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Ep.241: Ngaio Bealum: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.241: Ngaio Bealum: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.241: Ngaio Bealum: MCBA Spotlight

The enigmatic Ngaio Bealum joins us and explains through his long time Golden State Warriors fandom that he is in fact a bay area native. He lets us know that he’s a nerd but he’s not a punk and he most definitely was the class clown. He studied music and theatre and rather than become a high school band teacher, he became a road comic in 1990 doing the drive, drive, drive, joke, joke, joke detail. A self proclaimed low-key enlightened narcissist he has always been an activist as his parents were in the black panther party in Oakland. He says he’s always down for rally’s or parades. A veritable quote machine, one of Ngaio’s ethos is to never let anger guide you but let it motivate you.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Ngaio Bealum, the enigmatic illum joins us and explained to them as long time Golden State Warriors fandom that he is in fact a bay area native. He lets us know that he's a nerd, but he's not a punk and he's most definitely a class clown. He studied music and theater and rather than become a high school band teacher, he became a road comic in 1990 doing the drive drive, drive, joke, joke, joke, detail, a self proclaimed low key enlightened narcissist. He's always been an activist as his parents were in the Black Panther party in Oakland. He says he's always down for rallies and parades. A veritable quote machine. One of them guys, ethos is to never let anger guide you, but let it motivate you. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy below

Speaker 3: them. I mean, everybody's got a pretty interesting name and cannabis you've noticed. I'm sure. Sure. Dragon fly. Let loose.

Speaker 3: Jorge said, why don't they? It's all very Spanish. Absolutely. That's all very, very strange. It's a pretty involved name. You got. You know that we can't all be named seth. Yeah, that's true. That's true. Seth. Ethnic name. It's in the Bible, right? So fine. I don't know what Bible, but I'm sure. I think Old Testament, the Bible in the Old Testament, the old testament from the bolt as well. That's where you're from. Fortune favors the bold guy smoked a bowl lead. Jericho, Jericho, Jericho. God spoke the bowl with Jericho and the second walls came tumbling down. All right, go ahead. What were you saying? Yeah, no, that's, that's pretty good stuff. Sure. You know, I'm sitting here. We're in, I think San Francisco Still San Francisco at the Hilton Union Square for sure. International cannabis business conference 2017. That's what happens. That's what we do. Yeah. Where are you from originally?

Speaker 3: San Francisco. Right here. Born and raised Mr. High School. Class of 19. Oh, so you don't do the years anymore? I can if you like. I think it just heard you name the starting five from the 1,975 championships in golden state warriors. That's right. Phil Smith, Rick Barry, Clifford Ray. Uh, there were a couple other kids whose names escape me a little bit. Interesting. So you go way back. I go hell away back. You're not just this team, you know. No. Golden State Warriors for life. I'm not a bandwagon. So Chris Mullin is from New York. Chris Mullin, St John's university. There you go. Right. So we have him in common as far as him and we both have rooted for him. We both have a great, great ballplayer. A smooth jumper kinda slow foot it, which made him a role model for me because I am also slow. Yes. Well he can shoot and we have that in common and I guess if you can't shoot then we have that in common.

Speaker 3: I can shoot a little bit. I got some. I can't shoot like Chris Mullin. No, well no one can. That's the point. You could be a hall of fame basketball player and to have an Olympic gold medal as he is and as he does so. All right, so you're growing up in San Francisco liking it, not liking it when kids with skills, great place to grow up. Sleep back then different when the public schools, you know, when people took care of public schools and you had afterschool programs and bands and spirit clubs and football and all that and get the whole thing. Everything was happening and the peace and justice club and musical theater and everybody had a budget for arts and extracurriculars. I was kind of a smart kid and I'd like to read. So high school was relatively fun for me, you know, and I was kind of tall so even though I was a nerd, I was tall and my brother was known as a bit of a brawler so people didn't really fuck with me, God as much.

Speaker 3: And I'm also not afraid to mix it up if it comes to that because I'm a nerd, but I'm not a punk. Okay, that's good. That's good. So you're and you, when did the humor kind of. When did you realize that you had humor in like fourth grade? Everybody thought I was wanting it. Right. If you can avoid fights, sure. Now can you be a nerd and the class clown at the same time? That's what I did. That's what you did. Yeah. Interesting. People laughing. It was a great thing to me and it feels so good, doesn't it? People? It feels great. You know, there's very few physical sensations that release the pleasure drugs in your brain. Like laughter. There you go. Alright, so on. Pleasure drugs. I hear Ya. Sex drug plug. So class clown nerd. So what, what book turns you on? Initially you realized that you could read what was I realized I could read, but I'm saying you realize that something to you.

