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Ep.246: Sara Batterby, Hifi Farms

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.246: Sara Batterby, Hifi Farms

Ep.246: Sara Batterby, Hifi Farms

Sara Batterby joins us and takes us through the pesticide regulations in Oregon and the resulting affect on the industry. Originally from England a blissful Thomas Hardy-esque part the country, in her words- a knife fight was the scariest thing that could possibly happen. Sara eventually found herself in finance as she loves designing structures. She notes that most folks don’t understand that finance itself is truly a creative pursuit. Following some dialogue on this moment in global socioeconomics, Sara goes on to share how she is vesting her employees into the ownership of her company ensuring they share in the growth of the capital asset. With ownership, her employees are completely self managing based in there engagement in the greater vision.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Sara Batterby joins us and takes us through the pesticide regulations in Oregon and the resulting effect on the industry. originally from england, eight blissful, Thomas Hardy esque part of the country. in her words, a knife fight was the scariest thing that could possibly happen. Sarah eventually found herself in finances. She loves designing structures. She notes that most folks don't understand. The finance itself is truly a creative pursuit. Following some dialogue on this moment in global socioeconomic, sarah goes onto share how she is vesting our employees into the ownership of her company, ensuring that they share in the growth of the capital asset with ownership or employees are completely self managed based in their engagement in the greater vision will come to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Sarah battery. That's how it

Speaker 2: goes. That's how the whole. I would not have known that. That's how the technology works. Sara bader be. Yeah. Why have you not been on the why have we not done this yet? Either because you don't understand how important I am to this industry. Oh, I understand how important you are. I understand how important land you are. I am in portland. What, so what's happening in portland? What do we need to know? Pulling out a little bit of a rocky few months. We, um, I didn't know how bad it was until I heard people in other states talking about us. I see. You heard secondhand, how bad you were. I would go To conferences and people would be like, yeah, wow. Portland, they really screwed up. And they were talking about, um, really the regulatory recalls though, right? No, I mean there was one, you know, I think we had one issue with a recall.

Speaker 2: We have seen it. You know what, what's been a big deal for us is that our pesticide regulations shut down our market, which is a good thing when you think about it. Wow. We set the bar so high that nobody could get over it. Like, you know, except for, of course factors. um, but let's go back and just take us through the whole thing because you're on the ground there, right, right. How did we set it up as far as the regulations and then, you know, what was too much and Oregon and acted the strictest pesticide regulations in the country. Um, it caused a big step because I think people just want to know how that was going to go. And we knew that by kind of throwing out a net that lodge, we were going to start catching a lot of fish and that's kinda what happened.

Speaker 1: Sara Batterby joins us and takes us through the pesticide regulations in Oregon and the resulting effect on the industry. originally from england, eight blissful, Thomas Hardy esque part of the country. in her words, a knife fight was the scariest thing that could possibly happen. Sarah eventually found herself in finances. She loves designing structures. She notes that most folks don't understand. The finance itself is truly a creative pursuit. Following some dialogue on this moment in global socioeconomic, sarah goes onto share how she is vesting our employees into the ownership of her company, ensuring that they share in the growth of the capital asset with ownership or employees are completely self managed based in their engagement in the greater vision will come to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Sarah battery. That's how it

Speaker 2: goes. That's how the whole. I would not have known that. That's how the technology works. Sara bader be. Yeah. Why have you not been on the why have we not done this yet? Either because you don't understand how important I am to this industry. Oh, I understand how important you are. I understand how important land you are. I am in portland. What, so what's happening in portland? What do we need to know? Pulling out a little bit of a rocky few months. We, um, I didn't know how bad it was until I heard people in other states talking about us. I see. You heard secondhand, how bad you were. I would go To conferences and people would be like, yeah, wow. Portland, they really screwed up. And they were talking about, um, really the regulatory recalls though, right? No, I mean there was one, you know, I think we had one issue with a recall.

Speaker 2: We have seen it. You know what, what's been a big deal for us is that our pesticide regulations shut down our market, which is a good thing when you think about it. Wow. We set the bar so high that nobody could get over it. Like, you know, except for, of course factors. um, but let's go back and just take us through the whole thing because you're on the ground there, right, right. How did we set it up as far as the regulations and then, you know, what was too much and Oregon and acted the strictest pesticide regulations in the country. Um, it caused a big step because I think people just want to know how that was going to go. And we knew that by kind of throwing out a net that lodge, we were going to start catching a lot of fish and that's kinda what happened.

