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Ep.239: Maya Elizabeth, Whoopi & Maya

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.239: Maya Elizabeth, Whoopi & Maya

Ep.239: Maya Elizabeth, Whoopi & Maya

Maya Elisabeth from Om Edibles and Whoopi & Maya joins us and explains that if cannabis discovered today it would be the most miraculous medical discovery…if it wasn’t for the stigma brought on by prohibition. Originally from the bay area, Maya wound up working for one of the first dispensaries in the late 90’s and realized that there wasn’t a whole lot of non-flower product on the shelves. She met the challenge by producing product and couldn’t believe that she very quickly found clients…which led to the creation of Om Edibles. Following years of success, when Whoopi Goldberg was interested in getting involved in the space, Maya was an obvious partner choice. Maya also shares a very personal story where she learned the mantra- the only way out is through.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Maya Elizabeth, Maya Elizabeth from ome edibles and Whoopi and my ed joins us and explains that if cannabis was discovered today, it'd be the most miraculous medical discovery if it wasn't for the stigma brought on by Pearl vision originally from the bay area. My, uh, wound up working for one of the first dispensaries in the late nineties and realized that there wasn't a whole lot of non flour product on the shelves. She met the challenge by producing product and couldn't believe that she very quickly found clients which led to the creation of edibles. Following years of success when Whoopi Goldberg was interested in getting involved in space, Maya was an obvious partner choice. My also shares a very personal story where she learned the mantra. The only way out is through welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Maya, Elizabeth, do you have a Pelican case for your phone? I have a pellet gun in

Speaker 3: case for the zoom. I use that for cannabis a lot. Oh yeah, no, they're great. No matter what waterproof. It's air proof. There you go. Look at that. Look at that. Maya, Elisabeth, which we'll discuss whether that's your real last name or not at another point. Birth given middle name, middle name. That's what we figured. Family name. It's A. It's a beautiful name. Thank you so much and you're doing beautiful work. Let's be honest. Right? So much. I really appreciate that. How. Let's just start right at the beginning of your journey with cannabis because you're on that journey as as folks can hear through the microphone right now for where did this all start for you? Because you've been in the game, as they say for awhile, you know you're no rookie. Thank you. Thank you very much. I grew up in a cannabis friendly household.

Speaker 3: I was always smelling it around the house. I didn't realize what I was smelling until later like, oh my mom and dad were smoking diesel, so gassy. They had some good stuff. They were paying a lot. It was like 400 bucks announce for them. The late seventies, early eighties, early eighties. I remember my mom had the joint roller with the Little Cray cray candle. She used that and she was super cocky about it, but we were like, we always, you know, she acted guilty. We could tell she was doing something that she wanted to hide from us and I think up until, you know, we were probably 12 or 13. We always thought my dad smoked cigarettes, but it was never a cigarette. It would be interesting to do the in. My Dad's a really. Both my mom and dad are really awesome people there. My mom came here from Canada for the summer of love.

Speaker 3: She never left and to what state? California. She did come to California to Berkeley and they were into it. Yeah. And Her and my dad fell in love, but he used to take us to dead shows and stuff at Stanford. And I'm from here. My Dad's from Los Angeles Long Beach to be exact. They met in Berkeley. Um, and so, uh, they didn't really hide it from us, but we weren't really on to them until we started smoking. I used to get in trouble for smoking pot. You know how you square that, circle my. That makes no sense. You know, as a parent, I think you want your children to wait until you've made it through school just to make sure you're not going to live somehow. Throw your whole life away. Even though I find cannabis quite motivating, I was able to get really great grades and play sports and do all these things while smoking cannabis.

Speaker 3: It helps with my creativity and my focus. I find you know the opposite to be true. Well, let's, let's be straight though. In the late nineties I think is when you're talking about schooling, we didn't necessarily have the choices that we had. We didn't have the intellectual property that we have on this strain this way, this result as opposed to this is what pot does. Refine. Exactly, yes. We didn't have all the information and that's the thing about cannabis is that information is key. You know, time and time again, people want the new smartphone, they want the new smart tv, but they won't let any new information about a plant. Cannabis was discovered today. It would be the most miraculous medical discovery, extreme cure. All the pharmaceutical companies would be going crazy for it. It's just so. I've never underestimate the power of a stigma and a prohibition. Absolute powerful stuff. We'll, we'll come back to that because I want to make sure we get all this with you. You've got the cannabis friendly household, which means cannabis friendly

Speaker 4: for parents, not cannabis friendly for kids, but then you know, you start investigating the plant. I think as we all did as a, as a student, so to speak.

Speaker 5: Time I ever smoked pot was when I was 11. Oh, so that's early. Yeah. It was on the playground out of a Super Mario Punch can this little short in the eighties and I didn't get high. The next time I smoked pot was when I was around 14 and I thought so yeah. I got so high I can feel my eyeballs were Mike years felt like they're on an airplane and I couldn't remember what I did with my day, but I found all these receipts for food. It was like pizza. Ice Cream was like, Dang, I must have gotten the munchies and like, what was that experience that was the best. I mean even at that young age, I just felt my mind go to ease and my body felt amazing. I mean, I love the feeling, really loved the feeling. It was a good fit for me.

Speaker 1: Maya Elizabeth, Maya Elizabeth from ome edibles and Whoopi and my ed joins us and explains that if cannabis was discovered today, it'd be the most miraculous medical discovery if it wasn't for the stigma brought on by Pearl vision originally from the bay area. My, uh, wound up working for one of the first dispensaries in the late nineties and realized that there wasn't a whole lot of non flour product on the shelves. She met the challenge by producing product and couldn't believe that she very quickly found clients which led to the creation of edibles. Following years of success when Whoopi Goldberg was interested in getting involved in space, Maya was an obvious partner choice. My also shares a very personal story where she learned the mantra. The only way out is through welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Maya, Elizabeth, do you have a Pelican case for your phone? I have a pellet gun in

Speaker 3: case for the zoom. I use that for cannabis a lot. Oh yeah, no, they're great. No matter what waterproof. It's air proof. There you go. Look at that. Look at that. Maya, Elisabeth, which we'll discuss whether that's your real last name or not at another point. Birth given middle name, middle name. That's what we figured. Family name. It's A. It's a beautiful name. Thank you so much and you're doing beautiful work. Let's be honest. Right? So much. I really appreciate that. How. Let's just start right at the beginning of your journey with cannabis because you're on that journey as as folks can hear through the microphone right now for where did this all start for you? Because you've been in the game, as they say for awhile, you know you're no rookie. Thank you. Thank you very much. I grew up in a cannabis friendly household.