Speaker 2: Ngaio Bealum, the enigmatic illum joins us and explained to them as long time Golden State Warriors fandom that he is in fact a bay area native. He lets us know that he's a nerd, but he's not a punk and he's most definitely a class clown. He studied music and theater and rather than become a high school band teacher, he became a road comic in 1990 doing the drive drive, drive, joke, joke, joke, detail, a self proclaimed low key enlightened narcissist. He's always been an activist as his parents were in the Black Panther party in Oakland. He says he's always down for rallies and parades. A veritable quote machine. One of them guys, ethos is to never let anger guide you, but let it motivate you. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy below

Speaker 3: them. I mean, everybody's got a pretty interesting name and cannabis you've noticed. I'm sure. Sure. Dragon fly. Let loose.

Speaker 3: Jorge said, why don't they? It's all very Spanish. Absolutely. That's all very, very strange. It's a pretty involved name. You got. You know that we can't all be named seth. Yeah, that's true. That's true. Seth. Ethnic name. It's in the Bible, right? So fine. I don't know what Bible, but I'm sure. I think Old Testament, the Bible in the Old Testament, the old testament from the bolt as well. That's where you're from. Fortune favors the bold guy smoked a bowl lead. Jericho, Jericho, Jericho. God spoke the bowl with Jericho and the second walls came tumbling down. All right, go ahead. What were you saying? Yeah, no, that's, that's pretty good stuff. Sure. You know, I'm sitting here. We're in, I think San Francisco Still San Francisco at the Hilton Union Square for sure. International cannabis business conference 2017. That's what happens. That's what we do. Yeah. Where are you from originally?

Speaker 3: San Francisco. Right here. Born and raised Mr. High School. Class of 19. Oh, so you don't do the years anymore? I can if you like. I think it just heard you name the starting five from the 1,975 championships in golden state warriors. That's right. Phil Smith, Rick Barry, Clifford Ray. Uh, there were a couple other kids whose names escape me a little bit. Interesting. So you go way back. I go hell away back. You're not just this team, you know. No. Golden State Warriors for life. I'm not a bandwagon. So Chris Mullin is from New York. Chris Mullin, St John's university. There you go. Right. So we have him in common as far as him and we both have rooted for him. We both have a great, great ballplayer. A smooth jumper kinda slow foot it, which made him a role model for me because I am also slow. Yes. Well he can shoot and we have that in common and I guess if you can't shoot then we have that in common.

Speaker 3: I can shoot a little bit. I got some. I can't shoot like Chris Mullin. No, well no one can. That's the point. You could be a hall of fame basketball player and to have an Olympic gold medal as he is and as he does so. All right, so you're growing up in San Francisco liking it, not liking it when kids with skills, great place to grow up. Sleep back then different when the public schools, you know, when people took care of public schools and you had afterschool programs and bands and spirit clubs and football and all that and get the whole thing. Everything was happening and the peace and justice club and musical theater and everybody had a budget for arts and extracurriculars. I was kind of a smart kid and I'd like to read. So high school was relatively fun for me, you know, and I was kind of tall so even though I was a nerd, I was tall and my brother was known as a bit of a brawler so people didn't really fuck with me, God as much.

Speaker 3: And I'm also not afraid to mix it up if it comes to that because I'm a nerd, but I'm not a punk. Okay, that's good. That's good. So you're and you, when did the humor kind of. When did you realize that you had humor in like fourth grade? Everybody thought I was wanting it. Right. If you can avoid fights, sure. Now can you be a nerd and the class clown at the same time? That's what I did. That's what you did. Yeah. Interesting. People laughing. It was a great thing to me and it feels so good, doesn't it? People? It feels great. You know, there's very few physical sensations that release the pleasure drugs in your brain. Like laughter. There you go. Alright, so on. Pleasure drugs. I hear Ya. Sex drug plug. So class clown nerd. So what, what book turns you on? Initially you realized that you could read what was I realized I could read, but I'm saying you realize that something to you.

Speaker 3: I love comic books as a kid. Of course. Fantastic for Spiderman. X made a, all that good stuff. My mom actually was kind of wild and that she didn't really care what I read as long as I was reading and she had all these random books. She had Roald Dahl. She had a xavier. How a. She had Erica Jong, she had sidney, Sheldon, she had all these things and so like I would just read a book and you'd be like, you know, you're 12 ebook might be a little advanced, their sex and some of you like, ah, whatever. It's just a book, throw that run, you know, she didn't care and it will be great. You. I just read voraciously. I'd spend the afternoons at the library. Could not stop as well. Improper nerd fashion. I still, I still read a lot and you know, it's easy with the easier.

