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Ep.226: Will Head/Stanton Barrett & Jamie Perino Part II

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.226: Will Head/Stanton Barrett & Jamie Perino Part II

Ep.226: Will Head/Stanton Barrett & Jamie Perino Part II

Will Head and Stanton Barrett, Ojai & Jamie Perino, Euflora Part II
Will and Stanton from Ojai join us to take us through the journey from a basic understanding of hemp to delivering a CBD product. Will studied permaculture design in Australia as well as sustainable community development and holistic health. His parter Stanton has a distinctly different background which included growing up with old hollywood and olympic athletics as well as racing cars himself.
Jamie Perino then returns and describes cannabis as a marathon at a sprinters pace. She discusses the lower prices of cannabis in Colorado and the myriad changes in the state going into the fourth year of adult-use cannabis. Finally Jamie shares if getting in, cut estimates of what you’ll make in half…and triple what it’s going to cost you.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Will Head, Stanton Barrett and Jamie Perino joined us to take us through the journey from a basic understanding of him to delivering a cbd product. Will studied permaculture design in Australia as well as sustainable community development and holistic health is partner. Stenting has a distinctly different background which included growing up with old Hollywood at Olympic athletes as well as racing cars himself. Jamie Perino then returns and describes cannabis as a marathon at a sprinter's pace. She discusses the lower prices of cannabis in Colorado in the myriad changes in the state going into the fourth year of adult use cannabis. Finally, Jamie shares if getting in code estimates of what you'll make in half and triple what it's gonna cost. You walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Jamie Loreano proceeded by will and Stanton from all the folks in Ohio are going to get all excited because of all high. There are many people will go, oh, hi. Oh, hi. No, just Ohi. Correct. And, and as I say it, it makes sense. Is there any,

Speaker 3: you know, besides. Oh, hi. Is there any etymology to the name? Is there a reason why the energetics is that we're focused on the holistic energetic element of CBD, the plan ecosystems or ecosystems environment, how we synergize my endo cannabinoid system. I'm sure you're interested in. I am. And you're headquartered where? Oh, Hi California. Okay. Oh, Hi California. Which is north North la by about an hour and a half, 30 minutes. And when Santa Barbara little slice. Terrible there. Rough. Oh, the winters. And Ohi don't get me started. So we'll, I mean, is this your kind of a. Did you come up with this whole thing?

Speaker 4: I didn't, I wasn't satisfied with, so I was looking for cbd a 2014 as a patient. A. Yep. Not the. And I thought I was looking for dispensaries that had cbd so I can get it on Amazon. Sure. How is this legal and possible? This doesn't seem legit. So I order it. Yeah. Look at the ingredients and it's got a questionable glycerin, most likely genetic modified source. A polysorbate 80 is petroleum based, right. And uh, if he, uh, hemp sourcing iffy hemp sources at the beginning is from China industrial hemp waste product. Sure. Hampson incredible dynamic accumulator, which means it will remediate soils dirty, don't want to. Right. So it had high heavy metal so it wasn't something that I wanted to take and I felt comfortable or safe taking. Right. So I wanted to create something that I would take personally, I'm sure the basis and for everyone to take what I cared about it.

Speaker 4: Alright. So how old were you at the time? A 25. So you would have been able to have gone to some sort of schooling of some kind to. Correct. Okay. Uh, so I had studied a permaculture design Australia, which is sustainable design science, uh, and it was getting my major and sustainable community development and Prescott College and holistic health a moment. And where's Prescott and Prescott, Arizona seem less coasting. Right? Grew up in the bay area and then. But we're. Well, so permaculture is a name for an applied system designed science on basically how do you get maximum abundance for minimum input? So it's designing an ecosystem, whether it's a business, your lifestyle, or an orchard in patterns with nature as opposed to fighting nature. Okay. So this is the founders of permaculture or Australia. Got It.

Speaker 3: So this is all sorts of hippy dippy stuff here, right? You're from northern California, you've got your bone of fee days in hippy, dippy culture, right?

Speaker 4: Hippie. And I'd say hybrid, Hippie, like techno hippie.

Speaker 3: What I'm really asking you, how did you grow up? What were your parents doing? What was life like? So I grew

Speaker 4: up in silicon valley. Oh, you did a parents met at Stanford. My Dad was teaching a saber, my mom was getting her Mba. There they are economists, financial consultants. So they study the math behind damages and securities cases, attorneys hire them and figure out the damage caused for security. These are the smart people that we need or we go for it. So I grew up in that environment, uh, around kind of realized I, I'm naturally a systems design thinker by nature. So I study patterns and I see what trends are, see how nature works, how that diffuses and social patterns, etc. And I was looking at, like shocked me when I asked, I started thinking, well, why for a healthcare do we have all these specialists yet, none of them know how to communicate with each other. So there's, they're treAting a, a system and a symptom, but not the holIstic system, of course not.

Speaker 2: Will Head, Stanton Barrett and Jamie Perino joined us to take us through the journey from a basic understanding of him to delivering a cbd product. Will studied permaculture design in Australia as well as sustainable community development and holistic health is partner. Stenting has a distinctly different background which included growing up with old Hollywood at Olympic athletes as well as racing cars himself. Jamie Perino then returns and describes cannabis as a marathon at a sprinter's pace. She discusses the lower prices of cannabis in Colorado in the myriad changes in the state going into the fourth year of adult use cannabis. Finally, Jamie shares if getting in code estimates of what you'll make in half and triple what it's gonna cost. You walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Jamie Loreano proceeded by will and Stanton from all the folks in Ohio are going to get all excited because of all high. There are many people will go, oh, hi. Oh, hi. No, just Ohi. Correct. And, and as I say it, it makes sense. Is there any,

Speaker 3: you know, besides. Oh, hi. Is there any etymology to the name? Is there a reason why the energetics is that we're focused on the holistic energetic element of CBD, the plan ecosystems or ecosystems environment, how we synergize my endo cannabinoid system. I'm sure you're interested in. I am. And you're headquartered where? Oh, Hi California. Okay. Oh, Hi California. Which is north North la by about an hour and a half, 30 minutes. And when Santa Barbara little slice. Terrible there. Rough. Oh, the winters. And Ohi don't get me started. So we'll, I mean, is this your kind of a. Did you come up with this whole thing?

