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Ep.214: Jordan Person & Bob Eschino

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.214: Jordan Person & Bob Eschino

Ep.214: Jordan Person & Bob Eschino

Jordan Person, Primal Therapeutics & Bob Eschino, Medically Correct

Jordan Person joins us to discuss how cannabis saved her life. She takes us through her remarkable medical journey and how she refocused her life to healing others with cannabis. Finally, Jordan shares that she didn’t think she’d live to today and that every day is a gift.
Bob Eschino then returns to give us an on the ground update from Colorado. Hiring is happening, tax revenue is skyrocketing and regulations are tightening and to that end, Bob takes us through the latest on potency and consumption. Bob then discusses his libertarian point of view and his issues with both corporate media and social media…and closes with some advice for those on their way in to the industry.

Transcript:

Speaker 3: So a Jordan person. Is that? Is that a real last name though? That is my real last name. That was, you're giving, I mean, your birthday, your birth name. Yes, yes. I believe it was like personal for personal cozzie and they changed it a in Ellis island. It was a rush, rush, rush and Jew. I Say I'm a German Jew. Awesome. Yeah, there you go. Ashkenazi Jews. That's us. Yeah, exactly. Um, so, you know, we, we, we've come to know each other. Yes. And you just said something to me. We didn't have the microphones on and we're just standing and talking. And then you said cannabis saved my life. And for me, a guy that runs a podcast called cannabis economy. When I hear those words, it's time to turn on the mics. Right? Let's

Speaker 4: just start right there. Right. So what happened? So I had pain that was undiagnosed for about two years and as a nurse I just kind of kept ignoring it and let's stop. Yeah. As a nurse you kept ignoring it. Ignoring it isn't that do as I say, not as I do type of thing. Nurses and doctors are the worst patients and I think any nurse or doctor would agree with that statement. Um, we like to take care of other people, that's what we do. We're caregivers, not self care givers. Um, but when I finally decided to have everything checked, um, they checked everything and they couldn't give me answers. They kept giving me pharmaceuticals and so I was 29 years old and I was on 13 pharmaceuticals and they finally discovered that my gallbladder wasn't functioning properly and they decided to remove it even though I had no symptoms of having a bad gallbladder, just take it out right.

Speaker 4: And so when they did so they found a massive tumor on the underside of my liver that had caused my gallbladder to stop functioning. And so the tumor was not cancerous, it was benign, but it was estrogen fed and caused by the birth control pill. And so they told me it was inoperable because of its location and that it shouldn't give me any issues even though I had pain in my abdomen everyday, no gallbladder, but you're going to keep the tumor going to keep the tumor. Um, so, uh, I woke up one day about two weeks post operative living in Florida and my skin was yellow, gray and um, yeah, it was, I was dying and I called my mom who lived in Colorado and I knew medical marijuana was available and I said, mom, I don't know what to say other than I think I'm dying.

Speaker 4: And she said, well, leave everything behind and get on the next flight. And so I did, um, I got my medical marijuana card my first 24 hours into living there. Um, and I began to use cannabis, whether it was topically, orally, I anyway, that I could consume it. I did. Um, and very quickly I ended up in the hospital again and they actually found a 10 millimeter stone in my right kidney that had been there for so long, misdiagnosed that I was going into renal failure as well as septicemia. Um, so I ended up initially that my gallbladder was that thing that was the pain. The pain was coming from my kidneys and they died. The tumor, was that still there? Oh yeah, absolutely. Told me that that was inoperable at that time. Um, so it took two surgeries, two different things that you have.

Speaker 4: You have a stone under Schumer sewn into tumor and now I have. Yeah. And they had already taken my gallbladder. Right, exactly. So now they're messing with my kidneys. They discover that I'm septic, put me on antibiotics for 137 days of that year, whether it was intravenous, intramuscular or oral. Um, we finally thought I was better and I started to have really severe menstrual symptoms, but they had taken the stone out, taking this down. No gallbladder, no stones, tumors. But it's benign. Correct. Go ahead. The pain kept getting worse. I had a total abdominal hysterectomy. They removed everything, cervix, ovaries, uterus, and when they closed me, they put me into renal failure on the same side that I already had been one time because they sutured my yard or down. Um, so again, used cannabis solely for pain, for nausea, for treatment, except the nausea at that point became so severe.

Speaker 3: So a Jordan person. Is that? Is that a real last name though? That is my real last name. That was, you're giving, I mean, your birthday, your birth name. Yes, yes. I believe it was like personal for personal cozzie and they changed it a in Ellis island. It was a rush, rush, rush and Jew. I Say I'm a German Jew. Awesome. Yeah, there you go. Ashkenazi Jews. That's us. Yeah, exactly. Um, so, you know, we, we, we've come to know each other. Yes. And you just said something to me. We didn't have the microphones on and we're just standing and talking. And then you said cannabis saved my life. And for me, a guy that runs a podcast called cannabis economy. When I hear those words, it's time to turn on the mics. Right? Let's

Speaker 4: just start right there. Right. So what happened? So I had pain that was undiagnosed for about two years and as a nurse I just kind of kept ignoring it and let's stop. Yeah. As a nurse you kept ignoring it. Ignoring it isn't that do as I say, not as I do type of thing. Nurses and doctors are the worst patients and I think any nurse or doctor would agree with that statement. Um, we like to take care of other people, that's what we do. We're caregivers, not self care givers. Um, but when I finally decided to have everything checked, um, they checked everything and they couldn't give me answers. They kept giving me pharmaceuticals and so I was 29 years old and I was on 13 pharmaceuticals and they finally discovered that my gallbladder wasn't functioning properly and they decided to remove it even though I had no symptoms of having a bad gallbladder, just take it out right.

Speaker 4: And so when they did so they found a massive tumor on the underside of my liver that had caused my gallbladder to stop functioning. And so the tumor was not cancerous, it was benign, but it was estrogen fed and caused by the birth control pill. And so they told me it was inoperable because of its location and that it shouldn't give me any issues even though I had pain in my abdomen everyday, no gallbladder, but you're going to keep the tumor going to keep the tumor. Um, so, uh, I woke up one day about two weeks post operative living in Florida and my skin was yellow, gray and um, yeah, it was, I was dying and I called my mom who lived in Colorado and I knew medical marijuana was available and I said, mom, I don't know what to say other than I think I'm dying.

Speaker 4: And she said, well, leave everything behind and get on the next flight. And so I did, um, I got my medical marijuana card my first 24 hours into living there. Um, and I began to use cannabis, whether it was topically, orally, I anyway, that I could consume it. I did. Um, and very quickly I ended up in the hospital again and they actually found a 10 millimeter stone in my right kidney that had been there for so long, misdiagnosed that I was going into renal failure as well as septicemia. Um, so I ended up initially that my gallbladder was that thing that was the pain. The pain was coming from my kidneys and they died. The tumor, was that still there? Oh yeah, absolutely. Told me that that was inoperable at that time. Um, so it took two surgeries, two different things that you have.

