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Ep.192: Marvin Washington & Betty Aldworth: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.192: Marvin Washington & Betty Aldworth: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.192: Marvin Washington & Betty Aldworth: MCBA Spotlight

Betty Aldworth returns to give us an update on what SSDP is up to leading up to election day. She’s doing her best to ensure that the youngest voting demographic registers to vote and does in fact vote in this ridiculous, inane, disgusting yet remarkably important election. Marvin Washington discusses what good coaching or leadership means and then dive into his involvement in cannabis. He’s interested in ensuring that he doesn’t get pigeonholed simply as a former NFL player- he’s wants to understand and communicate what the whole plant can do for the masses. We finish by Marvin discussing how the cannabis movement can help the current societal racial unrest and ensure that all of society has the opportunity to be involved.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Betty Aldworth and Marvin Washington, Betty Aldworth returns to give us an update on what SSDP is up to leading up to election day. She's doing her best to ensure that the youngest voting demographics registers to vote and does in fact vote in this ridiculous, Inane, disgusting, yet remarkably important election. Marvin Washington then discuss what good coaching or leadership means and then dives into his involvement in cannabis. He's interested in ensuring that he doesn't get pigeonholed simply as summer. NFL player he wants to understand and communicate with whole plant can do for the masses. We finished by Marvin discussing how the cannabis movement can help the current societal, racial unrest and ensure that all of society as the opportunity to be. Bob, welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social media handles can economy. That's two ends of new economy. Martin in Washington, proceeded by Betty.

Speaker 2: I had yogurt with honey and lemon

Speaker 1: yogurt with nuts and honey. I mean, this is like a very healthy breakfast

Speaker 2: theater. That's true. Well that's good. We need you healthy betty. We need you help. Yeah, exactly. It's hugely important for the, like, for the, for the proper functioning of. Yeah. Betty, like my nutritional needs. We need betty

Speaker 1: functioning on all cylinders.

Speaker 2: Yeah.

Speaker 1: Alright. So where are you in the world

Speaker 2: today? I'm in Tampa, Florida. I'm on my way to Fort Myers. Our students are hosting these Florida and taught French this weekend where they will be doing a lot of work around what are educated education and voter turnout in advance of the initiative as well as our, our typical work of uh, you know, training them up to be effective advocates and providing the skills building for them to continue to work after the initiative this past year.

Speaker 3: Yeah. We haven't done a ton of conversation around Florida. Give us a sense of what's going on on the ground.

Speaker 2: No, we've had this conversation here before in 2014. Uh, the initiative was run for medical and failed by just two points. Florida. Interesting place because such an initiative requires passage by 60 percent and we got 58 percent in 2014. Didn't quite cut it, so this is the second time already in sort of heard the conversation about the importance of medical marijuana for people

Speaker 2: who need it and they are, I think, ready now as as evidenced by the pole, the latest poll, all the polls has been strong since the beginning. The latest poll showed 77 percent support for a moment too, and we're pretty confident that this new revised tire initiative is going to get the voter support here in Florida. Now, that being said, this is one of those states were shuttled Sheldon Adelson and dumped a bunch of money to millions of dollars of onto the opposition campaign, I believe, and so you know, while we are confident about Florida, you can never rest on your laurels during a campaign, especially these last week he taught, no one's going to come out in the media. You don't know what's going to be happening in terms of opposition support, and we just need to continue having a conversation.

Speaker 3: Just keep pushing because betty, the people need to vote.

Speaker 2: Oh, absolutely. Listen, this election is going to be really a transformational in a lot of ways. We can safely say that the dialogue has changed and most people will agree not for the better, um, but when it comes to candidates issues and issues that are going to impact cannabis businesses moving forward, this is an election pay a lot of attention to not just because there's a ballot initiative. This is the very first election where millennials and Gen xers are going to outnumber everyone else at the ballot box and we also have the very first generation z boaters coming in this year. So the electorate is changing dramatically and rapidly due to the size of the millennial, the millennial generation. And even with low turnout, we're going to see a ton of millennials and Gen xers at the ballot box. So I think our politicians are shitty taking shape a little bit differently based on that.

Speaker 1: Betty Aldworth and Marvin Washington, Betty Aldworth returns to give us an update on what SSDP is up to leading up to election day. She's doing her best to ensure that the youngest voting demographics registers to vote and does in fact vote in this ridiculous, Inane, disgusting, yet remarkably important election. Marvin Washington then discuss what good coaching or leadership means and then dives into his involvement in cannabis. He's interested in ensuring that he doesn't get pigeonholed simply as summer. NFL player he wants to understand and communicate with whole plant can do for the masses. We finished by Marvin discussing how the cannabis movement can help the current societal, racial unrest and ensure that all of society as the opportunity to be. Bob, welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social media handles can economy. That's two ends of new economy. Martin in Washington, proceeded by Betty.

Speaker 2: I had yogurt with honey and lemon

Speaker 1: yogurt with nuts and honey. I mean, this is like a very healthy breakfast

Speaker 2: theater. That's true. Well that's good. We need you healthy betty. We need you help. Yeah, exactly. It's hugely important for the, like, for the, for the proper functioning of. Yeah. Betty, like my nutritional needs. We need betty

Speaker 1: functioning on all cylinders.

Speaker 2: Yeah.

Speaker 1: Alright. So where are you in the world

Speaker 2: today? I'm in Tampa, Florida. I'm on my way to Fort Myers. Our students are hosting these Florida and taught French this weekend where they will be doing a lot of work around what are educated education and voter turnout in advance of the initiative as well as our, our typical work of uh, you know, training them up to be effective advocates and providing the skills building for them to continue to work after the initiative this past year.

Speaker 3: Yeah. We haven't done a ton of conversation around Florida. Give us a sense of what's going on on the ground.

Speaker 2: No, we've had this conversation here before in 2014. Uh, the initiative was run for medical and failed by just two points. Florida. Interesting place because such an initiative requires passage by 60 percent and we got 58 percent in 2014. Didn't quite cut it, so this is the second time already in sort of heard the conversation about the importance of medical marijuana for people

Speaker 2: who need it and they are, I think, ready now as as evidenced by the pole, the latest poll, all the polls has been strong since the beginning. The latest poll showed 77 percent support for a moment too, and we're pretty confident that this new revised tire initiative is going to get the voter support here in Florida. Now, that being said, this is one of those states were shuttled Sheldon Adelson and dumped a bunch of money to millions of dollars of onto the opposition campaign, I believe, and so you know, while we are confident about Florida, you can never rest on your laurels during a campaign, especially these last week he taught, no one's going to come out in the media. You don't know what's going to be happening in terms of opposition support, and we just need to continue having a conversation.