Speaker 4: I didn't, I wasn't satisfied with, so I was looking for cbd a 2014 as a patient. A. Yep. Not the. And I thought I was looking for dispensaries that had cbd so I can get it on Amazon. Sure. How is this legal and possible? This doesn't seem legit. So I order it. Yeah. Look at the ingredients and it's got a questionable glycerin, most likely genetic modified source. A polysorbate 80 is petroleum based, right. And uh, if he, uh, hemp sourcing iffy hemp sources at the beginning is from China industrial hemp waste product. Sure. Hampson incredible dynamic accumulator, which means it will remediate soils dirty, don't want to. Right. So it had high heavy metal so it wasn't something that I wanted to take and I felt comfortable or safe taking. Right. So I wanted to create something that I would take personally, I'm sure the basis and for everyone to take what I cared about it.

Speaker 4: Alright. So how old were you at the time? A 25. So you would have been able to have gone to some sort of schooling of some kind to. Correct. Okay. Uh, so I had studied a permaculture design Australia, which is sustainable design science, uh, and it was getting my major and sustainable community development and Prescott College and holistic health a moment. And where's Prescott and Prescott, Arizona seem less coasting. Right? Grew up in the bay area and then. But we're. Well, so permaculture is a name for an applied system designed science on basically how do you get maximum abundance for minimum input? So it's designing an ecosystem, whether it's a business, your lifestyle, or an orchard in patterns with nature as opposed to fighting nature. Okay. So this is the founders of permaculture or Australia. Got It.

Speaker 3: So this is all sorts of hippy dippy stuff here, right? You're from northern California, you've got your bone of fee days in hippy, dippy culture, right?

Speaker 4: Hippie. And I'd say hybrid, Hippie, like techno hippie.

Speaker 3: What I'm really asking you, how did you grow up? What were your parents doing? What was life like? So I grew

Speaker 4: up in silicon valley. Oh, you did a parents met at Stanford. My Dad was teaching a saber, my mom was getting her Mba. There they are economists, financial consultants. So they study the math behind damages and securities cases, attorneys hire them and figure out the damage caused for security. These are the smart people that we need or we go for it. So I grew up in that environment, uh, around kind of realized I, I'm naturally a systems design thinker by nature. So I study patterns and I see what trends are, see how nature works, how that diffuses and social patterns, etc. And I was looking at, like shocked me when I asked, I started thinking, well, why for a healthcare do we have all these specialists yet, none of them know how to communicate with each other. So there's, they're treAting a, a system and a symptom, but not the holIstic system, of course not.

Speaker 4: And now the missing piece, which I learned later is the endocannabinoid system. It is the homeostatic regulator for all of the systems of the body. None of them knew about the uncontaminated system. Uh, and so I started to question things and what's really going on? Why, why are we treating symptoms instead of causation? And then also looking at, uh, the way that we were living on an ecological level wasn't really sustainable. We were, we were a second, a lot of resources out and not putting a lot of good stuff back. I thought, okay, well, we're not really headed in the best direction. how can we improve this whole thing? Do now before we get to that answer? Yeah, okay. Because you're the ceo. But we got the precedent here. We did, right? So here we go with stanton beret. And uh, this is quite a native san, I mean, this is a name to live up to, right? It is. where are you from originally from bIshop California. Where's fisher?

Speaker 5: Uh, eastern California mammoth lakes. You submit it.

Speaker 4: Okay. In the eastern sierra Nevada mountains. Oh wow. It's beautiful there in a way. Different way than Ohio. Absolutely. Beautiful. Very majestic. Okay. And so as a kid, what were you doIng

Speaker 5: as a kid? I grew up around a professional athletes. My mom was a world cup skier, ski hall of fame, youngest woman to won a world cup metal cantel vancouver olympics. My grandpa coach the us ski team in the late fifties, early sixties.

Speaker 3: So you know how to skate. I learned how to ski and still working past the snow plow. But uh, you know, my dad was a

Speaker 5: man, so he, burt reynolds, paul newman's diva queen, kind of grew up learning.

Speaker 3: I was already second. That's the big three of 1970 cinema of tough guy, you know, good guy, hero, you know, every guy wants to be those guys. and, and, and it's your dad that's doing the stunts. You got to be kidding me. Which films we got to know of hooper banded. He's been. He's been good.

Speaker 5: And a happy employee. Hellfighters. That's crazy. We had a. Paul used to babysit and he is my godfather. Paul newman. He babysat me. Come hang out at the house. John wayne would stop by.

Speaker 3: Good call. That's ridiculous. Sewer.

Speaker 5: I called paul to. And

Speaker 3: would you, do you remember any like a lesson from paul or a kind of a way of life, a way of thinking from him.

Speaker 5: He's just was loving caring guy that you would ever meet is a charitable desires and helping kids quality of life. And my grandfather are just extremely humbled and coming from the success of the iconic personality and image. Uh, he, he's a true household name around the world just to see his interaction with people in his care for helping people's trip in this, um, you know, just taking, taking that aspect of just. He just wanted to help people. That's what his was.

Speaker 3: It feels like you kind of took that lesson for your own life.

Speaker 5: Yeah. Well my father was that way. My mom's are similar, but really on a large scale to see what he's done. My dad and he both have done a lot of projects together, can build camps and helping with medical things for people all around the world right now. That is one reason why I got together with will and we decided to work together because my passion is same. My time and energy is spent developing this company with, you know, our focus is truly providing a product that will help quality of life and change people's lives and make it affordable, cost effective and get it out in the marketplace. Because you're my background at car racing and I direct commercials and movies, iracing. I'd dealt with marketing brand sales can have all kinds of levels. So that's why we jumped on it.

Speaker 3: So we're going to go back to will to, to kind of continue the story and tell us about how you guys met, but when you bring up car racing, we have to dive in there. What kind of car racing are we talking about? That'S also a Paul Newman type thing,

Speaker 5: right? Know had a lot of fun on the racetrack together. Playing around with almost crashed cars. Laughing together. I ran sprint cup, nascar. Sprint was fixed. Vanity truck, ran indy cars. Amsa, what's your preference? Whatever series. It gave me the best car because it's all about the car type of thing. It's a lot about the car. Yeah, it's evolving constantly. I mean an open wheel was a lot of fun on street courses, like long beach in st pete. That was a lot of fun. We're going to do some stuff this year in trans am, which for me is the funnest racing right now. I love nascar. Going into certain tracks that I really like. Daytona darlington, bristol, bristol totally changed it. New which is up by you to walk in somewhere and every year you certain tracks. I love. Let me make a point to figure out a way to get back there and have fun

Speaker 3: courses. Bandits, car. So everything kind of comes together here with the burt reynolds reference earlier, but it comes either as far as the name, but trans-am is actually a series of

Speaker 5: paul ran and won.