Speaker 3: Okay. With the computer on your phone and whatnot. You can just read website after website, article after article and things like that. Absolutely. I still like to read a good book. Science fiction and fantasy. Mostly surprise. Okay. So like star wars, you know what's happening there? Uh, yeah. The episodes four, five and six and episodes seven and I'm waiting on eight and nine episodes. One, two and three. You can do with that. You know, that's a true fan right there. Some people like it. They were kids when I was a different kid. You will not charge. Are Your banks know you could charge. Are these beings hit you right in the jar? Dryers. So where'd you go to school? Do you go to school? San Francisco. What? What a college do you go? I went to San Francisco City college and then I went to San Francisco State University. So you just stayed here for a long time. I know a lot of people here. Not as many as I used to because we all moved somewhere else because it's ridiculous. But yeah, the rent is too damn high. I think I've heard someone say I believe are just like, oh, like that guy for Halloween like five years ago. You can pull that in. The readers do damn hire for it. I'll send you the pictures. You can find one on my instagram, I'm sure. So back

Speaker 3: 250 weeks scrolling right now as Ngi Ngo for 20. There you go. So you know, you're, you're in San Francisco for all that time. That includes the seventies as you kind of already knew that I was a kid in the seventies, you know? No, totally get it. Totally ridiculous. No, but eighties and nineties. Eighties and nineties. And compare that to today. San Francisco, would you on go? Well, the things that I've noticed is a pharmacist was always been kind of fancy and expensive anyway, and it has and it's even more

Speaker 3: fancier and expensive in a lot of ways, but there's still pockets of true San Francisco and as you can still smoke a joint on the patio, that guy sort of the back of the sycamore, you can't really put a cloud up in the air in the middle of the El Rio nightclub and bar like he used to do for, for certain performances. But, but it's still, it's still San Francisco man. I still find spots and you know, you can hang out with me. We can go to see. Maybe not so secret, but it's so key spots. Yeah man. And we'd, you know. And that's the thing. Like when I first started I became a road comic around 1990 I think is what I became like a serious road comic just on the road all the time. Right. Different nights, different town, different eight different towns things, different town drive, drive, drive, joke, joke, joke, joke, joke.

Speaker 3: And it was a little bit of a culture shock because it San Francisco and even in the eighties and nineties when San Francisco was, when weed was way more illegal, San Francisco was very relaxed for the most part about it. Right. So I will be in different places and I'd be standing outside the comedy clubs smoking a joint before the show. If people what that. What are you doing your, your soul Ralph, what do you mean? I'm smoking a joint before the show, like I've done 100 times like I do all the time. It's a ritual. Some people like to have a drink so we would like to smoke a joint before the show. Like I'm not doing anything wrong, you know? And, and that became kind of a little civil disobedience for me too. I would get to some small town sometimes and just walk down the street smoking a joint on a Saturday or whatever, just to do it, just to do it just so people know what good weed smells like in rock springs, Wyoming, you may be confused.

Speaker 3: This was back in the day I met a kid. And when actually one time wanting to smoke a bowl and I pulled my weight down and he's like, hold on a minute. I've seen weed and weed is brown and dry. What's his green? Sticky like all dog. Your Day is going to change gear all day. Play boy, it's a whole different thing. It's a beautiful morning. Ha. So you go to school. What did you study in school? Music and theater. Okay. And so you were doing that for awhile? That's what I was doing, kind of parts where you getting into theater and was I was going to be a high school band teacher. That was my original. Oh really? That's what I wanted to do. Alright. So how many hits from my high school music teachers? All my good. Mr Jim Bruno was my middle school music teacher. He was great.

Speaker 3: My first three years of high school. Uh, Bruno, that's name. Great name, Italian G J A, M, b u r o Giambruno. That's a good name for music too. Right? So how many instruments do you play a these days. But what was at the height of the height of was mostly brass and percussion. Right? So I marched drum corps and all that. So I played Tuba, trumpet, trombone, phone. Not really the French horn because my lips aren't thin enough. You need, didn't lips. Very interesting to play the French horn. It's very, very small mouth pieces. Very intricate. We can't really see this on the podcast with one of my, but I have full rich lips. Indeed.

Speaker 3: Look at my lips on instagram. Bio Fourteen zero. Scroll back up, back up. Lifting. Very, very prepared. The recent. Generally I'm the president down to the present, but always there. Sure. Ubiquitous apps on my face. I got lips all over. Sure. Um, you're talking about the phase one stuff. I got that, that would be your fault. But anyway, I played the percussions. I played the drums. Uh, I did a lot of singing in the musical theater sort of thing. And then kind of parts where you getting into theater a high school, you know, there weren't a lot of. I played tranio in, um, in, uh, Tammy was through high school. Then in college, uh, I played one of Lewis Carroll, I can't remember his real name, Thomas Dobson or something like that, remember, but I played one of his college buddies in a fictional account of his life.