Speaker 3: Just keep pushing because betty, the people need to vote.

Speaker 2: Oh, absolutely. Listen, this election is going to be really a transformational in a lot of ways. We can safely say that the dialogue has changed and most people will agree not for the better, um, but when it comes to candidates issues and issues that are going to impact cannabis businesses moving forward, this is an election pay a lot of attention to not just because there's a ballot initiative. This is the very first election where millennials and Gen xers are going to outnumber everyone else at the ballot box and we also have the very first generation z boaters coming in this year. So the electorate is changing dramatically and rapidly due to the size of the millennial, the millennial generation. And even with low turnout, we're going to see a ton of millennials and Gen xers at the ballot box. So I think our politicians are shitty taking shape a little bit differently based on that.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Having said that, as far as a disaffected millennials, at least in the voting sense, I mean, you know, on this issue, who can blame them? Uh, what, what are your thoughts on, on kind of turning on that electorate? Maybe not necessarily, you know, right now, but um, how can we kind of change that dialogue? What, what, what's the trick there you are of course with the students for sensible drug policy. So you've got a, a unique point of view here.

Speaker 2: Yeah, I mean listen a lot and it was just the way that people behave, right? Like the, the, the way that people have always the is that as they get older they tend to vote more. So we expect to see approximately 50 percent turnout from millennials in this election and um, you know, maybe 55, 56 among Gen xers and boomers are going to turn out at 60 percent or higher and much of that has, has very little to do with what's on the ballot or who's on the ballot candidate is going to pull out, pull out many letters and a compelling issue is when it is going to turn out many writers. But when you're really looking at what makes the difference overall in every election, it's age. So we do everything we can to have that conversation with younger people around why it's so important to get out to vote and how, how much their voice matters and there's no question that a marijuana initiative being on the ballot is going to chew trail voters, especially those 35 minutes, but so much. So much of it is really just about the ways that people behave no matter what else is going on.

Speaker 3: Got It. Yeah. As far as, uh, you know, uh, that focus though, um, where, where else are, are, are your eyes and where else are your feet? Um, you know, you're doing a fair amount of traveling,

Speaker 2: right? So, you know, I'm all over the place, the tree now and election day as doing everything I can to make sure that students are riled up. She'd be out there trending out there, appears on campus, but we also have students for sensible drug policy has staffers on the ground in many of these different states. So we've got folks in California and Nevada and Massachusetts and Florida who've been working all year to build up the SSEC presence and to be able to enact a really aggressive GSU strategy on campuses and these states. So we expect a huge voter turn out to be nudged, uh, uh, you know, by, by maybe a point or two in all of these various states based on SSDP efforts where we're looking to make that number of context or our funding. So we have a phone back, been running illegalized 2016. Anyone can join that phone bank. It doesn't, you don't have to be a student to call these very targeted voters who we know are highly likely to vote yes on the initiatives. And our high end are also, I'm a little bit less likely to get out and vote on their own. All they need is that extra push. So every listenership illegalized 2016 register there and call some voters and try to get them out to out the door and to the polling station.

Speaker 3: Absolutely.

Speaker 2: So yeah, so we've been working really hard in these states. We've tripled our presence in California. And Massachusetts, we've gone from zero campuses to know in Nevada, which is almost every bad. We've got folks on the ground in Arizona and um, and are working hard in every state to make sure that we can support these initiatives with specific efforts focused on those dates that we're most concerned about right now. I, he, Arizona and Nevada.

Speaker 3: Okay, well let's do those in order than Arizona, you know, uh, how are we looking? That's the red state to begin with as jp says.

Speaker 2: Yeah. So always others a little bit, you know, he came out from the Arizona Republic and cronkite was uh, was taken. Oh, just a few days ago between October 10th and 15th. Um, and that whole margin of error, shorter sentence showing 50 percent in support, a 41 percent opposed with eight percent undecided about where a chat for most of the election there was most of the season so far that is tight and it's going to require a lot of efforts on the part of supporters over the next few weeks to make sure that we're training people out. You know, it's, it, it, it's that the most concerning of state shirt as sturdy right now, but it's also a machine, a lot of like really strange when she comes in for the opposition, including, you know, the discount tire and the money from therapeutics, which makes sense. Chanel and essentially making a in a marijuana product. So the, the opposition campaign is quite well funded and it's certainly something to be keeping an eye on, especially if they're able to do some big ad buys and producing an ad that might be considered effective by the end and decided voter.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And uh, what I like though is that a time keeps marching on. So, uh, the longer those bowling, that polling data stays the same. The, you know, the better the chance. However you did say it's not what I'm most concerned about. What are you most concerned about?

Speaker 2: Oh, a husband show worried right now. It's a tough one. Polling does not look great in Nevada and you know, I know that electric rate really well. I was raised in Nevada. Um, I, you know, it's, it's a place where marijuana policy and drug policy is near and dear to my heart, uh, so that might have something to do with my concern, but it's also the polling which is a little bit brutal at the moment. Place Sheldon Adelson dropped shoe million dollars into the opposition campaign and uh, you know, the, the, the guys with the coalition to regulate marijuana like alcohol or doing a great job of, you know, a really strong media campaign. Um, but yeah, no, this kind of opposition dollars are real tough to come up against, you know, they've got the latest report has a supportive and 3 million and the opposition that just over two. And that's, I think the closest I've ever been in any election for marijuana related issue and it's showing in the poll support seems to have dropped a little more than we're comfortable with. And the latest poll that came out a couple of weeks ago, um, it shows a 47, 46 and seven percent undecided and that is close for comfort. So we're actually directing more of our phone calls into Nevada right now than any other state in our, just to make sure that we are really moving the needle with young voters in that state.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And that, that Adelson money is, is new, uh, you know, because, uh, that that's within the last nine days or whatever. Um, so. So yeah. Okay. So that's the type one we figured it might be Arizona, but it looks like it's going to be in Nevada and it is going to be, you know, because of Sheldon Adelson money. That's what we have prescribed all along, isn't it?

