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Ep.209: Amanda Reiman & Kyla Hill: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.209: Amanda Reiman & Kyla Hill: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.209: Amanda Reiman & Kyla Hill: MCBA Spotlight

MCBA Spotlight: Amanda Reiman, DPA & Kyla Hill, Hemp Butter
It’s Amanda Reiman time once again and with the win, Amanda joins us to discuss what we the people can do to participate in the language of how Prop 64 gets written into law. Amanda shares that localities will be dictating where state licenses can be had. One thought is for folks to discuss with local elected officials that no cannabis in a locality means no cannabis tax revenue in that locality. We then discuss that individuals have the opportunity to go to town halls and public hearings to meet and greet public officials and to give direct feedback. So essentially, act now or forever cede your peace. Kyla Hill then joins us and gives us her unique perspective on people, product and inner-peace.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Amanda Reiman and Kyla Hill. It's Amanda Reiman time, once again, and with the wind. Amanda joins us to discuss what we, the people can do to participate in the language of how prop 64 gets written into law, Amanda, to shares that localities will be dictating where state licenses can be had. One thought is for folks to discuss with local elected officials that no cannabis in a locality means no cannabis tax revenue in that locality. We then discussed that individuals have the opportunity to go to town halls and public hearings to meet and greet public officials and give direct feedback, so essentially act now or forever. Seed your piece. Kyla hillman joins us and gives us her unique perspective on people. Product and inner peace. Walk into a cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the habit can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Amanda Reiman, Kyle Hill.

Speaker 3: Oh God, nothing good. I had a packet of nuts from starbucks leftover from the airport yesterday.

Speaker 1: Okay, well let's. It's it's protein or what they say is good fat.

Speaker 3: Yeah, it was fine. It was, you know, it wasn't my most nutritious breakfast, but we got in. We were delayed out of O'hare. We had to fly from Savannah to O'hare and of course were related o'hare because it's O'hare short and united that we didn't get home til really late last night.

Speaker 1: Well, welcome back. Thank you so much for giving us a few minutes once again, which would mean that it's Amanda Reiman time.

Speaker 3: It is.

Speaker 1: So congratulations on the heavy lift. A prop 64 has passed.

Speaker 3: Yes, it has passed and has passed quite convincingly, which is always great to see. It was, it was not a nail biter. Uh, it was a very convincing when including wins in all three counties that make up the Emerald Triangle. So it feels good to know that the farmers are ready to, the public is ready and regardless of what happens at the federal level, we are moving forward.

Speaker 1: Yeah, we'll get to the federal level in a minute or maybe we won't because we have the pleasure of speaking with Ethan about that as a matter of fact. Um, so I do want to talk about prop 64 and what about the day after? So this is the day after the week, after the month after, whatever it is, we talked about what was in the bill and what people love or didn't love or kind of misunderstood if you will or you know, kind of didn't understand, uh, you know, as far as, uh, the verbiage, uh, now we are in a place where we're going to actually write this into law. And so I wonder if I'm listening to Amanda and I actually really do want to change things or be involved in any way. What are the various ways I can do that?

Speaker 3: Well, I think there's several ways that people can be involved now than before. It's. So one of the things that the main focus for DPA and pop before was the retroactive relief and sentence restructuring for people who are currently incarcerated or who have records related to marijuana. And one of the big critiques during the campaign was, oh, this isn't really going to get anybody on a jail that wasn't really reducing anything. That's not really going to help anybody and we know already that that's absolutely not true and we're getting cases. I've every day report the people who were charged with felonies that are getting them reduced to misdemeanor, that either paying a fine or having their charges dropped completely of people who are getting out of jail early because their sentences have already been served. So this is a process that is already taken off and so if you're somebody out there who has a case related to marijuana or a charge on your record related to marijuana or you're currently on probation because of marijuana, we use investigate what your rights are regarding getting your sentences reduced, getting off probation. I believe the attorney general of a website in California now has information about what people need to do in order to get that process going. And there's a myriad of amazing criminal defense attorneys here in California. I'm like, oh, Mark Figerola and Joe Rogan away, and Annie Margolin and all of them do amazing work. Helping people get these records expunged. Seek out an attorney, find out what your rights are, and that's something that each individual now can do to help clear themselves.

Speaker 2: Amanda Reiman and Kyla Hill. It's Amanda Reiman time, once again, and with the wind. Amanda joins us to discuss what we, the people can do to participate in the language of how prop 64 gets written into law, Amanda, to shares that localities will be dictating where state licenses can be had. One thought is for folks to discuss with local elected officials that no cannabis in a locality means no cannabis tax revenue in that locality. We then discussed that individuals have the opportunity to go to town halls and public hearings to meet and greet public officials and give direct feedback, so essentially act now or forever. Seed your piece. Kyla hillman joins us and gives us her unique perspective on people. Product and inner peace. Walk into a cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the habit can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Amanda Reiman, Kyle Hill.

Speaker 3: Oh God, nothing good. I had a packet of nuts from starbucks leftover from the airport yesterday.

Speaker 1: Okay, well let's. It's it's protein or what they say is good fat.

Speaker 3: Yeah, it was fine. It was, you know, it wasn't my most nutritious breakfast, but we got in. We were delayed out of O'hare. We had to fly from Savannah to O'hare and of course were related o'hare because it's O'hare short and united that we didn't get home til really late last night.

Speaker 1: Well, welcome back. Thank you so much for giving us a few minutes once again, which would mean that it's Amanda Reiman time.

Speaker 3: It is.

Speaker 1: So congratulations on the heavy lift. A prop 64 has passed.

Speaker 3: Yes, it has passed and has passed quite convincingly, which is always great to see. It was, it was not a nail biter. Uh, it was a very convincing when including wins in all three counties that make up the Emerald Triangle. So it feels good to know that the farmers are ready to, the public is ready and regardless of what happens at the federal level, we are moving forward.

Speaker 1: Yeah, we'll get to the federal level in a minute or maybe we won't because we have the pleasure of speaking with Ethan about that as a matter of fact. Um, so I do want to talk about prop 64 and what about the day after? So this is the day after the week, after the month after, whatever it is, we talked about what was in the bill and what people love or didn't love or kind of misunderstood if you will or you know, kind of didn't understand, uh, you know, as far as, uh, the verbiage, uh, now we are in a place where we're going to actually write this into law. And so I wonder if I'm listening to Amanda and I actually really do want to change things or be involved in any way. What are the various ways I can do that?

Speaker 3: Well, I think there's several ways that people can be involved now than before. It's. So one of the things that the main focus for DPA and pop before was the retroactive relief and sentence restructuring for people who are currently incarcerated or who have records related to marijuana. And one of the big critiques during the campaign was, oh, this isn't really going to get anybody on a jail that wasn't really reducing anything. That's not really going to help anybody and we know already that that's absolutely not true and we're getting cases. I've every day report the people who were charged with felonies that are getting them reduced to misdemeanor, that either paying a fine or having their charges dropped completely of people who are getting out of jail early because their sentences have already been served. So this is a process that is already taken off and so if you're somebody out there who has a case related to marijuana or a charge on your record related to marijuana or you're currently on probation because of marijuana, we use investigate what your rights are regarding getting your sentences reduced, getting off probation. I believe the attorney general of a website in California now has information about what people need to do in order to get that process going. And there's a myriad of amazing criminal defense attorneys here in California. I'm like, oh, Mark Figerola and Joe Rogan away, and Annie Margolin and all of them do amazing work. Helping people get these records expunged. Seek out an attorney, find out what your rights are, and that's something that each individual now can do to help clear themselves.