Speaker 3: Um, I was up for some, like the Irene Ryan acting awards back in the day. This is 30 years. Understood. So was hard. The details are a little blurry sometimes, a lot of weed and did a lot of acting. So I'm doing some acting right now actually. Are you? Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Uh, my boy posted the thing on facebook, some actors for these stage readings and he, he's one of the catches of collective member with the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which was one of the great old school political theater groups in the country. Political, political theater. They do a lot of political theory, a lot of ajit pro. They do a lot of free shows and parks. It's their whole thing. They do a lot of outreach to schools and the prisoners and all these things. So this, this play was written by prisoners. High school students and immigrant workers will go high.

Speaker 3: And my boy Michael tied it all in together and it's like a short play, but we're doing a stage reading at the high school that helped write it and uh, at the prison that have already been like three performances. If it's the laughter in comedy that is the reason you're onstage for theater. Is it the performance itself or is it the applause or what is it? Well, performing of course nothing happened. An entertainer. I've been a performer since, since I was 14, 15. I've always shit I used to put on shows when I was like seven or eight. I want to be a ventriloquist me have been trialed this dummy and I practiced as hard as I could and I would put on shows for the neighborhood kids. I'm always, I was always putting on random shows. Anything, just whatever, anything, anything we can try to do.

Speaker 3: We come up with a show, we'll put it on a uh, and so, you know, like little rascals south, my mom can make cars and uh, and so I've never really grown out of it. I'm always putting on shows and doing events. But comedy is the Big One, right? What? Comedy is probably one of the easiest ones. I mean, and I'm really, really good at it. So one of my favorite things. Yeah. Yeah. Well listen, you know, I'm also really, really good at. Well, I'm pretty damn good at math, but I wouldn't want to have a career. It's not really my thing. Comedy, man. I fucking love it. It's easier than being in a band because you don't have to worry about the bass player's relationship. Sure. Drummers, drug problem. You just have to get yourself to the show and you don't have to split the money.

Speaker 3: Five ladies, they give you the money, the money, the money as a low key. A enlightened narcissists makes it so much easier. You're also by yourself. If the joke doesn't work right, if you're in a band. I said, well, you all take collective responsibility, right? You know what I'm saying? Uh, so, but not alone, no matter if the joke doesn't work on stage, you better have some ideas. How do you become a low key enlightened narcissists practice, self awareness, self awareness, paying attention to shit shit. And not just being a selfish ass, but actually I know I like to think my ex wife a little bit for teaching me empathy, a Ha, or at least how to recognize and use it. It'd be that, you know, because not just a sensitive yes, but to be empathic you have to learn that that is what you have to learn to figure it out.

Speaker 3: Because a lot of people who, a lot of entertainers, a lot of quote unquote crazy people, whatever, they're just really sensitive and empathic and you feel a lot of things. This is one of the challenges, like when I walked on the street and big cities all the time and I love cities. I love city so much, but a lot of cities are having problems with today's though homelessness is rampant, right? Like it's really hard and I feel bad. I feel bad for everybody. I want to take everybody home with me, right? We can't all fit in my house with chicken. We can all be warm for a night or something, but y'all can't keep coming back and everybody's going to have to get a shower. And. But everybody's got problems, you know, and so one of those things like out in Sacramento where I live now, Sacramento counties does crazy shit.

Speaker 3: Like, oh you can panhandle handle anymore and you can't do things like that. I'm like, listen, that's not the way to fix homelessness. You're just given Sacramento your problem. You want to fix homelessness, give him a fucking place to live, man. Right? And so that's the challenge if you live in the city is how do you remember things that you can accept them, you don't, you have to learn to live with it and not having super affect you all the time and you got a shield up and these things. So, you know, it's easy for me because I can go hang out in the mountains and the Humboldt hills and get into my super literal thinking, hippie roots or whatever it might my magic fly. But when you come back to the city, sometimes it presents challenges so well. So you just kind of gave us a window into your activism mind, right?

Speaker 3: When did that start to, when did you realize that not only should you be telling jokes, but you should be doing something else as well? I've always been an activist, but I've been an activist since I was a kid. My parents were activists. My parents were in the Black Panther party back in the day. I went to a school run by the panthers in Oakland. Look at that, everybody. Yay. Yeah. So activism is kind of been my thing. I've always been down for rallies and parades. It's how you fix it, if you believe in America. And as a last idealist, I'm trying to get my idealism back, but if you want to hold the country, listen, nothing's ever perfect, but you want to try to, you want to do your best to uphold your ideal. Right? And so, uh, like I believe it was Alice Walker who said activism is the rent I paid to live on this planet.

Speaker 3: Look at that. Do you want to make things better for when you go? Even just a small thing, you can do it. So we've been hustling. Cat's been working their asses off and now we have legal weed, California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado. When you know how much stress that relieves, you can just walk around with a bag of weed in your pocket. You can hand people marijuana. You don't even have to trip. My goodness. My blood pressure is so much better. That's it. You know. Uh, and that's one of those things and you can point to it. And one of the things I like about marijuana activism is, you know, you can get, it covers a lot of things. One thing covers a lot of different things, right? If fewer marijuana arrests means less need for private prisons, right? Fewer marijuana arrests means no harassing minorities, uh, by the law enforcement officers, right?

