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Ep.229: Nancy Whiteman & Amy Andrle

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.229: Nancy Whiteman & Amy Andrle

Ep.229: Nancy Whiteman & Amy Andrle

Nancy Whiteman, Wana Brands & Amy Andrle, L’Eagle
Amy Anderley joins us and takes us through how growing up with an activist mother has led to her being an activist herself…and bringing along her daughter for the ride. Amy and her husband operate one and only one dispensary in Colorado and she shares exactly  how and why that’s the case. Amy draws a distinction between organic cannabis and clean cannabis and takes us through how and why that’s the case. Nancy Whiteman then joins us who happens to be a voracious reader. She explains that when she jumped in she didn’t realize the power of the plant but quickly learned how much cannabis revolutionizes peoples relationship with medicine. Go back to Episode 185 to get more of the backstory.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Amy Andrle joins us and takes us through how growing up with an activist mother has led her to being an activist herself and bringing her daughter along for the ride Amy and her husband operate one and only one dispensary in Colorado and she shares exactly how and why that's the case. Amy draws a distinction between organic cannabis and clean cannabis and takes us through how and why that's the case. Nancy Whiteman then joins us who happens to be a voracious reader she explains of when she jumped in she didn't realize the power of the plant but quickly realized how much cannabis revolutionizes people's relationship with medicine. Go back to Episode One eighty five to get more of the backstory. Welcome to the cannabis economy I'm your host Seth Adler check us out on social with the handle can economy that's two ends and the word economy. Nancy Weideman preceded by Amy Enderlin. Amy Andrew Leigh. So that's like the alliteration.

Speaker 4: Yeah you get that. OK. And that is that the married name or the mate. I see that you're working what your non-working ooh Tanz. Reminds me of Danzik stands. Yeah. Oh you remember Danzik really we were you with Danzik fam. I'm a very young 41. So we're right in the same wavelength. Yeah. OK. So you liked Danzik father right. Right that's then yeah. OK.

Speaker 5: So you're from Princeton New Jersey. Wow. OK. Where were you born in Florida. Pompey's very nice. Very nice. Also a Cuban mother American. Aha. What was that like. It's great. Was your mother always right. Yes. Now you don't have to be Cuban right now. Right exactly.

Speaker 6: As was my family although no Cubans. So you moved from from Florida to Princeton New Jersey. A lot of tourists in Palm Beach. And then look at this. All sorts of college students in Princeton New Jersey. So like living among tourists is what you do basically.

Speaker 5: Well I also spent 10 years in Colorado say oh my god.

Speaker 7: Why do you do this to yourself. Well you didn't have to do anything. You weren't in charge of the move to Princeton. No but how old were you when you got there.

Speaker 8: Oh so young you remember Florida very laid back kindergarten high school and then to Maryland. What was I like to see bright. It was so lame when. When am I getting out of here. Totally right. OK. Drew the line shortly thereafter went to college.

Speaker 6: So you didn't go to school it sounds like it's not a high enough because you're like I'm going to stop. But how did you know that you could ski.

Speaker 9: How would I my my father and my mother were divorced and he lived in Colorado so I had some friends that I loved visiting down here it's like a place to be and just kill me.

Speaker 7: Yeah. What an interesting word to use in terms of your friends cultivating for help. I mean I will get into that. I'm not a child of divorce. OK. And so one of my best friends in college. He he. His parents divorced when he was like 10. And so it was my first. And even like my grown up there weren't a lot of parents that got worse. It was like my first experience of having a very close friend where I was like I just I don't even understand how it's possible.

Speaker 1: Amy Andrle joins us and takes us through how growing up with an activist mother has led her to being an activist herself and bringing her daughter along for the ride Amy and her husband operate one and only one dispensary in Colorado and she shares exactly how and why that's the case. Amy draws a distinction between organic cannabis and clean cannabis and takes us through how and why that's the case. Nancy Whiteman then joins us who happens to be a voracious reader she explains of when she jumped in she didn't realize the power of the plant but quickly realized how much cannabis revolutionizes people's relationship with medicine. Go back to Episode One eighty five to get more of the backstory. Welcome to the cannabis economy I'm your host Seth Adler check us out on social with the handle can economy that's two ends and the word economy. Nancy Weideman preceded by Amy Enderlin. Amy Andrew Leigh. So that's like the alliteration.