Speaker 2: Yeah. It's kind of what we figured. You're right. We thought, we thought from the beginning that Arizona was the patient. We were in a fight this battle, as it turns out, it looks like it's going to be in Nevada just about both of those seats are very competitive right now and we need to do everything we can to support those initiatives.

Speaker 3: Okay. So what, where do I go for that phone banking? Once again, if I'm listening and I just can't have it, uh, you know, uh, that Nevada is not going to pass

Speaker 2: legalized 20 sixteen.org.

Speaker 3: Okay. Um, and you know, Kinda

Speaker 2: like, like I said, anybody can use the phone bank, you can be 80 and have not been a student for 60 years and you can still use our phone bank too many calls and like I said, we have really tightly like we are calling those voters who we know are very, very likely to be in supportive the initiatives with a message of, listen, you got to get out to vote this year. And I hated it. Like we everything we know about the way that the electorate behaves, everything we know about the influences of age and ballot initiatives has fed into the strategy. And I think we can really move the needle on the phone.

Speaker 3: There we go. Move the needle. We will, uh, betty, you know, by now that I'm going to ask you as a final question on the soundtrack of your life, what name one track one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 2: Um, you know, I have been listening a q, a lot of miles Davis lately and I know that that's like not particularly enthralling and the sense of giving you any sort of lyrical inside. Okay.

Speaker 3: No, no, that's, that's good stuff.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Yeah. So, so, so two very disparate a albums we've been defining this election for me kind of blue and then the pixies surfer Rosa. So something else was one of those. We'll probably end up being the song is defining the selection for me. Let's check the math on November ninth and I'll let you know which is the most, uh, important there.

Speaker 3: That's a, that is fair. And just demonstrating how cool she is. Betty Aldworth with a, with a miles Davis selection. So Betty, I will get out of your way so you can continue your efforts. Uh, one more time on the phone bank. Where do I go?

Speaker 2: Legalized 2016. That Org. I hope to see lots of sex shredding in the efforts there.

Speaker 1: There we go. Betty, thanks so much. Speak to you soon.

Speaker 2: Thanks.

Speaker 1: This episode is also supported by Focus. Focus is working on independent and international standards. While offering third party certification for cannabis businesses, the foundation of cannabis unified standards helps build your business into the best it can be. Focus is not a regulatory agency, so they don't engage in enforcement. Rather the organization is in place to help improve operational efficiencies, decrease operating expenses, and ultimately increased profit focus will help you build your business in a sustainable way. Guarding against risk and liability all while protecting your Ip. Go to focus standards.org. So you're from Idaho, you're not from Idaho,

Speaker 4: Texas, Texas Fed when I die, but Texas. Dallas from Dallas says Fancy Dallas. Dallas is a good city. Yeah. It's fancy though, you know that, right? Is it really? I mean, you know, you know better than I do. I could see some of that North Dallas stuff that's real fancy. North Dallas Highland Park. Yeah. We got some, uh, some, some affluent areas over there. Definitely. I was in deep Belem in the nineties. What do you think of that? I was hanging in deep element in night. He said that's what I was fun then I was, it was absolutely fine with the green room. Had My buddy on day a deep, which is still down there. Um, uh, what else was down at St Buka was down there with Calvin at the door. Yeah, it was, it really happening down there. It was really happening to blind lemon. The clubs down there.

Speaker 4: It was good. Good area. So what, what, where were you in your life at that point in the 19 nineties? Uh, what were you. I was struggling up in New York with the jet and playing pro ball and uh, all the things that came along with that and they had a family and uh, yeah, it wasn't a bad time. I had a good time with it, you know, and, and all lessons are not, you know, all lessons to me or, or, or, or all experiences to me are neither good or bad. They're all lessons. All lessons are neither good or bad. They're all lessons. All experiences. Oh, okay. Are not either. They're not good or bad to me, they're all lessons. When you sack a quarterback that's not positive. That's very positive. That's good. That's very positive. People want to say it's better than sex, but it's not very sexy, but it's a pretty good here to tell us it ain't better than bad.

Speaker 4: Hell No. All right. So then how does Dallas get to, uh, get to Idaho? How, what everybody needs a home. And so coming out of Dallas, coming out of high school, I was a high school basketball player and I went to Utep. I played for coach Don Haskins for, for two years and we were top 10 in the nation and we had a little guard named Tim Hardaway. That was my roommate. Heard about him. We, we, we, we were pretty good. And uh, the guy that recruited me to employ a who went on to coach with the balls and use with. He's back at utep now. He, that was his first head coaching job at io. Following them up. They're not to be confused with sleepy floyd either way. No, not from Georgetown because I can't give you 40. But let me ask you this about sleep, about Georgetown, right?

Speaker 4: Because you're about to write a you, you and me, or that was the greatest national championship game I've ever seen in my life in 1982 with a Georgetown North Carolina man. That was like, I still watch it on youtube. It's still a. I get the same feeling. That was the greatest game ever. And I remember the whole year. Paranoia. But let me say this, in 1985, we beat Georgetown at Utep. Did you? Well Patrick Ewing was. Well 85. No. Wait a second. Oh, later in the year after it came out in 84. He was in the draft with uh, with, with. No, no, it was [inaudible] 86. We beat. There you go. Yeah. There we go. Yeah. Because I remember. No, because that, that, that final four in [inaudible], 85 was three big east teams. Uh, St John's Villanova, Georgetown. And then the. What was the outline? What was the other thing? I do know that Rollie Massimino in the boys in the Villanova took it home.

Speaker 4: Yeah, they did, man. They shot lights out. They shot the lights out. That was a. So there you go. So you were, you're a fan too, right? I'm a, I'm a man. I, I go back way back. I'm an old Aba guy. Okay. Definitely a, well, my father worked for braniff airline and we spent a lot of time in Denver, Colorado. And uh, that's where their base was and whether they were in Dallas, but we have relatives up there and then I started falling. David Thompson and Thompson complaint. David Thompson, few could play. He could give it to you. He had 73 and 77 almost wanting to score entitled with George Gervin. Went out and had 63. That's the iceman. Yeah, that's the iceman. So yeah, I remember the iceman artists deal more. David Thompson, Matt Calvin. That's out here. All those guys. Dr Jay. Yeah, man. What position did you play? I play power forward six. Six. Power for it. I really couldn't shoot but I could play some defense and pounds during the, in the paint.