Speaker 1: Well, there you go. That's one of the reasons why we say cannabis loves lawyers, but that is something that is happening right now. Right away you're seeing, you're seeing that change immediately. You're seeing action immediately.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. And so this is an action that people can take before the licensing goes into effect before any of that happen. So I really encourage people who have been impacted by this or have a friend or family member who had been impacted by this to look and see what their options are. Excellent. And then of course, as we said throughout the entire campaign and as is the case with our medical cannabis regulations in California, so much is going to be determined by what localities decide they want to be their cannabis landscape look like. And we're already seeing of course, as expected, a rash of bans on commercial candidates activity in counties in California that has never been cannabis friendly. You know, we're not seeing these in places like San Francisco and Berkeley, but you know, areas where you know they have tried to shut down any cannabis activity for the past 20 years are now formalizing that opinion through Bam.

Speaker 3: Now, of course we know it's probably before that if a locality decides not to allow commercial cannabis activity, they also do not get the local share of the tax revenue, so we may see some of these bands become resended once localities see that their citizens are simply driving five miles down to the next town, getting their candidates there and then the next town is getting the revenue that bands will be short lived, but what we need is we need people on the local level to go and talk to their board of supervisors to talk to their city councils when these bans and regulations are being discussed, especially patients because something else that was bantered around a lot during the campaign was how bad was going to be for patients. Now, of course, we haven't seen that either. In fact, if you have a state medical cannabis ID card starting November.

Speaker 3: Nice. He we're. No longer paying sales tax at the sensories that benefit when into effect right away, but if you're a patient and you want to ensure that you have access in your community and your community makes the decision to regulate rather than band, you need to show up. You need to go to city council meetings, you need to meet with your board of supervisors. You need to pay attention to what's happening at the local level because that is where it all starts. So you know, licensing at the state level isn't going to happen until January 20, 18. But by then we'll pretty much know which localities will be letting those same licenses come into town and which will not. So those decisions are all being made now. So that's something that people need to do and get actively involved with. And then I would say the third thing is the fact that there are state level regulations happening and this is happening both at the bureau of cannabis regulation and through the legislature.

Speaker 3: So individuals have opportunities to go to town hall to give feedback to bureau on topics like cultivation and processing and manufacturing and distribution and people should take advantage of that. And similarly during this next legislative session, there's going to be a big push to reconcile and Crsa, which is our medical cannabis regulation with prop 64 to create one unitary program that gives patients a financial incentive over non patient in the marketplace. So that means we're going to be adopting some aspects of ncrs and some aspects of prop 64. So if there's something in one of those that isn't in the other that you feel really strongly about, you're probably want to get involved with a group like California normal or drug policy alliance for other people that are gonna be in the legislature trying to ensure that the best part of each piece of legislation to make it through to the final model.

Speaker 3: So for example, prop 64 allows people with drug felonies to get licenses in the industry. It's possible that the police chief could push back on this and the next legislative session. So if you believe that this is important, you should be ready to fight for this, right, and you should be ready to write letters to your legislators and let them know how you feel about this. So there's going to be a lot of activity in the legislature over the next session that's going to determine what the final model looks like. You have a piece of that, but you're really concerned about making sure that your local legislators know about it, find out what it's going to be discussed at the state level, and make sure that your voice is heard

Speaker 1: as far as letter writing. That could start right away. You'll want to wait until they get back to the office to do the phone calls. Uh, but, but definitely start writing those letters right away. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Well it depends right away. You can be more general letters. So saying things like, you know, I'm really glad that the state has legalized marijuana and I want to impart to you how important I feel it is to ensure and protect the rights of people who have been formerly incarcerated for drug felonies. Have the ability to get licenses in the industry and why you think that's important. Now, of course we don't know if that's gonna come under attack. So another thing to do is to wait until a specific bill is introduced and then send a letter to your legislator about that specific bill either in support of it or against it, because that's going to help them determine how they're going to vote when it comes time to do.

Speaker 1: That's how you directly affect the vote right there.

Speaker 3: Yes.

Speaker 1: Excellent. Okay. Fantastic. And I love the fact that, uh, you know, no matter what, you can go to your local jurisdiction whether you're a consumer, a patient, an entrepreneur, a business owner, a or just a, a interested party. Um, and, and start knocking on those doors right now of those leaders.

Speaker 3: Oh, absolutely. And of course, let's not forget that now marijuana is legal, so we're not criminals asking to do shady thing, right? We're not people that are consuming out an illegal product or breaking the law for our behavior, which gives us so much more leveraged, not just with our local officials that our chambers of commerce, other local businesses. So we really need to take advantage of the fact that we're now talking about a legal, regulated commodity and the State of California, which will reach changes the dynamics of these conversations.

Speaker 4: Yeah, no, absolutely. We're simply people that eat cheese. We have the same rights,

Speaker 3: well or well vegan cheese.

Speaker 4: Exactly. Uh, you know, uh, attack cheese at your, uh, at your own peril. But, um, so, okay. So there is a lot to be done. You know, things can happen right now. So then let's talk about a Nigga know now that we've got, um, you know, California under wraps because this is a quick one. Um, with all due respect to the WHO, uh, let's talk about, uh, you know, perspective Attorney General Jeff Sessions, uh, again, we spoke to Ethan and I know, you know, what he thinks and says about that. Uh, what would you add from your perspective is, as you know, as we go here?

Speaker 3: Well, um, you know, it's a very scary thing. I'm not gonna lie, um, you know, I think the big question, trump direct or delegate, uh, these responsibilities regarding how the country views drug use, um, if he delegates and leaves it up to the ideologies that those in charge, I think we do have a big concern because they are driven by ideology more than money. And I can't say the same thing for our president elect. If you think that we have the benefit of having a lot of other marginalized groups in our quarter now, whether had you know, a good thing or not, just from the broader perspective, I don't know, but sessions sessions is not just an enemy of marijuana, especially as an enemy of gay rights sessions is an enemy of women sessions as an enemy of aspiring Americans from other countries sessions as an enemy of those with disabilities.

Speaker 3: So we're not just talking about a group of cannabis consumers, it's going to come under fire. We're talking about groups of people who really create the umbrella of what social justice is. So I think that now more than ever is the time for us to reach out to other organizations and other tamp that specialize in protecting the rights of individuals that have the potential to also be subject to his ideology and that if we band together under the umbrella of what it means for, to have social justice, I think we stand a much better chance of protecting ourselves then if each group reaches out under their own interest.

Speaker 1: Absolutely. Um, you know, and it probably can't hurt to, uh, you know, whether you want to wait for the phone calls but start writing letters to your senators. Um,

Speaker 5: oh, absolutely. Absolutely.

Speaker 3: Groups that are doing petitions in DPA has done one. Glu has gotten one, so there's a lot of ways to speak out against sessions. Um, most of the group that look after the rights of marginalized communities have ways to contact senators around those concerns. Absolutely. Start that now. And don't assume that just because you're represented by a Republican, it means that they're not going to listen to you because this is not normal. These, these people that we're seeing put into these positions of power. This is not just regular republican versus Democrat. These are very scary individuals with very extremist, racist, antisemitic viewpoint. And Republicans have a responsibility to recognize that this is not just a Republican, but that these are very dangerous people. So don't assume that just because you're represented by a Republican, that they're not going to be on your side. In fact, you can even frame it as, look, even you as a Republican understand the danger that putting these folks in power create for our democracy. And I think that that's a way to go about it that may be successful.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, absolutely. And in terms of jeff sessions, he, you know, was rejected as a federal judge. Uh, you know, what, 20, 30 years ago, um, you know, for his, uh, for his own beliefs, which is a, which are the same beliefs which has helped him get to the position that he's in. So it's interesting, uh, where we are as far as where we've been, um, you know, on, on these issues, so. Okay, great. So there's stuff to do there as well. There's stuff to do at the federal level. Of course, you know, you did have a chance to breathe. Yes. You took at least a break for the, uh, for the holiday for Thanksgiving

Speaker 3: I did, I did have a chance to breathe and he had spent some time with my family and you know, I'm very, very fortunate because I have a family that support my ideology and my viewpoint and so, you know, one thing I don't have to worry about is going to family time and having some like crazy racist uncle talk about how trump's going to save us all because, you know, I just don't think I'd been handled that.