Speaker 3: One plus one equals three man. Or for 20 short, you mentioned the Black Panthers. I wonder what your take, you know, kind of, did you adapt a philosophy, a way of thinking, a lesson? Um, you know, from what seems like it would have been just after the heyday of the wound. I remember I was a kid, right? So I was like six, seven, eight, nine. So you got little kid brain but still good brain, but still learning activism and paying attention and, and I had good grounding and uh, and uh, uh, how do you call it? Like I, I know myself and I knew my worth or whatever. So then when I went to other schools in different schools and you know, just not full of black people in maybe some of the teachers are kind of racist because this is the early, this is the mid seventies, right?

Speaker 3: And so the voting rights act, the Civil Rights Act, 12 years old, 15 years old, man, I had some funky ass teachers. And when you were a smart black kid, you were in the gifted program and you're the only black and there's like three black kids. Some of the teachers can be a little rough, but I, I want to go there. What do you mean? How, how, how was it quote for quote Mr Koenig's fifth grade honors class. Little nigger kids don't belong in the gifted program to be kidding me. No. Why would I kid you? My mom had to talk my dad out of killing that dude. Oh yeah, so you know, this was 19, 77, 19 when I got to high school, 1981, so this is 1977, 88, 89, sixth grade. So things like that, right? I mean he was the most vocal of other people aren't quite as obvious as that, but it was that same kind of message without necessarily the exact necessarily saying.

Speaker 3: So I had to learn to lobby. My mom was a great active advocate for me. And you learned to speak up for yourself or how did you repurpose that racism that you've experienced a listen, never let anger a guide you, but let it motivate you. That's always been my thing. So angry you get mad associate and now I'm just fired up skipping on the basketball court. Right? I'm not going to try to fight you if you gave me a hard file, I'm just going to try to win and you got to get off the court, right? Right. This is how to stay. You're going to say you want to go. You can talk all this shit you want, right? I'm the one still plant, right? So that's the living well is always the best revenge, what kind of weaving around, but I guess I should have expected that a, I'm a rambler indeed.

Speaker 3: I'm a Rambler Cupsi my active. We talk about everything I'm getting to is as far as comedy that, you know, who were the guys or girls, you know, maybe who were your main stays as okay, these are people I appreciate and maybe I'm going to do this as a kid. Uh, I listened to a lot of Bob Newhart, Steve Martin, a bill cosby. We don't talk about him anymore and no we don't. He's dead to me and fuck. And Richard Pryor, those are my four favorite comics as a kid. Richard Pryor, obvious he's saying what is on his mind? Absolutely filthy a first amendment. If you just talk, you just go up there and ramble a lot of pain in his act. Like I have some friends who are super sensitive. We can't really listen and be like, I can't listen because it's too much pain. And he went through a horrible childhood and there was abuse.

Speaker 3: I'm like, how that shit is absolutely funny. And the messages, there are messages there, a Bob Newhart Dr. son of a bitch on the planet. Explain. So you just did explain him, but explain his brilliance for folks that just because it wasn't in the TV show, the standup act, you know what I mean? He would create a situation and then create a character who would be handling the situation where I like the concept of bus driving school. So now he's the bus driving school instructor. Right. And he's teaching guys how to drive a bus. Was like you. Okay. Ms Dot Norway. Start running. You're gonna. Come up with a situation. Someone's going to be running for the bus. Alright. Alright. Mr Norwood's started running. You see how he closed the door right in their face before he took off. This is what makes it great bus driver and it's so low key and yet so subtle.

Speaker 3: And yet so funny. Oh my God. Anything about Sir Walter Raleigh, uh, introducing tobacco to the Europeans, right? Like, you know, they're talking on the phone of course, because you had a phone in 15, 63 like, hey, well yeah, we got all the Turkeys. That's an American holiday writing, so I don't like yet. Not all so good. So it's about Steve Martin in the heyday. I think the records you were listening to, I mean silly. Is that the right word? Well, we talked about this. He was definitely not afraid to be silly for sure. Kat, juggling the crazy balloon animals, wild and crazy guy. Uh, I appreciate him a lot for his absurdity, right? Like a grandma's song where it starts off pretty straightforward and then it just, you know, be obsequious purple and Claire Foy. Iggy pop is obese and need cactus be dull and boring. And I'm the president and it just more and more assertive.

Speaker 3: He just gets piled on and that's the ship that I always appreciate it. Right now he's mad at his mom and she's 120 years old. She calls me I'm, she wants to borrow $20 for some food. Right. So I loaned her the money. I, one of my secretaries write it down, she goes, she can't pay me back anymore. I'm like, Hey, look, I work for a living. I'm going to have her move. My weight's up to the addict. Right. Like this absurd and ridiculous and some of the funniest shit. Now my mom used to listen to me listening to Steve Martin for there. I think there was like two years when, you know, and my mom would let me listen to anything. I'm a fifth grade bringing my Richard Pryor albums to school in San Francisco. So Mrs [inaudible] was, she was like, listen, you guys, maybe we don't listen to it at lunch.