Speaker 5: You're a Charles Barkley? Uh, I guess. Yeah, something like that. Something like that. Okay. But you're not saying you're Charles Barkley. I mean, he's just saying he's not. I'm a better athlete than that. We gotta we gotta tell them

Speaker 4: splitter basketball player Charles. Charles was a force of nature, but you know, that was back in the, uh, the eighties where, you know, you had the six six and under power for, from a, or a small forest for like Charles Barkley. Uh, Adrian Dantley, mark mcgwire. Those guys could, could really scoring the pay. Yeah, man, he was a, he was a hell of a player to that. That whole Pistons team. They had a what? Mini vinney microwave Johnson. Do you remember him? Because he's a baylor guy. It's all Benny Johnson play play in college. That's a Baylor southwest conference guy. Yes sir.

Speaker 5: Why didn't you go play basketball then? What? What did I tell you? I did. I played two years for Don Haskins. I was out in Youtube. I saw the youtube to step in in its inception. Let me ask you this then. Why football? Because that's a short career. What do you know? When I was at on Youtube,

Speaker 4: I was like six, six to 35 and that was pretty big back then. And coach Haskins used to always tell me, and finally he was like, mom was calling, this is this, this is something that you need to follow. And I'm thankful that I did because one of the things that he told me, he was like, Marvin, you don't want to be sitting on the couch at 40 years old having regrets. You need to get this thing and try. And so I did and I'm thankful for it and I'm, I told coach asked him is that, you know, during my career, uh, that I was thankful for them and tell coach Tim Floyd that just all the time, if it wasn't for him and coach Haskins, I wouldn't be here. I wouldn't, you know, I would just probably be, you know, working in a law enforcement or doing something like that.

Speaker 4: But I'm happy that, you know, sometimes the decision has to be made for you because I didn't want to leave basketball. Kind of felt like a failure, but they knew what was best. And how did they. Talking about mentorship now, right? We're talking about coaching, we're talking about actual leadership, getting out and playing basketball, playing football, you know, because I had a father and he was enough for me and I really didn't need the father figure or what have you, but he there and they were telling me athletically like, you need to try this. And I did how my question is, how did they approach you? In other words, this is a guy that loves basketball, this guy that wants to play basketball. And here's two guys telling you, you know, you said Mama's gone there. They're pushing you. And football was it, was it a, uh, an uneasy feeling or was an uneasy feeling if you new co task and you know, everybody, he's a hard man, but he was compassionate and he was just like, this is best for your future.

Speaker 4: Okay. And uh, I tried it. I'm glad I tried it at Idaho, not in the southwest conference because I was a six slash 16 slash 35. Deepened Chavez tried. I'm glad. Glad I tried it in the Big Sky Conference and instead of the big fan or something like that. But, uh, I tried it and a play one year basketball at Idaho and play one year of football and the year I played I said it's sack record and uh, I could run and that got me there. And the thing is, is that I didn't develop any bad habits and football, uh, I was already always just like fundamentally sound because I learned the game the right way. Now. Who was, who was the football coach, if you, if you learn the football coach was key person who went on to become a head coach at Washington who would become the head coach at cal Berkeley and was the personnel director for the Cleveland Browns for a number of years.

Speaker 4: So I had some good coaches. I definitely had some good coaches. My uh, uh, another guy in the defense of staff was Ed tail and now he's with the bears. Now he's been in nfl for 20 something years. And I had good coaches. What, what's a good coach? You know, La, la La. Let's actually sent her this because you had Haskins, you had these guys. And it sounds like you're giving them the credit, you were the player, but you're giving them. The thing is, is that what's a good coach, a good coach is you can have a coach that teaches the system, but you can have a coach that teaches fundamentals and the fundamentals. You can go play in any system that if you learn the game fundamentally you can play anywhere. And that's one of the things that coach Haskins a preached about was fundamentals, especially on the defense event and a coach give us until we were learning football, you know, at, at a lower level.

Speaker 4: But I was learning to correctly. So I didn't develop any bad habits with my stance, my hands or what have you. I remember watching films that he was showing me, your guys that were doing it right from reggie white to how long or what have you. And so that's what I picked up on. Reggie white. Not Bad, Huh? Yeah. He was a freaking day, right? Yeah. He, yeah. He will preach a sermon to you on Sunday. You get a chance to play against them. No. You were defense, but do you ever get a Oh hell yeah, and one of the things is I tell people that see 1993 went up to Lambeau and we finished eight and eight that year, but we were, it was late in the season and we were fourth and a fourth and a like one and we're going in to get a field goal.

Speaker 4: We could have won the game and for whatever reason, our defense coordinator had our nonblocking tight in our past catching tight end trying to blog reggie white and it was he threw, he threw that guy at the bar and sat the raping your stopped there back in the back row for like a four yard law. I, I will never understand that. You can't do that, right? I mean, come on. And this guy that we had as a tiny, I'm not gonna mention his name, but he shouldn't have been blocking anybody. He should have been spread out or out the game and we got a blocking tight end in there. All right, so reggie white. You know, what, what if anything know did, did you get a chance to, to, to chat with him ever and talked to him about what he said he'll preach to, you know, just, uh, I talked to the guys I played against them, keep talking and read, read you will one of the guys that, that is an nfl films or whatever, one of the guys, uh, you know, try to cuss at Reggie and Reggie told him he was going to bless him and Reggie did bless them, bless them.

Speaker 4: Finally the guy apologized to reggie so, you know, Reggie, Reggie would bring it. He was a freak of nature and may he rest in peace? Absolutely. Alright. So Idaho happened and id here comes a draft. Yeah. And uh, what were your expectations? My expectations was, here's the thing, I didn't go to the combine, but I had 23 teams come and look at me. There was only 30 teams, so I knew I was going to get drafted because there was 12 rounds back then. And uh, the Dallas cowboys came down. Jimmy had just gotten a job. Yeah. Jimmy Johnson. I ran like a four, seven, seven, eight, four, seven, nine for, for a defensive. That's good. And I thought I was going to the cowboys in the fourth round, but they took Tony Tobar, who's my homeboy who was at utep with, he was playing football, a totally hike and ski and put a for four, six, nine, eight, something like that because we were the same size, same player.