Speaker 2: And a lot of people who had previously made it through less rigorous pesticide testing or there wasn't, there wasn't stringent pesticide testing. And, and as soon as that came to bear, about 80 percent of the industry's product got caught up in that, um, and that stopped the flow of product onto the market. so the people who suffered with the people on the retail level who suddenly couldn't get their hands on anything to sell and their income got terminated. So people, of course, patients, yeaH, they laid off staff. Patients couldn't get access wreck, patient rec uses, couldn't, couldn't get access and people lost their jobs. A couple of folks lost their businesses, which is horrible. Then that's often you've made it this far. The idea that something like that would take you out is, is pretty distressing. and so it, you know, these regulations, what we always say is obviously safe patient access along with sensible regulations and we're good.

Speaker 2: Where was it that this was kind of became uncensorable in other words, why was it too much type of deal? I don't think that these are and sensible regulations. I think the regulations are fine and I think the industry is dirty and a lot of people have been getting away with a lot of nasty stuff. And if you can't, you can't build an industry based on this claim that this is medicine and this plant is good for people and then shortcut your way around good, healthy, clean, um, agricultural horticulture by using pesticides and chemicals on these products that people are then going to consume as if their food. And I just think it's. I mean, I probably won't be super popular for saying this, but I think people need to just stop whining and clean up their acts. Winging right. They have to start winching we're.

Speaker 2: Where are you from, sarah? We can hear the accent, right? Let's do this. I'm english and so wouldn't hit for a long time and is verY much a hodgepodge at this point. It's been very watered down. But where you grew up in where I grew up in a town called cheltonham in england, which is in this kind of blissful kind of Thomas Hardy, esc, heart of england with rolling hills and little villages and the countryside sheep. The english countryside that we hear so much about. That is basically it. Yeah. And so was it boring or was it a blissful, you said? I mean, it was, it wasn't boring at all. It was super fun. Um, what did you do and have guns? No one has guns in england. The police. The craziest thing that ever happened? No, definitely not the police. Who would give guns to those guys?

Speaker 2: I think that's is a whole different conversation that we'll have on a different podcast. I mean, try to imagine what might happen if all the police had guns. Let me think really quickly. Anyway, it was great. Yeah. Knife a knife fight. Was this gary's thing that could ever happen. Got it. And you know, I rode horses. I was that kind of a kid. I, we didn't have any. My parents couldn't afford them, but we, I had friends who had him so I was always taking off and writing other people's horses and I was that I was a wholesale and had a dog and I wanted to ride horses. That was it. I didn't going to be a veterinarian is super into animals. I wasn't going to be a that I wasn't ever really that good at math, which is kind of funny because I spent so much time in finance, but it's certainly not because of my math skills within.

Speaker 2: What's it for? Why? Why did you find finance? Because I love the. I love designing the structures and what people don't really know about finances. It's really just like sculpture or drawing. I mean, there really aren't any rules, like there's things you're not allowed to do because they're against the rules around fraud and misrepresentation and, and all of those things, but finances, just anything that you can come up with as a way to transfer money or transfer value from one place to another. Um, and so basically it's this, it's really a creative pursuit. I mean, it's fun and then when you come into somewhere like cannabis where there are no systems and structures and you get to design them to do things like fund to cultivation company and figure out how to create the relationship between real estate and how do you protect investors when those a cannabis risk with asset seizure and foreclosure and coming up with these interesting structures.

Speaker 2: And then how do you help first time entrepreneurs who have never raised money before and don't want to give away 40 percent of their company for their seed round, which is a terrible idea. Um, it's a little bit too much. So that's what finance is. It doesn't really have much to do with math. I gotcha. It's, it's about creative thinking, right? Design thinking almost. All right, so where did you go to university? I went to. Gosh, no one ever asks these questions. It's so funny. I know. That's why. Listen to this. It's a totally different. I went to the university of durham, which was a very good school. It's like one of england's ivy league schools. Huh? And you studied finance? No, I studied philosophy. Of course you did. Of course you did. And so socraTes, plato, I mean, who, who were your guys? Because it was all guys, right? It was definitely old guys. But um, yeah, no, I was, I was kind of a communist so I was really into like I jesus on. Yeah, on soviet socioeconomics. In what time period? Um, from um, the russian revolution all the way through, um, crest and I ask. Wow. So then what did you find? Tell us what you know that maybe we don't understand. Um,