Speaker 3: Maybe everybody could listen to it afterschool. And I got plausible deniability. Sweet way to go, right. Let's wait till 3:00 to 3:00. Maybe. Maybe some of these other kids. I want to hear what everybody else wants to sit around a because he was so funny. But um, I can't, I can't remember we were talking about. Well that's, those are the main stays. And then now it as you get out and, and start hitting the road and you said, um, you know, a joke, joke, joke, drive, drive, drive, I think is what you said. What did you learn? You know, when you really jumped in, what did you learn? Okay. So when you learn the basis of comedy, listen to those guys, you get the feel for it. Then you go on say, did you start training your own shit? You know, and it worked out pretty good and things I learned from watching because, you know, I'd never really seen a lot of comedy.

Speaker 3: I just listened a lot of albums and comedy show I think when I was 19 and then I started and then shortly there after I just started to come and call me. I've been a street juggler at pier $39 for a while. So I do some things and I'm like I said, music performance to act as the beginning, middle. And I have some stage skills, right? I'm not just going in super raw and I'm fortunate, a paranoid that people tell me that I'm very likable on stage. That's what I heard. Sure. Elicit. I've looked at old video tapes. The jokes, not so much, but the calmness and the national, the likability. It's still pretty good. So the presidents of states presidents important listening. If you don't think the joke is funny, no one's going to think the joke is funny. Zero people, right? I read an interview with Bob Hope one time and he's like, listen, if I know the joke is funny, I'm going to stand there until they fucking get it. He didn't say fucking no, but he's like sometimes you gotta wait them out. And I took that to heart. Every once in a while you tell a joke and you just got to stand there and man, it's like, wait, I'm not afraid you will get this.

Speaker 3: I'll wait for everybody to get this job. You're going to eat your vegetables, but then you start performing, start hanging out and you start performing. Started watching a lot of performances. Right? So like from Robin Williams, I learned to go very fast and then from Rostock I learned to slow the fuck down. Bill Hicks A, a legend. I was very fortunate. I got to ride in the car with him one time and pick his brain a lot and I've seen him in Sacramento and his show was filthy. Oh my God. And on fire. Oh, it was hilarious. I laughed so hard, but it was just dirty and so we're in the car and I'm like, man, we're rolling in San Francisco. It's a whole different crowd. Right? It's one of the things I love about Sacramento crowds is they're very smart, but they love filthiness and ridiculousness because they're small town kids who came to the big city to be politicians say capital and so I'm like, man, let's hold shows going to be completely different crowd.

Speaker 3: He's like, man, I got a completely different set. Every show is different dog. And so I learned that from him right away, like interesting approach. Each show like each other. Sometimes there's situations like you show up at a bar, you're like, this is clearly three b, I'm going to try to deal with to start with and see how it goes from there. But you got to. Every show is different and every crowd is different. You can't judge the first show by the second challenge is the second shelf from the first show where he listens, but just to go back to the car, because Bill Hicks, you said legend. That's about right, and also just brilliant. Fearless, right? One of those guys like he'd been. He started comedy when he was like 12 or 13 or 14, which is crazy. He played all kinds of shitty one ladders and all kinds of things, so he's not afraid like anything can happen on stage.

Speaker 3: That's the thing. Writing comedy is one of the few things where the audience is and encouraged to get involved, but they are sometimes allowed cats. Colorado head goes do you do do some things. There's drug people. People will drink it. You can go to a theater show. People aren't sitting in their seats, hammering back, luck in drinks, high balls in my ties at the Bachelorette party or whatever. High balls, balls, balls are important. This podcast is theater of the mind to bleed together, get so drunk. Tourists and Hawaiian shirt. She's like a data. Another my tie with the Bachelor party screaming in the back.

Speaker 3: Why does your penis straws, why do bachelorette parties keep going to comedy clubs, but the comics hate them. I know. Oh, you don't. Oh No, you it. Once you realize the Bachelorette parties to come to your show, maybe you have a couple jokes you radical geared toward or are you aim some of your jokes that Mike could fit you, kind of turn it around and aim it toward that way. I know what I'm saying. I'm listening. Or you want everybody to have a good day. Use the room type of thing for what it is. And, and playing the crowd playing to the crowd. Does it mean pandering to the crowd since described the difference? Right? Uh, you know, if you just go up there and he hack hack this, this, this, these guys like this, I'm just going to give him all the shitty jokes about that that I have.