Speaker 3: Oh, the series, not the car, excuse me, that you can take. You can see how much I know a good correlation there. So it is the series of just those cars or the name is trans am. So they run most things

Speaker 5: marrows. Corvette cadillacs are, they're, they're pretty advanced race car and that's what paul used to race all the time. So it's pretty fun that I get to go out and raise some of that is kind of lonely series left the United States.

Speaker 3: Got it. Okay. Alright, so we're going to hand it back over to will here. Obviously we can, uh, we can tell that uh, as, as far as stanton goes, he lets the car do the shouting. You know, you are a very soft spoken person standing. So. So how did you guys kind of cross paths? Where did that happen?

Speaker 4: Uh, we were on a flight to mammoth and I grew up snowboarding area where I'd love to meet somebody. You could show me the good spots and secret spots on the mountain and lo and behold, I'm flying in with stanton. Sure. best person I could imagine. And then we just ended up talking about cbd and how to impact and change the planet.

Speaker 3: So cannabis came up on the plane in that first conversation. Yep. That's interesting. And so obviously his approach holistically, your approach scientifically in essence, when did you stumble upon what became the answer?

Speaker 4: Uh, for the product and how well so, so what I set out to formulate something that I would want to find the best ingredients, purist organic ended up meeting a canvas to figure it out of a water soluble and

Speaker 3: usually you have to use oil or something like that. So

Speaker 4: they're fAt soluble compounds, right? And so they're great for when they get into the body, then they can travel anywhere. But the key is getting them into that.

Speaker 3: so coconut oil, olive oil usually. Right. And

Speaker 4: the thing is is that the pharma kinetics, and that means around 90 percent of what you're eating is destroyed before it even makes it into the body. So you eat 10 milligrams or getting one program. Oh, san fran. The same for cbt. It's not bio available. Right? So basically the best we've evolved to have a water layer that's like the gatekeeper, it prevents fat soluble compounds from getting in because once they're In they can go anywhere. Sure. Uh, and so what we've done, so he made a water soluble, it can bypass that system and get it immediately. We're faster. So I said, okay, well was that organic? And we look into not organic processes it. Okay, well let's, let's, we to figure out how to do this certified organic and clean so it's safe and that people would want it. Sure. So we figured it out and we patented it.

Speaker 3: I was going to ask you, well, what, how did you figure it out? And then you said I patented it. So now you can't tell me. no. Well, the ip, I guess I can go to the patent office. You could exact now. So

Speaker 4: a guy went out and we found top ip attorneys on the planet and build a really amazing catalog. Uh, and so it's not just on the water solubility. Basically what we do is we reuse a certified organic surfactant that is sustainably harvested and is biocompatible. And use that to blend that wIth the oil and water. And we basically pop bubbles of water around the oil. So it's fully, it's a full spectrum cd. It's not isolated, isolated. My opinion does not work properly. It's got a very limited effect. Shadi is lacking. This synergistic compounds that entourage effect. But what we do is we actually encapsulate the entire oil in microbubbles water so that your body recognizes it as water and absorbs it instantly. And, and so we've got the fastest acting, most bioavailable cbd on the market night day. And we can do that for all cannabinoids. Sure. We're the only ones who can do it without using synthetics. So petroleum's. So when you start nano sizing and you're bypassing the filtration system, you have to be super careful and ethical and what you're putting into that person's body. Sure. And when you start putting petroleum's that normally would be filtered out or synthetically modified compounds, you're actually penetrating that intercellularly. so I don't think most people want to put a synthetically modified compound loaded into their cells.

Speaker 3: Well, not if you say it that way, but, but what about acting too quickly? What about it being too effective? In other words, one of my very best friends has crones and we got to get that

Speaker 4: all the way to his large intestine. We caN't have it activated in his mouth. While the beauty is, is that, uh, so, so terpene, we're touching on europeans. So turpines what differentiates between like a lg kush and a girl scout cookies? Sure, there's going to be some differentiation canabinoids, but the primary difference is the terpene profile. Now, those two strands indicated a sativa or hybrid all have very different effects. Why is the terpene, because they will direct the cannabinoids to the systems that they have affinity to write. So alignment in a type compound is good for digestion. It's going to go to the digestive track, and so basically it will hold the hand of the cannabinoid and bring it there. So if you get it in the blood, the endocannabinoid systems, beauty and intelligence that we're just scratching the surface of is that it knows how to regulate homeostatic balance of the body.

Speaker 4: So once it's in the blood, it's got receptors on every single system and so it's primary concerns groans, it will deliver it to the digestive finds correctly and goes there. They will go, you will send it. there is actually you don't need it to get it. Now there's some benefits if you want to do slow release on that, which we have patents in tech for controlling where it enters the gut. I'm just using a bio made compounds but I'm not synthetic. But essentially with our delivery system, let's say someone wants to work on the digit, they're good. Just attract sure. What's unique with our processes, you can put the oil and that we can custom create a terpene blend or a strain if you will, on the spot because it's absorbed instantly and the fastest way to get a terpene into the body is by smelling it, inhaling it.

Speaker 4: And so the timing is right. So if yoU took a regular cbd oil or the oil could swallow, it takes 30 minutes and now it's into the system. After thIrty minutes the turbines have already gone off to other things. Right? So what we can do is you can actually smell it on the spot while you're holding it, and they have. We have customized essential oil blends with the terpene specifically for different systems at that person who smelled them, the essential oil blend for digestion while they're holding it, and it will take the cbd and directed specifically to the data here. So we can create targeted delivery systems for the individual for what they want on the spot just by central as we were the only ones who can do that.

Speaker 3: You guys are the siegfried and roy of cbd. A good relation to your friend? Yeah. Yeah. Go ahead. Yeah,

Speaker 1: I've been given a different disease in their feedback. Has been to like the guy and he's. He's in the film business, significant crises, seeing them, put them out for days and stop taking it. I don't have any more symptoms so I've never felt this good in my life. And that's taken under the tongue and when you swallow the rest of it, it still goes into your digestive and it helps. Helps snakes. Orbs immediately versus the other stuff that doesn't get as senior digestif takes 30 minutes, you'll lose all the nutrition. So even for crones it's effective. Evil, like digest it after you swallow it,

Speaker 3: right? Even taken orally I guess is what we're saying. Right. So let's just go back to the mountain here. You guys kind of meet each other on the plane. You land. How terrible of a skier is, is we'll actually didn't get whiskey with them that we gain. And uh, I did ski. We did. Is run different schedules or, or you were on diamonds and black diamonds and diamond. There you go. Wake up at 6:30 AM kind of ease into the day, full days again and then go visit my grandparents. So different schedules. When did you then meet up again after, after the due date and touch. So it's fast. Friends. We knew that we were going to do this. We kind of stayed in touch daily pretty much. And then how quickly um, with staying in touch daily was the first, okay we have something, let's go.