Speaker 4: Yeah you get that. OK. And that is that the married name or the mate. I see that you're working what your non-working ooh Tanz. Reminds me of Danzik stands. Yeah. Oh you remember Danzik really we were you with Danzik fam. I'm a very young 41. So we're right in the same wavelength. Yeah. OK. So you liked Danzik father right. Right that's then yeah. OK.

Speaker 5: So you're from Princeton New Jersey. Wow. OK. Where were you born in Florida. Pompey's very nice. Very nice. Also a Cuban mother American. Aha. What was that like. It's great. Was your mother always right. Yes. Now you don't have to be Cuban right now. Right exactly.

Speaker 6: As was my family although no Cubans. So you moved from from Florida to Princeton New Jersey. A lot of tourists in Palm Beach. And then look at this. All sorts of college students in Princeton New Jersey. So like living among tourists is what you do basically.

Speaker 5: Well I also spent 10 years in Colorado say oh my god.

Speaker 7: Why do you do this to yourself. Well you didn't have to do anything. You weren't in charge of the move to Princeton. No but how old were you when you got there.

Speaker 8: Oh so young you remember Florida very laid back kindergarten high school and then to Maryland. What was I like to see bright. It was so lame when. When am I getting out of here. Totally right. OK. Drew the line shortly thereafter went to college.

Speaker 6: So you didn't go to school it sounds like it's not a high enough because you're like I'm going to stop. But how did you know that you could ski.

Speaker 9: How would I my my father and my mother were divorced and he lived in Colorado so I had some friends that I loved visiting down here it's like a place to be and just kill me.

Speaker 7: Yeah. What an interesting word to use in terms of your friends cultivating for help. I mean I will get into that. I'm not a child of divorce. OK. And so one of my best friends in college. He he. His parents divorced when he was like 10. And so it was my first. And even like my grown up there weren't a lot of parents that got worse. It was like my first experience of having a very close friend where I was like I just I don't even understand how it's possible.

Speaker 8: How did you deal with that.

Speaker 5: This is part of the podcast. It happened when I was less than six months old. Oh so you don't even know. No. No difference.

Speaker 7: Interesting. But he was a part of your life. But from a distance sounds like. Right. And then your mother really raised. Right. And so what did your stepfather. What's it like to be raised by a Cuban mother.

Speaker 5: I don't know. Right. I'm very close to my mom. So what she's cooking a lot. And no taste for it. Oh she did not. Oh my goodness.

Speaker 10: She's not the stereotypical human right. Right. She's very involved in. Politics. Was she a politician. No. It's just one. What was her issue. You name it. Back then you used to take me to. Say. Aha. Interesting. He used to go up. Yes. Right. Equal rights interest. It was early 70s.

Speaker 6: What did you. Yes sure. But the late 70s and early 80s. Do you remember what you thought and felt as a little kid.

Speaker 9: It was really important. I like to and my memories I had in that crowd. And so I took my daughter last Sunday to the party. Right.

Speaker 7: Right. And do you remember what was she saying to you.

Speaker 4: Because three year olds talk my daughter was saying that must have been adorable.

Speaker 7: Of course she was. All right so you kind of come out to the mountains to visit dad. Yes.

Speaker 10: He was happy to see you go up to the mountains right for 10 days haha. What does that mean to you. Haha alright talk about it in and around this time.

Speaker 7: Talk about waiting tables because I've spoken with waitresses and waiters about being in the weeds. That's not what I'm asking you about. I'm I want to ask you about turning tables.

Speaker 11: What's the what's the key to turning tables turning table that all right. Thousands of people over the years in fine dining restaurants. I don't know that I would rush people out. I don't think it's about turning tables.

Speaker 5: So while they're in the air space there you go oh hey here is my segue into marijuana. I think about it it's all customer service. If they're happy and if you establish with them that.

Speaker 12: They enjoy your you know your service during their meal they're going to be very gracious with how they tell you there you go.

Speaker 6: How can we make this final bill. What will be a final bill. More plastic. How can we add to it. And I'll give you an answer to that. So are you doing that for 10 years you kind of bumming around right ski bumming around. And at what point does cannabis kind of rear its head to you or your head on shore. No of course just so you did have a relationship with the plant.

Speaker 11: I did have a relationship with marijuana yes. And in fact perforated over alcohol on time. I'm not a big fan of alcohol. Why not.

