really great experiences with police officers are, has been. Got some of them surprise you right there. They're friendly, they're about the right things I think. But, you know, unfortunately when a, and this is kind of a human thing, when you give people power and a lot of ways, a lot of times it can corrupt them. And I've definitely had my run ins with the couple, a couple, a couple, three. Uh, you know, really I think a police officers is that without a doubt profiled me. Um, and, and without a doubt, um, didn't treat me as fairly as maybe I would have hoped a one for instance, um, I, I was driving up to college with some of, uh, some of my friends, two Caucasian guys, actually, one of them was Jewish, so, so he was in, we get around.

Speaker 6: So we were all in the car heading back up to college or to Florida state from Lakeland, Florida who is driving? It was actually me that was driving in my car, uh, and both of my friends, one was in the front seat, one was in the back, the friend that was in the backseat had cannabis and we were all were cannabis consumer. So it wasn't like we were scared of the fact that he add Canada was. But we knew that he had cannabis in his bag, driving it up, back up to school, and we got pulled over. Um, I don't even know if there was a reason to stop light. I think it was maybe they said that we veered off into the, um, into the middle lane or something. But it wasn't. You were doing 80 and 55? No, no, not at all. It was something very minor, like you veered off or something like that.

Speaker 6: Maybe. Maybe it was. We didn't use a signal. Um, and you know, they ended up searching the car. We actually weren't smoking, so I'm not really looking back at all this and the things that I've learned. I should've fought a lot of these things. Right? Like illegal search and seizure budget. No, he asked if he could search the car. I said, sure. Officer. I'm scared to death at the time, so I want to let them do whatever, you know, whatever he wants. Plus you're a good kid that actually isn't causing any problems. So it's like, yeah, sure, go ahead. What do you have or whatever you need to do to get me out of this. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And I didn't think we had any camera. I didn't. I thought that the cannabis that we had was on his person. I knew I didn't have any.

Speaker 6: So either way he ends up searching. The car, finds about a, about a gram of cannabis and the behind the seat, you know, a place where you can tuck some canvas. So unfortunately my friend, quote unquote friend tucked his cannabis in the back seat into your car, into my car. Did the search. I'm actually the buddy who was in the front admitted or he told them yes. It's actually not Jesse's cannabis. It's the other guys, right? Um, in the officer really didn't care. He ended up taking me to jail. Take you to jail. Yeah. And you said the grant, did you say a pounder? Did you say grant was a grant was actually under a gram, I think like point seven. So that's it. It can't be smaller than that amount. And because it was your car and you had, you had possession of it even though he was told otherwise jam.

Speaker 6: Yeah. Yeah. And I mean, I've been in situations where officers usually give the people involved the chance to say, okay, whose is it? Right. And kind of take the consensus of who was it that didn't happen. He didn't really want to hear it. So here's, now I'm going to match you with a story of my own. I didn't think that I was going to do this, but here we are. So why not? So it's, it's high school, senior year, sorry dad. Because this I think is the first time they'll will hear this story. We're in a caravan and we have definitely have cannabis. And we did. We have beer. So we got a case of beer and there's like six of us in the van. We took out the middle a row because we're in a um, uh, you know, uh, what's that when you go on a scavenger hunt. So there's a list of things that we got to do. There's cars have of all the kind of high school buddies and gals and everybody when we're competing, we're gonna win obviously. So there's a, you've got to get a sign with a, uh, with a, uh, a picture on it.

Speaker 7: And so, uh, we go to the duck pond and liberate the sign from the ground, a complete with a concrete still attached to the side and throw that bad boy in the, uh, in the caravan. We're like, no one else is doing this. This is amazing. We're going to win a. all of a sudden we get pulled over and we're like, oh, we probably shouldn't have done. That was the feeling, you know, it wasn't, oh my God, we're going to jail. It was like, oh, that was stupid to take the sign. So, and that's how we were treated. So there was a, like a little kind of a shack, police shack stand. It wasn't like, uh, the, uh, like downtown, a little shack will security guy. Well, but it was, it was, uh, the police. So the county police. So they take us, take us in there, they make us drive our car.

Speaker 7: The driver was not drinking because we're, you know, we're dumb, we're not stupid. I'm one of the kids said this is one a test, you better pass to the driver. And he did right. Um, they don't find the cannabis because they're not even looking or thinking about it. They do find the beer because you can hide a case of beer. And what they did was they kind of read us the riot act. And in retrospect they thought that this was hilarious and they made us pour out the beer to the. Yeah, exactly. Well, I didn't know how lucky I was until I got out here into the real world and discovered that that's not how police, you know, police the community every time in my community in which I'm very lucky to have grown up. That's how we were policed. And you know, am I ever going to pull a sign out of the ground again?