Speaker 1: Well he already knew he had something. He just needed additional people to help with getting an executed in early in the grant and growing the business and you know, more manpower because he was really good help. So we just decided, you know, what the background marketing and direct commercials and we can degrade advertising, we can build the brand, get the brand image up, get a great foundation for the company and grow it so we distribute it.

Speaker 3: So we'll do a great job of kind of sharing the science and the specificity of this product and product assortment as far as the marketing, you know, what, what, what's the approach, you know, how, how are you kind of highlighting what we're talking about, you know, for every man or every woman

Speaker 1: explaining the differences of our product versus everybody else in the significance of the difference in the technology that was created to be able to get it distributed or into your system. And then, you know, we're working with influencers both in sports and business men, the entertainment fashion to get the word out. So we're doing multiple different means of advertising. Most education. Our goal is to educate people on the endocannabinoid system and then help them understand the difference in our technology versus other competitors or people in this space so we can first educate people why that works within the system is and how it affects your body and what categories that supports in your body system and then how come our product is so effective in its delivery system to effectively make you better and make quality of life better for you. So our big thing is about education and getting people that are like minded, like spirited, a great extreme sports athletes, professional athletes are driven the character a great energy to voice their feelings. Even just, you know, brand and get their stories but get it out

Speaker 3: with athletes and kind of actors and such that, that kind of set. Those are folks that traditionally are really in tune with their bodies. Are our folks, those folks that you're talking to, are they getting it, do you think as far as athletes and as far as the folks that you're talking about? Yes, absolutely.

Speaker 1: If they get it, they Want, you know, especially athlete wise, you're doing every thing. You tend to be the most

Speaker 5: physically fit and mentally fit exactly within your all day long, the countless hours for am to 10:00 PM, all your waking hours or how do you maximize 100 percent of your body and get the in it takes extremist, you know, training and effort and discipline. So they do get it. And when, you know, a lot of people on their own have looked into canabinoids for treatments of different things or pain resolution or whatever. So when we start to educate them on the complexity of the endocannabinoid system and get in there more scientifically and give them background and that opens their whole lives and then they try our product and they feel the effects that we talked about pretty much immediately. And they're like, oh my god, okay, this is, this is it. We do want to help. We do want to advocate and educate people on what the endocannabinoid system and what our product.

Speaker 3: Because it's more than just a branding exercise. It's more than just, you know, chips. I believe in, so you know, there's everybody, right? There's your regular people. If we want to call actors and athletes, regular will. Did you think that it would be this quick to it to adapt to adopt? I mean obviously we've got standard that's kind of an ace in the hole, but as far as non scientists getting what you're talking about, you surprised that the adoption adoption?

Speaker 6: No, becAuse I think everyone, we're, we've, we've kind of hit a critical mass consciousness and the internet has really accelerated a questioning and information share. There's also no overload and oxidated stress that comes with that. Hence why every human need cbd as a nutrient and not just on the therapeutic window. It keeps you healthy, right? It's vital now more than ever. We need it.

Speaker 3: The cause becomes the ends. The beans becomes the cause. Beautiful.

Speaker 6: And as a system's designed, can you get right? Get beyond satisfying now? Sure. So I'm not surprised they're there. Uh, there's a lot of misinformation, unfortunately, around the plant and different stuff. And like people still thinking hemp is different than medical. Cannabis has. A legal definition is not obtainable shit. So it's sad, but people are waking up to that pretty rapidly and I think in particular with us, so we're really deploying our, our, our marketing this year, last year was really kind of beta building markets, has no marketing really deployed at all and we grew very rapidly by word of mouth because on the spot when their demos, our booths are full because people are not just hearing it but they're actually feeling the benefits within a minute. Whereas most people take 30 minutes and they're not getting enough to prime those systems. So there's, there's, if something really works, which ours does, it dramatically changes your life for the better people talk it and then that one person in fractals out.

Speaker 6: And so I think that there's a, that's a big part of getting it as actually feeling it and then simultaneously a people are ready for it. I know that the allopathic model or know that preventative nutrition and integrative health is the next step or at least is not nonsense. How about that? Precisely. And, and, and back, uh, when I was in high school, we had a general mccaffery tend to talk about shorts and I, so I prepared and I said, hey, well, can you tell me why, uh, why cannabis will be scheduled, one, the synthetic form, which is same thing but not as scheduled three. Whereas schedule one says there's no therapeutic benefit. Then how can you have the active component? Say there's therapeutic benefit that it doesn't seem like a contradiction. And he goes, wow, we buffer is all, you've done your homework or whatever. And then they called the area after. He's like, look, you know, I, I really see cannabis changing. He's like, oh wow, you're speak about like cocaine and crack and stuff. But I see an heroin which is scheduled to but. Right, I digress. Yeah. He's uh, and he said, so that's really, he predicted that the, that the shift would be coming and it is. And we all, we all the this to general stanley mcchrystal who knew this is fantastic characters.

Speaker 6: Yeah. And, and, and a cool thing is, is that a cbd basically the way one of the ways it works is it naturally raises your body's anonymized levels in the blood and so not to mind is what everyone needs for their indogenous Connecticut. We just don't produce enough. You've always supplemented it with ex external connections. Efficiency is what we've got direct, especially since we relied on it as a nutrient for thousands of years, cut it out of the diet and now you add an exponential oxidative stress. You really need it, but one thing that it does is it puts you in a flow state and a flow state. Darpa actually studied biochemically and figured out how to get people into three electro stimulus. Took a sniper who had no training, typically took three weeks, got them the flow state and train them to up to scratch in three days, three days, so vastly improved learning time, capacity in function, so that that's where any pro athlete actors, they talk about the zone that's flow and it's an actual biochemical state.