Speaker 4: You have a stone under Schumer sewn into tumor and now I have. Yeah. And they had already taken my gallbladder. Right, exactly. So now they're messing with my kidneys. They discover that I'm septic, put me on antibiotics for 137 days of that year, whether it was intravenous, intramuscular or oral. Um, we finally thought I was better and I started to have really severe menstrual symptoms, but they had taken the stone out, taking this down. No gallbladder, no stones, tumors. But it's benign. Correct. Go ahead. The pain kept getting worse. I had a total abdominal hysterectomy. They removed everything, cervix, ovaries, uterus, and when they closed me, they put me into renal failure on the same side that I already had been one time because they sutured my yard or down. Um, so again, used cannabis solely for pain, for nausea, for treatment, except the nausea at that point became so severe.

Speaker 4: Um, I kept going back to the emergency room and they kept saying, you're fine, you're fine. Um, and giving me more Zofran, giving me more pharmaceuticals and it wasn't working right. So four weeks post op they discovered they sutured the yard or down, um, put an emergency nephrostomy tube in. So I had my pee on my thigh for six and a half months so they could go back in and do a non refluxing uretal reimplantation and move my bladder up and over to allow me to have a proper working a kidney system. Um, so that was sealing my surgery cycle or so I thought, um, I moved from the mountains of Colorado to Denver in hopes to start my new life after not working for three years and an incredible surgeon out of emory university transferred to the Porter Hospital for liver care and got ahold of my chart.

Speaker 4: And on December twelfth, 2012, I had a liver resection, um, and he removed the inoperable tumor, um, and a seven and a half hour operation completely laparoscopically. Why did he do that? Because I do to the a hysterectomy, I instantly woke up in menopause at the age of 30. And so between all of the symptoms that happened, it was impossible for me to take estrogen, um, to combat those symptoms because I had an estrogen fed tumor. And so it was their hope that if they removed the tumor, then I could take estrogen. But after the tumor was removed, we decided to forego it and look into bio identical hormones or something like that instead, um, to prevent it from possibly growing back. And I've been the healthiest. I've been my entire life since they removed the tumor. Unbelievable cannabis tumor all along. Well, there was no doctor to do so I was told by three specialists in three states it was inoperable. This gentleman just happened to be literally a world renowned surgeon. I'm interested. Yeah. Yeah. Dr Thomas Heffron. He saved my life. Dr Heffernan cannabis cannabis. So then where does, because if I'm listening and I don't necessarily believe that cannabis is medicine, I'm thinking to myself, well, okay, she took the tumor out, that the issue, what

Speaker 3: economists do, cannabis didn't do anything.

Speaker 4: Oh, cannabis. It got me off of the 13 pharmaceuticals that they had me on because I was able to use cannabis medicinally and I was able to go to a dispensary and try different strains that have been grown specifically for my element, um, and I was able to consume it in several forms as well. Right. And, and that's what saved my life was the ability to take either an ethanol extraction, um, and high doses of thc and high doses and marijuana in general help the body reregulate and go back into homeostasis. And I was so ill. That was its primary purpose.

Speaker 3: So it, it, the tumor being removed has given you a different reality. If the tumor was still in there, you'd still be going with cannabis. Every, you know, in your life would be what it was. Absolutely. And still going because of the canvas. Absolutely. There we go. Absolutely.

Speaker 4: Okay. I use cannabis if I have a headache, I use cannabis. If I have a panic attack, I use different strains for whatever ailment I'm feeling. Um, I don't take Ibuprofen. I don't take, I don't take any pharmaceuticals in any way anymore unless it's an antibiotic because I'm deathly ill. But nurse person, why don't you take any, uh, nurse pharmaceutical drugs. Nurse person is retired. She retired, she maintains her license in two states, but I do not practice, um, I will always remain a nurse, a nurse first because that's my primary education. Um, but I cannot knowingly go into a hospital and practice. Yes. Because I would tell every patient get it out, right, because you can, so you'll give care as a nurse would do. Absolutely. But now as a massage therapist. So then what are we doing with the massage therapy? So, um, because of what I saw topicals due to my own body and my watched my incisions heal exponentially faster than with neosporin or anything I'd used before. I wondered what would happen if you rubbed it from head to toe. And so I googled it and there was nothing, of course. And so I had to start literally at the beginning I just started trying different topicals and working different techniques on patients. Um, and over the last three years, I now make my topicals and try to source all the ingredients as local as possible and as organic as possible and provide my patients with the most therapeutic treatment that they can have with the most natural way possible.

Speaker 3: Okay. And so, uh, the is involved. Oh yeah. And CBD. And how, of course, cbd, I, I assumed cbd. How psychoactive is your treatment? There

Speaker 4: is no psychoactive effects. It's all about the healing and the health. So reduction of pain, reduction of swelling, expedition of healing time. Um, when I started using cannabis I used to, um, let me rewind. When I used to just do massage, I used to have acupuncture done once a week to once a month to you to myself. Right. And I would even have my risks cannizzo taped about six months into using cannabis. I just looked down one day and realized that I had not used any treatment and six months. And so now I can tell you I haven't used any treatment in three years. Um, and that was a side effect. The side effects, that's what you say. What have your patients say that they've never felt anything like it? Um, I have patients that have hypersensitivity that say, oh, as soon as you touch me, I'm going to jump that never make a move.

Speaker 4: Um, it, it all, I don't want to say it numbs the skin, but it allows you to do a type of body work. I specialize in deep tissue and so I now can do that to patients without their need for ice afterwards because it works as it's own anti-inflammatory. Amazing. So you're amazed by the uh, plant. My life will never be the same. Right. And so now I have to scream it as loud as I can. That's where Denver norml came from because I, I, I felt the need to then devote my life to the plant because it saved mine. Alright. So how closely do you work with the head office with Keith, our friend Keith? Well, I'm the executive director of Denver normal. So I email him pretty often. Um, I actually emailed him on the way here and I was like, I don't know if you're getting an award or we are, but either way, gay, normal.

Speaker 4: So, so, uh, what's it like working with Keith because we've spoken to him a couple times. He's an incredible man. I've been telling people all week so far that, you know, I, I truly, I credit him with, with being the reason we're all here right now. You know, he's, he's truly the outlaw that started it all 46 years ago. He, he had that loud voice that said, dammit, marijuana should be legal and he hasn't stopped. And to now see the fruits of his hard work has to be amazing every day. I know he's very proud right now that eight more states just came online. So, um, it's just an honor to be part of this organization and to be part of something. So I'm deeply rooted in this industry. And what are you guys working on in 2017 from a normal perspective? From a national perspective?

Speaker 4: I believe they're doing from Denver norml. I'm, I'm focusing on employer drug testing. Um, I really want to create a campaign of awareness and create that conversation. Um, two years ago, the Supreme Court ruled to give us the right to fire anyone we wanted to that had been using cannabis, um, and I would just like to open that conversation and that dialogue up again, it's legal. We are allowed to legally consume the substance. So keep drug testing for other substances, but perhaps maybe move removed marijuana because you could smoke a joint today and hurt yourself at work tomorrow and you're going to get fired even though you're not high. Right? That's not fair. It isn't fair, correct. No, I'm with you on that. Yeah. So

Speaker 3: that's, that's the conversation we're going to make as loud as possible this year. I hear Ya. Um, and so you're already loud enough. It will be as loud as I possibly can. So I'm going to ask you the three final questions because we haven't spoken before. I tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of Jordan person's life named one track, one song that's got to be on there. First thing starts you might've already answered. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 4: What has most surprised me in cannabis? Um, I have to agree with your previous guest is the diversity. Um, I was at this convention last year and it was, it was very specific. Um, it was almost like a uniform that everyone had on. It was, it was very much one side of the business. And now at the fifth annual seeing how much the audience has grown has changed. Has diversified. Yeah. Um, it blows my mind. It was what I like to say we got everybody in Canada. We do. Absolutely because it's anything from someone who's been growing in their basement for the last 15 years to the science side of these scientists that are leaving multimillion dollar companies to come into this industry to see how they can help. So it's, it's pretty mind blowing.