Speaker 1: Sure. Well, I mean, hey, you know, that's uh, let's see. Let's see how this goes, I guess, right?

Speaker 3: Um, yes and no. I mean obviously we're going to have to see how it goes. We don't know the future, but that doesn't mean we just did back at the house.

Speaker 5: Oh yeah, no, that was not my. Yeah,

Speaker 3: yeah, we have to remain vigilant. We have to, you know, get past the distractions of the, you know, sensationalism and really think about what's happening in ways that we can actually impact it and I hope that people are out there taking this seriously and that it won't just kind of wane and become kind of a, well, you know, we'll just see what happens because I think that there's been times in history where we've taken that same approach and it has not turned out well.

Speaker 1: Yeah. No either here or elsewhere on the globe. Okay. Well, you know, we didn't have much time. And so as a final question, I'll ask you the same final question. You know, for the soundtrack, what would you add for today?

Speaker 3: Sure. Soundtrack. Oh, you know, I knew you're going to ask me this and then I totally didn't think about it. Oh, you know what, I have a song that I've been thinking about lately. I don't know if you're familiar with the song by Nancy Sinatra. These boots were made for walking

Speaker 1: again, that's just what they'll do.

Speaker 3: Yes. And I've been kind of playing that song in my head recently, I think it Kinda started towards the end of the campaign. Um, and so I think, you know, maybe it's just a shout out to the nasty women everywhere who have found themselves back in some kind of crazy 19 fifties parallel universe where we're all wearing gogo with beehive hairdos. But I feel like one thing that this election has done as really brought out a women's voice again for the first time in a way since the 19 seventies about what it means to have our independence and have a quality and even sitting back for awhile and, you know, maybe we're not going to do that anymore. So I would say that as a warning, not just the political world, but I would say that as a warning to the cannabis world because if there's an idea that we're just going to proceed at every other industry and it's only gonna get usurped by the same player. People are sorely mistaken because the women involved in this industry are a special type. And um, and we're definitely not the type to lay down. So, um, so I think that this was elections fired up a little bit.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, that's a, that's true in general and an absolutely in the cannabis industry. Uh, you know, I, I, I know that the dudes that have been around in the industry for awhile, no what you say to be true, so I'll just put it that way. Um, uh, Amanda Reiman, thank you so much. As always for Amanda Reiman time, very much appreciate it.

Speaker 3: Oh my pleasure.

Speaker 1: And, uh, I guess, uh, finally, uh, come on, boots. Start walking. This episode is supported by above and above and it takes the pain out of people's passions. Maintaining a human or guitar or cannabis flower is a painful time consuming. Mystery Bova makes it all very so you have more

Speaker 4: time to enjoy your passion. Lab testing of cannabis within without Bova found story and with Boavista retains 15 percent more terpenes. Top cannabis businesses are using both of to cure store and merchandise flour. And you should too, go to [inaudible] dot com slash herbal or on social at bulb to ink. For more information,

Speaker 6: there were nine marijuana reforms on the ballot and uh, within the last 30 minutes, you know, we can say that eight of them have passed, so that's great. Yeah. With me and yeah, congratulations to me and you know, that's definitely great news. We can kind of see in most things and we can also see bad in most things because for some people they might not agree with the legalization of cannabis. Sure. And, but you were okay with it, you know, for the most part I would say that my views are a little different than most advocates I find because as a business owner and kind of seeing what is keeping out big Pharma and big business, it's like the fact that it's not federally legal is the only thing that's stopping them. That's correct. So I'm a firm believer in decriminalization as well as legalization with regulation.

Speaker 4: Okay. Fair enough. But you aren't necessarily, you're not fighting the battle of dea scheduling because you liked this whole idea of let me establish my business while, you know, it's just us small to midsize players.

Speaker 6: Uh, well, not necessarily just establishing my business, but shutting out the potential businesses that are going to make this big farm all over again. Uh, it's like there's a button that these companies are waiting to press when that federal legalization is lifted. When the dea scheduling is completely lifted, there's a button that they'll press. They've already scouted land. They're already growing plants. They already have facilities, they already have their packaging, they already had their products. And we're essentially gonna turn cannabis into the new tobacco as well as big farm. Okay, well

Speaker 4: let's talk about new tobacco first because it's different crops, right? And then we'll get to big farm.

Speaker 6: What do you mean? So what do I mean? I mean a way to control how we are ingesting medicine. So for example, pills are going to be pop in, uh, these smokeable cigarettes that have other chemicals in them are going to be popping. Um, and as far as other products to come, you know, everyone's going to be trying to find that addictive quality that they could people back that makes their product superior. Just kinda like cigarettes. You know, there's hundreds of different chemicals in cigarettes and you know, the nicotine and the tobacco is only one component.

Speaker 4: So staying on cigarettes, staying on that aspect of what you're talking about.

Speaker 6: Uh, I guess that's easy. XXIO.

Speaker 4: Yeah. And then we'll get to the other thing, but uh, as far as near them adding chemicals, here's what I years Mike intention, even if they come in and do that to their product, um, I wonder if the, you know, obviously everybody potentially as a cannabis consumer, but folks that, uh, right now or cannabis consumers seem to me to, to think of the plant differently than they think of cigarettes and some people do smoke cigarettes to smoke cannabis and you use cannabis, whatever. Um, I feel like the majority of folks that are cannabis consumers now see it differently, evaluated differently, wouldn't necessarily be into a added chemicals. Obviously there's a. because everyone is a cannabis consumer, could be, there's a slice that certainly don't care and would be fine with it, but I think I'm, a majority of folks would probably refute it. That's not necessarily your point of view.

Speaker 6: Well, you're absolutely correct. And I would say that they're going to find a way to relate to our younger generation who aren't going to know the way that we experience it, that we've experienced it since the sixties. So when they come into this world and they're old enough to make the decision to consume on their own, perhaps due to price point, do to appeal due to what is popular at the time, they're going to be drawn to what's available. Yeah. And you can see how the trends have changed. There's old school people, uh, that are still fine with, uh, what people would call swag, which is more like outdoor grown,

Speaker 4: well outdoor grown for you. So we're on the east coast. What, and this is an east coast perspective, which is nice for the folks that listen on the west coast because that's not quality is what you're saying. Right.

Speaker 6: Local, you know, and a lot of people have different views on that because that's just kind of from the ground and it's and manipulated in a sense. But when you look at the way that people are growing now, they have so much power from the seeds that they start with as far as genetics, uh, to manipulating the lights, the nutrients, the Ph, and all of those things, you know, you don't necessarily have that control in nature. Um, so the sixties versus the cannabis that people are consuming now, I would say that this new generation, they're not even necessarily into flower the same way they're onto concentrates a. So maybe some of them have never even experienced the flower. Right, exactly. So it's just going to be popular. I'll

Speaker 4: point out at this that, that you and I are different ages, right? And I a way more familiar with flower than anything else. And so I'm, I'm with you on that, respect it, you know, as far as, you know, this new gender, you just spoke of this new generation, so you're not a part of it. When I'm looking at millennials, it seems like. Right. So what do you mean? Well, how, how do you evaluate that with yourself outside of it?