Speaker 2: I don't know. I think you guys aren't too far off the base on all of that stuff. Like stalin was a psycho maniac. And um, what you probably don't know is that most russians wish that stalin was still around. No, yeah, well that's, I think that there's something super interesting. So you know what style in dead he did the gulags. He basically, he basically did the thing in Russia that they kind of, the chinese revolution, the revolution didn't China. He got rid of all of the intellectuals. He kind of rounded them up, put them in work camps. He killed all the artists that, homosexuals, the writers, the teaches, the university professors, the novelists, the oldest people. He killed him. Okay. Now then what he did was he terrified the population for and stop them fairly persistently for, for about, I don't know, 20 years also, and as they've gone back and studied this, that actually genetically altered the population over course of time, like people are phenomenally adaptive.

Speaker 2: And what it did was it created an incredibly passive population because any type of initiative or. Well I don't, I, you know, I disagree with that buy off. You go to a ghoulag, you know, like it created a different population that was more compliant and less ambitious. And then what happened was, is when the wall came down and suddenly it's like the berlin wall. Yeah, we're going to be free and western economies and all the rest of it. You the, the, the general population fell victim to the small part of the population that was always running the show, which was really the mafia and they created this huge like mafia oligarchy with nothing but an incredibly passive and dose I'll population used to being taken care of or terrified or fat or not fat, you know, this kind of waiting population and I just don't.

Speaker 2: I think it's going to take decades for that dynamic change, which is why so many people like putin right there in Russia is perfect for Russia. They love him. Now. We've also noticed though that the rest of the world is starting to really like these kind of a strong armed leaders is what is how I'll put it. Yeah. Okay. What are, what are your thoughts on the rest of the world kind of now starting to that, that kind of passive. Let's let you know what's on populism. What is populism? I don't know. Why is it? What? Do you know why it's called that? I think it means that a lot of regular people are interested in their own kind of rights, which have somehow been subjugated along this very long history. They don't understand how that happened, how could it possibly have happened and now here we are, and so I have, you know, elected these leaders and those leaders and none of them work this person that I'm talking about. So whether that's obviously a somebody that's talking about brexit or somebody that's talking about someone like trump or to wear today or a pan, you know, these, these people are finally they're talking to me.

Speaker 2: Yeah, I mean, brexit. That was a shocker. I'm still enGlish, you know, I never became an american citizen for a variety of reasons. I think by the time I was eligible to become an american citizen, I think, um, bush was about to get elected. The second bush. Yeah. Right. So I didn't want to be an american right then, right. I wasn't, it was embarrassing. And I would go back to europe and people would be like, what is going on over there? What are you doing? You know, the europeans, they love americans, but they do feel a little bit confused about some of the politics over here now just in jet for a long time. Yeah. I mean, bush was not considered the way bush was perceived in england as a choice for president is not dissimilar to the way trump is perceived. IT's just that we've forgotten all about that.

Speaker 2: The bush now seems like this totally legitimate and viable president relative to what we have now. Yeah, it was, there was a different type of dialogue is what I'll say to speak to kind of. There was some civility in the conversation, you know, um, and there. Yeah. And I'm sure those people, bush included, a very sad to see that go away. I know I am. I think the thing I feel really sad about is the quality of the conversation. Well, there is no conversation. Well, just the fact that we know that there are people in the world who just lie indiscriminately and who called women dogs and who like just, you know, treat the world like just one huge opportunity to show off and feel important and not give a fuck about anybody. Right. But the idea that that person could find their way into the presidency is just so profoundly unsettling.

Speaker 2: Well, I think that, uh, you're about a kind of social mores and I think that there is of course a something to that. I think it behooves us to think economically though, mino he'll probably be great for my company. Oh no, that's not what I mean. That's not what I mean. What I mean is his support, uh, supporters and the supporters like that around the world and the ones that we were talking about, uh, you know, under stalling it and putting it in that these folks are not talking really about immigration. They're talking about their own economics. Oh yeah. And so for us to focus on anything other than simply the economics that are related to the every man I think is a mistake. I agree, and here's the thing is that, you know, to bring it back to cannabis, this is another thing, why would we do that?