Speaker 3: You're speaking of mindblowing, you've had a little bit of a mind blowing life here. What has most surprised you in life? Can you even crystallize it?

Speaker 4: Um, truthfully, I didn't think that I would live to see 35 and so I turned 36 this year. Happy Birthday. Thank you. And um, every day is a gift. And so for me, I learned the biggest surprise is to not have any expectations. Everyone walks around expecting something from someone including themselves. And when you live life that way you're shorting yourself because you're in control of nothing. Nothing. So that's, that's probably the biggest thing I've learned.

Speaker 3: No control. No, it's so funny because, um, I think it was Mike Sanders that said that you're in control of everything. Um, and you're saying you're in control of nothing, but I think that that um, despite those two points of view, you're coming out of that thinking the same way the two of you, which is, you know, kind of just enjoy where you are and do what you're doing and don't let stuff get you down.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. So that's an interesting concept. You almost, you know, die a few times. It makes you look at life very differently. And so the, you know, don't sweat the small stuff, you know, the, the little things that happen. It's like you have to just laugh and keep going because gear a spec here, spec on this gigantic planet, you know, when you really think about the timeline of, of everything, you're, you're nothing,

Speaker 3: you just dust expectations. Absolutely. Absolutely. On the soundtrack of your life. Jordan. One track, one song that's got to be on there. Do you know the for my favorite song is Pearl Jam's yellow led better. Oh Wow. So honestly, anything a pearl jam is, is what's coming to my head right now. I don't. I don't know why. Well, you told us what your age is and so that makes all the sense in the world. They were huge. Yeah. Very precise time in your life. And that song would be on repeat. Um, on my CD player, on my boombox. What was it called back then? It was called a CD player for those who remember cds. Jordan person. Old Person. I'm only 36. Exactly. But I mean for someone who doesn't know what a CD player. Right, you're right, you're right. The millennials. Anyway, Jordan person. Thank you so much. Thanks for getting through all that shit. Yeah. Thank you. Here we go. Onto tomorrow onto tomorrow we go. Thank you so much and thank you for our candle. You got it.

Speaker 1: This episode is also supported by consumer soft. Face it. Your life starts and stops with your multiple devices. Technology is the centrifical force of running your life or your small business. Chaos ensues. If a device fails you, whether it be for your laptop, apple or android device, consumer soft is immediately available through my phone support for consumers and technical support. Lie for businesses. Get fast, professional assistance. Twenty four hours a day, seven days a week, removed that feeling of panic when something goes wrong. Call Eight, five, five, six, nine, eight, three, two, four, one. Or go to consumer soft.com. You just turn up your volume. I will. That's the. I don't want. I like a moderate an event. I literally, I have to sound.

Speaker 3: Tell the sound man. I'm louder than anyone you've ever had before. I'm a Jersey Italia man. I can bring it. Don't worry. See, that's where I want to begin because I, when I look at you, I see New Jersey, it doesn't matter to me. Yeah. That spent literally 98 percent of my life in Colorado. Yeah, I know. But I'm curious about it. Me, your New Jersey. That's exactly right. Um, but you know, everything about your life really is Colorado. Um, you know, and you came on in a right at the beginning of this whole cannabis thing and you know, here comes election, this whole cannabis thing and then his whole cannabis revolution, the revolution of, you know, personal rights is a revolution of medicine. The revolution, you know, so this whole cannabis thing, eight out of nine wins for cannabis. Yeah. In, in the election that I was going to say that was the most surprising, but that was not the most surprising part of the election. I guess it shouldn't. It kinda goes to what we've all been feeling with this cannabis thing.

Speaker 5: Yeah. You can't stop it at this point. It is more popular than any political candidate. Whether it is, there are so many things going on, whether it's adult use and a personal freedom, sure issue or it's a medicinal issue or it's a get the government out of my life issue or if it's a states rights tax generating job, creating issue, right? So many things about this effect. So many different people. It seems like everybody can find a reason to sink their teeth into what's going on. That's it. So California. Sure. Okay, fine. Massachusetts finally. Thank you California. Thank you. Sure. Finally, and of course, you know, as a California goes, so goes the nation and you know, here here come here we go on the other side of the hill type of thing. Right? But Massachusetts had the um, you know, uh, the uh, opposition that had had and the governor and the mayor of Boston, but we figured those would be okay.

Speaker 5: Nevada looked good. Arizona never did fine. Um, but 58 percent. And in Florida last time we figured we could get over 60, 71 percent. I've been t versus 71 percent. And the scary part is there are a handful of anti cannabis people who are fueling that anti fire straight. People Think, oh, they're such a. no, it's a few people. One guy dumping millions of dollars into anti propaganda. And it sways people thinking, oh wow. A lot of people don't want this. No, I, you know, the ads from the x, Colorado. What mayor and governor down in Arizona and you know, false stats wise, just sit there with your mouth open and going. You guys are from Colorado. You do see what's happening here, right? Yeah. Show me where the sky is falling. Show me where there are issues. You know, you, you can look at these statistics, right?

Speaker 5: With, oh my God, with air quotes, that's what you were doing. Four hundred percent increase. It went from nothing to almost nothing, right? It's statistically insignificant. The things that aren't declining are barely moving up the scale, but they were so minute to begin with any little tick, right? Going from three to 12. Oh my God, it's a 400 percent increase. Yeah. It's still 12 out of millions. Right? It is statistically insignificant, but they take those stats and they twist those stats and and they pound their chest and go look at what's happening here. Yeah. Okay. So it's finally a reporting issue. Right? People are more comfortable saying, I consume cannabis or they're starting to test when they didn't test before, or I'm sorry, there's still no real research. You know, they're talking about babies coming in with canvas initiatives and eight, there are cannabinoids in mother's breast milk.

Speaker 5: Right? So your body does produce its own cannabinoids. That was the mother's fault. Exactly. But no, I'm kidding, but that's factual, but there's all the new reports coming out and saying that what tylenol or Acetaminophen is, is linked with Adhd. Right. But you're told take all the motor and take. All right. It's taken us. If you choose to use a in organic substance like cannabis for nausea, for paying for any of those things, now somehow you're a criminal. Right? Somehow when there's really no proof yet that that is damaging. The only real study that I think we've ever seen is in Jamaica study, right? Where it prove the opposite. It proved that the children with cannabinoids in their system and their mothers used cannabinoids, they were more advanced at I think five, what was a five year study or something like that. But I guess let's, let's stay in Colorado.