Speaker 6: Okay. Well, I'm at the opposite end of the spectrum as far as millennials goal, so I'm the oldest millennial that there is a, so I'm kind of in the middle where I can relate to old school methods of flour and swag as well as new school which has concentrates and torches. Uh, so I just think it's a matter of, uh, what our younger generation, the younger millennials perhaps are exposed to and even the schools that we go to, the areas that we grow up in that's going to be kind of different too as far as what is appealing to a certain person of whatever age, you know, look, the younger millennials, when they're old enough to make that

Speaker 4: decision. So how does, how does big Pharma play into all of that? Or is that separate? Are we still talking about, you know, folks in tobacco or other spaces that are going to encroach on that market that you speak of?

Speaker 6: Okay. So we're all kind of an experiment. Uh, and there are tests, studies and there are people whose job is to kind of watch our buying habits and where they can advertise an influence, certain chemicals that are in cigarettes for example, or let's, let's not even talk about cigarettes. Let's talk about candy. Like sugar. There are certain things that are in our foods that make your brain have the sensation of being full or a certain amount of sugar that keeps you coming back. So all of this has been studied, so that's why companies have specific ingredients that they add a to make things. So it'll kind of be the same way. They're already running experiments by what they're exposing us to in the sense that, okay, well if they like this type of box, for example, there's a reason why the boxes looked the way that they do. There's a reason why certain commercials come on in a certain time. There's a reason why billboards are in certain areas and I'm sure there's going to be like regulations on how you can advertise, but there's ways to find around it. You know, prior to being in the cannabis industry, I was in marketing, so

Speaker 4: no know of what you speak.

Speaker 6: Yes, yes. Uh, so I spent a lot of time, uh, specifically, uh, Xm or experiential marketing, activating and kind of face to face marketing. So you're probing people constantly. You're getting feedback from them, you know, what they're looking for, you know, how to appeal to them, you know, what not to say and what to spend more time talking about.

Speaker 4: Let's dive in there. What, what, when you were doing that, what kinds of products, whether you want to name them by name or not, but you know, what industries are kinds of products were you talking to folks about?

Speaker 6: Uh, anything from mobile devices to foods such as soups, coffees, um, sports branding, uh, with Nike, Adidas,

Speaker 4: I feel like we should go back and understand how we got to have butter. We just understood the, you know, what you call Xm experiential marketing. I know that to be radio, but that's a whole different thing. You're from DC, you from the DC area.

Speaker 6: I grew up in Hawaii. I've been in my life for. I've been in the DMV for over half my life. Right.

Speaker 4: DMV, DC, Maryland, Virginia. You just told me that. Correct. Grew up in Hawaii. Yes. So why would you ever move from Hawaii?

Speaker 6: Unfortunately it wasn't my decision. I come from a family with a military background. My father is a retired major. I thank you for your service again. Thank you for your service. And with that, you know Mr Hill, Mr Hill and with that we were stationed in Virginia and this is where my family decided to set up a life for my sister and I to have stability and go to the same school without moving around younger or older sister. My older sister. So how many years? She's two years older than her. Birthday's coming up. Happy early birthday. Kendra.

Speaker 4: Well there you go. Let me ask you this. What, what age were you when you left Hawaii?

Speaker 6: Uh, I was six when I left Hawaii. Hawaii, of course. Yeah. What kind of stuff were you doing? A lot of. A lot of the influence with the brand is from Hawaii, but I can remember a trips to the beach, the waterfalls. I remember the weather. It rained a lot. You know, we talk about the rain and a Washington state. It rains like that in Hawaii also during certain times of the year. The difference is the sun is out, so you see a Rambo's it's a quick drizzle. It doesn't pour all day. Um, I remember fresh fruit, pineapples. I had a mango tree in my backyard and I didn't like the mangoes at the time. Sign ever take advantage of that. I remember all of the diversity. Now that I can look back.

Speaker 4: Well, what do we mean by that?

Speaker 6: Uh, kids in my class. Uh, it wasn't like it was going to school in Virginia. I had, uh, any ethnicity you can think of almost in my class from Asian to Hispanic, White, black, and uh, it was a lot more diverse than it was when I moved to Virginia. I was in New Jersey for a while as well.

Speaker 4: Okay. In New Jersey, Virginia. Uh, what were classes like?

Speaker 6: Um, I was

Speaker 4: meeting in, in terms

Speaker 6: of diversity in terms of diversity and I only noticed this older as I'm older looking back, but I was the only brown person in my class or I would say there were probably three of us out of, I'd say a classroom of 24 students

Speaker 4: and now we are looking at this retrospectively. So it seems like it didn't affect you then until you kind of realized what was, you know, until you grew up type of thing. But what lessons do you now know what, what did happen in retrospect, you know, coming from a diverse class and going to a not diverse class?

Speaker 6: Um, I went to see a geographical location. Um, you know, the area that I lived in was predominantly um, white. Uh, so children went to school in that area and they happened to be weighed as far as not noticing that being exposed to so much diversity at a young age. I didn't see color and I don't necessarily think that that changed. But now that, you know, we have conversations and kind of looking back, I can say, Oh wow, you know, I didn't notice that before, but now I see that I was one a few with you.

Speaker 4: Well, when, when did this become apparent to you? And I'll. So, um, I grew up in a predominantly Jewish place. I'm Jewish and I didn't realize that Jews were a minority for quite some time. Uh, and then I realized it wholeheartedly. Um, and so my understanding of my reality as a kid has completely changed, you know, as, as I grew older and it's completely different now that I'm an adult. It sounds like it's similar. It's obviously very different, you know. Um, but you have a similar thing that has happened. When did you realize, like, I was in college, I realized I was Jewish essentially. When did you realize you were

Speaker 6: black? Um, I would say, uh, I always knew I was black. Um, I would say that I realized I was different when I started to care about my appearance more so I would say right around middle school. And it started with my hair, you know, I just had this desire to change the natural texture of my hair and make it straight at the time. I didn't know why, but it Kinda goes back to the whole marketing thing and what we see around us and what is sold to us, what we are role models look like and all of those things. So that's when I realized that I was different because I had to do, I had a different process to make my hair straight versus my friends, they're here was already stripped. Right. So that's just one example.

Speaker 4: Um, okay. And happened in, in middle school. What, what else was going on at that time? Because that sounds, it's obviously a transitional phase. You start caring about your parents

Speaker 6: grades, your grades change, uh, your, your goals change your objective.

Speaker 4: Did you work with them? I'm not saying I'm, I'm asking the immediate question to you. So how did your goals change? How did your, how did your whole thing change? Obviously, besides the, the, uh, the body changes, but you mentioned the hair. What else would, how did your mindset change is what I'm getting at?

Speaker 6: Um, I felt like I needed to fit in and in order to fit in I had to change my appearance and

Speaker 4: wholeheartedly hold high component in totality. Yes, totally changed my appearance. And you did that? Yes. And then, uh, you, you obviously Dutch junior high school, high school, did that affect high school in any way? Were you still kind of in that mindset in high school?

Speaker 6: Um, no, I was never really in the mindset at that age. I only really noticed these things looking back because I've learned otherwise. But during that time it was just normal and it was just part of being a teenager.

Speaker 4: When did this again become apparent to show? So we've got the, you know, you're a little kid, you have one reality in Virginia, you realize something's a little bit different when you're a little kid, but you don't make a change until junior high school. When did you, do you know, when did you undertake another change? As far as mindset?