Speaker 4: And they took him and then I thought it was going to go to go to the seahawks and then the draft ended and then the next morning about 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM, 10:00 PM eastern, the jets had drafted me and the guy got me on the phone. He was like, you don't sound too enthusiastic. Like, dude, it's like 70, 30 and you're. So you're saying it was just the time of day. It was just the time of day. And I was drinking my sorrows the night before, but uh, know that that happened. And I went to the jets and I had to make it because they had drafted three different defense alignment ahead of me. Uh, and so I had to make the team and an idea because when I came they said they were only going to keep 60 defense lineman, but I forced them to keep centered when people watch hard knocks on a TV. Ever watch that. Yeah. I've, I've watched you since its inception. What are your thoughts on that as somebody that's been through that it's realistic. Uh, there's no over romanization of, of, of what happens, but it's not, you know, once the camera goes away and what have you, they get real technical and then you get with football. But it gives the casual fan, uh, a view of training camp, but it's not, it's, it's, it's, it's not the whole picture.

Speaker 5: Speaking of, uh, a fan. Yeah. Tell everybody what jet fans are. What, what's a jet Fan? Explain jet fan long suffering. No, but they're very low. They're very passionate.

Speaker 4: They bleed green and white and uh, uh, the jets are, you know, the frustrating thing about the jets, I was just thinking about that because I'm going to the uh, just played the seahawks. Uh, uh, October second, I'm going to see Pete Curl. All right, who was my defense coordinator for four years at the jet and then head coach for one and Richard Leon Hess in all his wisdom fire Pete Carroll for Richie Cotai. Yeah. And for the next two years we went to like four games. The last 28 the jets are starting to do develop a program because you know, if you got the giants, it's a hard nose defense run. The Patriots have their way. The 49 have their way west coast into jets. Their way changes with each coach. Did he get. But now they started to get a program and I hope they stick to it because I really like tod bowls. I liked the job that they did it and hopefully the joy, jets, loyalty a fans loyalty would be paid off to them because they deserve it.

Speaker 5: They do. Yeah. Just one last thing on this football stuff because you got to get to cannabis. Pete Carroll as a coach, a great coach, energy guy obviously very, very interested to see. That

Speaker 4: was his first head coaching job and I think he got, he, as I said, all experiences are good and bad, not good or bad. They're all learning experience and I think he took that and said this wasn't going to happen again and it didn't. And he went to New England. He won, but not to the expectation level, but you know, he's, he's one of the top three coaches in the game right now, right. Because he went from there to use and he dominated at USC, got that program back to. They were back in John Robinson, Hay Day, uh, and uh, uh, Mckay coach, Mckay student body, left student body, right? Or thought Jameson. But, uh, he, he got that program back and he's doing a hell of a job in Seattle with a young team. And he kept, I think he kept 15 rookies there. Wikipedia there.

Speaker 5: All right, I can see that. So we're here at the show. So now let's get to cannabis here. Well, you, you, uh, you mentioned that this isn't your first Rodeo. You've been paying attention to what the cannabis industry has been doing for quite some time. You and I have a friend in common nurse, Heather, who we both love, which is fantastic. Yeah, but will take us in the wayback machine. How did you find a cannabis where you. Were you one of the guys that pain management while in your playing days?

Speaker 4: Well, of course I was on the form of pseudo per regiment that they, you a. because I was on edge. Well, we were out. It was a dark ages. Nobody knew about ct, no concussion protocol, no pain, uh, knowing about the negative side effects or what have you. And I went into the financial industry after I retired and I got approached by a company that academies, medical company that actually had a, a crater with a, an nih, national institutes of Health to a study, a cbd as an antioxidant, neuroprotective for regrained in relationships with concussions because that's when concussions. What happened I think was 2012, 2013. And that was really, you know, in the forefront. And so I knew what ct was. I knew about the suicides, the knew about this, uh, the stats on that and I knew there had to be a solution to it and so I said, well, the solution is going to come from technology and science and I was with that company for three years, but in that time I come to these conferences and what have you.

Speaker 4: I wanted to learn about the whole plant. And so you mentioned nurse Heather. She was one of my teachers and I met one of them today call a one to Jane. She's the first black later on the dispensary in the state of Colorado. Yeah. She's phenomenal. And earner and her husband and they were telling me about this and so it was an education process to, to me, and it still is a. I spoke on a diversity panel today and I know they had that, the football talking about their, their, their parents paddle with the Stanley brothers and I'm close with them and it's no issue because we're moving this movement forward. Sure. But, uh, I want to go wide and deep in this industry. What are you just not be pigeonholed into? A talking about concussions and the sport.

Speaker 5: Oh, you're a football guy. We need to talk about concussions with you. You're saying? Yeah, of course. Of course. No, no, no. What you're saying is there's a bigger picture here. There's A. There's A. There's a big one

Speaker 4: picture here and I want to spread the word about this movement and the whole plant, the cannabis whole plant and the medicinal benefits in it.

Speaker 5: When when you say Narsad is one of your teachers, talk about what you do know you're coming at it from concussions. You're coming out from cte are coming at it from a perspective, but then you have been educated and now you do know. What do you see what you said deep and wide? What are you looking at?

Speaker 4: Well, about this whole plant height can help everybody from kids to to senior citizens, to active people, to athletes and ex athletes. I believe that this plant was put here for our benefit and it's time to end the prohibition. I believe that contrary to a lot of people in this industry, I want big farmer to get into it because I know they're. There are positioning so we can get that money and research behind it because they cannot change, reinvent the wheel, right? Uh, I definitely want this to be something alternative to the pharmaceutical and opiate, a routine or regimen that professional athletes. This goes from football to UFC to baseball to basketball. You know, you can't medicate these guys for 17 weeks with these heavy narcotics for eight years, 10 years, whatever cutoff their insurance, two or three years after they quit plan and then turn them out to society and say, okay, you're on your own.

Speaker 4: You got to give these guys some alternative and even let them take over there on medicine care, but let them be educated. And that's one of my ultimate goals is to get this into the NFL and if there's ever a sport that needs to experiment with the cannabis plant is, it's the nfl because the NFL is not a contact sport like basketball or like hockey's a frequent collision sport and in guys are hurting, uh, before the game, after the game and all during the week. And I know how they're medicating themselves. And so I just want to have an alternative because the nfl has stuff on his band list that they'd still let players take. The players that have this Ritalin, you know, that they have add or whatever. They take Ritalin and adderall, right? Why not have cbd and you have that and they call it a temporary use exception to you is why not have thc is the, uh, you, you've been, you've know, fought for the shield.