Speaker 5: Gives sense of folks, give folks a sense of what is happening on the ground for anybody that's not. That doesn't live day in and day out in Colorado. Uh, they might find it hard to believe that nothing. You mean when you go from four to 12 reports of whatever happening at the hospital, but talk about what's happening on the ground and you know, since 2000, nine to 2014, 2014 to the end of 2016. It's been three years of adult use. By the way. Can you put me? That's ridiculous. But what's happening to business? Yeah. And that's it. I, it's, it is just a growing industry. We're hiring people. The, the industry is booming. It's growing. The tax revenue is skyrocketing. Regulations are getting tighter, right? Opposition is coming in because they know if they can kill it in Colorado, they can kill it other places.

Speaker 5: Right? You shall, what happened in Pueblo where, you know, they're trying to get things off the ballot. So everybody who was pushing potency over the summer, right once, once they lost that fight, let's say, shut down into Pueblo, right? Totally. But let's slow down and make sure everybody understands what we're talking about. There was a potency, kind of a, an initiative on the ballot. What happened was, and this has been going on for about a year and a half, we started, we started hearing about this about a year. It's the, all the anti cannabis people, they have figured out a way to kill cannabis without killing cannabis. And that is setting potency limits on everything, right? Um, you know, on a flower, you might be able to get around that, right? Uh, a 16 percent potent flower. Okay. Right. It, it, it, it might be all right. But then they wanted it for edibles. They wanted it for extracts they want to do for every other product. You can't have a 16 percent shatter. You can't have a 16 percent vape pain. You can't have a really a 16 percent edible it. They say, why?

Speaker 5: Because what's the other 84 percent, right. Right. And that's the one thing I keep trying to tell people when we bring regulators, indoor facility, we are trying to get more pure medicine, right? I want to take out all the fats, although lip is all the things you really don't want. You're looking for cannabinoids and Terpenes, right? So everything we are doing on our end is to make a cleaner product that we can then add back into other products. Sure. Right. You can clean it up and you can smoke it as a shadow or a distal it. Nine Times out of 10 it's going to probably seven times out of 10, right? Because 30 percent of our market is, is smokeable, right? Shatter. But um, and decreasing by the way. Yeah. So we're, we're adding those products back into other products, right? So if I can put two drops of oil into, you know, a chocolate bar as opposed to 10 drops of oil, it's, it's a better product, right?

Speaker 5: It allows us to do different things with it. Um, taste profiles, all kinds of things change when you can put less oil. That's more pure, that has less flavor, less of the things you don't want in there. It just kind of opens the door for us to do because 100 milligram bars, 100 milligram bars, right? Right. Whether I put 20 drops of oil in it or whether I put one drop of oil and it's a 100 milligram bar. So you're getting what I tell you you're getting. Why are you going to limit what I can put into that bar? Why are you telling me it's got to be a 16 percent oil? Because if it's a 16 percent oil, my stuff won't even set up. Right? I mean if we get down below 50 percent potency level that it's just terrible, right? The size of the manufacturer, you cannot make kind of products anymore.

Speaker 5: So it's a cannabis is legal, but you can only have three, two beer. That's what they're trying to do. If they can limit potency and regulators who don't know anything, think this is a good idea. Sure. So that sounds reasonable. Takes us to educate them and bring them in and show them why this isn't a good idea. But they, so you know, they started floating this idea about a year ago and we started hearing about it in other states and then they tried to push it through in Colorado to be on the ballot know by adding it to a bunch of bills. I think they tried to attach this to. It was either nine or 11 different bills going through the legislature. Yeah. Going through the legislature in Colorado. So we had to be on our toes and every time they were coming into bills it had nothing to do with cannabis and going, oh, we want to throw a 60 percent potency and on cannabis our regulators were smart enough, they finally might just go, is this about this bill that we're talking about?

Speaker 5: Stop trying to stick this cannabis regulation in this bill. Right. So the, the legislators were getting a little bit upset also, but they've still got the ear of some pretty powerful people that are still going to get behind these potency limits because once again they don't understand it and you know, once it last legislatively, then they tried the ballot initiative and once again, you know, five different sentences that talked about packaging and labeling and things that we are already doing in the industry. Things that are already happening, right? Hey we're, we want to do x, Y and Z, better packaging, child resistant, opaque, all these things are happening in the last sentences. Oh, and we're going to cap. Potency is 16 percent. So even cannabis users in cannabis supporters never even got to that bottom sentence that this seems very reasonable. Sure. And they were voting for it.

Speaker 5: So when you went back, when we did some mock polling data and, and went back and told people, you realize you just got rid of 80 percent of the product in the market, people are like, wait a second, why voting for childproof package? The way this thing was written was so deceptive. There was a very good chance that it was going to pass, but out of deception, not because if you would've said we're going to limit potency to 16 percent on all cannabis products, people would vote no. But the way they had it worded, yes way they had it worded. And it sounds like, and it sounds like that it's almost as if you, uh, told, uh, the pharmaceutical companies that you have to have a certain percentage of potency for all of your drugs. Correct. So, you know, and that includes, it's hey, alcohol's legal, but you can only have three, two beer, right?

Speaker 5: Right. If you went and told Jack Daniels, hey, you know what, it's great you got Jack Daniels, but it can only be 12 percent now. Well, I mean on, on chemotherapy, you know, chemotherapy can be this percentage of potency. People would say, are you out of your mind? And that's what people don't understand, right? Sixteen percent thc. Cap means 84 percent of something else. Yeah. What is that? 80 four percent, right? We're adding filler, adding crap or adding things you don't want. So then I didn't have success in the legislature, didn't have success on the ballot, uh, and then, uh, went to Pueblo and did what all, it seems like that whole group of people, once it didn't get on the ballot, started sinking their teeth into Pueblo where it was very easy for them to get it an issue onto the ballot. You didn't need a lot of signatures to basically ban all cannabis in, I think Pueblo city of Pueblo County, one of the largest, one of the largest cannabis centers in Colorado.

Speaker 5: Pueblo was very vocal many years ago of actively recruiting people to come down there to spur their economy, to help with what was going on down there, you know, to, to help build infrastructure and to help create jobs, which has been a huge success. It has been a huge success. Right. And you could get a handful of people once again who are a little bit angry. Right? And those people got something put on the ballot and you know, thank God the people of Pueblo went, yeah, no, it's, this isn't. Yeah. I think by 10 points, right. Which politically is huge red, it's, it's all inside. So hopefully they're starting to see that they're wasting their time, but they're getting smarter. The opposition is getting trickier. They're getting better funding that they are now losing their foothold and they, what are we 56 percent, 58 percent of, of people in the United States now have access to some form of cannabis, right?

Speaker 5: So we're past the tipping point to California now going full adult. You should, right? So as long as they put good rules and good regulations in there. And you know, California is one of those. I talked to a lot of people when I was out there and heard both sides of of 64, 65, 64 and 60. Good, good. Cannabis. Um, yeah. And I heard both sides of the argument and what I just kept telling people is I get it right. And I know that it's perfect. It's not perfectly perfect and it's going to change. If it's anything like Colorado and everywhere else, it will change every couple of months. So what you're voting for now, it's not necessarily what's going to be in place a year from now, so if there are things you don't like, they are going to change, they are going to move, but you need some form of regulation, right?