Speaker 6: Okay. So I started questioning things more than ever. I'm out of high school because I wasn't really in with the traditional path of going to school, getting married, having kids, going to a nine to five job abnc sign. I knew I was different. So I would say I realized that out of high school. And as far as

Speaker 4: while you were still in high school or just after leaving the African, leaving high school. Now let me ask you this tangent question. Right? So we've got major hill who seems like he's probably a pretty traditional guy as far as the things that you mentioned. So how can kyla daughter Kyla not be into these things and how did dad take that when, you know, you made him aware of that, that, that fact?

Speaker 6: Um, well my parents, both my mom and dad have been great role models and they trust my judgment so they might not be on board with what I'm doing right away, but they do their best to understand it and we don't agree on everything, but they kind of accept my decisions because they trust them.

Speaker 4: Good. So again, you said, you mentioned not traditional family. You said [inaudible]. Think what, how did that become apparent to you?

Speaker 6: Um, as far as non traditional family? Um, uh, what do you mean exactly?

Speaker 4: I, I'm just trying to take what you said. Do you see, uh, did you say not having are.

Speaker 6: Oh, the traditional way of life. I'll say so there you go. I guess elementary school and high school is preparing you for college. Sure. Which is preparing you for career, which is. Yeah. Which is preparing you for settling, which is kind of like the next step of getting married and having a family and it's almost like you do things in a certain order and if you don't, you're shunned upon not so much now as it was, you know, earlier on,

Speaker 4: you remember those old millennial?

Speaker 6: Yes, exactly. So if you're not doing things in that order, then something's wrong with you, you know, it's like why are you not doing things the traditional way? Uh, so that's when I knew I was different because I wasn't excited to go to college. I was excited to build my businesses and being an entrepreneur. And it's crazy having these conversations with my mom now because she knew that I wasn't going to go to college also before you knew almost possibly I'll have to ask her when she realized it, but I realized that I actually did go to community college while I was in high school because I figured out that I didn't need to spend the whole dance school and get credits because I already had enough. So I was like, how can we play this? What can I do so I'm not wasting my whole day in school. And then that's when I was like, oh, well let me try to see if I can enroll in the university and take classes and get credits at the same time and you know, balance my time that I would normally be wasting time in high school.

Speaker 4: Cool. Wasting time and wasting time in high school. So you, I mean, this is a real entrepreneur right away. How am I going to optimize my day? How can I be most productive, possibly most productive throughout the entire day. So what classes did you start taking?

Speaker 6: Uh, so right away I started taking the entry level classes, so that was a English 100, one math and one on one. Um, I took a business class and I took a psychology class.

Speaker 4: Now did you know what, let me ask you this. So those are basic, you know, the basic one-on-ones on the way in. Did you know where you were going as far as what you want it to do with that education or was it simply I need to optimize my day?

Speaker 6: Um, it was knowing what I didn't want to do and I need to optimize my day

Speaker 4: so I don't want to waste time. What else was on the list of what I don't want to do?

Speaker 6: Uh, well I used to run track and field and I was kind of over that. I didn't like the coaching. Like I, I can take direction, but I'm more of a leader. So when you have someone yelling at you and telling you to run 800 meters and you don't want it, it's just why am I doing this? I'm not getting paid to do this. And I was, I was okay on the district level, but I didn't see myself going to the Olympics for track. So. Got It.

Speaker 4: So then what are we doing this for? Decent shape anyway, right now. How good were you though?

Speaker 6: Oh, I had a pr, uh, and the, the hundred, that was 12. Five. What's your personal record? Which is 12 slash five, which was good enough to qualify for the regional level at the time. Uh, so I would say that I was pretty decent. I was one of the fastest girls in my school squad, but I would get crushed at regionals.

Speaker 4: Got It. Okay. So it wasn't, I wonder if you knowing yourself now if you were better. Yes. You know, if you weren't gonna get crushed at regionals or didn't get crushed, your regionals and actually came out on top [inaudible], would that have been a better use of your time? Would you, do you think you would have stuck with it or was it that ultimate, you know, hey, I'm not going to the Olympics. So even if I'm winning regionals, I'm not into this. What, what do you think?

Speaker 6: It was more a matter of I didn't like to practice it like I had outgrown it and it was more of a job than it was fun and just the anxiety of coming out of those blocks, like I felt like I was going to die every time and I didn't want to feel like that anymore.

Speaker 4: What was the anxiety about the fastest group? One of the fastest girls in the school. What do you mean

Speaker 6: when you're anticipating the gunshot for when you have to come out and knowing that if you come out too early you're going to ruin a disqualified and just having all of those things in your mind and then also just the finish line ahead of you. So using all of those aspects of your brain, it really creates anxiety and it's like until that gunshot goes off and you're just a wreck.

Speaker 4: So you know, with, with without the, uh, stepping over the line too soon thing what you're describing sounds to me like every day in business. How is it different?

Speaker 6: How is it different? I wouldn't say it is two different. I'd say that if it's something that your hardest set in, you're going to do it whether you don't like it or not. So that's kind of how you could tell where your heart is.

Speaker 4: So the anxiety was based on the fact that my heart isn't here yet. I still have to perform. Yes. Look at that. Look at what we figured out.

Speaker 6: Thank you for explaining that. I wouldn't have been able to put it into words.

Speaker 4: Um, well you did. I think with us together is really the key there. All right. So, so that's track and that's kind of your mindset in high school and taking some classes in, in community college and realizing that you weren't going to go to school. What was the first business? What was the first idea? Was it

Speaker 6: this? Well, I had businesses, uh, in school as well. Um, I sold candy. I used to go to the commissary and pick up the six packs and it was like thirty cents or less a bar and I would sell it at school for seventy five cents. So, you know, my kids were pretty good, like I was making over a, I was making over 50 percent profit and that's kind of where it started. And then, um,

Speaker 4: got it. Where does that come from? So if your dad's a military guy, does it come from him?

Speaker 6: Uh, my dad's an entrepreneur at heart. Um, I think that he chose the military route for his family, for my sister and my, yeah, my sister and I and my mom. And so he chose that route and it's paid off, you know, like I, I really admire my dad for being able to do that because as an entrepreneur it's hard to kind of put your, your true passion to side for the whatever, the greater purposes. And for him that was his family, which is a nice thank you. I can't thank him enough for that,

Speaker 4: which is amazing because that's, he's being brave twice, you know, he's putting his neck on the line quite literally for us. And then he's also putting his mind on the line for you guys. He's like, I'm just going to do this because it'll be better for them. Yeah, that's pretty good. We'll talk to him another time. I guess the opportunity. I think meanwhile we should do this now. I guess he knows somebody that we know. Right?

Speaker 6: Definitely. Um, I, I just hate talking about that because it's, you know, I never want to name drop, but Neil Franklin is my cousin so that would be my dad's first cousin. So.

Speaker 4: Well you're not name dropping if Neil's, your cousin does your cousin.

Speaker 6: Well, I'm not in that aspect. I just find that uh, for some people they might see me differently just because I am related to Neil Franklin for everything that he's done in the end

Speaker 4: streaming, trying to use that. Yeah, exactly. Well I think that anybody that's listening, here's exactly how you see it, which is do not, I am not using that. Is that right? Yeah. I'm very proud. Yeah.

Speaker 6: To be part of this great family. I know Franklin is my role model. Like I love what he's done for the industry. I love his voice. Being able to speak on both sides of the industry, being on the line as well as being uh, and entrepreneur and representing a reform organization with leap. So it's just, it's just a great and amazing to see someone that's able to speak on that. You know, a lot of people can talk all they want and advocate all they want. But you haven't been in those shoes. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 4: No, that's exactly right. He's been in the shoes, you know, I love talking to him when I have the opportunity because it, the, his, his point of view is so clear and it also is backed up by all those years on the street, you know. So anyway, so that's that. So this is that your dad, so your dad has a little bit entrepreneurial and um, what about your mother?