Speaker 7: No lesson. Yeah. Am I going to drive around with a case of beer? No, because that's more ironic. Um, but that was my experience. I had a whole case of beer. We are definitely under aged and we had to pour the beer out. That was the worst. Got very fortunate. I'm very fortunate in it. Crazy how different your experiences than mine. That's, it's, it's amazing how stark that differences. Oh yeah. Without a doubt. I mean, you know, but that's again, what we were kind of taught is that, you know, when, when the police pull you over, you're not going to be treated the same most times you're going to be treated a little bit differently and the, you know, tends to be the case, you know, at least from my experience. And again, my experience living in the south, the south eastern United States. Yeah. Knowing your basic experience, what are your thoughts on how we can nuance this from, if we take cannabis as the centrifical force, how can we, you know, help with this? Because, you know as well as I do that I'm, the minority cannabis business association is helping folks get in at an ownership level. Um, you know, from, from minorities because of where dispensary's are because. Well, because it's right, but also it's, it's helpful that Oakland is a wonderful cannabis economy. It's also rich and diverse in its community. Can that be an example? Oakland for example, or in Portland is pretty wide, right? But yeah,

Speaker 6: yeah, I think, um, yeah, without a doubt, you know, the similarities of cannabis prohibition and, and um, the, the negative views of the, you know, sometimes a lot taught negative views of black people or people of color are very similar. It's all about fear I think, and we've kind of used fear in both cases to make each and outcasts or to make each not really acceptable and traditional daily life. Right. Um, and then, you know, with cannabis, I think I'm right, you have the whole reefer madness type of situation and with, for example, I'll say black men, right? You have the whole violence and even cannabis, right said the for awhile, they said that it made you Bilin as well. So we're just looking at both of those situations, um, and what's happening in the cannabis movement. I see a lot of similarities on how we can improve, um, improve the, the race relations, right, and how cannabis can be a motivator to do that.

Speaker 6: And I think that education, it really is one of the biggest things, right? As we're learning more about cannabis, we learned that it's exactly kind of the opposite of what everyone taught us, right? It destroys people. We learned in heels in so many different ways. Um, you know, we learned it. It's addictive. We learned, you know, the opposite, right? It can help to get people off of addictive medications, right? So as we learn more about it and as we were more open to spreading that knowledge, I think we're starting to be more acceptable, right? We have cannabis in some sort, at least here in New York. And I think that as we start to do that within communities of color, especially within the black communities and within black males and start to do more education, start to tell them more positive stories, start to not do some of the things I think in media that are done to, uh, to, to show a negative appeal on people of color and if we can start focusing on the opposite, um, and I think use cannabis as a motivator or as maybe a way of looking at how that can happen.

Speaker 6: I think it'll be without a doubt, helpful and, and the cannabis community and being a from a culture that has been outcasted from a coach that has been deemed a maybe a negative, a segment of society. I think we have a lot of people within our particular industry that understand those injustices and are willing to fight.

Speaker 7: Yeah. On behalf of us, on behalf of we, no matter who we is, the, the, the, you know what I picked up from what you just said, there is no, the problem is other conceiving of other, you know. Oh, I don't do, I don't know, cannabis, I don't like those people. I don't, I don't drink, I don't like those people. I don't do pharmaceutical drugs. I don't like those people. I don't use tide pods. I don't like those people. You know, it's like, it's ridiculous actually when you start to think about the concept of other, it makes no sense. So that concept of other, uh, is that not the, you know, that's the Kryptonite to society, you know, because when I think about you, I think about like laid back Jessie and how different you are than me in the makeup of our emotional content context. Uh, cause you're like way laid back way not, but I don't think about like, oh, it's black. Jesse, you know, I think this is a laid back Jessie, you know, cause I know you or you know, um, talk about that concept of other when you were growing up, I mean, you, you had white friends or do you just said it, but like, you know, how did you attack that?

Speaker 6: For sure. You know, I moved around a lot when I was a kid every two years I moved and I had to make new friends every time. You know, a lot of times those friends were sometimes Filipinos, sometimes black, sometimes white a lot of times because of the particular school that I was in or because of a particular neighborhood I was at a time. And you know, where, for example of Filipinos, right? There's a lot of Filipinos in Jacksonville. When I moved to Jacksonville, a lot of my friends were Filipino, right? So I, um, I learned a lot and kind of broke down some of those other types of barriers. And I think that that's what a lot of people, um, experiences they'd been in certain areas, certain around a certain type of people and they don't understand, right? They'd never had to learn. And um, unfortunately the learning that we see out here by way of media is not always accurate and it's not always true.