Speaker 5: Because it doesn't make me feel good the next day or the same day in general.

Speaker 13: I don't like that feeling that slurred speech. Now it was very uncomfortable not for you know. Now looking back at my youth I'm in like social anxiety and all that I had all along. So alcohol didn't make me feel more comfortable in those situations. However marijuana and back then we didn't know what strain or what you were getting. But sometimes we happened to get what I now know is probably sativa as different strains and it just made me feel better. Yeah.

Speaker 14: So you always have that kind of consistent relationship. When did you realize that there was an industry here in Colorado. Or when did you realize that the caregivers were actually becoming you know kind of business owners because 2009. That's right around when that was happening.

Speaker 13: Yes. So my now husband and when I was towards the end of my. 10 year I was my boyfriend at the time I also had a relationship with no one. As you describe it and I got that from the audience you know. Yes. And so we always had jokes. Can you imagine if it was legal what we do is shopping. So when I was actually away at graduate school I spent some time living in Miami. Well what school master's degree from you. Are you a nonprofit management. Well when I was pursuing that because I didn't wait to go to school but I have since finished paying for lots of school. So he was able to secure a license for a medical shop here in Denver and worked on opening that up and got that going and so he opened it in 2010 had the license in 2009 was one of the first ones out of the gate didn't cost as much as it does now.

Speaker 13: Well it was a different time. I think you know. People always ask us like how did you start it. He started with all that he had. And then. As the business grow he said you know we didn't build out a crowd the way people build out the ground. Now a couple million dollars of investment but it was it was piecemeal and it was put together as the business grew and so did his space inside the warehouse and he to develop it to the point where we are now we've expanded into space and we're at about 10000 square feet.

Speaker 15: So we're a modest size bright one store location. But I think what we do we make a really big impact. What do you do. So I legal services it's a retail dispensary so I don't use any one of the 21 although we were medical four years prior to turning recreational we decided to go 100 percent into adult use. How come. You know we're a small storefront and there's a lot of compliance that goes with servicing both medical patients. I'm twenty one. So we we just couldn't maintain at the back end of that administratively. And also tracking the plant seed to sale there have to be tracking them differently. We also felt like we could serve the most patients because it was the clinic Yeah and we could extend a discount you know a medical discount to those who come in with red cards to get their promotional pricing.

Speaker 15: But then people coming to us from out of state who were looking for the same kind of high quality medical care could also come into our store and receive that and then as well as you know the U.S. consumer who comes in because they're curious so they enjoy marijuana. The reason I think legal and our brand were different. We specialize in clean cannabis. We define that as organic best practice no pesticides we treat nothing in flour besides that we do use during the cloning or vegetative state. Our rerated so there are Cannick materials with few products that we use. But again we do not treat in flour. We put the rooms in the flower room and we rely on our integrated pest management system that's heavy on labor cleanliness age medications systems and really looking at the whole picture.

Speaker 14: So for some grown frames yes. You're here to say that you can grow indoor organic.

Speaker 15: You know I think organically as I'm always careful using that term because we're getting cultivation is not always necessarily sustainable either. What do as we've always say clean clean can't arrive. Yeah because. So we really pride ourselves on also being sustainable. So you know we do try to mimic as much of the organic best practice models from agriculture that we can but then we also try to do that sustainably. And then we're very very careful about what is put on plant which is why again clean cannabis you know pesticide free it's just such a misnomer because you know even even cleaning the room in some ways you're administering some sort of passive protection right. So you know and when we do use pesticides. Meanwhile as garlic says natural products. So we really try to focus on that. But you know we also take it a step further and that we care our plants. And our.

Speaker 16: Flower longer than I think anyone I've heard so far we go with a minimum of 90 days before anything is put into our shelf. Wow. So we care the same way people here because I think tobacco cheese caviar wine. Sure all of the finest items that we would imbibe to. Have that time. To really ripen lack of a better term. So we believe that you know under the right conditions you create for that plant an opportunity to plant matter to dissipate and divide and degrade naturally the trade commerce. You know the Turpie and everything else is really going to mature. And then when we deliver that plant product on our shelves to our clients we have you know comments of a smoother burn really full taste longer high. So we really pride ourselves on curing not. Just one of many corners we don't cut right which when you talk about cutting corners that's also earns people money. And I think that we really feel like quality is going to take us long term we're going to be recognized Sure.