Speaker 3: I was always smelling it around the house. I didn't realize what I was smelling until later like, oh my mom and dad were smoking diesel, so gassy. They had some good stuff. They were paying a lot. It was like 400 bucks announce for them. The late seventies, early eighties, early eighties. I remember my mom had the joint roller with the Little Cray cray candle. She used that and she was super cocky about it, but we were like, we always, you know, she acted guilty. We could tell she was doing something that she wanted to hide from us and I think up until, you know, we were probably 12 or 13. We always thought my dad smoked cigarettes, but it was never a cigarette. It would be interesting to do the in. My Dad's a really. Both my mom and dad are really awesome people there. My mom came here from Canada for the summer of love.

Speaker 3: She never left and to what state? California. She did come to California to Berkeley and they were into it. Yeah. And Her and my dad fell in love, but he used to take us to dead shows and stuff at Stanford. And I'm from here. My Dad's from Los Angeles Long Beach to be exact. They met in Berkeley. Um, and so, uh, they didn't really hide it from us, but we weren't really on to them until we started smoking. I used to get in trouble for smoking pot. You know how you square that, circle my. That makes no sense. You know, as a parent, I think you want your children to wait until you've made it through school just to make sure you're not going to live somehow. Throw your whole life away. Even though I find cannabis quite motivating, I was able to get really great grades and play sports and do all these things while smoking cannabis.

Speaker 3: It helps with my creativity and my focus. I find you know the opposite to be true. Well, let's, let's be straight though. In the late nineties I think is when you're talking about schooling, we didn't necessarily have the choices that we had. We didn't have the intellectual property that we have on this strain this way, this result as opposed to this is what pot does. Refine. Exactly, yes. We didn't have all the information and that's the thing about cannabis is that information is key. You know, time and time again, people want the new smartphone, they want the new smart tv, but they won't let any new information about a plant. Cannabis was discovered today. It would be the most miraculous medical discovery, extreme cure. All the pharmaceutical companies would be going crazy for it. It's just so. I've never underestimate the power of a stigma and a prohibition. Absolute powerful stuff. We'll, we'll come back to that because I want to make sure we get all this with you. You've got the cannabis friendly household, which means cannabis friendly

Speaker 4: for parents, not cannabis friendly for kids, but then you know, you start investigating the plant. I think as we all did as a, as a student, so to speak.

Speaker 5: Time I ever smoked pot was when I was 11. Oh, so that's early. Yeah. It was on the playground out of a Super Mario Punch can this little short in the eighties and I didn't get high. The next time I smoked pot was when I was around 14 and I thought so yeah. I got so high I can feel my eyeballs were Mike years felt like they're on an airplane and I couldn't remember what I did with my day, but I found all these receipts for food. It was like pizza. Ice Cream was like, Dang, I must have gotten the munchies and like, what was that experience that was the best. I mean even at that young age, I just felt my mind go to ease and my body felt amazing. I mean, I love the feeling, really loved the feeling. It was a good fit for me.

Speaker 4: Yeah. Yeah. It turns you onto yourself

Speaker 5: most. It shows you to yourself. It can be like if you were to take a velvet comforter and put it in the dryer and just our brain in it. Well that's a good analogy right there. Just so peaceful. It's just like just calm everything down like a nice heavy, warm blanket to cloak your mind.

Speaker 4: So you have obviously these very positive effects that are happening. When did the rubber meet the road? As far as you know what? Actually this is more than just something that makes me feel great.

Speaker 5: I could make a career out of this. Okay. So I went through college. I studied psychology. I was always a waitress for like 12 years. I was a waitress and I used to lay in bed at night and I can recall every single tables ordered, but as soon as I was done I couldn't wait to get high. I mean I'm talking like, sorry if I'm getting myself in trouble, but like on the car ride home, I light by. Do Good. How do I do be ready to go? That kid I could. I was there.

Speaker 4: There you go. I think statute's a little bit of limitations and they're also figuring out how to make that all work. But that's a whole different conversation. I wasn't driving there. You go into an automated Carpool. Yeah.

Speaker 5: Um, so yeah, it was always just my beautiful treats at the end of the day. And um, I was going to San Francisco state. I had just graduated. I wasn't sure what I was going to do. I was about 21 and.

Speaker 4: Well let me stop you there. Right? Because what, who sits before me is a smart person. I know that most people know that. Look at the results. Thank you. So what is this San Francisco state graduate doing as simply, if you will, a waitress, meaning, uh, this is, uh, a great profession and uh, of course, uh, valued, but we feel like maybe you could have had other options. How long

Speaker 5: with so many other people went through college and like, you know, I was like, well, what am I going to do? What was your male psychology? All I knew was that I loved people and I wanted to work with people wanting to do something helpful and meaningful and I wasn't sure what yet. I couldn't really picture myself being a therapist, but I knew whatever I was going to do. It was good to involve people. So I figured it was a safe bet to study psychology.

Speaker 3: Sometimes it's familial. Where your parents. God funny, my dad was a psychiatrist and my mom was a psychiatric nurse. You really picked up on that. So, so yeah, it was, it was.