Speaker 7: Yeah. So you brought that up before. I do want to hear what you're saying there. You know, what, what is being presented to us through the general media, which is not helpful. Let's, let's dive in.

Speaker 6: Gosh, yeah, that's tough, man. That's a lot. I know that. Yeah, that's a lot. And you know, out there in the general media, um, while we talk about it in black circles a lot, right? I mean, you always see the stereotypical people right on, in the media, the people that they want to show the stereotypical people. I'm in the movies right on, on TV. And it kind of continues to hone yourself to believe this, right? If I was a white guy and all I saw was a black violence on TV and all I saw was this black guys always a thug in the movie and all I saw was a, there's a black guy is always ignorant, right? He always speaks in a certain manner if I don't ever meet any black guys and that's what I'm going to naturally believe as I grow up.

Speaker 6: Right, exactly. That's just the way it is. And you know, that's just the way our minds work. Um, and it's just so complex with media and it's really just a big cluster fuck I think in a lot of ways. So, you know, cause it's a, it's those guys in the movies plus Bill Smith and Denzel. Right. That's about it. Yeah. And so then everybody else is painted with a broad brush of, oh well we gotta have that, we got to have that, we've got to have that. And a lot of guys who are making the movies right are usually just a, a one particular color. You are from a particular place or question, socioeconomic background. Um, and that's allowable. MTBA is about, is making sure that we can get more people as this industry is being built, more people in positions to have more say and to have more power, to have more success.

Speaker 6: Have you ever been in a, a, a group of people that was completely and totally diverse and had an issue? In other words, if everyone is present, there is no other, you know, I'm, I'm hooked on this other concept because I don't know if, uh, if I think I've got half a thought here, but, you know, when we sit around Mtba, you know, there's just everybody's there and so what's the problem? There's no problem. You know, we shouldn't say that. Don't say that. You can't say that here. You can say everything here. You can not say nothing. Yeah, right. Is there, is there A. I can't say anything here that uh, you know, when you talk about media, you said you talk about a black circles a lot. Are you talking about news coverage as well? Because you talked about media and movies and the way things are presented.

Speaker 6: Does that include news coverage? Most certainly, yeah. Everything. I think, yeah, a news coverage is a big piece of it, and I, what I take from news coverage is, you know, the news coverage that I can see on television, it's this versus that no matter what, if we're talking about politics, if we're talking about, you know, uh, race relations, if we're talking about anything, the Olympics, uh, make sense because it is this versus that, you know, one of the countries has to win. But, uh, how, how, how, how bad is that, you know, for, for us to, you know, we're, we're almost put into that mindset more often than we used to this versus that, you know, you've got to have the other side of the opinion. Yeah. Yeah. That sucks. That's such a simplistic way of thinking and sometimes when we don't challenge ourselves to think a little bigger, I think even the most intelligent mind can think that way, right?

Speaker 6: It's, it's our team versus them. Um, and I think you see that a lot in, in the cannabis industry. I think you, it's definitely a result of a media and we know the exposure and the things that we see, um, and when you look at race being really just a kind of a made up social construct, you can kind of even see it there as well and that it's kind of developed in a way to kind of pit people against each other or to separate people and, and um, it just carries on throughout a lot of media and you even see it in the cannabis industry. Um, that's why they called it marijuana. Yeah, right. Was to, was to help to separate it. Mexican. Yeah. Why don't you to start thinking about all the craziness, um, you know, people that see it in the cannabis industry and maybe don't have a view of it from people of color.

Speaker 6: Right. It's the same exact thing, right? You use certain terminology, you show certain things, you put certain things in front of people to make them believe what you want them to believe. And it's been so successful in the cannabis industry and a lot of us who understand cannabis, see it, see right through it. Yeah, just because we understand and it's not quite as easy to see it in other areas of the world, but you know, what happens here and what's successful in one in one particular areas usually successful and others without question, uh, you know, as we get more towards the center of the conversation here, um, and, and by that I mean a cannabis being the center of the conversation because everybody's very intrigued about what, what the heck we're doing here? What, what, what, wait a second. This stuff is legal. I think that that's where general society is, or better yet this stuff isn't legal yet, you know, especially if I'm hearing that maybe cannabis is medicine really.