Speaker 6: Uh, my mom has a lot of entrepreneurial her as well, you know, um, she worked from home, which is probably one of the hardest jobs because you have to have self discipline and she put my sister and I before herself, you know, she always made sure that we were at school on time. She was always taking us to all of our different activities. Uh, she plays a huge role in my extended family. Like I would say that she's somewhat of the glue and extended family. Yes, exactly. So she's organized a family events reunions. She's on boards within the family. She's studying our ancestry to kind of see where our roots come from. If there's a family question we asked your mother. Yeah, exactly. In my mom and dad are kind of the first people that I call for advice and depending on what I'm asking, I'll either use their advice, um, knowing that I'm doing the right thing or I to try to do the opposite of what they say.

Speaker 4: Okay. So these are two conflicting.

Speaker 6: Yeah, it's, it's two conflicting points. And let me explain that. Okay. So we come from, we're different ages, so you and your parents obviously. So this is baby boomers and millennials, right? So what appeals to them may not appeal to me and vice versa. So when I'm asking them something and they're like, oh, no way, then I almost know that I'm doing something right. Give me an example. So let's go back to building this business. Okay. So when I came up with my formula, I didn't necessarily have a name for it. So, and naming it, I said to myself, no one is making cannabis products that you can buy in Virginia. I'm going to name it after familiar strains. These aren't going to be called flavors. They're going to be called strains. So the first, the first original was chocolate Kush, and as you and I know that's named after the popular, a popular a plant that, you know, people smoke and medicate with.

Speaker 6: Uh, so my dad right away, he was like, you know, you're going to stigmatize yourself and you're gonna cut yourself out of the mainstream. And when he said that, you know, I was like, you know what, I'll drown in the mainstream. So I'm going to embrace the stigma rather than run away from it. So you just confirmed for me that my next I'm going to use chocolate Kush and my next formula is going to be Molly Wiley. Uh, so that's kind of where I'm at. That's kind of where I know that what they're saying and how it'll affect someone who's their age will have, will allow me to reach a different audience and kind of like thrive and thrive in a sense

Speaker 4: that gets back to your marketing research, you know, abilities, you, you, you know, that, that is, that, that you know, that to be true, you know, if, if it's not going to work for that, uh, that age group, well, okay, let me see, let me see which, which, what other demographic will it'll work on and because it doesn't work on that debt, well, it probably will work on this stuff.

Speaker 6: Yeah. And I, I wanted to kind of start with who I can relate to most and I relate to people that are my peers. Yeah.

Speaker 4: What? Give us a idea of a, a piece of advice that you know is right, and then you continue with,

Speaker 6: uh, so, uh, is it okay if I use an example from someone else? Um, I just recently came across a something that Oprah said, um, my business partner molly calm and shared it and she said as far as failure, it doesn't exist because it's kind of one of those things where you don't know which direction to go until you've come to this obstacle and that's kind of what molds us. So I would say that my word of advice would be to use trial and error and if you have an idea, start with that and you're going to make mistakes, but pivot and change direction based on those mistakes. Don't expect to do everything right right away. Sure.

Speaker 4: And you learn more from failing than you do from eating. Let's talk about starting the company, right? You're doing these courses, you know you're not going to go to school, you don't go to school. How did this hemp butter what, how does that happen? You got the shirt on?

Speaker 6: Yeah, always representing. So I would say that I'm going back to self identity and when I realized that my hair wasn't straight coming out of my crown, that I was spending too much time trying to make it straight. So in transitioning to dreadlocks as when I was concerned about what I was putting in my hair.

Speaker 4: How old were you?

Speaker 6: Um, at that point I was about 25, 26 and not necessarily just growing my locks, but growing my perm out, like I stopped relaxing my hair. I stopped using chemicals in my hair, but I was still doing the most by buying like all of these different hair products that are marketed to women, specifically women of Color, specifically black women. So I was buying all of these products still, you know, I wasn't getting a perm but I was still using everything under the sun to straighten, straighten my hair and team the edges and all that. Uh, so eventually, you know, I said I'm not going to do this anymore if my hair, if I'm fighting the natural texture so much, then it's not supposed to be this way. So I started trying to find products that wouldn't necessarily change the texture of my hair but enhance the texture of my hair and I couldn't find that.

Speaker 6: So I started making my own products and that's when I started studying like different oils, different butters, how they work and experimenting on myself. Uh, I never really saw it as a business opportunity and that's not what I was doing right away, you know, I was just trying to find something for myself. But eventually I learned about him and that's when I saw a business opportunity. I was like, well this is great and it's working for me. Why can't I share it with everyone else? And maybe it can work for them too. And that's when I started developing him butter over three years ago at the time.

Speaker 4: All. Alright, well congratulations. Thank you. That's a lot of time. Um, I want to key in on it though. Was there a, a moment of epiphany where you were working with your hair and realize and think what the hell am I doing? Like was there a moment or was it, you know, over a certain period of time you mentioned that there were a couple of phases, but the, either that first moment or that final moment where you're like, you know, f this.

Speaker 6: Yeah. So I would say that, um, again, transitioning to natural hairstyle and eventually locks, you know, I thought the moment was kind of like, why am I spending so much time, energy and money trying to change the natural state of my hair or why can't I just let it grow the way that it does and that's really how it started, you know, and in, in growing it, I had to figure out a new way to take care of it and a new way to be comfortable and in my own skin as far as how other people react to it. Uh, and that was part of the whole process. You know, before there was hemp butter, there was me figuring all of this out,

Speaker 4: which is fantastic. Right. And then now we complete the circle from Hawaii to today with you kind of going away from yourself, if you will, and then coming back to yourself. Yes. So over these three years, let's talk about actually developing something that worked. Um, you know, you, you found him. When did you find him butter? Meaning when did you know you had it right? And what did that include?

Speaker 6: Okay, well, uh, it goes back to caring about when I put in my hair. I traveled to Colorado. Um, I stayed with my friend Katelyn and I forgot the concoction, the current concoction that I was using my hair. And this was before I ever learned about him and I was freaking out because, you know, I explained to her I can't just use anything in my hair, you know, my hair's not like yours. And you know, she emphasized with me and Kayleen uh, she's um, way. And then she has the most beautiful long blonde hair. So my hair is different than hers and I said I can't use what you use. Right? So she comes back with a petroleum base, fragrant field cream and says, here, use this. It has hemp in it, you know. And I was like, oh, well, you know, this isn't what I would normally use, but I'm going to give in because I don't have any other options. Right. So I use the cream that she gave me a that had hemp in it, you know. And eventually when I went back to, um, back home I was like, you know, what, why can't I add him to what I'm currently making? And then that's kind of when the whole business opportunity came about because I had a product that was going to be unique because it had happened and it was all natural and it was different from the stuff that I use that she gave me and the stuff that I was currently making.

Speaker 4: What was the next step? That right now, here we have it. I want an all natural product. I have an all natural product. It's him based. How did we get it to the, to, to now a product that could be used by others.

Speaker 6: Uh, so, um, I figured out that I was onto something and I immediately started sharing it with friends and family and I had already had a plan. Like I knew I wanted to do something and it started with a, a concept store that would relate to here and it would give people the ability to buy natural products, you know? And, and exploring the concept store, I realized that I didn't have money to pay rent and the square footage was crazy and it was just unobtainable

Speaker 4: waiting. Not a lot of square footage, amount of money that we're asking for it

Speaker 6: exactly. So I said, you know, what, if I start with a hot product instead and I'm telling the story a little backwards and then that's when the time that I went to Colorado and that's when I figured out how I can make this hot products. It was going to be hot and unique because I was adding him to it. Got It. Um, so in the product development phase, I stayed up for 24 hours and just in my kitchen I just played with butters, oils, ratios, temperatures, and you know, all of the science aspects that you need to make something. And I had 12 different versions of it. Uh, so I called my mom and dad and my sister and I said, hey, I finished my hot new product. I need you guys to try it out, let know what you think. So I did a boat.