Speaker 4: You've been, uh, you know, you've played a under the NFL. What is the thinking do you think? Well, the thinking, very aware. They're aware of what I'm doing and I know Roger Goodell says there are falling the science, their medical team is following the signs, but they need to lead the science. But let me say this, like whenever there's a dangerous industry bid, auto automotive for coal mining or whatever it is, trucking the industry. It's always been the workers have a union that initiates the safety measures are the safety, the safety guidelines. And so this is something to me that needs to come out of our players association. And I'm talking to them and I think that's where you can get the most traction from because, you know, I understand the NFL supposition, but I think our union really needs to be behind this. How, how are we doing with the union?

Speaker 4: Uh, how does, uh, at either rubber tree one bite at a time and eat elephant one bite at a time? Man, it's, it's, it's slow going, but, you know, be steady, be persistent and eventually it's going to come. We, we, uh, I've spoken with Leonard Marshall who calls himself a [inaudible] 96 guy, uh, spoken with Ricky Williams at the Godfather. The godfather of this movement. Yeah, that's a grandfather. That's the father of this. You know, ricky, you know it. It's still taking some flack. If you look at, do they post a story about them? You'll see in the comments section, there's still great career way just to smoke pot, this, that, and the other. It's quite the opposite. But in 25 years, 35 years, then look back and people are going to be like, what the whiskey Tango Foxtrot. Were they thinking this guy was ahead of his time and he's going to be recognized they had an assignment. I tell you that every time I see them because I think he should get his grade because I know a lot of guys are get minute, but I was in it when it was me culturally and ricky and I know how hard that was, but ricky was in it when it was just ricky. Right. And, uh, I think he's history is gonna show him to be on the right time. That's Rick Delorean, right? You know? Yeah, man. Yeah. He probably needs a Nobel peace prize.

Speaker 4: He'll get there now. You know, as far as [inaudible] 96 [inaudible] 96 for you. The way that you're talking, explaining it to me that what it was later mean by pre nine slash 11. He was. The way that, uh, that he's talking to is basically they changed the whole, you know, a system. As far as retired players, there's, there's pre $96. 10. Oh, okay. Yeah, I understand that. I understand that because will enter came in I think in the eighties. I understand that, yeah, there is a, yeah, there is a difference basically, but there is a difference and, but be persistent with that and take it to the union. I think I don't want to get too too often to it because I, I had a, a guy that was trying to dethrone the union leader the last time, the election up, so we'll revisit that in 2020.

Speaker 4: But the thing that the players have to realize is they're all going to be x players. It's the 3,600 active nfl players at one time, but there's 20,000 ex players, uh, we need to move some of those benefits around, like the NBA just voted. The NBA Players Association just voted to pay for the health insurance for all their explayers. A NFL can certainly do that. The Nfl Pa can certainly do that. Put a pool of money for x players. How realistic is it that you think, I think is very realistic because we just seen it done by the NBA and NBA is a third, third highest reducing Revenue League in America behind the NBA, Major League baseball and the NFL. And the NFL out signs environment outpaces them by far. I would argue that that's a bigger issue and that's a bigger fight and yes, it is not as possible. Tell us, take us through where you are as far as cannabis being a medicine and having the NFL PA and the fight that, that, um, concentrate none in my area of concentration.

Speaker 4: Now he's trying to get cbd into the NFL and the whole cannabis plant and let them look at it and scientifically look at it, study this and see how it can benefit their players. Because when you say any oxygen in neuroprotective, that means protected. Uh, and this is something that can happen before a game, after game. And even at the point of contact, they're doing some things in Israel that, you know, the soldiers that are, get the ids or whatever they're applying a canabinoids in, in, in, in the cannabis plant tour, you know, to lessen the effects of the concussion. Why can't we do this in football? You know, because there's no helmet that's going to stop a concussion. They stopped the open head fracture, but it's not going to stop the close head injury. We need to do something because despite the concussion protocol, despite their awareness of it and, and all that, the treatment of it is still the same like it was 20 years ago. It's still the same. So let's try something because this is something that the nfl, you know, to me has to do because I know the stats from 2010 youth participation. I know the stats in high school participation. I noticed that's in Texas going to, you know, it's going down and things going down to Texas when for when I grew up in Texas, there two, two sports, there was football and there was spring.

Speaker 5: You're going to say church, that's a religion. But uh, there was football,

Speaker 4: spring, football. And if you participation is going down in Texas at all levels in the high school level, a Houston, we have a problem. Yeah. Literally. Yeah.

Speaker 5: I want to talk about a couple of other things. Go ahead. We don't have a ton of time. One of them is, is societal, and I've been talking to, you know, I don't know if you met Neil Franklin yet at a leap law enforcement against prohibition. Go have it. Um, but there's groups here that are coming in and uh, that are, uh, good bedfellows, you know, with this industry. Before I get to that, as far as the players are concerned, we talked about the league, we talked about the player's association. When you talk to other players, are you or is that, is your message getting, getting through to them? Do you think

Speaker 4: as far as the. Are you talking about an ex player is a current player. Everybody, they know the medicinal benefit to not going to name names, but you got to a cannabis cocaine to cook for a lot of nfl players. You get guys that use it instead of, you know, they're educated about it. So instead of taking the Naprosyn and innocent and the anti just to get through a Wednesday, they're, they're vaping, you know, they're doing edible because it has the same effect as there are anti inflammatory properties in that. As far as the ex players goes, just to educate them because they know more than I heard you in the marijuana industry. Well you have to educate them and tell them about the medicinal benefits. But I, I, I can tell you this, when their family members in trouble, when they're in trouble, I've received calls from them or their spouses or their parents and they go, Marvin, we heard cannabis can help and I send them product and it does help them and some of the guys don't thank me, but I'm fine with that too.

Speaker 4: I'm fine with that too, as long as you know, because here's the thing. It's just like what society a sports is a microcosm of society. I'm not going to get in something that I'm not going to jeopardize your, your livelihood, cbds. Not going to do that, but I'm definitely not going to get into any ideology. Talk with you about your religion or what have you, uh, because I'm just not going to do it. What I want you to do is to do the research and follow the science and then come to your own conclusion. Right? That's what I want you to do. That's what I want explore to do. That's what I want people in society to do. When, when you say ideology, so that, that's why I brought up the Bible Belt Church. Yeah, I understand that. So I brought him Neil Franklin because uh, you know, he's bringing in law enforcement and, and kind of explaining.