Speaker 5: So as we recognize you for that. Yes how did you possibly figure this all out. Well we came from the food and beverage industry sure. So he did what he did as well.

Speaker 16: He worked. He was a restaurant owner. He also worked at a number of different restaurants know fine dining with her and also bartending and getting very into wine and wine service. You know I think one of the quotes we use in our market with Terrill's is why not expect the same if you're Canibus that you do your food to your wine. You know why not ask the same questions. So we just felt like it's just another avenue we're putting in the time having it be as close as it possibly could be to the most natural form of that product. You're going to get something better.

Speaker 14: Better all we've talked to a lot of people about the journey from 2001 to 2017. So without all of the stops along the way you know just describe to folks the difference in the reality of 2009 and 2017.

Speaker 13: My face probably just like on your store please do. My gosh. The cannabis industry is a shit show because there's no I. When I stopped working I was thinking of director network reservation organization and business development director are contemporary art gallery. I was steeped in the business. Side. And I thought I knew all about business so I would snicker when my husband would come home from work and he's having these issues where he's got an issue with it whether it has to do with a new compliance regulation needs to keep up with or marketing him like what's he doing for marketing rather. So I stopped working at my job after that and shortly after we had our daughter and I went to work full time with my husband figuring as a couple we had to be all right and I was so quickly humbled by the marijuana industry that everything that I thought I knew about business from each are from like I said finance finance.

Speaker 13: I mean there was like a very very short period of time where we were in a bank kerfuffle a whole lot better like shirt. What do you what do you mean everybody has they don't feel bad about working and not having enough. And that's not even really as bad as it could be. Right. And trying to keep her business going to you know just all the way around there. Everything is constantly changing and it's fine as much as it's humbling and it's terrifying and you know every day holds with it a new surprise. We're also we've been on the forefront of this industry and now we have a really good story to tell. Sure. But it's exhausting. We run into situations that no one other business owner you know I walked into work a handful of months ago when our parent company called me up and dropped us.

Speaker 13: Sure why tell your canvas company we can't. We've been working with you for five years. You knew this is our business right now. Sorry. Yeah bye. Ok I guess that's my emergency for the day. You know. But at the same time as as many as these complaints that I can have I'm a sounding board member of organic Cannabis Association like here I can be a part of something when it's just brand new and really make an impact in that change. I serve on different industry groups and I work with the city work groups that they pull together. And it's fun because you have a voice and what's happening when we travel we just got back from a short vacation and no matter who you talk to they want to know more. They want to understand it better they have a million questions for you. They want to know and you feel like you're monopolizing the conversation and they just won't let that go.

Speaker 5: Now people are fascinated by fascinated.

Speaker 13: You know and then I kind of this little third layer that is specific I think to me as a mom and a woman is that judgment the stigma that goes along with working in this industry I don't feel it as much in Colorado as I did initially especially when my husband John was working in the business and I was outside the NRA.

Speaker 5: People would say What do you do.

Speaker 12: You know what would your husband do for a living and I used to make things up whereas now very honest very forthcoming with what I do and where I work. But there's still that. It's legal. It's no different than that glass of wine in your hand but I can tell everybody what it is like instead of a wine party let's have a black party. We get behind it and there is still this for the parents right.

Speaker 4: I just want to clarify that yes they said you know they have a fundraiser. Sure. And they do. But you just you still can't bring these things out.

Speaker 12: So it is it's new and it's different in some ways maybe not like that. Sure sure.

Speaker 17: So you know we don't have a ton of time yes. So I have to ask you the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask them in order. What is most surprised you in Canada. What is most surprising life on the soundtrack of your life. Me one track one song that's got to be on there. First things first. What was most surprising. Can I follow up with the final statement about my final statement about your story please. What has most surprised me about. What is most surprised you encounter. Indeed.

Speaker 18: The customers that come into our. No they're not the Democrat everyone thinks they know the regular people here.

Speaker 17: So follow up about your shop. Oh. You. Only saw what we grow. So particular. And.

Speaker 18: How we cultivate so that doesn't just extend to our flower but also on the edibles and concentrates. Even though they're manufactured by different brands in the cannabis industry here in Colorado there are own the cellar that's. Look at that close loop. So.

Speaker 17: Question What is most surprised you like.

Speaker 11: How awesome. I known sooner. I wouldn't.