Speaker 5: So they finally took that step and they can start to help shape now really shaped the national framework because everybody's going to look at, everybody's going to look at you and that's what I kept telling them. Respect as well. As soon as you pass your five times bigger than the Colorado market, you guys are going to be the epicenter of legal cannabis. I think we accept that fact a good consumption. Speaking about the changing ways of cannabis and the regulations around it that passed in Denver $300. So what does that do to for, for you as a business owner in the. In the city? It's funny, we were having this conversation last night, right? I'm glad it passed and we. It seemed like we had to force Denver's hand, right? Because nobody seemed to be doing anything right. It's still scary, right? It's, how do you mean?

Speaker 5: That's an interesting from a business perspective, once again, every little bit of statistics will be overblown. Right? And I, I think you can't have it in conjunction with alcohol consumption. Right? So I think that's it. I think that's part of what's going on, right? Because for me that's scary. So put everybody in a barter where they're drinking and consuming cannabis cannabis, when all of those people would be getting a Dui, now there's cannabis in their system because they're leaving a cannabis club. And then what's the blend? Now we are front page news again, it's going to take one or two accidents and were front page news and the sky is falling. That's my big fear. You know, as a manufacturer, that's it. It's a lot of exposure, right? We have opened the door for people just looking to beat up the industry. So I hope that the rules are done correctly and I hope that that, that they work with the city and they put a plan together that everybody can get behind and everybody's happy, but you know, they've got clubs in Colorado Springs, the clubs in Colorado Springs aren't working.

Speaker 5: That's all I can look at it, right? I can look it through there. Just a lot of illegal things go on there. Right? The way these clubs set up, the way it. I don't think it's A. I don't think it's a positive thing for the industry, the way it's been done up until this point, so I hope moving forward that we figure out a way to do it in a more positive light. It hopefully 10 years from now it doesn't matter. Right, right. You'll have high end cannabis consumption bars. You'll have, you know, dive bars. You'll have everything in between. You'll have a coffee shop, you'll have cannabis plus coffee. I'm sure you're okay with right. Like it, it's, you know, the whole landscape is gonna Change, but it's, it's, it's frightening, right? Because we're still getting beat up all the time. We're doing everything right and we're getting.

Speaker 5: We're getting beat up. Yeah. And so then now you're going to put me in the neighborhood of just. It's, it could possibly become a very. It's not possibly in. It is a. you're on a pedestal now, right? You are in the spotlight with what's about to happen across my fingers. I hope it gets done correctly. I hope everybody's responsible and I hope it's, you know, once again it comes down to the statistic right now that they're testing people. Oh, you know, dui or you know, there was a, there was an accident and we tested for cannabis. Got It. Have been consuming cannabis three weeks ago. I don't know. But you know, hey, cannabis in the system. What's legal now? Are you testing for tylenol and everybody's system? Are you testing for hot dogs? Oh my God. Hot dogs are causing accidents because now he also started testing for hot dogs and every time there's an accident or all they all came from the baseball game.

Speaker 5: Yeah. So you know, there's hot dogs in their system, so it's got to be careful is basically we have to be careful and of. Do I want it to happen? Yes. Am I frightened? Yeah, I really am because I just want it to be done incorrectly. Good. All right. And when I said there's one person, I think that there's one kind of mouthpiece, there's a couple of money people, and then there's some people underneath as far as opposition to cannabis. Right. You know? Yeah. Right. Yeah. All right. So, you know, I told you that I wanted to do this with you because uh, I know, uh, from, from our past conversations that you have a very specific way of looking at things politically. Is that fair? Yeah. Yes. Absolutely. Yeah. And so what, what are your basic principles of me? I've always been geared towards libertarianism, right?

Speaker 5: So I am very, I am very liberal on social issues, but the way this government is run from a fiscal standpoint, it's a nightmare, right? I mean, you see it, it's, we're spiraling out of control. We, we spend money, they spend money, like they can print money and they can print money. So they just afraid more money. Right? And there are zero thoughts. Have a budget and zero thoughts of responsibility in zero. The government's losing billions and trillions of dollars. If it was any other business, they be fired. Right? Well, that's an honor. People where they are now, they want these people to be fired. They have done both sides. Right? Both of the two major parties in my mind have been such a bad job for the last 20 or 30 years. They should all be fired. Okay. Sorry. That's the way I think and I think a lot of people obviously they year thought that because they don't want to see career politicians being put back into the office. It's, it's. I think people have kind of had enough, right? That, that something needs to happen at a federal level that needs to be shaken up and, and those people need to be put on notice that the American people are kind of sick of their bullshit.

Speaker 3: Right. And we're talking, let's just go down this fiscal path here. So if you ran your business with that much of a deficit, you, you wouldn't be running your business. You'd go out of business. We'd be at a business to the first six months. Right? But what about the debt? Like you, you can, you can work with debt, right? That's another reason we, we'd get absolutely not work with that. I have zero debt and I get it. I'd love to have some, trust me, I'd love somebody to give me a load so I can have a little debt, but unfortunately we're not in that position. So you as someone that, uh, you know, uh, cannot deduct anything because the two 88, you have no debt and you're running your business just fine. Thanks so much. Yeah, well once again, just fine air quotes again. Yeah, we're just fine.

Speaker 3: I whatever the definition of that is, but, but the, the financial picture as far as the United States of America, if you're looking at it as a business, which it's not, which it's not, unfortunately, it makes no sense whatsoever. No. Okay. Um, but, you know, I think that, um, when you start to have this conversation, you know, the hairs on the back of the neck start to go up on everybody and everybody starts to get into a crouching defense of what, what are we going to talk about now? And you know, we're, we're not going to be able to have a productive conversation because I believe ABC and you believe xY, , z. So I am and,

Speaker 5: and, and not only is it what I believe it, I watched it happen, we all watched it happen. The media, they grab onto the littlest thing, they blow it out of, you know, it is, we are. So I don't know if it's desensitized or over sensitized to what's going on, but we get spoon fed little pieces of information and that we hold that to be so true. Right? And we can't get off of those little things so we can't have productive conversations. It's Oh, candidate x, Y and Z is this and that's all they are. And that's all the over B, alright guy that, you know from both sides. And I don't know if it's a generational thing or it's just the way we are now where we get eight second blurbs of information and we think that's education now that that's all we have and that's everything we need to learn.

Speaker 5: You know, I tell my kids all the time, social media, don't put it out there, right? It is in public and you know, kids now and really people now say whatever they want over the Internet. When you meet them face to face, they won't say they won't say a pleasant conversation. It's like, wow, you've just been such an asshole to me on social media for the last two months and I meet you in person. You're like my best friend. Right. What's that about? And I think a lot of people just don't see it. Right? They don't understand that they, they feel that they can say anything they want on social media. Release it. Yeah. And it's okay. They can just vent and it's not real. Right. That there's not another person on the other side of that conversation that's like, wow, what did I do?

Speaker 5: Or you know, how did we get to here and let's have a conversation and why are you talking to me that way? Yeah. Either something to. And it's. I think it's just think it wasn't the latest South Park, right where they're, where they're showing who's actually the trolls, right? They are, they're advertising who the real trolls are all these people who've beaten people up on the Internet. I've just seen a little snippets of it. I haven't watched, but that's it. Right. It's like all these people hiding behind fake names and fake identities saying whatever they want and being as cruel as they can to other people. If the reality was, if you were sitting face to face, you would never do that, hopefully. Right? I hope people are absolutely that cruel and or crest. So. So the, the. There's two issues that you just identified. Number one is mass media, big media, corporate media give us a, a, a, a reality, you know, their spin if they are truly in control of what you think because they will just beat you over the head with this piece of information.