Speaker 6: I mean, why, why is this a big deal? Oh, this is a big deal. Do you start to see, can we start to see eyes, you know, ears and minds kind of learn, uh, from, from our group, you know, like you're just saying if, if we do set this up and you know, we are colorblind in this, um, in, in our community, is it, is it possible to be an example for, for other groups, for other, for the rest of society, or is that too like, you know, well, it may be too, like you noticed they were colorblind in the industry quite yet. You know, even though I think that I'm saying if we can be. No, no, I'm, I am not assuming that we are there. All I'm saying is if, if we do accomplish that goal in this, in this or at least that we can be further along than others.

Speaker 6: Right, exactly. Show, yeah, I, I can really lead the way. No, I think without a doubt we can. Um, and you know, I think this is something I learned from Steve de Angelo riding and not making another industry but a better industry. And I think because of the way the industry is developing, because of the people that are driving the industry and had been driving it for so long, um, and making sure that those people remain successful and remain a bigger heads in the industry. Um, and ambassadors for our industry. I think we can, we know without a doubt, show how an industry and show how we can be a means of economic empowerment and social justice. And in the, in the country, those are two of the, a three, a of the three legged stool, the principles of a minority cannabis businesses association, uh, economic empowerment, social justice,

Speaker 7: you know, and then obviously cannabis as medicine. But that's, uh, that's that. Let's talk about this. I mean, I'm starting to get excited in this conversation with you because I always see the silver lining, if we're five years away from accomplishing that goal of making the cannabis industry colorblind, which I think is a good time on. Do you feel that? That makes sense? Cause it ain't gonna happen.

Speaker 6: Might be a little bit when I the colorblind, I don't, you know, that I guess I, you're never going to get me to really go along with that because I just don't think that's really possible. I think it's a good way of looking at things without a doubt. Seventy five percent colorblind type of thing. Oh yeah. Seventy five would be a good target. I think that will be a targets. There's always going to be some people, there's always going to be some areas that have issues within any industry, but I think we are right now one of the most of the most progressive industry out there and I think we'll continue to get more and more progressive as it relates to social justice causes. So if, if I'm a cannabis industry operator, your advice might be to just make sure that you got all the colors of the rainbow working for you.

Speaker 6: Right? Or working with you at least. Well, I would say my advice would be um, if you, if you care about which a lot of business owners care about making more money, right? People want to do both. We want to do both, right? Yeah. But I think first and foremost, I'll be honest, as a business owner, I care about making more money. Sure. No, um, but I think it's easy to see, especially understanding what industry we're in that making more money is including others making more money is showing the diversity of the consult, the consumers of the plant is showing that, um, in order for us to really understand what patients and consumers need and be innovative and differentiated ourselves from what's happening in the rest of the market, we have to have different minds thinking about these things. Thinking about application methods, uh, thinking about, uh, social consumption, uh, thinking about all these different things that kind of work into how cultures like to consume and to interact with cannabis.

Speaker 6: There you go. Diversify your consumer base. Yeah. Yeah. And, and, and the best way to do that is to diversify the way that your particular businesses thinking. So that's why just like you said, having the, all the colors of the rainbow and not even just the colors, but different socioeconomic backgrounds, um, uh, Republicans, Democrats, whatever it may be, having just people who think differently. Um, and a lot of times that is a result of the culture and the color of your skin because of who you come around, come up around Republicans, Democrats, whatever. Trump has had to throw that. We're sitting here. You're sitting here in his, in his state here in New York. Yeah. We don't like to think of it as his state so. Well, anyone outside of New York? Yes, I tell you that unfortunately. Yeah. Well, whatever. I don't know what to do about that, but that's.

Speaker 6: This is August. We'll see what happens. Right. You know what I mean? I'm all right. I think for me, I'd love your take away. For me, my takeaway from this conversation is as much as you can do as one person to eliminate other, the concept of other, there is no other. That's just, that's them against us. If you think there's other, that's someone else, you know, messing with your mind. Right, right. Yeah, without a doubt. Um, I think the, you know, the lesson that I'm, that I think is stronger in my mind is I walk away is, um, is that um, the cannabis industry where we're all learning from it, we're all experiencing it. Um, we can all see how far it's come and we can all see how maybe our thinking about the industry as we first learned about her when we first heard about it.