Speaker 17: Give me a quote from your daughter that is both endearing and hilarious. Oh. My. Goodness. She.

Speaker 19: Has like a thousand running through my head right now. She likes telling jokes she's been making up a lot of jokes. She just doesn't know how to do it. She's very short so also does it tell you about a dog. Hey Mom did you hear about the dog who had the shoes on and then she started rolling around the ground. Did you hear about the dog. Yes. From to stare Bob says she just thinks she's.

Speaker 6: Well I just think it's a delivery problem because a dog who had yogurt for lunch.

Speaker 4: I mean c'mon it's pretty funny. Yeah yeah. Where is that night. I didn't see the turkey. It's just dirt. So she's Eurex again. Why would a dog wear shoes. It's ridiculous and I'm dumb. Come to me later she says.

Speaker 19: What she told me she was really impressed because we didn't have to go to CBS she calls it. See you next to pick up something because I guess she's smart huh.

Speaker 4: Just see you. We've got to go to see you next. You know I used to call the U.P.S. the upstroke Goffstown me. All right so on the soundtrack of your life and one trunk one song that's going to be on.

Speaker 17: Trees.

Speaker 4: Wow. I mean I look at you like you and me. I mean my daughter's name is. Delilah's Sampson right. Sure. Look at you. Oh my God. We've definitely been in the same arena. Let's just assume the same anymore. Amy thank you so much for sharing your.

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Speaker 21: Right. Yes. And we now know the truth.

Speaker 22: And you even posted some word mistake and time are you. So what. What did you quote me. I. And I mean can you escape into a book can you escape into a home. Can you escape into a home. I am a huge.

Speaker 23: Are you are in fact one of my only claims.

Speaker 24: I this is the opposite of me because I read one of those people read one page and I'm thinking about something else and it just takes forever. But you're a quick read. All right. So what. Going way back. You said you're born in Chicago but raised north of the city. Right. Custer there we go. Now I could hear it now that we're talking through other I have that Westchester. MARTIN Her near sure of it being from the area. I can hear you. I can see you're from where I'm from Long Island. Yes. Yes. I usually don't like to say but it's true. We've got to say like we're done with there you a new world and no relation although I'm sure some really at some point. Yeah. So I.

Speaker 22: So but were you always kind of a quick read and you know as a little kid reading books.

Speaker 25: Yes.

Speaker 24: And when did you first get into the real stuff. You know like sure OK there's the show Silverstein's and all that but when did you start when did you hit like a real book.

Speaker 25: That's a great question. I have very early arms maybe for the secret part right. Sure. But I would have been one of them Harry Potter. Yeah.

Speaker 24: And people were shocked to know that they haven't been here forever right. Like my children. I would imagine you would go to open the doors every time it's coming out. Yeah yeah but you know we would say see regard my book that I first realized that magic happens inside books was Catcher In The Rye. I read it as a 14 year old had just perfect timing. Holden Caulfield says that since he was my age I was sure. Oh sure. Well I think that he's actually just 14 or 13. I mean I don't. In other words whatever he is that's what he is. You know what I'm saying. So it was a secret garden was that kind of connectivity to hate his magic. Yeah absolutely. And all those books are natural indeed. All right. Well right. And absolutely more positive. The character is indeed. Why am I so angry about everything.

Speaker 24: He has to. I love this. Yeah exactly like realizing I'm angry as I'm reading it. You know inspector. All right. Sure. You seem more confused and that's why you know you keep turning the pages it's like maybe he's got answers. It turns out it didn't. Yeah. With his professor. That's right. But we could do this all day but we probably shouldn't surprise you eventually. So when did you leave. You know the White Plains area I went to college. But you did print out. That's where you met John if I remember correctly. Right. That's right. And I told him that I went to a good college and we had fun while you had studying. Our hands were up or something.

Speaker 22: And so we kind of got to that part of the journey from him. When you guys realized though that we are going to do this you know here's an economy. Not a great one where we can actually make waves. From your perspective what was that like jumping off of the diving board into an ocean. What. What was your emotional intellectual makeup when you realized Oh we were going to do this. To be honest with you that. I was.

Speaker 25: So unaware of the power of this and what it could turn into. Right. That I didn't even I wasn't even smart enough to be jumping off into the ocean. I was like wow this is a really fun cool idea. Let's try that right. And so it was it was almost casual. I call myself the accidental because I think it's a lot of people came at it from a position of activism or advocacy or really knowledge about the power of the kind of Ismat I came at it like before or since. Let's do this. But once I got to them I was completely hook line and sinker for when I started to realize the power and you know how much it really was revolutionizing people's relationship and all the things that differ.