Speaker 3: Or as Bill Hicks might say, I'll just give them dick jokes. Excuse me while I paste on a fake smile and plow through this shit one more time on my face. The plow through that one more time. But um, uh, we were talking about this yesterday when you, what I'm going to, I'm going to do it a different way. Okay. Because if be sheeps and goats yesterday, right? I'm going to shepherd them. Right? Right. But a rec is cheap. Can Be bullied. Goats have to be let. There you go. I learned that from metairie Pratchett books. But, uh, my approach and, and, and, and this is from a book I read on Juggling, I think it was the complete juggler from day one. Again, great book. He talks about performance and he's reminding jugglers. He says, you know, don't be inspired by other jugglers, right? Take your inspiration from flamenco dancers or construction or, and then try to convey that sort of field, that sort of vibe.

Speaker 3: Right? So while I'm definitely a huge influence, you learn things, you learn to craft and technique and shootings, you see a guy do some shit and you're like, I'm not really trying to do his shit, but the process or whatever, what's the old, uh, don't, don't, uh, seek to follow in the footsteps of the great, but seek what they sought, right? Go after what they were going after. They do the same thing, not the same thing, but you know have the same, so I'm really more of a grateful dead type of cat to come to my show. There's going to be some new heads and some old hits is going to be some noodling and riffing and jamming and not be afraid to let them make up a joke in the middle and tell another joke and come back and finish the job. Going to be drums and space and space manner where it's tight, it's tight.

Speaker 3: When it's loose, loose, maybe in going to be entertained and we're going to have a great time. I'm not afraid like you know, it depends on how I'm feeling. Maybe these guys are kind of dirty. Maybe I got some dirty jokes, maybe their extras or maybe there's like three really smart people in the back. I'm going to tell one quick joke for those guys. Everybody else, you might have to suck it up a little bit. You're going to wait this one out. What is it? Be Quick. Something quick. I go fast, man. I listened to recordings and in my head this is crazy long, it's like two minutes like that much. So you're describing the stage and what it feels like and you. So at this point with your colleagues, your contemporaries, you know, what they're doing because you're doing it also. Basically what I'm asking is out of your contemporaries who you dig for any reason, you know, comedy.

Speaker 3: Oh, there's a lot. MMM. MMM. Well Brian, of course convergys presence. He slow. Yeah. No, he's not the fastest talker, but he's so, so funny and so descriptive. Uh, Caitlin Gil is one of my favorite comics of all time and she's young and she's just hilarious and fearless and unafraid. And so, uh, just fun to watch. It's got a great presence. I love being real because he's cute and dirty so you can't always tell how filthy, just one minute you came to the office building is because he's getting away with it. Um, I haven't seen, you know, I don't watch as much comedies they used to because it's hard. It's hard to do because you don't, you're either doing it or watching it, enjoying it as much as just sitting there, being all technical about it. Oh, I see how he did that. Oh, nice call back or I see you already turned around. Maybe you could do a little thing you asked me to watch her set. I will watch it for you. But uh, other than some of them I got to get the door.

Speaker 3: Alright. So we're, we're coming in for a landing. I guess what, what went up the runaway foaming up the runway. I guess. Why not? That's why I see now. Sure. You know, I want it to be more gentle than that, but if we got a crash crashes. So what other, just because you mentioned inspiration other than whatever you're doing. So you know, aside from reading and books and aside from Juggling, besides marijuana, besides cannabis, you know, what, what are other things that you see as inspiration or uses? Inspiration, everything. Everything. And if something happens, you get a thought, your kids say something funny or you think something funny that your kids go to say it and you pretend they said it.

Speaker 3: Well, mushrooms like whatever. Like that's the whole point is you have to write what you know, write what you know, be who you want and why. My album's called weed and sex. This is available on itunes and CD baby. There you go. Great. I really love cds. I mean it was always good, but I can't believe he's still here. They have new, a download code stickers, right? I don't even carry around cds. I just carry around the stickers. The sticker download code on the back. There you go. So much easier to carry and I can make the pricing more flexible. All the radio hit model works out great. And I love, I love said great customer service. Always looked me up. Do you don't get that a lot from any company. Oh, they've been great. I love, I can't say enough good things about. We'll just buy one.

Speaker 3: I want to say it's something that people, hey, if you like something, tell, tell a lot of people. Right? Because what's the old adage if, if, if somebody likes something, they're going to tell one person. If they don't like it, they're going to tell every spread the good news as often as you spread the bag. That's it. There's more of that now than there ever was, but we're not going to go down that road. We don't have much time. Exactly. Which is why I'm going to ask you the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of [inaudible] life? What is one track? One song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: Not much. I got to say that the swiftness of all the money getting involved like little chickens, right? Uh, where were those guys? Will we were all going to jail when we need each other, they all see money, you know? And so that's one of the things and it's, it's kind of surprising how, how a lot of cats come in. Like I was talking about this on my podcast, I have a podcast rolling with them. Geico cannabis radio.com. There you go. A lot of these cats have been in this industry less than five years in all, uh, charging to consider themselves. Experts are using the label expert or a master. And I'm always confused about that. Like the first time somebody called me an expert about, we'd almost made them take it back, you know, and I had to think about it and be like, am I.