Speaker 5: And um, and I just love people. I love people and I wanted to do something meaningful. I couldn't imagine myself sitting behind a screen all day, you know, but I also wanted to be successful. I wanted to do something meaningful. So I had this roommate, his name was Max Max, if you're out there, you were extreme part my destiny and fate and I think you

Speaker 3: engage account economy.com if you want to get back in touch. Okay, good. Yeah. Hollier Max. Max

Speaker 5: was working at a dispensary at the time and this was like so long ago. I'm 35 now, so this was about 15 years ago. It was a whole different era for cannabis. Um, we did not have a sign outside. It was not an accident. No, we were a speakeasy. It was beautiful. It was at polk and sutter in San Francisco, which is like the tenderloin and it was a beautiful, probably like a 4,000 square foot building. And you go downstairs. There was a huge Buddha and these mirrored magnetic double paned windows and it was very official early have this vibe going on of like creating a safe environment. Not only because when you work with cannabis you can be a target. You're dealing with some a street value, it's not only illegal want to, you know, grab it and you're not going to call the cops. I think those are changed that. So it's time. It's changing.

Speaker 3: That's why I want to time check it from the street. You didn't know what this was. This was in the shadows, so to speak. It was quote unquote in the shadows.

Speaker 5: What we were doing was like next level things that people still aren't doing it.

Speaker 3: So let me take that time.

Speaker 5: God, I would love to take you on a tangent because this is a beautiful thing and you know, just like anything else, like food, I mean, the way you serve it really makes a difference. You know, the way I call it medical, your medical cannabis etiquette, the way in which we speak of our medicine, the way that we treat our medicine directly affects the experience of the patient has and how other people treat us right with anything in life. Everything in life is like that. So at the time it was the only female bud tender. It was like you came in through these double doors and there was a huge Buddha and then you go downstairs and there was, you get checked in, you know, we checked, everybody verified everybody cameras everywhere. We were legit, as legit as lipstick in a very not legit time and, and you came downstairs and it was like a speakeasy.

Speaker 5: There was beautiful, beautiful purple velvet walls. It sounds cheesy. They were so pretty though. Our Bras are brasserie was from France, from the twenties. We had a seven piece of aluminum storyboard of a band courting a woman in the Kama Sutra. It actually went to a museum afterwards. It was totally museum quality. My boss really appreciated the finer things in life and you have really good taste. So I was the medicated Barista. I would make you medicated drinks. We had these medicated milks, we did Cappuccinos and whatever anybody wanted, you know, run your volcano bag for you, rolling you some doobies. We had a lot of patients that were disabled. They couldn't roll their own joints. I was there to facilitate you enjoying your medicine. I also did clones and I also did a lot of bud tending and then it was a personal chef and I went onto the staff meals and all these went on this huge thing.

Speaker 5: Um, but we, we retrained all of our medicine and, and anyone who's in touch with the cannabis market and you will laugh when, when I tell you this and you'll remember we were getting, we were paying like 40 to $100 for a pound of purple. Then it was like all about purple and all about Oh gee. And it was $4,200 a pound, but then you say you're also retrieving it and we have someone in the back. We Trim it because so much of cannabis is about aesthetics and when you take that time to clean it up and really trim it like super beautifully, Oh my God, it looks so much better. And then you're left with this beautiful sugar shape that's beyond trim. I mean it's like the closest cotton. It's just prime for rolling joints. So we had crushed Kush, we had great shake, we had ready to roll.

Speaker 5: And so patients that couldn't afford the more expensive medicine could just get a jar of premium shake and roll it into duties. It was like flow after flow, which is what cannabis always shows us. She is so generous, you know? So yeah. It's like the farmer got to make their money, the trimmers that trim that cannabis got to make their money. They took that trim, made some other money, then they took it to us, we paid the other trimmers to trim it again, and then we sold it to the patients. It's like how generous giving, giving, giving. Yeah.

Speaker 5: Flows. So that was super beautiful. And it was there that I was exposed to so many different types of cannabis. And I feel like we were some of the first people to ever brand strains like the purple urkel had a Steve Urkel on it. That was all purple, you know. And we were preparing an image with a strain name, which no one had done yet. And um, everything was served in glass, a glass jar because that's way better for cannabis. Sure. Um, all those volatiles tricombs I was talking about, you know. Yeah, totally. So I'm just for innovations that have stayed with us, what are the things that you guys were doing that still aren't being done? I'm interested to hear that. Well, the medicated Barisa thing we were consuming onsite. Come in there and smoke. They've cracked down on that. Then Yeah, you run your vapor bag for you and just beautiful things. Anytime anyone disabled came in, we would open up the upstairs. I would go up and spend as much time as anybody wanted. Finding them they're perfect medicine because cannabis is super personal and a lot of times when people don't have success with cannabis, it's simply because they're having the wrong form. Like they're having an edible when they shouldn't be smoking or vice versa, something like that. Um, they have the wrong strain. Like too much of a sativa when they suffer from anxiety or the wrong amount, which could throw anyone off. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And we'll have been humbled by candidates. We'll throw in a start low and go slow. Right. You know, you can always add more. Totally. It's so personal. You can have a little old lady and a football player right next to each other and she might be able to consume 50 milligrams, two milligrams might throw this guy off. We've all been humbled by cannabis. I love that. I have a special file and my brain just for that. Every Cannabis Cup I go to an ice, someone crashed out, like humbled by cannabis. And I've been humbled by cannabis so many times. She continues to remind me of how powerful she is. Yeah. Yeah. So as far as how powerful she is, she's given you a career. So this was the first stop. Uh, it sounds like a great experience. When was the change and where was that place

Speaker 5: called? CMC, which stands for Canada Med care. Still shout out all the staff and all the people we got closed down uh, some years ago. Um, irs in the feds. It was just when they came in and pulled everyone's file, we got, we got, they threatened the landlord.

Speaker 3: That's the way to do it. That's how they're still doing it today. Speaking of innovation today and I know what I mean,

Speaker 5: run into my old boss because I run into them here and there. Um, he still says that he regrets doing that because they, they kind of didn't end up following through on a lot of those. So we were very ahead of our time. It was a whole different era for Canada.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And we're talking about roughly turn of the century, right? I mean I did that, what you said about 15 years ago. Yeah, exactly. Okay. So what was the next step?