Speaker 24: Describe that journey because I think you know now at this point there are many that come into this industry from that perspective. Oh I got to get into campus and then they realized that oh there's magic here. You know to dovetail those two points. Just kidding. Do you remember the kind of the journey of use the of the aha moment you know of. Oh wait a second. This is real. I'm doing something more than I could have ever imagined.

Speaker 25: Yes actually no. And for me it was like an aha moment. It's more gradual you know. Sure. And it started with just getting real feedback people problems when things that we talked about with the one story is that it was very clear to us right from the start and it will spread. Shall we say a very elementary stage when we entered the market. We now must people be tested making products. And so right from the beginning distinguished ourselves by the very system we actually lab testing RTX years here's tattoos. And so I think current products even at the beginning stages really did get a reputation for being very consistent and because of that serves to get feedback people like oh you know I always know that I quickly want to hear x y z products that I know I'm going to feel better.

Speaker 23: It's like oh OK that's interesting. I mean certainly theoretically I do that candidates with strong medicine. But I guess I'm certain that experience will garner me over the head a little bit with people saying to me many times oh my gosh you really feel better. Yeah. So that was a big I'm sorry.

Speaker 24: Well no just that I think that that's where everybody figures it out. No matter if you're in the industry or not you don't.

Speaker 26: I remember early on just going to one of these invented whole Bensemann.

Speaker 22: One of the patients was talking to Pete and saying you know and he said hey how do you like that. The stranger said Oh I haven't had a seizure and I was watching this happen and I was like this. Really.

Speaker 27: Yeah exactly. There's almost this part of me that I can't believe it's powerful. But for me one of the big turning point spring is that we were lucky enough fairly soon who are flying through the air. It's really pharmaceutical company which actually has a part ours and they have developed state support. To my knowledge only extend these candidates for. Not just Colorado. And so we ended up licensing their technology and producing the product with their technology under wraps. And that really opened up in terms of understanding the powerful but this is natural that this is actually medicine. We'll share that. One of my sales. Her husband has severe multiple sclerosis. And they're actually refugees they have to talk to her so that they can have legal access to care. And. You know just. His experience with the cancer is so to feel more water to feel more comfortable and to not have this since that brought me to tears some of the testimonials we got from the nothing.

Speaker 28: I don't know what you what you what are you looking for. I think that was really when I said I was the buildup of all these experiences.

Speaker 22: I would be pretending if I said I came into as understanding sure that when you say it was gradual and then I understood you're still talking about a while back though right. I mean it's been a number of years. I started here. Just remind us when you wanna start it. So we started in 2010 and that's a long time ago a long time ago.

Speaker 27: Pick somebody said to me recently that when you hear it it is like five years.

Speaker 24: Well I'll tell you one better. I like to say cannabis users of dogs. It was a seven Craige means you coming up on your 15th adulations. So you know it really wasn't worth time.

Speaker 25: And we got into the business and the very first round of regulation. Prior to that run issue which require you to actually license people were literally baking brownies and wrapping them in and downloading them and bringing them to events. So when you think about where we were six years ago where we are now it's just not today. And it's also my day in terms of how accepted it is how much more mainstream at least in our little worlds in Colorado.

Speaker 23: But I think if you look at the national numbers the picture is not much different. And you look at the outcome Florida as well.

Speaker 24: Eight out of nine or 71 percent 81 percent.

Speaker 28: That's a mandate.

Speaker 23: So it really has to change. Time. Sure.

Speaker 22: Well mandate you know this is so fleeting. So let's go live that we have my vote. Exactly. It's not necessarily doesn't hold the same water. But but but I take your point. You know 2010 2017. You say the rarefied air where you are you're describing the rarefied air of here in Colorado as you well know. What I mean is this is a community truly that does understand it. So when I get into a taxi. The cab driver understands that it's an industry here. When I check in at the hotel and they're asking me what kind of meetings I have. They understand who I will be talking to. Actual leaders of the community who are paying tax revenue into the system to build education and bridges etc.. That understanding on a total community level is really not many other places. That's true. You know I think that the numbers are there with the general populace saying OK we understand that cannabis is medicine or at least that it doesn't hurt. So go ahead and have it if you want it. Montana and North Dakota and Arkansas. But this truly I mean we are we into the fabric of this society here in Colorado. When you travel do you are you surprised that it isn't quite where it should be. Other places. Or is it that history of hey we've been doing this you know for a while now.