Speaker 6: It's probably completely different than our thinking of the industry now that we've taken some time to get into it and to learn more about it firsthand. You mean the people in the industry that people in the end. What do you mean by that? Well, I mean, for example, uh, you know, and maybe people who have been living on the west coast, I've had a longer time of learning it, but I think first, the first thing that most of us learn who, and I'll maybe I'm even on the east coast and the West, there's just so much learning. But the first thing I learned was that candidates is bad, right? It's against the law. It, um, it's something that is going to make you stupid. It's something that, um, is going to hurt your motivation. It's something that you just shouldn't do because it's wrong. And as I've learned more about it, I've learned how the effect on my body, and I've come out here to Oregon and I've gotten in the industry, right?

Speaker 6: I learned about it, I learned that I liked it. I learned that it wasn't as negative, it wasn't negative from what I felt made me feel good and help them to certain things in my life. But when I came into Oregon and lax and got, or I came to Oregon and I got involved in the industry, I learned the medicinal benefits. I learned about the endocannabinoid system. I learned about canabinoids. I learned about all these different things that blew my mind to if someone who was even an advocate or someone who liked it with someone who was completely almost in a one 80 from how I view cannabis in our country with.

Speaker 7: That's well said. The thing that blows my mind, uh, and, and I don't even understand it, I just know that we're onto something with the fact that the endoccanabinoid system is in my body and the cannabis plant is out there and those two things are built for each other. That's nuts.

Speaker 6: Yeah, it is nuts, right? But exactly. I mean, and there's cannabinoids and a lot of stuff, but the, the complexity of the amount of cannabinoids in cannabis and um, the fact that you have so many different types that have different levels. I mean, it's just, it's completely mind blowing, but at the same time it makes sense, right? It's Kinda one of those things to where it's like, you, you're looking at race and then you're, you're, you're looking at this, this white guy, there's a black guy and you're like, this guy, he looks different than me. He dresses different than me. He even talks a little bit different than me. Right? But then I go and I actually get to know that guy and I understand all the different things that we have in common and how us as people can help to help each other to be better people or all these different things we can kind of come together as puzzle pieces was something that I thought was completely separate. And I think this the same thing with cannabis. You're looking at something that can make you healthy and you kind of looked at it as something that maybe was going to hurt you. Um, so I think the, the, the race view and in the view on cannabis is, is similar in a lot of it.

Speaker 7: It really is. It's unbelievable how, how similar the two are. When you say, you know, I go over there, I talked to the person. I think that that's why I'm, I'm so confused by people not being able to get along because I've spent my life just talking to everybody, which definitely doesn't work for everyone I've spoken to,

Speaker 6: but it's like a, that's really all you have to do is just kind of say, ah, hey, hey, what's going on with you? And then if that guy doesn't, a girl doesn't want to part of the conversation. Okay, fine. But it's like just open the door here from if you're, you, if I'm me, if any, if you're anybody that's something I learned from my dad, um, is that you have something in common with almost every single person here, you know, but if you take the time, uh, to, to learn about that person and talk about it, you'll find that point where you have something in common and that's a connection and you will look at that person. You will look at the prejudices that you may have had about that person completely different. If you look, think about that principle. I think that we do all have a lot in common and it's just about taking the time.

Speaker 6: And the patients to understand what it is if you care. Alright. So there we go. Right? So if, if anyone's listening to this, I feel like we've got a few things to do. If you're, you, you know, you listener, you audience person. Uh, Jesse, thank you for, for doing this. Before you go, we'll do, you know, we've done the three final questions with you. But now what we do is every time we asked for a new song, so on the soundtrack of Jesse Jordan's life named one track, one song that's got to be on there for today. You know, I don't, I don't listen to, um, uh, um, I don't listen to a diverse set of music, usually hip hop, R and b probably. I've never heard of this guy. His name is Dj. Okay. Uh, from Atlanta. And the name of the song is actually my summer anthem right now. Just came a little while, is feed my family. And it's all about taking care of your responsibilities, not complaining and doing what you have to do. So that's, that's my anthem right now in life. I will, uh, listen, I'll match you with. We are family. How about that? Okay. There we go. I like it. I like it, Jesse. Man. We'll just keep having these conversations until we, you know, something happens or good happens. How about that? Until more, more good happened to more good happens to you. That sounds good.

Speaker 6: So that's a,

Speaker 2: I very much appreciate Jesse sharing. Um, I feel like we got a lot done there, a discovering and I'm kind of doing away with the concept of other. I think that might be a key. A key to this whole thing is you. Thank you so much for listening. Can't tell you how much I appreciate it.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.