Speaker 5: So at that point I had a couple edibles on the shelf. We'll really just one. It was called Mama's cookie dough

Speaker 3: and that was yours was a frozen cookie dough because

Speaker 5: I see people time and time again, like giving these crusty edibles that had been in there for so long just because they can take cannabis. I'm like, well what about a fresh cookie you can take home, bake yourself, you know, just a little ball, a cookie dough that was medicated.

Speaker 3: Wow. And when did you, do you remember the first go at it where you said, you know, hey people, I can see the opening for this. I really should do this. I'm doing it. Here it is on the show.

Speaker 5: I already had experience doing some medical cannabis stuff. My mom and I had made brownies together a few times. By the time I was smoking I was smoking with my mom. But definitely, yeah, one of the things that we enjoyed together because you know what I was aside from the cannabis, I was pretty much a square in the best way possible was a hippie. But it's like I've still to this day, never done cocaine. Ever done math. I'm not into that. I don't do that, you know, I love a glass of wine here and there, but I would never mix the two because very different vibrations, cannabis as a medicine in a food. So I don't even categorize it with other controlled substances. But like I was getting very good grades in school and we were just getting stoned together. It was really awesome. Yeah.

Speaker 5: So getting good grades in school. So this is now 19, 20 year old enough is what she. Her high school. I was blazing with my mom. She was like the cool mom. We were doing it. It was awesome. So. So okay. So I had the medicaid and cookie dough. We got closed down. I ended up, it was right in the trim season was like, man I can't go back to a regular job. Like I just can't. I got to go out on my own. So I just decided to like take wind and fly and spread my wings and I was a career trimmer for awhile and I ended up making $10,000 trimming. I did. I was in California in the fall. That can happen. The timing was perfect. I had already requested the time off work to work for a couple of weeks because my friend's boyfriend was the grower and they had hundreds and hundreds of pounds up in nor cal time off work from waitress from the dispensary kind of writings on the wall.

Speaker 5: It's all I knew was that I was in love with cannabis and that's what I wanted to do. As long as the universe would let me do it, I was going to do it. Well, so what, what it was was it was about 200 bucks per pound to trim a pound. And I don't know if you've ever trimmed a pound before. It's actually, depending on the type of person you are, it's really challenging. It's hard on your body. You see your, your butt gets sore, your risk gets sore, your hands get sore, your neck, every part of your body gets sore. Um, it can take for some people on average, eight hours to trim a pound, depending on the type of buds you're tripping. They can be big buds are a little buds. I mean there's so many variables. Um, some people take a lot longer, some people take a lot quicker and it depends on your mental stamina as well, like can you sit there and focus?

Speaker 5: I would start to get stir crazy. I officially got the itis after many seasons as trim, even if it's mine. And so I was trimming weed. I was making hash was even taking that material that I made the hash out of. And then making edibles, the generosity is like three flows that I was cooking the staff meals and it was getting hourly for that. Long story short, I ended up doing a bunch of trim work and a bunch of other work that made 10 racks. I got back and I was like, this is what I was working for. So I, I got my own little grow and the animals were just deciding. I don't know if that's awkward for me to admit, but like in the, in my general path of cannabis, I really wanted to grow. I got the grow and I was doing the edibles on the side.

Speaker 5: Would that be awkward to admit my full thing now? Now it's like I don't have the time for the grow. Edibles and topicals are my thing. It's just like this flow. This is the journey. I don't think any of it's awkward. Well then I wholeheartedly admit that at that time, my side dish. And then I um, I came up with two different truffles and we call them queen to 15. It was dark chocolate ganache with a milk chocolate outside and a peanut butter puffed rice truffle. That sounds very nice. And I had gotten. My very first accounts was like vapor room and hope net or some of the very first people to put me on. This was a whole different era of cannabis and vapor room said we want to enter the peanut butter truffle in the high times and at that time, high times was like all.

Speaker 5: There was no. It was like the end all be all. If you've got a cannabis cup, you were like, forget it. In my eyes it was like the tippy top top. They were doing a lot in Amsterdam time. They just started bringing them to the US. So there was one in San Francisco. Vapor Room said, we want to do the peanut butter. Truffle will pay. I'm like, yeah, let's do it. I ended up getting a third place. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe it. You now, why could you not believe in another words? Uh, you seem like someone that's a confident person, right? You, you've got to come across,

Speaker 4: seem to be familiar with what the patient wants and needs and you seem to be, you know, providing that patient with what he or she wants a needs. Why were you so surprised at the fact that you got the third place? You know, why was that A.

Speaker 5: I have no idea. I was going to, when I was up against all these people with like serious money, they had beautiful packaging. Mine was like this little golden mylar with the Sri Yantra on the front. It's just like the symbol that is assimilated with home and you know, all these funny things. I was just this like Kinda like a, it felt like a little girl and coming off the street. Here we go. Let me see what I can do and I'm a winter there pig because I can't afford it. Just a kid are expensive to enter and I did this one shot, boom. And we ended up placing and I just could not believe it right to me. Third place, first place were the same. I didn't care. I agree. Yes. I'm a winner. I couldn't believe, there we go. So that was kind of the beginning of that. So you have the two accounts and then when did we start to say, okay, we got to, now I've got a win under my belt at the, at the holy Grail, you know, of winds and I've got these two accounts. What, what am I doing here? Oh, I just couldn't believe it. And um, you know, at that time I was growing the girl scout cookies, which was a time when nobody had the cookies yet nobody had the cookies that people have caught up on that for them.

Speaker 5: And the person who gave it to me, it was actually the person who made it so, so I was gifted, um, you know, as this girl grower, they wanted me to grow it because they, they liked the touch that girls had on these flowers and I just think it was some kind of enigma for them. So they light the touch that girls had on these flowers. What's that mean? I think there's a special connection. Um, there's more and more women growers now, but um, there's just a special connection with the lady fingers and like man handling, it's just a thing. Not One is better than the other. In fact, in my opinion, together we all make like the best team in the whole. I totally value at a place like a female plant woman, a grower connection type thing in means without simulia means seed.