Speaker 6: One of those peaks is a non demand. So when we get cbd in our body and we're boosting our natural cannabinoids and building homeostatic balance, we're actually putting ourselves in the flow more often, which means we can learn faster. We're activated our parasympathetic nervous system, so we're not in a state of fear, we're actually out of the amygdala and in our higher faculties so that we can, we can interact in a, in a much more synergistic manner. And that's another way I see it as a, as a catalyst in increasing awareness and increasing knowledge share and increasing

Speaker 3: a propensity for, for growth up in a healthy way. I love it. Will you, uh, as uh, the gen set, you've done your homework. Alright. So we, unfortunately, we don't have a ton of time. So I'm just going to ask you the three final questions. I'll do it this way. Um, I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. I'll ask you what has most surprised you in cannabis? Then I'll ask you what has most surprised you in life? And then both of you will answer on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there, fIrst things first will, what has most surprised you in cannabis? Realizing that you know a lot about what's going on there. So

Speaker 6: would it continues to generate a in me is on how little we know still, you still know today and how odd every system of art society, individual ecosystem of our body to our greater ecosystems. This plant has been a co evolutionary ally that enables us to thrive in an abundant manner sustainably. And uh, just from, you know, making super capacitors out of our waste product a and we're replacing petroleum dependency while simultaneously getting into our higher genius statement, building more awesome stuff. Uh, that still surprises me. I just have one plant can provide so much and it's just the beginning.

Speaker 3: Pretty remarkable. I can live in a house built on hamp, brian, anything in the house that, what used to be built, uh, they used to be made out of plastic and b may not have had meanwhile, and taking cbd and everything's grant right standing. What has most surprised you in life? Realizing that you've crossed a few different paths along the way here with your, uh, you know, babysitters and, uh, race cars and uh, and now cannabis, uh, you know, entrepreneurship, surprise, surprise. What has most surprised you in life? Indeed,

Speaker 5: from where I grew up, very small town around a great family. Gave a lot when you got outside of that world, the amount of dishonesty there is.

Speaker 3: Yeah, that sucks. I agree with you. it's pretty terrible.

Speaker 5: C and a handshake doesn't mean anything outside of the family. I grew up in tHe network of business people. So

Speaker 3: I would just say a handshake doesn't mean as much as we'd like it to me. Right? I mean

Speaker 5: that does exactly better. But then again, it's also surprising how many very, uh, for a variety of individuals who have a passion to help people at the same time. That's it.

Speaker 3: That's where the handshakes come back in. It would be great though

Speaker 5: that we all with that mind and spirit that wanted to make a difference. And there's a lot of people that do comms crossover and hopefully advocate in some of the great message out. So we can turn the other people their hearts and minds to to do better and be better and hopefully we, we live in a better place with better quality of life and inhale in and go have fun at mammoth and

Speaker 3: places like, oh, absolutely. Good environment. So your eyes. I also still think that it can happen on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there,

Speaker 5: a youtube with or without you.

Speaker 3: Wow. Look at you. So you're older than you. Look, because I remember that song. That's all the joshua tree, I believe, which you probably have been to go ahead. They wrote that album primarily

Speaker 5: going through the mojave desert and through bishop. I believe the word is bishop. They wrote the streets with no name.

Speaker 3: Bishop

Speaker 5: tree is pretty much the best record in history.

Speaker 3: There's a lot of other really good ones, but that one's the one I hear you. Will your, your, uh, I feel like you're a little bit younger and stand. Yeah. Although this,

Speaker 6: this goes back a, it sounds, sounds almost cliche, but it's a, it is a soundtrack that needs to be on, right?

Speaker 3: Not so it's a, the, a song that's got to be on the sounDtrack. Soundtrack. Yeah, exactly. A little birds. Bob marley. Oh sure. Sure. The, everything's gonna be all right.

Speaker 6: That, that, that message gets in. It's the, when we look at, uh, the allah and like what stan was touching on is people who care and want to do good. And when we look at the way nature works is we really do live in a propensity majority of people are good people and if there's a situation that's a challenge, it actually facilitates us into growing and excelling and becoming more compassionate and more effective and that, that track has come up numerous times. Absolutely. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Uh, singing sweet songs, melodies, pure and true. Saying, don't worry, everything's going to be all right. I love it. Will get better. I wish we had more time. I really appreciate another time. Come to the race track. Oh, I definitely will. I will take that insight. we're gonna, we're gonna. We're doing programs and series around sports in general so we can reach masses and educate them just like this. Do you like testing and all hands on

Speaker 7: interaction with her? I'll see You in the northeast. how about that?

Speaker 2: This episode is also supported by consumer soft. Face it, your life starts and stops with your multiple devices. Technology is the centrifical force of running your life or your small business. Chaos ensues. If a device fails you, whether it be for your laptop, apple or android device. Consumer soft is immediately available through my phone support for consumers and technical support. Lie for businesses. Get fast, professional assistance. Twenty four hours a day, seven days a week, removed that feeling of panic when something goes wrong. Call eight, five, five, six, nine, eight, three, two, four, one. Or go to consumer soft.com. Jamie corino, jamie loreano. It's been awhile. We haven't seen each other recently. We know each other now. Four years,

Speaker 7: which is what I. When I came in here, you're doing a little construction, right? Little construction. Yeah, you can say that. Making sure that to keep it up and you know, make sure everyBody's happy and make sure everything looks good. Name of the game. Stay ahead of the competition. So we're here on the 16th street mall. Still one of the best ideas for retail establishment in cannabis. Thank you. I appreciate that. I mean come on. It is. It's a, it's a killer location. Not gonna lie because over there is the, the yard house for the people that come in for the convention center and it's right down the street is a convention center. hotels all over and all kinds of shopping and restaurants. I know where I'll go, I'll go to a dispensary. I'll see what that's all about. What the heCk. I'm in town.

Speaker 7: NEver tried it. SO I guess let's start there. Right? You've got now adult use folks that, that have Been coming to you since 2014. What have you noticed in the difference in the makeup of that? You know, a customer and the requests first, the makeup know the makeup has changed a little bit. I mean I think the attitude about the makeup has changed. Let's start with that. You know, people used to kind of come in and look behind the door and you could tell they were nervous and kind of jittery to command and now there's still occasionally those people, but for the most part they are just excited to be here. They've understood it's been going on for, you knoW, going on 2017, three years now. So it's, it's crazy to think it's been going that long, but we're seeing a lot more requests, you know, back in the day it was, you know, I want to try edibles or something that they hadn't done for a long time.