Speaker 6: I was like, which one do you like and why? So I got their feedback to begin with and I already kind of had in mind which one I wanted to use. I just needed a second. What'd your sister say? Um, she, my sister is kind of quiet. She's, she's more to comment when everything is said and done, you know, she was happy with all of them, you know, she, she didn't really take a lot of time to say, oh definitely this one, uh, but my dad and my mom on the other hand, they were kind of like this one and this is why. So they gave me their feedback and it was kind of in line with what I already thought. So I just started focusing on that particular formula, you know, I had written down exactly what I did to get it this way.

Speaker 6: Uh, and then that's how the formula was created. And then I knew that the packaging had to be something different and unique. So it actually started as a glass hensher and I spent a lot of time in whole foods and cvs and walmart just staring at labels. Looking at like where they were on the shelf, looking at the size of them, the accessibility, and I knew I wanted it to be different, but I didn't know how yet. So later on I'm at the craft store and I see this jar and I'm laying fast the jar. So I got that car and then it's like, okay, now I have to make a label to fit this jar a. So at the time I was doing a sign painting project and my neighbors, uh, the fosters, they were like, I need you to make a mirror with an Irish logo, says fosters and has the dodgers tail.

Speaker 6: Okay. So that was what I was tasked with for this, uh, this project. So that's going to go in a minute. I have the tail in my mind. So, uh, I, I knew what I wanted to look like. So I sketch down on paper and I talked to my friend who happens to be a comic book artist who is my current graphic designer to this day. And I said, you know, like this is what I want them to label to look like a, the jar had four corners. I was like, I want the ingredients to be listed here. So they're easy to read. I want this site to be clear so people can see what it looks like inside. And I want this side to have like the bar code and all of those things because it's going straight to stores. So we just

Speaker 4: sign it out with your hands. By the way, you mentioned that you close your eyes real tight because you envisioned that label once again, the first label once again just now, but go on.

Speaker 6: Yeah. So I knew like, I knew that I had the jar first and the label had to fit the jar and the design had to be something different. Like the colors were important. Um, the current logo, it says hemp butter here, hand and body. Because when you think of butter is an edible. No, it's not because it says here hand and body on it. So that was part of the label from the start is like, it has to say these things. So my graphic designer was able to take my sketch and what I had envisioned and make a digitalized version of it, uh, and perfect the colors and add his own flare on it to make it what it is today. So we started with that, you know, with the jars, they were glass, the hinges, you know, it wasn't easy to fill them. So I ran into problems along the way.

Speaker 6: So after learning that I would potentially have to mass produce. It was back to the drawing boards. It's like, oh no, okay, well I can't use the jars. They're too heavy. They crack and they're not easy to fill. What's next? It has to be different. And you know, that's when uh, I started to develop my team. I'm molly was on board. She'd seen how much work I had already put in A. I was already getting opportunities to share the product. So she was on board and she, she mentioned things, you know, and it was like, uh, no. And, and I, I would always talk out of things because I'm, I'm very, what's the word? Uh, I like to have ideas and I'm very stubborn so I kind of get set in something and I kind of don't even like take anything else into account because I know how I want it to be.

Speaker 6: So I was stuck on making it out of silicone, which is the worst thing that you can ever imagine to put. Why do you think you were stuck on the silicone? Because no one was putting products in silicone and there's a reason why a, I just had to learn the hard way. So I had talked to designers and already was like stuck like this is going to work until I actually filled, filled it with product and it didn't work. And then I was like back to the drawing boards. So then that's when I discovered the bamboo, which was kind of something that molly mentioned, you know, like a natural. Yeah. So that's where we are today with the bamboo.

Speaker 4: So. Alright. So now you're describing the product that I know we've got the dodgers swoop, if you will. Which we should probably refer to a alternatively sports or baseball swoop. And you know, you've got the bamboo, which I think you told me once upon a time is the second most, uh, what organic, sustainable, sustainable.

Speaker 6: Yeah. I'm bamboo. Like I would say if it's not him use bamboo because bamboo, it grows way faster than trees and it has the same functionality. You can use it for fabrics, you can use it for furniture and you can even use the oils. You can use the whole plant of, of bamboo. And in other countries they've already discovered this, but it's kind of like we're just now learning about it.

Speaker 4: So, uh, let's do the applications. Hair hand and here. Hand and body, hair, head and body. Hair. What, what am I getting from him? Butter. What, what's happening?

Speaker 6: Um, so it's an all in one moisturizer. So it just goes back to anything that you put in your hair or skin you should be able to eat. So it has safe ingredients, no fillers, no fragrance, no dyes, and it's multi use. So just like you would use shea butter, coconut oil, it really does work for everything. So my first initial application was for my hair and then sharing it with other people. They discover other uses for it. My sister loves it for her hands, you know, she's a chemist by day, so she works and has to wash her hands multiple times. They ended up dry so she would use it for her hands. My Dad, he likes to use it for his dry feed in the winter time. Right. Um, I have people that say that it's worked for them for a, I don't want to say it's not a medical product, but people have said that it's helped them with their skin drying conditions. Um, we've also had people that use it as like an under eye cream. I use it on my face daily. So you can't really tell anybody how to use it. You just have to let them know that it works for everything. And then they can figure out what their ideal uses for it.

Speaker 4: Hand a body right there. He gave us a bunch of exact examples, but. So you know, you see my curly hair right here, you know, how, how, what, what kind of a application, what kind of, you know, how am I going to benefit?

Speaker 6: Okay. So for you, I would recommend using it as a leave in conditioner for perhaps I'm like out of the shower while you're here is a slightly dry. Um, you can also use it in place of like a jail. Um, so in styling your hair, it's not going to leave a flakiness are or anything like that. So use it like you would a jail, uh, your facial hair and it looks great by the way, can it be nice and warm for the winter time? Uh, but you can use it as a beard balm as well. Um, and it's just going to add moisture and add sheen and add some protection for you as well. Against environmental elements.

Speaker 4: We'll look at the, uh, we, we've spoken about him, but you're naming cannabis strains. Just tell us the CBD and thc breakdown.

Speaker 6: Okay. So a CBD, the non psychoactive constituit of hemp or cannabis is one of our ingredients that it's infused with. So it's not the base, um, it's just simply infused a hemp is the base, right?

Speaker 4: No psychoactive, no thc,

Speaker 6: no thc, and um, I currently produce in Virginia, so the laws are very limiting. They're nothing for me and have more than point three percent thc to begin with, right? Uh, so very strict on that, on that ass, on that aspect of it. Um, but hemp and cannabis, I would say the difference is who you ask because the dea, the FDA and person to person have a different definition of it. So I'll just name a couple of examples. The Da calls, anything from the cannabis plant that is flower or leaf is considered marijuana. Um, anything that is stock or seed is considered hemp. I have the FDA considers anything that is ingested, whether it's cbd or Thc as a new drug and just keep it to that point, new drug. And that's just based on it being ingested as a dietary supplement or anything that you eat.

Speaker 6: Uh, and then from person to person, people will say hip is higher in cbd and marijuana is higher in Thc, but you can find strains that are equally balanced. So how would you classify that? So again, it's just kind of a matter who you asked and kind of understanding that they are both part of the cannabis plant and a, I find a lot of people specifically in the hemp industry, they want to remove themselves from the cannabis industry. Those guys. Yeah. And I think that we kind of need to not separate ourselves in that way but kind of look at one as medicinal and one as industrial. Sure. And just leave it at that.