Speaker 2: Well, listen to this because this is my theory that I'm really like hooked on, right? And so nobody, you know, we've got some really amazing. I'm ceo like legendary ceo leaders in this country. Like people who are famous, like America is amazing. Like this ceo was a famous in America, you know, our heroes are different to your heroes kind of thing. Such as name of it. Give us a couple of names so we understand your thinking here. Larry page, elon musk. Elon musk is, you know, he's the stuff that he's what he's doing really important things. I mean these are just some interesting people, but one thing I think is missing is that ceos and actually not necessarily see your eyes, but founders of companies, people who build the structures that companies and grow under those people are actually more empowered to do something about issues like the wage gap and income disparity than any one in government.

Speaker 2: I mean by simply changing the economics of the company in a way that does not have to diminish pro profits or revenues and by vesting employees into the, into into the ownership so that as the industry and the company grows and succeeds, they will actually benefit not just from an exchange of their labor for cash wages, but from the growth of a capital asset, which is an ownership share in the company. So this brings us back to you as far as how you run things. Explain how you can do these. What sounds like good things for people that are really good things about running a really successful and profitable enterprise. How, how, how do you do that? Do it. I mean you need an employee stock option plan, which means you need to set your company up in a certain way. You have to have got to a certain level of maturity to do that because you need to have a certain kind of valuation is the basis for that.

Speaker 2: But even if you can't do that, you can still create contracts that promise your employees that in the event that the company gets that fall or can get to a place where you can afford a full time cfo and you can want to spend the money on the legal fees, that you will put those things in place and that these people will get, you know, this little piece of equity in all vest over this amount of time. The most incredible experience that we're having right now is that every, all of our employees own a part of our company and we've noticed that we no longer spend any time managing them. We have to manage the work and the production, but we don't ever manage our employees. They're completely self managing. You manage the how not the walk. They. We just. We don't have to worry about what time they show up at work, what time they go home, if they're working hard, if they're getting their job done.

Speaker 2: Is anyone taking long lunch break? We don't even think about it because our employees are so engaged and so productive. They're innovating. It took them all a while to figure out that they want that to be told what to do and get into a role where they really just get to innovate and then our job as managers is to take all of that energy and that innovation and that effort and creativity and steer it to make sure that we're all moving in the right direction and it's just not some creative like it's not as the difference between a company and a potty. Sure compounds. It's not like living on the andy warhol's factory, but we literally have employees who are designing products that we will be able to bring to market as additional revenue streams completely under their own initiative. How much of that is based on the fact that they have ownership in the company versus you know, the vision that you've established versus maybe something else.

Speaker 2: I think that all the same thing, they have ownership in the company because that is my vision. I think that is the solution to the wealth gap. I don't think anyone should have to work for like eight bucks an hour or even 10 bucks an hour. Those people will be our in a poverty trap and we all know that and we have a huge capital economy and people who work to build it should participate in ownership. So as far as left and right is concerned, at least in american politics, I have said that it left, comes kind of from a we philosophy, the right kind of comes from an eye philosophy, you know, pull yourself up this stuff up from your bootstraps and it's kind of. You have to pick either one. Lately I've been thinking. No, no, no, I think it's we plus off.

Speaker 2: Yeah, my company is doing phenomenally well. Thank you very much because I gave a whole bunch of it away to my employees and they're amazing. And so we. And we've had no money. We've been phenomenally successful raising money. So my thing about the ceos is why is nobody talking about this? Well, let me ask you a, to that point, so you've, you've, you've kind of figured out the relationship between the ceo and the. You've figured out the relationship between the employee and the company. What about those investors that come in and see you giving away, you know, x percentage of your company to your roof, dan present to your employees. And then they say, well, what, what, what, what are you doing here? This is crazy, but they don't say that. Why don't they say that? Because I, they probably or I mean, I've always talked about it from day one.

Speaker 2: They always knew I was going to do this and there's a very, very well developed economic argument that's data backed that demonstrates that this is a great way to make set and save money and take us one step deeper so that we understand so that we can buy in. Right? So the really toughest, the, the, the worst in the hottest mistakes to make as a startup or hiring the wrong people. Sure. Um, the reason is because, because it's the most expensive, you have to invest the most time and money in getting those people up to speed. And then if it doesn't work out all that time and money walks out of the front door of your company. And I've seen companies literally lose, uh, lose 50 percent of what their potential exit valuation is because they hired the wrong sales guy or they hired the wrong vp of whatever, um, and it's, it comes out with dating, gave him a title of vp of whatever they go.