Speaker 7: Now we're seeing a lot more requests for cbd and pain medicine. We're seeing a lot older clientele coming in. A lot of locals, even not even just somebody from out of town, a lot of locals are looking for this kind of benefit from the marijuana, which is something we're really happy to. You know, we're exploring and trying to offer it to more people to help with that. It's not just let's get high anymore. It's what can I do for my pain as well. It was almost like a rush and that's such a, uh, a buzzwordy type thing here, but from the, uh, you know, a tourism angle, a rush to. Okay, let me just go ahead and buy as much as I can and let me get all sorts of deep. See what you're saying now is

Speaker 8: okay, wait a second. I actually understand the plant a little bit more as a regular person and I actually want to see what the cbd is all about. Absolutely.

Speaker 7: I think education has become a big part of this industry and that's something I've always promoted as well. And so I think people are there. They're seeing it on the internet. You've seen it on the nightly news or seeing it on the morning talk shows and they're starting to understand that you don't have to get just high for marijuana. The benefits are far reaching that we haven't even started to explore them yet. Here in the us, we need more research and development and I also feel like the baby boomers, you know, they use this back in their heyday, they maybe use it illegally and now they may come back around and say, hey, I've got some pains and aches. Why don't I go back to what I enjoyed when I was younger.

Speaker 8: Right. Um, I should mention, yes, you can hear music because we are in a headquarters basically, right? We're her in grand central Station. Yes, absolutely. People coming and going. But that means that business is being done and we like to that. So we'll, we'll take it. Sorry. No people rushing, right? Yeah. And again, she used the rusch word people rushing by is a positive thing. All right, so a great. Now we've got actual people that aren't scared to come in. I'm coming in because I know I should be in there or even I would like to be in there. I'd love to See what's in there. It turns out that cbds in there, I'm more educated as an adult. Use patient. Great. There's your tourism. What aBout a Colorado? The band of brothers and sisters that we have here, how's, I mean, like as I look around the room, like I can see all of my friends from Ghana and incredibles and I'm just actually naming boxes. But uh, how is it, you know, now Adult use has been going for three years, you know, for the medical guys has been gone, a thousand guys and gals. it's been going on for almost a decade. Um, how does it feel as far as all of the running we've been doing?

Speaker 7: No, I always say that this is a marathon at a sprinter's pace because, you know, it just feels like every second year running at full pace. But, you know, it's a long haul ahead. You still have to keep ahead of everything, you know, it's been good. We see a lot of companies come and go. Um, we see a lot of price fluctuation, especially in this last year. So we started recreation marijuana back in 2014. The average pound for a price of marijuana was around $3,000. You can find the pounds, you can find it now because there's so much supply right now. Maybe between eight and $1,200 or pounds. So between eight and 1200, $800, $800. I had been educated to 1200. Now it's just gotten some emails recently for $800. It's probably, I haven't seen a product. I'm assuming it's probably outdoor grow product quality is probably not there, but it is there. I mean if somebody wanted to pick it up, it'd be there at that price. So you know, we've Seen a lot of changes we've seen in three years, a lot more regulatIons put in place. Not only is a dispensary, but also as the edible companies that based on a lot more testing on the flower itself, per mold, pesticides, all things I think are good, but it's been a lot of changes in a short amount of time, which I don't think most other industry space quite as stringent rules as we do.

Speaker 8: Well, no. And uh, and certainly not the rapid pace of change of regulations. Other industries don't have that because we're building the plane. While we fly it, as far as you know, what the rules are and what we do. Yeah,

Speaker 7: it's amazing. We haven't crashed yet. I mean Colorado I think has been a stellar example. I think people are really still looking to Colorado for what we've done.

Speaker 8: What do you think that. So that why I mentioned the band of brothers and sisters, you know, when I come and see you and I look in your eyes and I could see the same passion that you had like a few years ago. It's this refusal to give up and we are Colorado and we are doing this right and we will do this right? And It's like every couple of weeks still there's like a new role. NoW I got to stamp this this way, now I got to do that that way. Now we got to a pricing issue. What is it about the, the kind of original set here that just refuses to not let this succeed?

Speaker 7: What is that? you know, you definitely think happy. Partly insane. Honestly. I think there's something about as well because there's something there. Um, but you know, as you really start to get to see the people that come in and the benefits and the true use of marijuana can help with. I think that's what inspires me everyday. I mean they are, there's not a day that doesn't go by that something bad to some extent doesn't happen an employee quits or you know, something comes back with a negative test. But when you can really look at the big picture that we're making a change, not just for each individual person that comes in the store, not just the state of Colorado. We're setting a Bar for the entire globe as far as I'm concerned. And that's exciting, you know, to know that we are part of a movement that started in little itty bitty Colorado that eventually I think will be global.

Speaker 7: You have to be excited about that to be in this industry and you have to understand that not every day's gonna be perfect and you're not really making millions of dollars as it may seem. There's a lot more struggles than people realize that, that sacrifice. Do you really? You just have to have that passion. And if you don't, you Won't make an income stream. That's why you are seeing people now starting to bow. You're seeing some dispensary's and mips and grows For sale because people, they do get tired of this industry. It will wear you down. You have to have thick skin and a stronghold and desire.

Speaker 8: So you mentioned some of the things that, that remained the same and, and new kinds of hurdles to go over. Um, what, and you mentioned what, what has remained consistent as far as your day to day though? How has yoUr day changed from like back in 2014 to now? 20 17.

Speaker 7: Wow. From 2014 when we first opened. I mean I was the one packaging. I was the one behind the pos is I was doing the scheduling, I was writing the checks. I mean I, it was really a small two man band back here. I'm not lying. I did everything from top to bottom, whiCh is the best experience. and I think every employee in a district should have to do that from beginning to end. right now, obviously I'm a little more hands off on some of the day to day operations, but I've got great managers underneath me and I'm able to spend my time working on new ideas and expanding in that kind of stuff, which is fun to see that I guess if you will, younger generation, you know, the people coming up, they're still so excited and want to be a budtender that wanted to work in the grow, that want to do the packaging because they've never had that experience. The different states. TheY walk into a grow and they want this to be their first job and it's going to be in the marijuana industry.

Speaker 8: A lot of folks that, uh, listen are in the industry. We do have folks that are listening that are interested in getting into the industry and kind of trying to figure it all out, you know, as somebody that deals with people that are coming in. Right. Um, and also has been in for a little bit. What advice wOuld you give to folks that do want to get in, whether it be at an ownership level or a, you know, a trimmer level or whatever

Speaker 7: the entry level. The best thIng you can do, make sure you can pass a background check and get your badge. You know, we won't hire anybody that even you won't even interview anybody. Honestly, that comes into the store without a badge because usually our turnover rate, unfortunately for bud temperature iS pretty high. So when we're looking to interview someone, that meaNs we need somebody tomorrow. We can't wait and alliance to get badges to the marijuana enforcement division is two, three weeks now because everybody wants them. Like you said, you have to understand this is a full blown industry now. It's nOt shady fly by night kind of thing. So if you're expecting to be a bud tender to come in and just hang out and smoke some marijuana Wrong, I need to talk to my managers. They work full hours. They are, you know, you've got paperwork documentatIon, you're on a computer.