Speaker 4: He was a foot soldier in the war on drugs and he had, I don't even know what that means. That's horrible. That war on drugs, is this horror by which you have a war on poverty? There we go. Oh, excuse me. No, that's fine. Podcast, man. We can send it. But you know, he, he is bringing folks along that were, you know, knocking down doors and, and, and making problems in communities, um, in support of what he thought was right at the time. Exactly. He's been enlightened. Exactly. Exactly. We all come to that point of enlightenment. And the thing is, if you talk to him and I have relatives or friends in law enforcement and I always asked them to see is this questions. You've been a domestic violence calls, hundreds of them. How many of them involve alcohol level in a minute? They'll tell you.

Speaker 4: Most of all of them, right? How many involved candidates? Almost none, right? Not at all. So this is not. And, and, and I don't think, uh, this is something that law enforcement should be. I think it makes their jobs easier, you know, it makes their jobs easier. And so if the DA and the federal level, the federal government is not going to reschedule it, then I think it comes to the local cities and municipalities through to decrease the license because I don't see a, a, a, a kid who has a dime bag, you know, get caught up in the criminal justice system and get a, get one strike against them. And that's one of the reasons that I was speaking of diversity panel too, because people that have misdemeanor crimes, they're locked out of this industry. It's like this is stupid, but if there are certain states were felons can own firearms.

Speaker 4: If there certain states were felons can vote, and this is, there are states like that in America, why can't they be in the marijuana industry? California is working on that with, uh, with prop 64 says there's good news coming and hopefully on to that end. Oh, it's going to come because whenever you put this before the people it passes and uh, this is a general election is going to pass overwhelming. California's a bellwether state. That's it. That's exactly right. I just want to key in on, on law enforcement while I have you here because again, like I said, we're kind of about the same age to the last time that I remember a law enforcement issue in society

Speaker 5: back in Rodney King Days, right? Early nineties. And it feels like that. That's back again. I don't know if you want to talk about this if you don't just pat me away. I think it's happened.

Speaker 4: It's society and I was just telling somebody like every 40 years, uh, in America we go through a revolution. Like we went through the counterculture one and the 60 and the roaring twenties and industrial revolution. I think it's back because there's an undercurrent here of social justice, whether it's with the marijuana movement, whether it was the black lives matter, whether it's with the climate change, what have you, and I think this is the apple cart needs to be overturned a little bit because it's the same system that we've had since the 60. It's not working for everybody and so it has to work for everybody. And uh, there is that and there's, you know, for a reaction. There's a counteraction. Nobody is for. Nobody's against law enforcement. Nobody. We all know the sacrifice that they do in society. We're just against the bad ones. That's it. That's it. The ones that want to go out and brutalize citizens, the citizens that they're supposed to serve and protect. Nobody's against them, you know, but I think there's something that's coming in, in, in, in society and it's happening with this movement, this green rush movement. It's happening. And I think law enforcement realized the futility of the war on drugs.

Speaker 5: Well, your Dallas, the Dallas a guy is, is perfect on this. Of course, you know, he's, he's a, he's really kind of, I think he's retiring, but I think he's, he's really bringing this conversation to them.

Speaker 4: People. I, I really liked what he said after the incident in Dallas. It's like, well, instead of protests, they'd come in and sign up and do China Chinese and says, let's do this. You know, in Dallas is one of the cities that, I know Texas is a red state, but all the major cities in Texas, uh, over $100,000, blue state or a blue cities, uh, Dallas, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, midland, Odessa, whatever. Every state over 100,000 brought, took in 2012, 2008. So these are blue municipalities. And so Texas, Dallas, just a decriminalize small amounts of marijuana and that, that's a start because they know the futility of it. So why would a guy, the police officers can be out on the street patrolling, preventing crime, stopping crime, but he busted the guy with two joints. You get to come in and arrest them and write a police report and takes them off the street for an hour and a half.

Speaker 5: Yeah, that's what Neil Franklin said. He's is, you're asking these guys to do too much. They shouldn't have to do, you know, they shouldn't have. I have

Speaker 4: to do that. They shouldn't have to do that. And, and, and they know and they, and they know that this plant is, it's harmless. Like, what's the kid's going to do? He's not going to outbreak windows. Not go out, commit crime on marijuana. No, he's not. You know, they need to deal with, you know, the criminals. There's only a certain amount in any, uh, any community. There's only a certain amount of, of, of people that are hardcore criminals and they know that. So they need to give them the most attention instead of stopping the kid that, you know, that has a blunt in his innocence.

Speaker 5: Last thing on this, it's kind of to the side. Spoke about social justice. Bring up Collin Kaepernick making a stand by taking a knee. What are your thoughts on that?

Speaker 4: I have no issue with it. This is way this, this, this country was founded. It was founded on protest that was found on a revolution. So the thing that, that, that's what me, if Mohammed Ali, who was my idol, uh, outside of my dad, that, that was my guy, my dad introduced me to him. He almost got a state funeral, you know, but people forget that in the sixties, Mohana leaves probably most hated person in this country for the stance that he took, you know, and this is something that calling I believe is on the right side of history because when the things were happening the summer, you know, my son is 24 years old, another one is 18. Maybe you're wondering what the winter, when the things were happening in the summer in Minnesota and in Baton Rouge and what have you. They were frustrated and I had to tell my sons like, Yo, take a social media break because this thing, it drives me crazy. You need to, you need to take it easy, you know,

Speaker 5: and they get away. Yeah. Because everybody, everybody was frustrated.

Speaker 4: Boom, boom, boom. Everybody was frustrated, but I was telling my son, it's like, what do you think about your grandfather? Grandfather is 70 something years old, what do you think he saw? I said, I've seen this. I've seen it. The Rodney King, I've seen it plenty of time, but there is some way. Now they have a way to channel it because it's just, that's his frustration. So what else is he going to do? But he has a big platform, so why not? He's not being disrespectful to anybody or whatever, but he's telling you he's tired of the way

Speaker 5: that this country is going and treats minorities, which, you know, we don't get the fair enough, fair enough, fair shake of the stick and so I can understand it and I'm behind him. One hundred percent. So we're, we're up to three final questions are going to tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. Go ahead. Before I get to those, you know, as far as this industry is concerned, where are you going with this? You know as as, as you go here, you know what's, what's the next step when you, when you and I and talk and what are you going to do? My number one thing is to let people know about the medicinal benefits because there's to me like what is, what does society have a problem with right now it's the pharmaceutical prescription drugs and opiates and pharmaceuticals will then

Speaker 4: I have speaking on a panel tomorrow with a two people who have treatment centers and they using cbd, you know, I want people to be aware of that bed because even when they detox, they're giving him these horrible freaking drugs, so I want to let people know about that in my number. Number two is I spoke on the panel, the diversity panel today. I don't want this, this, this, this movement to be like silicone valley or, or the tech industry where it's all ruled by a Caucasian white men that are making all the monies and we're just being consumers. So I want our community, black, brown, yellow, whatever. I want us to go wide and deep. We don't just have to sell and grow wheat. There's all types of ancillary business that we can be in and I want to let the people know, but some of that sun on us too because hell come to Texas and talk about we'll go to the Bible belt and talk about marijuana, you know, so we got to get rid of that and that's what I want to do because knowledge is power and so follow it to its natural conclusion to see that this plan is good and get in this business because it's, it's just a lot of smart money is going to be coming in here by 20, 20.