Speaker 2: So I, you know, we have, we've made a couple of miss hires and we've had to move a couple of people through our system and out the other end, but for the most part were so, um, the team that we're building, we know they'll stay with us for a long time and we fail. That will have some very particular advantages around, um, you know, engagement, innovation, like they've studied things like what it takes for an environment to be innovative. And basically people have to feel almost like they're part of it. Well, one that they're part of it, but two, that they can operate outside of an imposed structure. The thing about ownership is it operates internally and externally. I can give you ownership of something like, here is a cup of coffee. Thank you so much. You actually did. So it's, you're now you're holding my cup of coffee, it's internal and external.

Speaker 2: Your hand is holding my cup of coffee. That's awesome that we've given them the equity, they own it, it's a contract and that's awesome. But internally something changes. They now own something and the way that they interface with that thing changes completely and they become able to experience that ownership in a way that opens up a huge amount of another part of the treatment. Yeah. And what's been really interesting is hiring people, giving them the company and then stepping away from them and being like, yeah, we don't really manage people here. And they're like, well what do I do? And we're like, you know, I don't know, figure it out, wait a second. There's no further you've got. We'd hide them for a role. I got you. Okay. But then you know, some people aren't, people are not used to this and you'll literally like.

Speaker 2: And the bottom line is it's a startup. So whatever we hired them for, the chances are something happened and we're not ready to do that thing just yet. So they've got to find something else to do for awhile. Got it. And that happens all the time. And what's been really amazing is seeing people go through this transformation where they spend a certain amount of time confused and then maybe become a little agitated and angry. They'll bell start to complain about things like, you know, no management, there's no management. And, and you know, my business partner who's a genius manager, I think there'll be like, you know, I, I have to ask him what to do. And I'm like, well then just don't ask him what to do just or something, just find something to do. Um, and, and then either they get, they get, they make it through that anxiety or they don't.

Speaker 2: And it's not for everybody but for the ones who've made it through. And I've got to say like 90 percent of people make it through. They come out on the other end and then this thing happens where they'll be like, they'll come to us and they'll be like, there's this piece of the company where this thing's happening and I want to do that, do this, and I want to own it and build the processes and design the work around it. And we're like, okay, there you go. Go for it. You found you found your spot. So that is literally the hire for culture versus hire for skill argument when you are actually hiring, no matter if you're in the interviews or not, what are you looking for? One hundred percent. I'm looking for someone who will fit with the team. What does that mean for high fi? Um, I think we're a team of highly creative people.

Speaker 2: I think we're all a little. We just decided to collect everyone's birthdays so we know when everyone's birthday is that we can say happy birthday. Right? And uh, we realized we're old taurus's and counting. I don't know. What this means is that all creatures with hones basically bowls and ratty old bulls and ramps. I see. Which means there's a lot of headstrong, stubborn, what kind of do you rebellious people and willing to go at it, meaning fight or flight. It sounds like a lot of fights, a lot of fighting, even though there's no conflict in our company, which is stunning. The extent to which we've eliminated conflicts. Well then how, how, if you've got these people that are inherently a ready for contact rams. I think that's me. I did like, um, I think that as a woman, um, you know, if someone comes to me and they feel angry or frustrated, I'm more likely to say, wow, yeah, that you seem you seem upset.

Speaker 2: You know, like rather than, you know, the, the point is when people are behaving in a way that's either aggressive or agro, the thing that's probably really happening to them is they're upset or they've, their feelings have been hurt or they feel confused or they feel defensive. And so, you know, if you spend enough time in like psychoanalysis, you get a lot of this kind of feedback and you end up being like, oh look, you're, you know, this might be feeling. So. Yeah, you got your feelings hurt. How can we fix it if you say that someone who is angry and I'm like, hey, did you get your feelings? Uh, like you seem sad. Then they just, they hate you a little bit for making this happen, but they'll like, it deflates it all. Totally. It just pulls all the conflict out of the air and that's what happens in our company.

Speaker 2: We just, we don't get pissy. You mentioned the air and I should say that we're outside and those are plants in our airplanes that are flying above us. So it sounds like you've created this utopia, right? I know it's, we make jokes about it because it does feel a little culty but um, it, it, it feels like that. Now my sense is that we're in this sweet spot and this has been written about also is like the perfect team size. So right now we're about 20 people and the maximum size of the business that you give us some way to measure it. So we have 50 acre farm, which is a big undertaking and we're building a big commercial tattoo, recreational license on that. Okay. Okay. Um, when you have the right amount of people for that. Yes, definitely. But we're also really running two businesses because we don't just grow weed with building a brand and so we.