Speaker 25: You know that is emerging. So I remember the year after we started actually ask everybody who writes it we think that you're right. But you know now I think the rest of the country and the states I tend to challenge people are a little bit aware of certain knowledge. It seems to me it's not as much to fact that we do you from Colorado that I don't get that much and that's how they were approaching you.

Speaker 24: Ireland absolutely must be one of those candidates. Exactly. And they've been joking. Oh you're right. And I would say actually you're right I don't recall exactly. Exactly. Oh leprechauns they take serious and serious too. Oh really.

Speaker 25: And you know various other things I did not. I did not know that. Had to build roads around it.

Speaker 24: OK. Now we know we can do more research. Meanwhile back at the home front. You know look the last time I was there you know John and I had our conversation and walking back and literally the guys and him because it was two guys were stamping gummies and because you got to stamp on now because that was the new regulation that I just called that it just came come to me and they're stabbing them and then they're you know hey here have one. And what do you think it's like it looks. Looks good. Now we're not quite there yet. That's where I left you. OK. Right. So what has happened to her. Yeah.

Speaker 29: OK. So what we do like to call called and Haussler deposits. As you might guess the product into homes has already.

Speaker 24: Yes. There you go. That's actually what we ended up doing as opposed to snapping. We didn't try any different methods.

Speaker 28: We looked at Standfield we looked at out. So we looked at just about every factor positive with the Snuppy. And I'm sure and this gets to kind of.

Speaker 22: Realizing that regulation is changing. Yes it really does affect your business. I'm sure the reason that you were stamping them post is because you had a tremendous amount of inventory that now needed to be changed. So talk about from 2010 to 2017. You know you product manufacturers have been through a lot. As far as hey the rules are different. Hey the rules are different. Hey the rules are different. Over and over and over again. Talk about that.

Speaker 29: It has been a challenge for sure. It's been a challenge. It's also been good. OK. And I'll tell you why so quickly this last one it literally made us all ok once for every. It's ok and we have products that we just took the market because we could actually too high a cost effective. Right. I personally for pretty they were not a big deal for all of us.

Speaker 28: You know it was it was. I was trying to think so. So there were things that we just actually took off the market. Here's why it is good. So when we started with I was saying home brownies wrapped in Saran Wrap backpack sensory free time round of major regulation. That's the first from the licensing. So everybody who couldn't get a real kitchen with about then it would seem to sell track anybody who couldn't figure out how to live with the manifesto to buy.

Speaker 24: OK here's the metrics you want to know. Right.

Speaker 23: By then it was hoping to test lab test. So if you couldn't make your products precise enough and at that point you had to be super precise about anything over 10 kilograms. Goodbye.

Speaker 24: Right. Well just let me take that tangent. The trick on that one was we've been testing the whole time. Yes. That was the trick. That was the trick for that. What if you hadn't been testing up until now. Right.

Speaker 28: GABBARD but a lot harder. Yeah. So those that wiped out a whole bunch of people then we had a whole round of packaging labeling that we had to stop and at every step of the way. We've had people drop out.

Speaker 23: So really what is left of the O.G. which would short fall into that category are really people who really understood how to run their businesses and the new crop of competitors that have. I think by and large we're not like us. We sort of bootstrapped it grew with the idea that I have a traditional business background so far. But. Most of the time people are now well financed they know what they're doing. So what we come up with is that it is true that we have a much more regulated industry. We also have a safe distribution. We have a industry that's safer for consumers. They can be clear on the distance that they are getting so ads that are coming to town resistance packaging that there clearly are.

Speaker 22: I have my opinion which is that we need to do short but the five from time Highsmith's higher hypothesis whatever we do that all the time just go past it. No you're right.

Speaker 23: Yeah but but the fact of the matter is the industry is more professional was 2010.

Speaker 26: What about because you know if you go back in the 200 whatever episodes most of the interviews are with folks that have been doing this for a long time.

Speaker 22: About the new folks you know specifically in Colorado. It's interesting to see new folks in Colorado. You know we would expect a new player in Maine or New York. Certainly yeah but a new player in Colorado. Talk about that.