Speaker 5: So I'm Amelia is without seed not fertilized. Yeah. So we're actually enjoying the virgin reproductive parts of the female plant and there's a place for the male plant. We need the mail online so we can procreate and make seeds of new genetics, all these things that we do. But as far as like good high grades go, what you're really striving for is an unfertilized egg meal plan and hands. We did well with the girl scout cookie. It was amazing. Like I still serve people in the collective to this day from back then. We still have the same people in our collective of patients that I met at CMC, people with Ms Cancer, all different ages, socioeconomic demographic, all different class. At extreme diversity and time and time again, cannabis is what brings us together. So you're growing, you've got your, your two clients. When's the next step here?

Speaker 5: Is it Omar? Is there, are there other steps along the Queen? 15 turns into Om is the primordial vibration of the universe that is all about health, wellness and healing. Elementary entre are the two. It's the sound and the visual that go together. I had a street on trails like I'm going to call it home established, own edibles. Um, let's see at this time. So vapor rooms requesting more and more so much love to Martin Martin. He put me on, he really put me on. Oh, we will, we need an out. We need an olive oil. And that time I was like, well, what would happen if you took cannabis and lavender and chamomile and put them together like how can cannabis and other healing herbs can't go together? Right? Uh, and so I started making these formulas with glycerin. I just didn't want to use alcohol even though I'm now we make some alcohol tinctures because alcohol is a very, very good teacher.

Speaker 5: A liquid. It's very, very good for extracting cannabinoids. Um, at the time I was just doing glycerin and it tasted good. It was gentle. I realize now I was capturing a lot of terpene in there because it was raw, so I did a daytime formula and nighttime formula and then we were doing the liquid cookies and the liquid Sherbert and I was just trying to get really specific and I'm doing like a cheering pie, Cherry Pie, uh, stuff that people maybe if they had thought of might not have access to the material anyways, you know, when I look back on it, I see it now. So that was an advantage right there. Yeah, just material really. And truly to this day, the quality of our products relies upon the quality of our ingredients. Yeah. And it starts with people's intention in my opinion. And so

Speaker 4: just what do you mean by that?

Speaker 5: Well, I mean, if you intend to make medicine, most likely you're not going to use a pesticide on your cannabis. And the people we're serving can oftentimes have compromised immune systems and just knowing your audience and like really what's your intention? What's your purpose? For me, for me personally, it was about making medicine and making products that we're bringing people relief because already I was getting these testimonials back and call them cannabis miracles and I got to witness tons of them at CMC, you know, like all day, every day people will come back and I'm even one woman in our collective. She has Ms. when I first met her, she was in a wheelchair and a cane. She walks to this day, she's on her, she's on her phoenix tears. I don't sell the phoenix tears. Really? They're not like on the market. They're just for really sick people and she takes a high cbd phoenix tears that I made for her every day and she'll do jumping jacks in front of me. Unbelievable. Yeah, and it's like 15 years later it is really unbelievable. And so witnessing that firsthand was already a miracle. Participating in that is even more of an American.

Speaker 4: Can you share with folks, because a lot of folks listening know the feeling for those that don't know the feeling. When you do share in, in that, in, in seeing the medicine actually help the patient, can you describe that? It's kind of an indescribable thing I would imagine.

Speaker 5: You know, and to describe that. It's like putting it in context. Context is so helpful. Look at the time we live in. I don't even watch the news because it's too much for me. It's so fucked up. What's going on in this world? When we find one heated blanket just to wrap ourselves in, is there any comfort? Is there a cloak? Is there a cushion? Is there a velvet we can put over this hammer? Because if you're paying attention to you, you're. You're realizing like how fortunate we are to have homes to go home to every night like the amount of people slipping through the cracks who have no medical care suffering alone with like pain and debilitating things like it's sad. Our philosophy at the dispensary I worked at was we never say no. So if you come in for compassion will help you with compassion. If we think you're reselling it will give you one tiny bong hit that you can consume in front of us. Right. You know, and providing that safe place for you to have some relief through a plant that has desirable side effects. So, um, it's an honor. It's a privilege. It's super powerful. It's almost so powerful that I can't even feel it sometimes because I'm like, whatever. It's bigger than me. I'm just going to keep doing it

Speaker 4: almost too much to actually conceive of.

Speaker 5: I can't even like wrap my brain around what this must mean to someone who's actually been dealing with debilitating pain for years and years and years, who maybe gets an a medicated bath and it's like a whole new person, you know, or something we might take for granted, like sleep, you know, not realizing that when people seriously or not rested and haven't had a good night's sleep for years. Can you imagine what, what would that be worth to sleep like a little baby one night, you know,

Speaker 4: everything that'd be worth everything. Yeah. Yeah. Alright. So, so thank you for that. As far as all edibles, when did we realize the tide had turned and that this was actually a real big thing type of thing?

Speaker 5: Well, I'm worried. How personal do you want me to get?

Speaker 4: Very. I want you to get as personal as possible

Speaker 5: because I've never really talked about this before. Great. I don't know. I don't know if it's a good time to like bring it out. It's just a part of my personal life. Um, so at that time, let's see, I had own edibles. We were doing um, probably four or five different formulations of teachers. We were doing something we call the lions bomb, which is, um, a beeswax shea and cocoa butter base. Tiger Balm. That's amazing. It, it helps so many people. It's filled with spicy ligaments and essential oils. It's a topical and now now where we are today, we make as many topicals as edibles from. Um, so let's see. I'm just doing my thing and I have my company, I'm probably like 10, 10 to 12 accounts. This is about five, four or five years ago I actually got pregnant. I went through a full term pregnancy.

Speaker 5: I was eight and a half months pregnant. I had the room set up for our baby and everything. We'd already had the baby shower. We lost our baby. Oh yeah. Just fucking knocked me right on my ass to hear the Humpty dumpty year. The year I fell down and had a great fall because my heart truly shattered, truly shattered. And at that point I just wanting to keep on edibles going so I can come back to it after I had had my baby and stuff. It was like I had such a good thing going. I believed in it so much, but I had put it off to the side because my identity was going to be a mother now. Um, so I did what any expected mother would do, which was, you know, focus on being a mom. So that's where I was. I thought I was going to be a mom. I'm, this was four years ago, now it's 2017, so we lost our baby in 2013. Um, and so, or I was pregnant all the way 13. Um, and so after this catastrophic event that I was not at all expecting, not in any way, shape or form because I had a beautiful pregnancy out organic and do yoga and all that good stuff.