Speaker 2: And we have a really great, you know, very buttoned up finance department because I do a lot of stuff with your home. Right. That's my world. And, and obviously we're always looking for ways to kind of do really. So the oldest stuff we're going to do next is the really interesting stuff. Like we just built the foundation with the license and the production in the fall and now we're going to start doing some really interesting things. We'll do, we'll, you know, we'll talk about that after you did next time when you're doing it. You know what I'm saying? Yep. Um, so that we wouldn't tell you what I was doing anyway. So completely topsy wanted to make it sound like it was my idea, you know, and then this light, it's like, oh, okay. They'll talk about it next time. Everybody's on the same page.

Speaker 2: I want to ask you the three final questions, but um, you know, I, I want to come back to this kind of leadership in society piece because the last time we spoke it was by phone and it was directly after the press secretary made his little thing and I know you were so upset and sessions. I really appreciate you calling me. I'm like, that guy's. Yeah. What? You were so much cooler than me. I mean my pinned tweet is still the 10th amendment, just to give you a sense of, you know, how I'm like, why are you so cool about this? Because I have a lot of money that doesn't, isn't my money at stake and in my business. Yeah. But it's all these people that you have ownership. And then, you know, I mean, I have an amazing group of investors who have put a phenomenal amount of faith in me and in my team and my partners and in our vision.

Speaker 2: And I feel like a profound sense of responsibility to, um, to um, manage this company in a way that gives them the best opportunity to kind of be proved right by making that bet. But how are you not knocked off a little bit because the best thing I can be at any given time is just levelheaded, levelheaded, and aware and just taking in the information like absorbing other people's reactions. I'm just a sponge like that. Like I don't, I don't, I'm a vessel. I don't. It's like the whole conflict thing, like conflict happens when one person has a feeling and then the other person decides to have an equal and opposite feeling. Right. Well if I just let you sit there and have your feelings, I'm actually going to have a much more interesting experience. I'm going to learn a lot more and I'm gonna save myself a whole bunch of acura.

Speaker 2: So I just mostly let a lot of people have a lot of feelings when it comes to this stuff and I just try to understand what it. Is this really happening. Excellent. This has been good I think. I think it's been really good. I'm a little nervous about hearing it. I'll know it's even better than you think it was. What always happens aren't the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of sarah battery's life. One track, one song that's got to be on there, but first thing's first, what's most surprised you in cannabis? I don't like any of these questions. Well, they're all real and serious. What's most surprising emotion and meet me where I am.

Speaker 2: What's most surprised me in cannabis is myself being here. Yeah. How did that happen? We've skipped that step, but just, you know, what was it that kind of brought you in? It was a complete fluke. Like I was leaving. I was bailing out of the bay area. I was like, I was. I worked here right in here in silicon valley and I lived in berkeley and I was done. I was just like, oh, I had a horrible commute and I hated my life and I was like, I'm leaving and I don't care what I'm going to do. So I just moved to portland because I love it. Love it. Yeah. No, I knew I loved it up there and I had, I'd been thinking about it for about a year and so I went, but I didn't know what I was going to do and I didn't have a job and I had a couple of months I'd given myself.

Speaker 2: I had enough time to spend a little bit of time checking it out before I committed to something. But I started to do. I started interview with nike and speak to all the vcs at bear and I was on track to get this epic job actually that was, um, I was super interested in, um, but it just didn't seem right. I'm like, I'm going to move to portland where like young people go to retire and I'm going to go work for nike. I hadn't had a job 25 years I've worked in startups and so I'm like, that snow. Right. But then my very differently, hanson and his wife had moved up to portland ahead of me with our two little girls and they were, and put a little bit of money together with a friend of lee's christiane, and they were doing a build out on this tiny little medical grow in a basement and the law had just paused for legalization and sara lee's wife was like, they're building this weed thing, but you've got to help them.