Speaker 5: It's all they want you to see, which is one piece of why the election result was so shocking to everybody. Some people weren't surprised, but I spoke to Steve de Angelo. He said he wasn't surprised foreign. What? It was shocking that day that he won because we weren't expecting it because of maybe what was presented to us and then conflate that with our own. Each. Uh, you know, what you just said about social media, you know, your own personal stream. You know, when you do come in contact with somebody, it's, it's a vicious issue, a vicious fight, but most of the time what you're reading is just what you think based on the friend group that you have. Correct. Uh, I heard, uh, I've heard a lot of unfriending happening, which is, which is a understandable based on the viciousness of the conversation. But um, but hold on, why don't we stop for a second and instead of just discommunication ourselves from each other, let's change the way that we talk to each other.

Speaker 5: You know, that's what my mother would tell me. Well, how are you talking to each other? You know, like whether it's my sister or my friends, you know, why are you saying it that way? He says, maybe you should re rethink how you're discussing that. Here's though friend, here's the one thing I learned along time ago that I figured out in my mind, yeah, whatever happens in any election, it doesn't change what I do the following day. It doesn't change how I treat people doesn't change how I act. It doesn't affect me on a, a macro level right? When it comes to taxes and how they spend our money and the things that they do on a federal level, it doesn't change what I do, doesn't change how I get up in the morning and go to work. It doesn't change what I do with my friends and my family.

Speaker 5: I am a firm believer like from the libertarian standpoint, I'm a better judge of what I can do with my money than the federal government. Right? I've seen them piss away my money year after year after year, give me back more of my money and I will spend it in my community and I will donate it to charities that I like and I will give it to my friends and family and I will help the people close to me. Yeah. That's what I would do if I had more of my money. Right. That's been my vision forever is the more they take, the more they spend and the more they spend it irrationally. And I understand that there are things that they have to do, you know, roads and education and, and uh, security. I get it. But man, when you see them just pissing that money away, it's hard to keep giving.

Speaker 5: Well, I want to come back to that because I want to you, you shared with me who you voted for. You can either share that or not. It's your choice. I voted for Gary Johnson and I knew I was voting for. I knew I was voting for Gary Johnson, you know, the year and a half ago before he, he was thinking about running and he came to some events and we sat down and we talked to him like. And once again, guy who doesn't know everything but he's okay. Let's say I don't know everything. Right? He's not bullshitting, you know, he's not. I would much rather have a guy going, hey, I don't know the answer. Let me go find it out. Because that's always the way. And I was a salesman for, for 30 years. It's like that's the. I don't lie. Right. Do you know the answer? No, but let me go find out and I'll get back to you.

Speaker 5: There you go. And I would much rather have a presidential candidate doing that then. Oh yeah, I know in, hey, this is exactly how it's going to be. Hey, you got to have your eyes and ears open and you have to have your mind opening after be able to change your course, especially in the cannabis industry right now. We're changing our course every other week, so you have to be flexible. I like people who are flexible, right? I like people who can learn to, who could admit that they're wrong, who can go out and find the right answer before they just say, Hey, this is definitely the truth. I'd rather have someone to go, I'm not sure. Let me go find out. And you sharing that, that you, uh, were voting for Gary Johnson before the election with your folks, with you, with the community. You told me you got it from both sides.

Speaker 5: You got it from Democrats to Republicans and what are you doing? Yeah, and the funding. But after it was after it was all over, right? Then the third party candidate, people who were, you're wasting your votes, you're idiots. Now we cost everybody the election, right? And it was, how is this? Hey, it's America. I can do whatever the fuck I want with my vote, and I voted for who I thought would do the best job. It wasn't a stab at anybody. That's right. There were 30 people on my presidential ballot, right? There was a guy from the nutrition party. If I would've known anything about nutrition party, I might have given that guy my job. I do not know, but mental health. I didn't know anything about the guy, but I voted for the guy who I thought would do the best job and I think if more people in this country voted for voted for somebody in and once again after the Ross Perot.

Speaker 5: Sure issue. Right? The first thing the Republicans Democrats did was made it much harder for anybody else on this presidential commission for debates was established and they. Yeah, and they basically made it impossible for anybody but those two candidates to get up and speak to the American people. That is the crime, right? Everybody, if you have an issue, the crime is. Those two were the best options. Holy Crap for, you know, for the last six months. I was scared because one of those two was going to win. Right, and that's what happened. It's terrifying from both sides. I don't appreciate and I don't see eye to eye with either one of the two major candidates, but we're not given any other options. Like I said, were spoon fed, so here's what you're supposed to believe in. These are your two choices. No people. We've got a lot more choices and if you do some research and you do some education, I would much rather see seven people get 10 to 15 percent of the vote.

Speaker 5: Right, and have it be a real battle between six or seven really qualified people. Right. Who can get up and have a reasonable debate because that's gonna open up doors for all of us and it's going to give us more option and it's going to put a more qualified person in charge and then everyone's voice is potentially or more. People's voice is up there on that stage. Correct. As opposed to, I don't like that person. I don't like that person. You've got two parties that are complete polar opposites and there's a lot of people in the middle and everybody, there's a lot of, and that's what you saw this election. There are a lot of people who are disenfranchised in the middle going, fuck, these are my choices. Right? So if you sound like a reasonable person to me, what you do or someone that's listening, let's get back to this infrastructure slash education thing because I don't think anyone.

Speaker 5: Well, no, let's add a security, a defense. So, you know, where do you come down on? I get the fact that uh, the roads should be better and that the bridges shouldn't fall down and I get the fact that our education is. Well, obviously I'm, I'm letting you know what I think, but our education should be better. Shouldn't we be the best in the world? The perfect example, right? The government takes a whole bunch of money for every citizen here and we are ranked so poorly in education. Why? Right. Somebody smarter than me, she'll be figuring that out. Sure. And we'd been getting worse year after year after. And it's not because the teachers don't care, it's not because they don't work hard. It's not. I don't want anybody to think that, right? We have very qualified teachers, but what's going on? Have we changed the system or are we not doing something right?

Speaker 5: Are there better models that we can look at and followed instead of going, hey, we're the US, we've got the bet. Nah, we literally don't. Let's go find the people who are number one and go, what do you guys do? What are you doing? Can we learn something from you? Can we change our system here? Because we've, I would assume we have the money. Right? And that's what it's all part of what we have your money. That's what I'm trying to definitely have a lot of money. Um, I, I, I am, you know, I end up, it could be unpopular. I'm a firm believer that the United States should invest back in the United States. Sure. W, we don't have to make everybody in the world, our friend. We don't have to spend billions of dollars in other countries. We, we've got people here in America that are struggling, right? Keep some of that money here.