Speaker 5: I was kind of my bereavement. Yeah. Yeah. I was like, okay, well who am I now? What's my identity? This is a huge identity shift. I'm not going to be a mom. It took a long time for me to realize that and what can I do? And I'm like, well, I need to go back to the only thing I know how to do, which is work with cannabis. This plant, which was still always with me. My was an ally the whole time. Right. And so, um, and I was still providing medicine for other people. Um, so flash to 2015, I was really focused on work and I ended up winning six cannabis cups that year. Oh my God. Okay. So you just dove right back in. Basically I did throttle type of deal. I did, it was, it was a mess. It wasn't pretty well what I went back to, the only thing I knew what advice before we get to the sixth

Speaker 4: wins for, for women that are in that situation or happened in that situation will be in that situation for men with them that um, are going through that. What advice would you

Speaker 5: give because that is all the help you can find, pull in all the support you can find and take lots of walks and just let yourself experience this and more because trying to fight it, it's only gonna make it worse, you know, it's like when you're out to sea and you're trying to swim in and the undertow so strong, you know, you have to go at an angle. So it's just like, you know, how much can I deal with this and process this morning while still trying to be functional and heal myself and like basically very much care how I show up in this world and trying my best to be someone who brings people up instead of bringing people down. Yeah.

Speaker 4: When you say try to fight it, what do you mean?

Speaker 5: Oh, you just have to let it wash over you. It's like trying to fight it, like pretending like you're heart isn't a shattered into a million pieces. It's just not going to happen when my attire yourself out, it's like swimming straight out of the other. You've got to go. Nagel.

Speaker 4: Got It. When my mom passed away about 10 years ago, I was 30 at the time, um, it was early for her. Uh, I did fight it and I very much regret that to this day. Um, that was, uh, that was the wrong way to go, you know,

Speaker 5: letting it with all due respect, I think there's a lot of pressure on men and a lot of men were never taught how to deal with their emotions and stuff, you know? So it's like you have to be stoic and you have to keep going to be a breadwinner and all this stuff. And where's the time? And you're like, wait, I'm a human being. I lost someone very dear to me. I need to actually like stop and process this and feel it and it's going to be nasty and ugly. But the only way out is through. Yeah,

Speaker 4: yeah, absolutely. The only way out is through. That's beautiful. So, so you made it through to these, to these six winds, which had to be, I would imagine, somewhat of a pat on the back. That was that also kind of a lift to the heart?

Speaker 5: It was, it was. I was like, okay, I'm doing something here. I'm doing something like, there might've been one thing I was sure of at that point. And that was that like, I'm pretty sure I'm supposed to be making cannabis medicine for people because it was like, oh, is one entry one when every time, you know, I'm not blowing hot air up my own bed or anything like that. I'm not being big headed. I'm just saying it's the truth. It's the truth. I would do one shot, one win and that's the way I was rolling. I wasn't entering twelfth things, winning one thing. So, um, we have them all across the board from a TMC edibles to topicals to cbd edibles. And I started really just understanding, like, wait, like all of these things are really helping people. And I'm like, how, how diverse can we make our line for things, you know, that they all have, every product we make has things in common. There are things that legitimate patients should be reaching for. Um, there are things that we try to make as healthy as possible. We have a couple everyday edibles that I think patients really enjoy that could be higher in sugar, but we do like a, a cbd me. So for example, it's three ingredients, all organic, non GMO.

Speaker 3: Is that the common thread of organic or whatever

Speaker 5: organic is you get out what you put in. Um, if it has a seat at our table on our information list or our ingredient lists that it better be bringing something good, you know? Um, and yeah, let's make medicine medicine a cannabis is a super food. Let's treat it as such. And what would happen if cannabis came together with other healing herbs and superfoods? Do you think a superior medicine could be made? I do, yeah. So that's Kinda my whole little vibe for both Whoopi and Maya and on the same philosophy.

Speaker 3: Well you've just a cross the two. So we have alm and everything's going great, and here's the winds and it's amazing and I've gone through this unbelievable thing in my life. Um, where is that next step? Where does she come in?

Speaker 5: So we're winning, we're winning all these things. Um, it's going well. We're starting to get some press coverage. People are into us in what we're doing. Um, we care deeply about the plant. Um, I ended up moving up to the farm for a year and a, I actually had a whole a year long experience with fraudulent investors. I know. How far do we want to go with this? What too far

Speaker 3: because yeah, for, for other folks, because now we've got a whole industry and new people coming in and

Speaker 5: very important listeners. Uh, we feel like it's the fish parking lot and it's Hakuna Matata. Um, there's a lot of greed in this world and unfortunately many people want to stand where you're standing and they don't want to acknowledge the path you've taken of like baby stepping your way over 10 years in an industry that's clear as mud, potentially risking your whole entire freedom and family and property, whatever it could be. Um, so the respect that comes with a tiny, brave, courageous, bold moves a inching, literally inching your way. You're not going to get caught. There's a cop behind me and I'm like, Oh fuck, I have epsom salts. It's a topical and, you know, like, why do I feel like a criminal? I've these knots in my back, I'm riding dirty for epsom salts, for arthritic feel fair, you know, such as reality. So, um, so, uh, so I'm vulnerable. I'm sad, I'm mourning, I'm doing my thing, we're winning these cups, that's helping. I'm walking a lot, trying my best to take care of.