Speaker 4: Just leave it at that or, or a wellness if we don't want to do medicinal, whatever. Wellness and industrial. So again, inclusive,

Speaker 6: inclusive and, and a lot of people feel that way because it's such a stigma and when you're associated with cannabis, people don't want to be in business with you outside of the cannabis industry. And I've learned that through the process that I choose as far as like how I named the product and where I've gotten most of my feedback within the industry. So I know that that there is, there is this stigma and there is a place for it, but it's not in mainstream right now. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 4: And you're, you're, you're, you're saying that it's other, you're, you're noting that I kind of want to dovetail it with where we started and kind of ended the same type of place, which is, you know, if you see that in the same industry, people kind of working against each other. No, I don't want to be considered with that group. No, I don't want to be considered considered with that group. What, when you think about that as we go here with cannabis and as we go here in life, what's your, what's your thought on, on where, where this is all going as far as politics, as far as community, as far as humanity. Because as I talked to you, you don't seem like some, you know, kind of liberal left wing person, you're, you're an entrepreneur. I would consider you like, you know, your belief system is somewhat center, if you will, on the political spectrum to me. Um, so I, I would love to heed your advice. What do you think?

Speaker 6: Uh, well, I think it's a matter of being informed and kind of knowing where we stand in the political aspect and the environmental aspect and the entrepreneurial aspect, uh, for the whole plant because like I said, everyone has a different classification. So I think that if you're learning about one thing, you need to learn about the other. Starting with the history. Okay. You have to really go back and understand the origins of this plant before it was ever called him before it was ever called marijuana. And before we have this stigma and people separating themselves from one or the other. You have to understand the whole thing as a whole before you can choose what one is and what is one isn't. So kind of like with, uh, with the election with a lot of people probably should have done before they voted or didn't vote is know what you're voting for, you know, being informed. So the same thing with being an entrepreneur and which direction to go to and either advocating for him or for marijuana or cannabis as a whole, you need to understand that being informed and educated.

Speaker 4: Yeah. I like to say that I think that the best way for us as a society or community to move forward is to just keep talking to each other because, you know, who I want to speak to most are people that don't have the same beliefs as me and that don't look like me. That's why I want to talk to most. So that I can understand obviously what would, would probably be at least somewhat of a different perspective. And that's kind of what you're saying, I think.

Speaker 6: Yeah, exactly. So it's just a matter of staying informed. I also keep myself informed. I, I study, uh, what legislation is doing. I studied different, um, health research that's been done. Um, you know, I want to know all about this, you know, like, uh, I want to establish myself as an expert in the industry.

Speaker 4: Okay. Well we'll keep checking back with you and make sure that that's true. Doing all right, thank you. Been doing it for three years. You got your solid products, you got your packaging, you got your logo, you've got, you know, your place. You said you, you've got a opportunities you called them, but uh, where, where can we find it I guess?

Speaker 6: Okay. So if you're looking for it locally and within DC, a capital hamp unit, kitchen, grocery, the watering hole, um, their spots in northern Virginia, Maryland. I'm definitely go on the website and yeah, email for specific details. We also ship nationally and any of the 50 states as well as the district obviously and internationally as well. So you, you're able to get it, you know, and if you are troubled on how to get it, definitely again, you know, we're a very responsive on, on the web. Have buttered I come get him. Butter.com. Yes. And that's across the social media waves. Instagram, facebook, twitter, get him butter,

Speaker 4: get him butter. But I'm supposed to care more about instagram than twitter now. Right? If I'm a millennial or someone that cares about that,

Speaker 6: uh, yeah. Then we could have a whole another conversation about social media.

Speaker 4: Let's not do that. Let's ask you the final three questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of kind of the hills life named one track. One song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what has most surprised you about cannabis?

Speaker 6: Uh, the most surprise I am about cannabis is seeing how long it's taken to come this far. It's pretty amazing. Yes.

Speaker 4: Pretty hopeful sign with everything getting voted and let's, let's hope that the new administration doesn't get in the way of that.

Speaker 6: Yeah, we'll see. That's to be seen.

Speaker 4: Uh, what has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 6: Uh, you said the most surprising. What has most surprised you in life? Probably this election, this election.

Speaker 4: I think it was surprising for everybody. We said that earlier. You with your eyes are telling me more than you're saying into the microphone. Do you care to share more?

Speaker 6: Uh, I mean, we could rant on that. Um, I just want to keep the energy up right now. Um, so now like I don't want to go into detail, but I would say that is the most surprising thing is just this whole 2016 presidential election. Yeah.

Speaker 4: So we're staying positive, pleasant, love out there. Here's what we're doing on the soundtrack of your life named one track, one song that's gotTa. Be on there

Speaker 6: one track, one song I'm going to call it, get hit on him and love yourself. Oh wait, is that a song? Uh, well I,

Speaker 4: is that as you. Did you write that song? Is that what's happening here?

Speaker 6: Okay. So I've disconnected from music for the most part. Why? Why? It's a whole nother conversation, but I feel like we are influenced by music it our subconscious and the music that we're exposed to most isn't necessarily positive and uplifting the way that it needs to be. Um, specifically music. But I have listened to my entire life, uh, so I decided to try something different. Um, it's more about cutting out the noise and listening to the music within yourself. And that's kind of where I'm at now. So I'm ready, I'm making my own tunes, so get hip on him and love yourself.

Speaker 4: So that. Is it a song or is that just a concept? I want to make sure I understand what you're saying.

Speaker 6: Songs are about feelings and most people get those feelings through hearing it through their ears, but I get that in other ways, like through experiences, through eyesight, listening to different noises. I'm making my own lyrics. Uh, so I mean, I, it's, it's very complicated to explain. Absolutely. Um, it's just a new concept that I've been exploring over the last, uh, six months or so.

Speaker 4: I mean, this is deep. I've never heard anybody approach music or not music this way. And your point is about that positivity. It's about the messages you're, you're not so pleased with being influenced almost. I'm not cognitively. You want to influence yourself. Yes. I was just like another. I'm sorry for interrupting. This is like another kind of, I don't want to mess with my hair, but this is kind of on that same path, yes or no,

Speaker 6: right? Yeah, it's pretty deep. Um, and it's hard for a lot of people to understand because I'm using can be very positive and, and kind of bring out a lot of different emotions. It can be therapeutic and I think that when we do that for so long and we've never detached from it, you don't know how it may or may not be affecting you negatively. Um, so that's the challenge, you know, I'd like to challenge anyone to kind of just live in silence for 30 days and write about it. You've been doing it for six months. Yes. Uh, well, not exactly. Um, as far as cutting out music, uh, I've been doing it for about three months, but building up to the idea of this, uh, it's been about six months. So three months? Yes. Do you miss it? Um, I don't miss it because I still get it, you know, there's certain times where I go out to social gatherings and there's music. If I'm writing in someone's car, you know, there's a music. So I've found different ways to block out lyrics, listen to tunes type thing. But when I'm in my own time and my own space, I'm in silence, I have my own thoughts and the sounds of nature and it's, it's deep, deep. We'll,

Speaker 4: we'll have a whole nother conversation and the conversation, but we'll turn the mics off. Kyla Hill. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it. Thank you for the opportunity, seth. My pleasure. Who got it? So there you have Kyla Hill,

Speaker 2: obviously a very deep thinker. So pleasure talking to Kaila, getting to know her a little bit and understand exactly what she's doing with her organization. It's always great to hear what Amanda Reiman is doing with her organization, so much appreciate the time that we spend with her. So much appreciate the time that you spend with us. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.