Speaker 5: We've got children in America. Keep that money here. We've got people in America who need healthcare. Who need. I'm sorry, the healthcare debacle is a perfect example, right? Our premiums have got, my premiums have gone up almost 50 percent in the last two years and my service has gotten worse, right? Right. That is not a bonus for anybody. And, and you know, one of the things I saw that that's a potential new plan is to bring the walls down for insurance companies, right? So you can go state to state. There you go. Wow. You know, once again it was that business getting in there and getting those rules and regulations. So they have overinflated, right? Their prices for decades. Right? And we're all forced into that system and it got the weird weird dying, right? The American people are struggling because we can't get decent health care, right?

Speaker 5: And, and health insurance and the government should be able to help. But just letting competition sort that out should help. Also, I am no expert on healthcare. Neither of my, uh, I will tell you that, sorry, half this shit when I'm probably 90 percent of this shit. I am not an expert at all that I just have opinions, people so don't listen to me and began to really know anything, you know, your most people in the country. What I do think is that the walls went up between states to give the power to the states or the governor to choose to have an exchange, a statewide exchange versus a be a part of the federal exchange. I think that that's why that was there. Maybe any, either way you look at it didn't quite work out the way that we wanted it to work out.

Speaker 5: Once again, I, I heard about that, right. And uh, I, I, I'm learning out a whole bunch of insurance because I'm dealing with it all the time, not when I found out. Yeah. So it just makes sense to me. It's like, why is there not more competition across state lines? Why can't you know? It competition's a good thing in a capitalist society before, right? You're going to get more value, you're going to get better services, you're going to get lower prices because some guy out there is going to be competing for your money as opposed to, you know, a system where there's not a lot of competition and people can do whatever they want and you're, you're kind of held over a barrel as a businessman. That's the way my brain's always worked. Right. And school vouchers is another one on, right? If people, the money that they were going to spend at their local school and if they don't like their local school, let them spend it somewhere else.

Speaker 5: Right, right. How is that a bad thing? I don't for them that personal. Don't be sourced to go to a crappy school if your school is subpar every year, but it's the one right down at the end of your street. Sorry. That's the one you have to go to. Well then are you going to fix it? Nope. It's not going to get any better. Can I go somewhere else? Nope. That's unreasonable. Yeah, that's it. Yeah. So give people that choice to go somewhere else. Now, let me ask you this, uh, that brings us to bridges right in and let's, you know, obviously state by state Colorado's doing great with infrastructure because of all the cannabis money. Hey, thanks again. Bob. Evil Cannabis. Yeah, we know good. But like let's talk about bridges between two states. You know, uh, that federal money, that infrastructure, the highway system. Where do you come down on this is Bob's money and it's going to go to infrastructure.

Speaker 5: What are your thoughts? It has to. I, I am. Okay. Even even if my tax rate goes up, I'm okay paying for that. If I see benefits a half, I see that this country is receiving those benefits and the people in this country, whether its infrastructure, whether it's better education, whether it's healthcare, whether it's food stamps, I don't if I see my money going to things that create value in this country, not even necessarily to me. My biggest issue is I don't see that enough and I see the way they waste the money and I see the way they waste money overseas when I go. When you go to New Orleans, when you go to Detroit, when you go to these places and go, why are the cities not rebuild? Why are you know what's going on? Why is there poison water in flint? Why is what is going on where our money isn't being spent right here at home to make the quality of life in this country better for these people whose money you are taking?

Speaker 5: Spend it here. So a couple things right on, on the, on those points. What about the guy or girl or person, uh, that. Here's what you said about you can raise my tax rate as long as I can see that money at work in, in positive ways. What about that person that says, I'm Bob. You're crazy. You know, obviously it's not working. Forget about it. Lower the tax rates. Let's all go out at a the way that we need to go at it. Once again, it brings me back to if I have more of my money, I know where it's going. So you appreciate that point and I will spend it in my community. I will be going to restaurants and my community, I will be buying things from shopping my community, I will be sending it to my family and friends and helping out people and donating it to the charities that I want to donate it to.

Speaker 5: But why would you say that you are okay if your tax rate gets gets? Uh, if I see benefits, I see benefits when I have my money and I spend my money because I get to see those benefits with yet I see value whether I'm giving money to the guy on the street. Right. I get to see the value. I get to see where that money goes and if I'm pissing away my money I can, Jeez, I probably shouldn't have bought that. Right. Or I probably shouldn't have spent it on that. I probably should've done something smarter with my money. Turns Out Black Jack was a bad idea. Yeah. One of the craps table last night. So, so far it's been good. I haven't left yet. I have not left Vegas with more money than I got here with, but right now I'm okay. Yolo 11. Right.

Speaker 5: Um, so, okay, fine. So that's that. Then what about the guy you, you brought up flint and there was a decision made by the governor to change the water from the water, the work to the water that didn't need to simplify it. Um, so that's what the problem was there, right? So that's another bad decision. No matter if it's a Democrat or Republican, that's another bad decision by government in, in, in your eyes, bad. Yeah, bad decisions. And nobody's held accountable, right? I'm sorry. You know, and banking and all of these things, they blatantly illegal. Possibly poorly mismanaged. Definitely. Right? Any other business, you are fired, right? The cream rises to the top. You get somebody better in there, but the fact that there's no, nobody gets in trouble, right? There's no consequences to making shitty decisions. You just keep moving. Career politicians are perfect example, right?

Speaker 5: You make bad decision after bad decision, you should be fired. You should be fired. This is your job right here to speak for me. The American people. I put you in power. Here's what I would like you to do. And you'd go up there and you don't do it. You should be five years. How do you not pass a budget? Yeah. Good. That's my job. Not Passing a budget. The correct. Nobody else in the world can get away with that shit. Right, exactly. That's the hypocrisy. That's where everybody's just. Their jaws are hitting the floor at this point because it's gridlock and nothing gets done. Nothing positive seems to get done nothing. And there's no repercussions if shit doesn't get done right. That's, that's what I did with. I'm sure everybody else is frustrated with the same thing. Just do something. Do something positive and productive.

Speaker 5: You were supposed to be the best and the brightest. I'm not saying I have all the answers, but figure it out. Go Up. They're learning the information. Make a good decision. Work with people on both sides of the aisle and get this country moving forward again. And, and, and bringing it back to, to industry. You brought up the, uh, economic apocalypse at least in passing with the bankers. Uh, I, I hope I heard you right in that, uh, your point was how did no one get in trouble for whatever happened there? Yeah, no one, I don't think a single person, one guy, one guy went lower level guy, one lower level guy was the scapegoat, right? Everybody got to keep the money. Everybody got to keep their profits. Everybody gets to keep their jobs. If it was anybody else, we would be in jail, right.

Speaker 5: Period. And I think that's what people see now is there's a different set of rules for those people versus the rest of us. And that's where I'm frustrated and I'm sure other people are frustrated also. I just. Hypocrisy is that is one of my pet peeves, right? Is I hate the hypocrisy of what we're seeing in everyday life. Right? I don't know, it just bugs me. So, so we're, we're, we're here in Las Vegas and kind of every, we're, we're here among 10,000, supposedly ridiculous, crazy. Uh, and we'll, we'll finish with that. But, uh, I know for a fact that every political stripe is, is downstairs. Every single type of view is downstairs. How can we as reasonable people, um, start having a dialogue with people that we don't necessarily disagree with or don't necessarily agree with. In other words, you and I are pretty close on these things.