Speaker 5: And I get this call from this person who wants to do this line. I'll spare all the details. Long story short, they wanted 51 percent of ohm and super long story short, like a needle in a haystack. Uh, we had to order an expensive piece of machinery. The person had this person's real name on the credit card. I'm embarrassed to say I never even did my due diligence. I, I had a fake name. I know, I know. You can laugh at me. It's really bad. It was a big lesson. So this is all real big lessons and also the universe just like providing a protection for me because the person who, who the fraudulent person ordered the machinery through, sent me an email and said, is this your investor? Five counts of fraud? I'd be careful. And it was a link to their mugshot. So I said, we're not doing this.

Speaker 5: Excuse my French. I said, you stepped in Shit and you're walking in my house. I can make medicine with people like you. Our intentions are not aligned. Uh, and that was that. Two weeks later I got a phone call from a gentleman by the name of Rick Usac, recusing of high times. Uh, so he said, hello, my name is Rick Cusick, and I remembered rick because he has this really distinct voice and I had entered these cups and he was my contact for some of them in 2011 for the peanut butter truffles. He was my guy and many times it's so interesting you loop around and so, um, and he has a really distinct voice and he's so awesome. He's a, he's a pop star. He's like this brave heart, courageous visionary who's tells the best stories. He's so animated. I just real true heart of gold, Mr Musick. And um, he said, I have a high profile celebrity who'd like to make a menstrual line, would you be the person to talk to about this?

Speaker 5: And I said, yes, I am. I am the person to talk to you about this. He said, I see you're female collective. I see you've won, you know, I think we have five cannabis cups at that time, or maybe six, I don't remember, but I was on this role. And um, would you be the person to talk to you said? Yes, I would. So I have a friend whose name is Alexis Gundara and she's an Oregon. She's a total, or be a witch you moon Mama, um, medicine maker. I mean she is on a level really and truly, and I mean I, I really focused mostly on cannabis, but she's very in touch with many different plant medicines and she already had a moon line not have cannabis in it. And it was a topical and the teacher and forever she was saying let's put our medicines together. Um, so as soon, I mean, I literally hit end with Rick and then I hit Alexis and I was like, Alexis, it's time to put our medicines together. Shoot the moon. Literally. Okay.

Speaker 5: Because her dream is to get her formula out to the people. So we started formulating, I had her send me all this virgin stuff, talk to me about her formula and then I was medicating it in California legally where I could. And um, we just started formulating. So two of the four products and would be in Maya are herb and those are collaborations between Alexis and I. and then the other two are formulations that were from own. Yeah. So we launched, we just launched Whoopi and Maya in April and we're worried about 260 dispensary's now and it's the new year, less than a year. It's been awesome and crazy and intense and beautiful and fruitful and educational and exciting.

Speaker 3: Well, you described the, the, the opportunity is presented to you, but what about that, that initial kind of communication, that initial kind of, hey, who are you and hear you, you know, take me through that. What, you know, what was that discovery period like for both of you? Okay. Well Rick was. Rick was already a legend in my mind. Oh No. Yeah, no, I mean we'll be though, right? And what was already a legend in my mind, my whole family is a fan of what people at Burton. We grew up watching her movies. Those were those movies that the whole family would watch together, jumping jack, flash and such. All of it. Yeah. I mean, she goes, there you go. She was like, you know, even though that one's needs kind of inappropriate for the family, but um, no, she, she was like, I've never in my mind growing up and watching these movies was I thinking, yeah, 20 years from now you and me, we need an period medicine. I mean the universe is such a trip. You're watching comic relief in you're thinking, Hey, maybe we know like, what are the chances, you know? No.

Speaker 5: Um, so, so rick and I are talking, we're talking about we, what else is there to talk about? And we're talking and talking and he says, well, will you come out when you come out and meet? What be? I said, of course I will. So I went out and they met will be, I've, I'm not like a star struck celebrity type person. I don't even watch tv, but her, she's special. You know why she's funny. She's genuine, she's a visionary. She's strong, like what you see is what you get with her. Like I was hoping she would be like, she was on the screens and was even better, you know, it's a real person. She's so real. She cares. This was her idea and her vision, um, she wanted to serve through cannabis and how people. She's a medical patient herself. She actually has glaucoma and that.

Speaker 5: What brought her to. Yeah, she gives us a vapor pen because it really relieves your interocular pressure. Sure. And so like the, the, when you inhale cannabis, the first thing that happens is your eyes get red in your blood vessels, dilate your eyes, like the first thing. Pretty much. So it's no miracle that that connection is there. You have receptors all over your eyes. Um, so I mean, I, I wouldn't do this for just anyone. I'm just not the star trek star struck type of person. I'm really more into like making a quality medicine. Right? I went out there and of course she was cooler than I could've ever imagined and we hit it off. Yeah. And I stayed with her. I went on another time. I stayed at her house for a week. It was an awesome experience. Something I can like remember for the rest of my life.

Speaker 3: What, what was most surprising? I guess as you know, you're not a star struck person. Okay, fine. And we have this actual person that you, uh, appreciate along that journey in, in, in that discovery period, as I

Speaker 5: called it, how cool she is, how conscious he is in, and what, what a strong visionary type person she is.

Speaker 3: So she's just not slapping your name on this. This is, this is a, this is a true journey for her as well.

Speaker 5: Absolutely. We did not buy the rights to her name. Um, it was, she decided to change the name to Whoopi and Maya, um, after we met. And I feel like what we've done is so unique and special because we actually partnered, you know, it's not just like I'm the celebrity,

Speaker 3: you make my thing. Right. I'm right. My name from me, it's very different. I'm sure she's on every day

Speaker 5: school board call. We were in contact often. She's very attached to this vision. She cares very much

Speaker 3: deeply about what we do. And that's the way I like it. Table stakes, right? Isn't that what the way it's supposed to be? Yeah. Yeah. Uh, all right. So you even gave us where we are with, with that brand is as well. Uh, what might, what might we not know as a final question before the three? True. Final question. What might we not?

Speaker 5: No. Well, I would just take one second to say about what the Maya there for products and it's everything. I know you're a man.

Speaker 3: Thank you for noticing.