Speaker 7: It is a lot of work. It's not just something fun. And you know, it's also retail business. I make my employees running a retail business. You're out there selling, you're educating, you're, you're not just selling. You also educate. And that is my biggest concern. I want people to understand that even though you may know a little bit about marijuana here and there, we do probably acknowledged tests. We do vendor trainings that is so important to us. So, um, be prepared to take on more work than you probably expected this industry and from an owner standpoint, wow, I'm getting in now. There's a high barrier of entry I feel like in, especially in Colorado, but in any, in any of the states, either I've tried and it's not cheap to do the applications, the fees and money they want to see in a bank and don't think you're going to be an instant millionaire. I mean, I've been at this for three years and I've probably spent more money than I've made honestly because we keep reinvesting and we keep reinventing ourselves. It's not easy. It's the harDest job I've ever had.

Speaker 8: I'm smiling because I'm looking at one of the original pot parents who's now saying, you know, uh, I've put more money in than I've taken out as, as far as that kind of understanding is there any way to, to ever really shaken because everybody that I talked to, no matter if the, you know, the business is making a ton of money, it's going right back in a, yOu know, because I can't deduct because the two 88 and all of that, um, you know, what is your, uh, your message to the prospective millionaire who's getting into pod and will be a millionaire tomorrow? I used the word pot on purpose.

Speaker 7: Well, you know, tAke a deep breath and step back because that's not gonna be overnight. You know, you really, like I said, have to have a drive and passion to do that and it's not easy. You got to, like you said, the two 80 esg is a huge issue at the taxes we pay the, you know, the licensing fees we pay and I call it the marijuana tax is another joke. If my toilet Breaks, it may cost me at home $50 at fixed. As soon as they hear him in the marijuana industry, there goes $150. I mean it literally is almost double or triple. Anytime you call someone to rent a location for your dispensary grower map, it's going to be double or triple space is hard to find in places I need help. You know, anytime you want consulting or anything, it's just a lot more expensiVe. So I think whatever you think you're going to make the first year, cut it in half and whatever you think is going to cost the triple a. And I'm not joking.

Speaker 8: I thought you were going to say double, but you went ahead and said all right. So that's, that's the message. That's the message to perspective owners. YOu know, so we've covered kind of adult use patients or don't use customers or patients because it's all wellness. We've talked about a owners, we've talked about employees and folks that just want to get in at that level. Let's tAlk about investors and eventually to to medical patients. So as far as investors, what differences have you noticed? Again, I. It's kind of a. Okay. We spoke a couple of years ago. We know each other from before that. Tell me about how the investor conversation has changed investor knowledge all that.

Speaker 7: Well, the investor market in Colorado has done a three 60 for starters, as of January 1st you can have outside money in Colorado where before you couldn't, which is a game changer. It's a huge game changer. You know, before you'd also people come in here and got $50,000. I said, great, I'll take it. So I need that. Now you've got people coming in and I've got five, $9. Great, I'll take it, I need it. But if it's a bigger market you've got, you've got real players coming in, you're not talking about just small mom and pop people coming in. We're talking people from big industries that are leaving their industries. We're talking hedge funds, you know, we're talking groups who really want to get into this industry, trying to find a way in and trying to get into Colorado. And those kinds of people will be the ones to get it. And unfortunately the people was just small amounts of money. I, I see that's probably impossible in Colorado and from now,

Speaker 8: right, that's gone. And so, but you know, those initial folks were able to get tremendous interest rate on their, uh, investment. I don't know how much you can share, but have, have those interest rates kind of settled at least a

Speaker 7: little bit. A little. I mean, I'd say it's not quite as bad as it used to be. You'll still find interest rates between eight and 16 percent, but you're down to eight though. If you could get a good loan because they know. The other thing too that has change. Speaking of that is banking is eased up a slight amount. I'm not going to say very much, but some of us in the industry have been vetted by banks. We do have banks. It's not free. It costs a monthly fee for us to put our money in there. But to me, the time and money and the safety is really worth the fact that we have banks. Of course, our money in it, we can't take cash from our customers or credit card or debit card. We don't take cash, I'm sorry. Right. But at least we have that opportunity now to put our money in a bank and the bank will also work with our employees, help them get car loans, help them get housing loans where, you know, a lot of times traditional banks when they see where the money's coming from, really the shut us down or just turn you away.

Speaker 7: That that's something that has been a slow. In other words, there were, fits and starts at the beginning of banks kind of being okay. Well, no, uh, aright yet. No. Well no. It seems as though, at least in Colorado banking has. I'm not saying it's been normalized because the banks that are taking you as a client aren't really being loud about it and you're certainly not being out of your bank banks are. Um, but it has somewhat normalized in the fact that I am essentially confident that my bank account isn't going to be closed tomorrow probably. Is that fair? That's very faIr. I mean, I would say my chance, my bank account that I have outside of this bank close about 99 percent, I'm waiting for them to close me down. The one I have with this, it's about 99 percent of the wave on happen.

Speaker 7: Exactly. And how much of a difference, what does that do to your mental makeup and just everything because you know, if we talked two years ago, which we did a, that was not the case. It was very stressful to you, is it? I mean the fact that I think that we would walk and pay our taxes, our monthly taxes in cash, all my employees in cash, on my vendors and cash. My landlords might. Any construction I had done everything was 100 percent cash. It was extremely stressful. Not just from a management of your time and money there from a safety issue. I was always concerned about that. So now it'd be able to write a check or you know. And also we've got terms with a lot of our vendors now where before like money was due. As soon as the product was delivered, now they'll do net seven or 10, so you have a little bit more cashflow in a little bit less stressed that way.

Speaker 7: And it is, has turned into the way that product, the way that the supply chain works, the way that, you know, financing works, it's turning into soMewhat of a normal traditional industries sort of feels like it is, you know, it's kind of exciting to see that we, you know, we try to be as transparent as we can. I think we have been all along and I think people kind of looking like, hey, you know, they are working with us as the city, the local government to see what we're doing in the state government and federal starting to see too that we're playing by your rules were doing what you Want. We'll file your reports and hair, monthly taxes and it's kind of niCe to see it a slightly easy now some of the regulations on us or, or in a way the, the, the mindset that too, you know, not only just from the government but even from just the general population.