Speaker 5: I might not agree with you over here. Or Am I not agree with you man? I can't believe you build a bridge. Screw you and your bridge. I mean, when we are tight, when we looked at each other, we just, that's would be ridiculous for us to talk to each other that way. How do we instill that in our colleagues? How do we make that doing exactly what we're doing and we don't have conversations anymore. Right? And for some reason, if we don't agree on something, everybody take shit personally. And I think that's everybody, right? And it is the. Everybody gets a participation trophy and everybody's feeling it's okay if you hurt my feelings, we don't have to agree on shit. Being able to go, hey, I don't agree with that. And You keep talking. You know what? We don't have to keep talking. I'm okay with not seeing your side of it.

Speaker 5: It's cool. I don't have to agree with you. You don't have to sell me on it. Right. Your job really isn't to convince me and if you can't convince me by the end of this conversation, you failed. Right? It's totally okay to go. All right. I see your point of view. I just don't believe that I believe something else because I'm coming from the 48 years I've had on this planet have taught me this where you're, you know, however many years I've taught you something else. It's so when it's 25 years, 25 years old, but it's okay to disagree on Shit. And I think that's part of the problem is people think if I disagree with you, the somehow, personally I think you're less than or I don't like you anymore. No Shit. I don't see eye to eye with my kids on a lot of things. I don't love them anyway.

Speaker 5: Trust me, Dave. Yeah, so it's the same. I think the final piece of that though is in that conversation where you know that you disagree, you find, well, okay, I disagree with you on that. I just, you know, and then the other side, I just agree with you on that. We're, let's find the common ground. What do we agree on? They have to be able to agree on something, right? Protestant. Yeah. And. And fundamentally, right. I mean there, there are some things that I see this way and I don't want to change and that's okay. You don't. Once again, you don't have to convince me to change. That is not your job. If I listen to your side of the argument and on a lot of Vata topics, I can see. Yeah. Well, Yep. I can see where you're coming from here and I understand that and I can see your point of view. It's not my point of view, but I get it right. I see it and I understand it. If I can help in any way to try to get you what you want and not go against what I believe, I'm okay with doing that.

Speaker 5: It's nice to find common ground, but once again, it's not a necessity. We can still be friends even though we don't agree on everything. Right. If it's not, politics will find common ground somewhere else. Oh hell yeah. You know what I mean? Music, New Jersey Pizza. Jack. Jack, Jack. So there is one place where we, the people of the United States seem to agree that is cannabis. We started there. We'll end here. You know that beat every, you know, politician at the polls. That always does. We have 10,000 people downstairs and you know, the election happened what two weeks ago. So this doesn't even include the people that are going to get into the industry now that eight out of nine states approved. Date's going to be, I would say what the industry is going to the. Well if you, if you don't add the California numbers right, it's going to go up to 300 percent, 400, 500.

Speaker 5: I then add column. Yeah. It's, it's, it's a good time for the cannabis industry. As long as the federal government listens to the people. Sure. And I think that's part of our frustration also is the people have spoken, right? The people listened to what the people want and stop meddling and know. I know you once again you have your opinions, but you're not necessarily put up there to voice your opinion. I voted you into office to voice my opinion and the opinion of this state. The opinion. It's not, hey, I want to now I'm going to do what I want. No, no, no, no. You are my mouth. Right? They're supposed to their power. Exactly. And that's part of the, I think that's why people are just so frustrated is I don't care what your opinion is. The people have you said x, Y, and Z and that's why I put you up there.

Speaker 5: Do X, Y and Z. not get up there and going away. You know, this lobby has gave me a and I got this donation and ah, playing politics now and you know, I want to do what's right for me and my, it's God have come on, do what we put you up there to do. There you go. All right, so, so to finish then, if we have all of these new people that are bound to come in and someone finds kind of as economy the podcast either on itunes or Google play or somewhere else, um, what would your advice be to incoming entrepreneurs to the industry? Things to definitely do things to definitely not do. Let's start with. Definitely don't do anything illegal. I do not give a black eye to the industry. I've operated that way for six years now. Yeah. What should they do?

Speaker 5: The right thing? I don't, I don't know what that is for your state, but follow your state rules, your state law to the wetter. Yeah, right. We're building an industry that is still federally illegal, that is still looked down upon by a lot of people, a lot fewer, right? But the people in charge have a strong bias to get and they are looking for ways to beat us up. So do the right thing, walk the line, follow the law, and help the industry move forward in a responsible way. We've done that at my company for six years. We've always tried to be ahead of the curve from labeling to packaging to stamping the products to consistency, to testing. All of the things we've done for six years are now mandated in Colorado. Yeah. Right. So those are no longer things that set us apart, which is great.

Speaker 5: Right. It's the entire industry had to raise their level. Right. So. So now we're here. Table stakes, right? Yeah. It's a. It is entry level. Things that used to set us apart that made us unique are now entry level to get into the Colorado cannabis market. It's going to be that way in every other state and make sure that it is a police. Yeah. That's what we have to do it. It has to be, and I'm sorry, there has to be rules. It has to be regulated. There has to be. There's going to be a federal framework at some point. As much as it might scare people. We have to be a regulated industry. There's too much going on. It is. Food is medicine. It is a lot of different things. There are going to be rules and regulations, so we need to be sitting at the table because if you're not sitting at the table, they're making rules for you and they're going to shove them down your throat. You don't want that. One of the things I learned several years ago, which if you're not at the table your dinner, right? So it's a great. You need to be at the table having these conversations, finding the middle ground. Right. So you can get. Everybody has to swallow hard and everybody has to give in a little bit and you have to move forward

Speaker 3: productively. Yeah. And responsibility. Yeah. Alright. So, so that's what folks need to do a, that's what folks need to not do. It's do things legally and get yourself a seat at the table. Yeah. Because if you don't, if you're not at the table your dinner. Yeah. I love it. Um, so I think we've done. I think we've done good work here, right? Yeah, I hope so. Yeah, I'm sure on social media people are going to say nasty, mean things. Like Bob said, everybody, if you want to come talk to me in person, we can have a reasonable discussion, are totally okay with that. Once again, you don't have to see eye to eye. We don't have to. Well, we can still be friends. Even if you disagree with anything I've said here today, or you can shred them apart digitally, which, which of course seems like a very productive.

Speaker 3: Everybody's favorite pastime. Make means I, I'm a, I'm all for Baba Skino, reasonable guy, middle of the road. Um, I think I forgot to introduce you because I definitely didn't say a skino until now, but, uh, for today, uh, a sound on the soundtrack of your life named one track, one song that's got to be on there as a final question. God, I always go back to west for life by Iggy pop. It's always been. He just came back and go, all right. There's a, you know, some. I like to say there's an epic scale for songs. Yep. So, you know, on, you know, closer to the top to the 10 is like just those songs that are just bigger than you. And they carry you. Lust for life is pretty. Is Pretty high up there. You know what I mean? When the said going, forget about it. It's good stuff. Pawlowski. No, thank you so much. I'll see you right after we turned the microphone. Microphones off. Okay. And there you have. Bob Is Skino

Speaker 1: and Jordan person at the top. Very much appreciate her sharing her story. What a remarkable story. It is. Very much appreciate Bob having a dialogue. You know, no matter where we are on the political spectrum, think more talking please. More listening please. But you're already doing that. Thanks so much for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.