Speaker 23: It's very interesting for me to watch it. So there's some interesting dynamics I would say in general that people are coming to now are. Better financed.

Speaker 22: Short.

Speaker 30: You can't say that enough and have already said are you kidding me.

Speaker 23: I said exactly what I would say is that in some ways they face even a more challenging environment because what we have seen a lot particularly in the last year or two as the dispensaries have begun to consolidate into groups is they've gotten very selective about the number of catchers who they want to work with and they certainly want to have 30 different brands on the shelf. They want to have a much smaller number of brands that they sell really well and they know these people are not backordered all the time and they know what they were going to be there on Wednesday and Wednesday and they know have the banks that they can check. Right. So. So all of those things you know the word with them or take that away. It might be easier to get started got deeper pockets but I think it's actually more challenging to get people to try who is not here either you're going to have to come out with something that's really new to friends or you're going to have to come in. You know you're going to have to do some pricing strategy to get yourself on the shelf and that's not a very sustainable strategy.

Speaker 26: No it is simply the flour has fallen to the floor as far as persons concerned for you though a product manufacturer. How does that affect you or not it doesn't affect us.

Speaker 23: First of all most of us I believe this is true but trim prices have also fallen by at least on the adult side show have not fallen at all. Interesting. And the reason for that is because medical there are no independent medical growers to have the medical care you either have to be tied to a manufacturing facility or a dispensary. Right. And if you're a dispensary you're tied to patient care. Right right. So there isn't a lot of a budget plan to turn on the medical side which is very limited for us as factors because we'd love to be servicing the market but we just can't get that trend right. However I don't use you site. Certainly the price of chips has fallen which is helpful to our margins. But especially helpful because we have other expenses that are coming in such as new regulations or what.

Speaker 28: Well certainly for many of us we all spend a lot of money to get into complying with the new manufacturing procedures that are needed for stamping shape.

Speaker 23: I also think that the whole retail environment is getting more competitive. So I think that people are spending their packaging to look for fresh testing requirements on the medical side have lab testing right now we just have right side which is amazing to me and tear up. So you know it's certainly helping to offset some of increases in expenses is offset by lower prices. What you have to remember that unlike flour there's a lot of input into the expense structure and California is possible.

Speaker 24: So it doesn't show up as a cost to the THC is actually not least expensive to sell because the manufacturers are manufacturers. Yes.

Speaker 29: And one of the other interesting things not too much about this but because we're all limited to our own home market home state with the possible exception of California really there's no capital justification for investing in large scale. So a lot of what we do is still hand down. That would make sense. Yup but you can't you can't justify the expense. So Labor is always going to be your biggest lie of course for us. So what I'm saying about that is that although the price of TRM has come down it doesn't bring down the price the same price flower. Sure. Yeah because there's so many other places.

Speaker 26: Exactly. And so here I am talking to somebody that manufactures a product and it happens to have kind of. Isn't that the point right. All right. So we don't have a ton of time unfortunately. So I'm going to have to ask you the three final questions right now to tell you what they are going to ask you them in order but if you don't mind I'd love to talk to what you should spend. Sure.

Speaker 31: So the so that's obviously started.

Speaker 26: So I'll tell you what they are offering them an order. What is most surprising camp is what is most surprising and why. And then on the soundtrack of one track on site. First things first.

Speaker 32: What has most surprised you can have is just with the potential it has to make some changes. For real. Yeah yeah yeah.

Speaker 24: What is your life. Nancy.

Speaker 32: There still is part of that. I'm fine with these people.

Speaker 31: What's wrong with these people. Actually it's probably still severely disappoint as my father tells me that I should be so disappointed. Yes exactly. I think there's a way around now for a little bit disappointed with the we're on the same page right. Soundtrack yeah the soundtrack of your life. I have one track one song. OK. Look at you. That is just classic what that is.

Speaker 24: All right Louis Armstrong if you don't know what if you can hear him singing that song right now. Go play. That's why thank you so much. There you have Nancy Whiteman.

Speaker 1: Very much appreciate Dancy's time as you can hear she's you know part of that old guard in Colorado she's been doing this for quite some time. So appreciate her appreciate Amy Anderlini who also has been doing this for quite some time. Appreciate your time. Go ahead and give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play if you don't mind. And if you do so don't worry about.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.