Speaker 5: Um, well, first of all, cannabis doesn't discriminate. Anyone who decides to consume or use cannabis oftentimes pretty much all the time has really? Yeah. And so, so that's, that's the first thing is that our line is actually great for men too. If you can just get past that one idea that it's a menstrual product. It's actually everything. A lady once, when she gets her mood, it's a medicated epsom salt soak in three different flavors. It's a multilayered topical that you can rub all over your, your joints, your abdomen, your back, anywhere you feel pain. It's very appealing to both sexes. It's very new to sexy.

Speaker 3: Would it be good for Crohn's?

Speaker 5: Yes, absolutely. Interesting. Absolutely. Um, I would say even like edibles are very, very good for crones. No, but the

Speaker 3: way that you described the, then you put your hand over your belly type of fat. You have cb one and CB two receptors

Speaker 5: all over your skin epidermis. So when we sit here and think like my menstrual cramps, how could it topical help that? Well, that's one of those cannabis miracles, something debilitating migraines. People who live their whole life losing jobs because of a migraine like he could get one out to call in because you have to sit in the dark, right? Applying a topical to your forehead and your frontal lobe is enough to prevent that Migraine for many people. And there's no side effects that doesn't get you high, you know, it's a miracle. So, so topicals are very powerful. I never underestimate the power of them. Um, our, our third product is a multilayered tincture. So this has like red raspberry leaf, which is a uterine toner. It has um, mother wart in it, which is a very sensitive, relaxing, or you're relaxed. It has elderberries which enhance your immune system and are also a great blood tonic, lose blood and iron in them. Um, it has cramp bark which has its name for helping women with cramps over all these years. Cramp Bark. Yeah.

Speaker 4: Take me through what cramp bark actually is.

Speaker 5: It's a bark and it's very, very hard. You actually have to kind of grind it up. Oh Wow. Yeah, yeah. It's a medicinal. Herb is from a tree. And so these are Alexis's formulations. And before, uh, before we formulated, she sat with every plant and asked it, do you want to come on this journey with us? And she listened and some of them said no. And they got left out. She listened. Yeah. It was pretty amazing. So she's got, she's a master in her own way. Um, so to, to take your called relax. And then there's our cacao. We just added an extra strain teach. So you see me and that one extra string. It's six ingredients. Organic, fair trade being in gluten free, raw. All you can pronounce. Cocoa butter, cocoa powder. So that's two forms of the Cacao bean is raw super food. And sure I'm organic coconut oil, that's raw as well. Organic, Raw Gabi, which is a plant sugar. It's better for you, um, and sea salt in cannabis.

Speaker 4: And when you say all things you can pronounce, you mean none of the crazy. What have you, is

Speaker 5: none of the additives. None of the 18 syllable come from a lab, not the earth type of ingredients. We don't use preservatives. So we use pretty much 100 percent organic ingredients.

Speaker 4: Love it. Yeah. So my, we've come to the three final questions. I feel like we have just scratched the surface stuff, so I would love to do this again at some other time. I'll talk to you about weed for as long as it's fair enough. I don't know. Anything else to talk about? That's good. That's good. Then we are a good couple, but I will ask you the three final questions at least for this time and I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And on the soundtrack of my Elizabeth's life, what is one track? One song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised in cannabis?

Speaker 5: I'm so surprised that it's taken us so long to accept this plant and I'm so surprised that we're able to do what we're able to do in this state at this time.

Speaker 4: So understood the. It's a been a a long time coming. We kind of referenced that at the beginning. When you say, I'm so surprised that we can do what we can do in this date at this time. Do you mean what do you mean?

Speaker 3: That would be Goldberg and I could get together and make a period medicine that contains cannabis and helped thousands of women find relief from something that comes every month.

Speaker 4: But this is your reality and that this is their reality is amazing to you.

Speaker 3: It's amazing. I'm so grateful. Uh, and we're grateful. How about that? What has most surprised you in life? Maya? On a personal level? Sure.

Speaker 5: You know, probably just experiences of loss, you know, that have come out of nowhere. You never know what to expect. Um, the blessings that the universe can put forward for you. And all the things that we have to learn. Yeah.

Speaker 3: So you seem supremely balanced. I'm glad I seem that way.

Speaker 4: Talk us through what obvious work you're doing to make it. So it seems that way to me.

Speaker 5: I walk a lot. I think exercise and diet have more to do with this stuff than anything like so often our society might think that the answer is with a psychiatrist or somewhere in the brain. And I'm learning so much, like more and more and more throughout these years that I feel like our bodies really have the answer. Yeah. And, and that maybe the answer is actually getting out of your brain.

Speaker 3: Aha. Literally stop overthinking it. Yeah, totally. Our, our minds can put forward the most hacky things. Like how could you come up with something so tacky? Like what are you saying that just thoughts. It's like you can run it through a filter and you're like, wait, do I know that this is 100 percent true? And then you can answer yes or no. And then your second question can be like, but do I really know that this is 100 percent true? Because we can start to believe the things that we think and before we know it, we have these limiting thought factors that are creating these, I can't do this and I can't do that when really we can do so much.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. As far as we can do so much. I just want to stay on that for one second because one of my biggest learnings has been, um, how relentless, you know, I can be and humans can be and how, you know, no matter how many times you get knocked down, pulling yourself back up and getting going, you know, what are you, where are you on that? As far as. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Oh yeah. I mean, picture what happens when you try to hold a ping pong ball or a cork underwater and you let it go. Right? Buoyancy. Yeah. Yeah. That's it, uh, for the, uh, heart, mind and soul, I guess. Right? Absolutely. All right. So either the, uh, most, uh, the easiest question to answer or the most difficult on the soundtrack of a Mile Elizabeth's life as the train goes by, one is one track or song that's got to be on there. It can be any and every Bob Marley's off. Can we go with Redemption Song? I'd appreciate it. That's great. Great talking to you. I can't wait to talk to you again. Thank you so much for having me.

Speaker 1: And there you have my elizabeth. Very much appreciate you sharing. That is a pure human being. There is no pretense there. That's a, you know, she is present, extremely present. So I'm an absolute pleasure to sit down with her. Pretty much enjoyed her time. Very much enjoyed your time. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.