Speaker 3: well I guess I do have a lot of expertise, but am I an expert? So I'm always, I'm always tough on that because words have meaning at least to me, right? At least to me, there's Shit I'll make a living from them. That's right. I do writing and I talk words or, or my gig man. So, you know, more meaning the numbers. Sometimes a numbers are almost always right. Uh, almost, almost fuzzy math. Things are imaginary. There's a lot. There's quantum physics light's a particle and a wave just not always straight arithmetic. So you were serious about the numbers. You could really have done that if you want it to a little bit. I was pretty good at it. Wow. Usually you don't have both. I was way higher on my words, sat then I was on my math. My math sat was still pretty good. Okay, so you the old model, right? And up to 800 on math. Yeah. I don't remember, but a long time ago I could probably still find it if I look for it. What has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 3: Oh, I know how you know. Here's the thing. Okay. I was talking to a friend of mine one time and I was like, you ever. You ever been driving and driving is one of the greatest trust exercises in the world. Right? Trusting everybody else and they're trusting you people. That is a trust. Absolutely. Totally right. Citywide, nationwide trust exercise. She ever been driving and somebody does some bullshit in front of you and you almost hit their car. Right? And then you notice that their car has a dent in the same spot where you would have hit them and they were like, people don't learn. You already did that. People aren't learning. And a friend of mine said, she said, well, at least he's consistent. Sure. One way to look, one way to look at it. I try to be a people person. I don't really know the guy.

Speaker 3: I don't know how he's. Because I just know he keeps fucking it up. And this particular man, he does that a lot. Apparently a lot. This is not the first time that he has had this particular challenge. So that would be my thing. Like people I would like, uh, for, for learning and paying attention and being open minded to be a bigger deal sometimes thing again. Right. It would be nice. I feel like we use it. I'm not saying you have to be like a fancy pants, smart asshole about things you don't have to mansplain or world actually a thing, but try to be informed about some shit. Shit that may not even affect you. Yeah. Just trying to learn about it. Just know stuff. My name means hungry for knowledge, so I have an advantage. Is that really true? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. That works out well. No pressure. Yeah. No. Listen, if they had made me hungry for wisdom, things might be a whole way more different.

Speaker 3: It's good to know shit. But what you do with that knowledge is really the challenge and that's it. That's really well said. Um, I believe you about the words thing right on the soundtrack of your life. Who Guy? Oh, on my spotify. You can follow me on spotify by the way. We can follow them a playlist. I have a playlist called songs to play at my funeral. Oh Wow. I'm in dark moods at all. No, there's some songs that I really liked the play that I got. Control issues play that shit when I. So the foreign affair from Tom Waits is one of my favorites. I love the Manhattan transfer version of it. Could you believe from Algero would be a great song for me. A Sidewinder from Lee Morgan, who's my favorite trumpet player of all time, even before Louis Armstrong, before miles Davis for Freddie Hubbard.

Speaker 3: I love me some. Lee Morgan. You got any a weather report with Jakob? Stories on it? Not at the funeral. You can play it at that for parties. I like Jocko Jocko. Cool. But no, I mean that's easy. The greatest of all time. You're. You're a musician. Excuse me sir. James Jamerson from Duke Ellington. Maybe he could be bootsy collins from Brown. Look at you. Yeah, he can be. He's kind of a bad ass. Adopts a loop. I would like to also give a shout out to allen and big cheese Herzer who was in my band most of your slack. Bob, and he's still one of my favorite bass players of all time to ever played music with that cat. Had it all. What was the name of that band? Most chill slack mob, which great. You can find one of our albums on spotify and then also if you go to soundcloud you can get all the besides and rarities.

Speaker 3: Exactly. We used to make cassette tapes. That's the album though. That should be on CD baby, right? That's when size limits should be ltd name. Exactly as the one. All right, so you've, you've said too much and uh, on one end, on the other, I feel like we haven't even gotten started. So this is a term that goes, it goes so fast and I love to talk for 20 on twitter, on instagram. Listen to my podcast, cannabis radio.com. Find me on all the things. Yeah, that's where we, uh, we always are on all the things, right? All the things, all the things, all the time, smoking weed, everybody.

Speaker 2: And there you have one guy who, I mean, come on that guy. That man's brain moves very quickly, very much appreciated. Sitting down with them. Guy. Very much appreciated. Trying to keep up with old guy. Oh, and uh, I mean, you heard how to follow him. Go ahead and follow him if you found them entertaining. I certainly did. And do very much appreciate your time. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.