Speaker 4: It's going to be $35,000,000,000 industry. We need to have a piece of that pie and that's how we will heal our community and bring it up and put this money back into the schools and educate people and give them opportunities. This is one of the things that that I want because I have a buddy that they went up for the, for licensing in Maryland. They did the unblocked unbiased blind scoring at Penn state. They were in the top 15 once the state commission get their hands on it. They were 21. How did that happen? Yeah, and it's minority group and they're raising holy hell up there. And as well as well as they should have because they played by the rules that you put out there. There wasn't asking for notes, special, uh, affirmative action or anything like that. They just ask for a level playing field and they got it and you still want to pull this, this, this cannot stand. It cannot stand. Here we go as well. They should. That is a Texas thing by the way as well. They should as well.

Speaker 5: Three final questions. I'll tell you what they are asking for the order. You might have already answered this, but what has most surprised you in cannabis? That's the first question. What has most surprised you in life? I'm excited for that one. And on the soundtrack of Marvin Washington's life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first though, what has most surprised you in cannabis might have already answered it?

Speaker 4: No. Cannabis is medicine. I'm most surprised about the intelligent people that, that are behind this and knowing that they only want to help society, you know, and most of the people, 90 percent of the people in this business want to help people and not make profit. People that want to make profit, they're not going to be here. You know, a lot of people in the industry say that. It's interesting. This is a different industry, isn't it? You have to want to help people. I believe that first and foremost a that says that in the book, if you know, uh, I don't want to talk about the book, but if you follow all these other things will be added unto you. Let's just say that everything else will be added unto you. So if you help people, everything else will be added unto you. I got you.

Speaker 4: I'm coming out of the Prequel, but I got you. Okay, good. Do you know what I'm saying? Yeah, man, I'm with uh, what has most surprised you in life? A life to me. It's always a journey. There are people that, that help you along your journey. But I think if you really want to be free, you have to go inside yourself and find yourself and I think when you find yourself, you will find the creator because too many times where we do what our parents are doing, what our relatives do, but you know, and I tell people like, uh, I grew up a Christian because my parents were Christian, but if I were to grow up in, grew up in Saudi Arabia, I would have been a Muslim. If I grew up in India, I would have been Hindu, you know, and I believe there is one creator, but there's just all these different religions out here.

Speaker 4: And it caused some, uh, some anxiety. And, and I guess some resistance with it. When I came out, like, listen, I'm not part of organized religion anymore. I'm on my own, my own journey. And I might, I might, I, I am at peace with where I am at. I am because, uh, I'm not attached to. I don't need a witch doctor in between me and the creator. I'm with you. And it's also, what's nice is that you can still use that book. You, you still take lessons from, you know what the book is good. It has a lot of lessons there and kicks a lot of people in the ass. But. So does the Crohn's. So does the book of Mormon. So does the boot is, it does give you. My thing is, is this, and my father had a saying he doesn't care what the individual does to find, fulfill boulder light meat can be Muslim or Christian as long as he's not crawling through his window at 12 midnight still this tv, you don't care where you get and he's a lot more colorful language than what I'm using. I saw you immersing your words. So whatever journeys for you. But this is my journey. That's it. Yeah. Alright. So I like that. That's a good answer. Yeah. Soundtrack of your life. Uh, I, I got to choose between Marvin Gaye and Jimi Hendrix. Oh, I guess I just, I got to go with a little sexual healing.

Speaker 4: I'm sorry. But those are two my favorite artists, you know. Let me give you the Jimmy Answer. What, what, what song would it have been a man? I think I'm just purple haze and kissing the sky. The Sky? Yeah, man. Yeah. I'm a big Jimmy Fallon, uh, my, my mom had a husband before and so I have an older brother that's, I think it's 12 years old at me. So I, I, I consciously remember meeting him in 1971 and I was six, but he had just finished high school or college. Yeah. So he's a little bit older than that, but he came and took over my room and it's no big deal. But uh, he was listening to Jimi Hendrix and honest, a eight track and I came in there and he said, you liked that? And Jimmy Hendrix was going down. One of its risks I think was, hey joe, whatever.

Speaker 4: Jennie Hendricks, it was just him by himself. I said, who are those guys playing? The Guitar Guy? It's just one. So whenever he would leave, I would sneak into his room. We go into work. I would put it into Jimi Hendrix. When he had the, uh, the, the battery, the battery faced, in fact, I used to wear all these batteries, listen to Hendrix. That is fantastic man. But I'm a big fan of him and music of that time. And, and uh, yeah. Last thing I want to say about that is like, I'm a big fan of his music. It was time and, and I'm sorry we lost some of the icons and I was really down about prints and it's not like I knew him, but through their music, Prince Michael Jackson, Whitney, Marvin Gaye, Jimmy, whatever. Their music got me to know myself. Absolute biggest thing. Absolutely. That's the biggest. That's the biggest thing. And that's why I asked this question. That's the thing that's losing these guys two iconic singers to this opiod addiction. Yep. We, we have to stop with it. We have to stop, we have to do something and give the medical doctors and alternative and natural alternatives. Nonaddictive nontoxic because we can't do this. Marvin Washington. Let's go do it. Let's do it. And there you have Marvin Washington.

Speaker 1: So first things first, get a get through to the NFL, PA. And while you're at it and let the rest of society knows what's good. So I'm very much appreciate marvins time. Very much appreciate Betty Aldworth time as always, and her energy and her efforts. And thank you so much as always, for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.