Speaker 2: They don't know anything about business. And I'm like, well yeah, I'll take a look at it. And so I went and um, they were like, well, will you be the ceo? And I'm like, what? Do you even know what that is? Like I would be your boss. So if you're okay with that, no, let's take a look. So I took a look at the numbers and I was kind of blown away by the numbers that pro forma on some of these businesses pretty, pretty healthy. So, um, yeah, we just were like, okay, well let's give it a shot. And we started building the company and that was a while ago. Now when was that? That was in january of 2015. Welcome to 2017. Just ending the first quarter for those keeping score. It's been mad fast. I mean we've done line that time. I mean we, you and I know each other for almost that whole amount of time and it feels like 10 years. Of course these are cannabis users or our dog years. Right? So we've known each other for 15 years, so at least we have, if not, uh, whatever, uh, you know, 21 years, something like that. What's most surprised you in life?

Speaker 2: Oh, how awesome. Getting old is w. Yeah. So I am with you on that one because like I, as I get dumber, I also get wiser. Right. That makes sense. Yeah. I mean we were talking, I was talking about it with a group of gals who were here at the conference, who are the important gals. Yeah. We had the total warrior princess crowd here yesterday. It was great. Um, donate to mpp, right? Yeah, definitely. I felt like I feel like all the stuff that you gain as you get older. I'm 45 years old, so all the stuff that you start to gain is kinda great. Yeah. And all the stuff that you start to shed is the stuff that you really was just kind of a pain the bike giving a shit about, you know, you look in these pants or whatever and you look great by the way. Thank you very much.

Speaker 2: That sounds weird. Oh, right. There's a dress happening is what I should. I guess I should follow that. So yeah, that's what I've, that's what I've been surprised by and I continue to be surprised by that. And the only thing, bummer about it is my, I was an athlete all the way through school. And what sport? Um, I played rugby and I was a swimmer, I played tennis, I played a lot of sports. I'm a big, you know, this is your podcast. Yeah, the big toe board shouldered person. I mean you're not whatever, but I. Yeah. So I mean that was um, that was kind of fun. But I, you know, my body hurts a little bit. I got you from that. Just I think it's just your body starts to hurt a little bit at a certain age. Sure. Yeah. And I just didn't think it would happen this quickly. Yeah. So that's a bummer. Yeah. I like, but I guess now that I've got like cbd in my life, I'm going to be fine. Everything's okay. Heavy emphasis. You free will save your log thca. Actually, I'm sure I just got correct ideas today. Hitting your cb one receptor and everything's gonna be good. Exactly what, uh, what's track, what song needs to be on the sara bader be soundtrack.

Speaker 3: God,

Speaker 2: you know, this happens to me and this happened to me every time anyone's asked me that question from the time I was when I was probably like five or six years old when I realized that the answer to that question, we'll let people know how cool you are. Yeah, sure. Of course. That's why I asked it. So now every time I'm asked that question, I'm thrown into like this total internal state of panic and I can't hear. My mind goes blank and I can't answer the question. We try to, let me try to help you. It looks like I've upset you. Right. Let me understand your emotional mindset. So this is, it doesn't have to be the perfect song. Right. And it doesn't have to be, you know, the perfect answer. It's just, you know, hey, along my life, this song is one of the songs that like when I put it on, I just love this and I can. I'm listening to the song right now is it plays along in my head and I'm trying to remember the name of it, which I probably won't be able to, but I might be able to remember. I might be able to tell you what it's about. Okay. It's

Speaker 2: no, I can't. Do you remember the artist? No, this is a real thing for me. Like I'm having a panic attack right now. I understand that. I'm, I'm sad that I'm doing that to you, but can you at least tell us the words not even seeing them? No. No. Leave me alone. So, uh, we've made history here. There's going to be no song from sara bader be and that's okay. Good. I'll send something in on a postcard. Maybe what we'll do. Absolutely. Just email me because I'm still wondering your on slack. It's perfect because I'm on slack, right? So 10 minutes ago. Oh my god. Uh, 10 years ago even. So you'll send it to me before I edit this so that in the outro that I call it, you know what I mean? Like when I say, okay, that was sarah battery, I'll tell them what song it was that you were thinking about. Now. There you go. That's perfect. I'm sure everyone's totally on the edge of their seat. If they're not, they should know that we're bending the space time.

Speaker 4: Sarah battery. Always a pleasure my friend. Thank you. Got it.

Speaker 1: And there you have sarah batter. Be the song in question. Nina simone's feeling good. Nina simone, of course, one of the greats in a different time and space. Sara bader be one of the greats. Very much appreciate her time. Very much. Appreciate your time. Thanks for listening and stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.