Speaker 7: so, uh, okay, great. Now we've talked about everybody except for the medical patients. Let's, let's discuss how, you know that program really hasn't changed so much other than we're finally going to get testing, which is probably should have happened a few years ago. Um, but, but what insight can you give us as far as the medical patients here in Colorado and the service of them and the program in general? You know, from what I can tell, it's still the medical market is about still even to what it was. It hasn't really dropped off. It's about even to the recreational market, you know, some people still prefer that the taxes are obviously less. You have a larger variety of products and higher dose and so for the people that really are using this medically, you can't come into a recreational store, buy a 100 milligram edible, unexpected help you.

Speaker 7: A lot of these patients, unfortunately so much pain or um, did than the 500 milligrams, which you just can't get in recreation store. So I think the rec market, especially as it started in Colorado and we're seeing other states, it's a good place to start, you know, it kinda eases people into it lets them see that this is for medical benefits. It does have a purpose in our society and, and, and, and use. So I think it's going to stick around. I'd hate to see it go aWay honestly because I think people are comfortable. No, I could go to a doCtor and I'd like to see maybe more, more doctors come on board, you know, I don't want to say I'm more legit, but that are more willing to work with you and test you and help you understand it better. I think that would help legitimize me with medical market as well.

Speaker 8: So when you say hey, would hate to see it go away, it, it kind of did in Washington state and they would argue that it didn't, uh, the original medical market certainly did go away. Is there, is there talk of such things? Why would you use those free?

Speaker 7: I think there are, there's always gossip. You know, you always hear this is that you know, that it can go away, the tax, a better recreational, let's just tax it all the same, but I belieVe there is, you know, people. and the other thing too is for medical use for kids. You know, we've got a lot of families moving here fOr kids that are six, 10, 12 under the age of 18 that can't get marijuana with abby and medical. That would be a disaster and shame to see that go away for those that really seriously moved here before that necessity.

Speaker 8: Yeah. No medical refugees, that's a phrase

Speaker 7: is, and I've met plenty of them along the way and to have that, you know, they go to the state obviously, but we were able to serve them here. Why would we want to get rid of that opportunity? How's your work life balance? Oh my goodness. Well i'M glad he's studied my work life. It's not quite 50 slash 50, but I know one of these days I'll get there.

Speaker 8: I mean, you know, and I, that was referenced to an earlier conversation you and I had, but

Speaker 9: um, you know,

Speaker 8: working in the industry and kind of doing what you gotta do to just make sure that it happens is obviously,

Speaker 9: uh, number one, um, you know,

Speaker 8: do you get a chance to breathe yet it feels like you're breathing at least a little bit

Speaker 7: more kind of like two or three years ago when you met me, I don't think I ever slapped down. They never stopped. It's been a lot better. Like I said, I put my, I'm a lot more trust in my managers, my assistant managers, my gm, they freed up a lot of my time for me. They know what they're doing. They've been with me. So from, since you and I last met, so it's really exciting because the turnover is high here, so to have employees it stick with yoU. It'S, it's really important.

Speaker 8: Do you think the turnover is so high because of what we talked about earlier, which is I'm going to get a job at a dispensary and it's going to be really great because I'll just, you know, kinda do whatever I want and of

Speaker 7: I think that's part of. And I also think, you know, people come in thinking, well these people are making tons of money so I'm going to make tons of money and you know, we still have bills to pay just like everybody else and we've got to start someplace, you know, we're above minimum wage. We pay tips. I mean my employees, they'll make really good money and we offered the health benefits, but I think they see the money, the cashflow on tv and the stories and the articles and assume that it goes down to everybody and we do the best. We can't take care of our employees. I really do. But it's not easy. There's all sorts of, uh, regulation. There's all sorts of kind of keeping pace with what I need to do and grow at the same time. Right? And that's what I don't think that, you know, unfortunately, employees and understand, and even as far as regulations, let me go back to this.

Speaker 7: We used a bonus, our employees for, you know, having an average sales, you know, and making sure that if we had product that, you know, is that we could have them help us move and if it was something that wasn't moving or explain it better, you know, we're not even allowed anymore according to state to incentivize our customers, our employees, which in most retail sales jobs, you're allowed to give bonuses for you the best that top performer. You can't even do that anymore. So how do you motivate people when your hands are tied to even get them to help move product? You know, they have no motivation. I went to buy a microphone so I want to do a at a store the other day. And uh, the guy, you know, put his little sticker on, on my packaging and I looked at it and I thought to myself, huh, not everybody.

Speaker 7: Not every retaIler could do that. You know, we're just limited by so much that we can't do it. No mark advertising, marketing, still baking. We can be on tv, we can be on some radio stations. Most magazines we can't be on. So you have to really get creative with all of that and you know, unfortunately that creative creativity also comes at a cost, you know, the average marketing budget and stuff is probably a little more inflated because we have to find different avenues. Unbelievable. keep fighting. Jamie. I'll fight the good fight. I got the final question. You know we've asked you the three final questions before, but I keep the on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's on there. I keep that as the final question in every interview because it helps inform us a little bit more about you. It also lets us know what your, what your mindset is kind of now a days type of thing, you know.

Speaker 7: So if there's one song on track, it's got to Be on their title but don't stop thinking about tomorrow. That's like. And keep thinking about [inaudible] looking at is looking ahead still. My goodness. That's fleetwood mac. I thank you fleetwood mac. I'm going to keep on looking to what's coming up. That's late addition. Fleetwood mac. Not to be confused with peter green's fleetwood mac. Yeah. So that's like the blues based stuff, but that's not what you're talking about. You're talking about like the don't stop thinking about tomorrow. It will soon be here. I think as a whole. I think that's kinda like, you know, tomorrow's, you always look to the future, but I think kind of in the whole big scheme of things that, you know, someday we'll look back on this marijuana, russian, it'll be just another day. And just be normal for everybody. There you go. We're getting there. Yep. Jamie, thank you so much.

Speaker 2: And there you have jamie perino. Hope you can hear in that voice, everything that uh, she's Been battling and continues to battle that goes for everybody that's been in this foR awhile. Will and stanton from ohi just getting in, but it sounds like they've got their ducks in a row. Thanks to them for joining us. And thank you. Of course for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.