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Ep.247: Jane West

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.247: Jane West

Ep.247: Jane West

Jane West joins us and gives us background on her initial foray into the cannabis industry- Edible Events. But before all that and after a key two-weeks, Jane switched paths from a potential career in environmental law, moved to New York City and found a place producing events. One of her events was to take place just four days after 9/11 and Jane takes us through her experience on that day and during that time in New York City. Within six months she married her husband and moved to Denver. After her employer relieved her of her duties due to  seeing coverage of one of her edible events…with an idea in mind to bring cannabis women together, she eventually crossed paths with Jazmin Hupp…and the rest, as they say, is history.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: 00:01:10 Jane West, Jane West joins us and gives us background on her initial foray into the cannabis industry at a bull events. But before all that, and after a key two weeks, Jane switched paths from a potential career in environmental law, move to New York City and found a place producing events. One of her events was to take place just four days after nine slash 11, and Jane takes us through her experience on that day and during that time in New York City, within six months, she married her husband and moved to Denver on down the line after her employer relieved her of her duties due to seeing coverage of one of her edible events with an idea in mind to bring cannabis women together. She eventually crossed paths with jasmine hub and the rest, as they say, is history. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Jane West

Speaker 2: 00:02:01 being raised for multilevel homes. And that's just happening right now. That's why the traffic is because of the construction. So as soon we're going to fill those homes with people with cars. So I'm going to get even worse. This is very 19, 84 of you. Soon we will fill those. Yes, Holmes with PBS and then cars. So the traffic that I've experienced here different than four years ago, you agree? Definitely completely different.

Speaker 3: 00:02:28 Um,

Speaker 2: 00:02:29 Jane West, what ride this is this not craziness. It's been pretty groundbreaking. It's been very, it's been a very interesting couple of years. So 2013. I meet Jane. She's running edible events. Yes. Yeah, pretty smiley. Everything's great. I do these things. You wouldn't believe it. They're fantastic. Yes. That's happened. Yes. And then there was like a little bag which was great. And there were recognition rate. There was a spotlight right away. Totally. Everybody noticed well. And all these journalists came to Denver in the beginning of 2014 to like cover the story and you can only go to so many gross. Sure. And there were, there were less than. What else might you. He's over there. Right. And so it's like, wait, I can go to a party where there's live music and food and everyone's getting high like that, like. So I had a big, I had a long press list of every event and just carried. Sure. Yeah.

Speaker 4: 00:03:28 Alright. So the let's just do the whole thing. Okay. So the edible events edible. So you started to do those, but that was, was that after or before

Speaker 2: 00:03:42 the moment of reckoning? That was before. Yes, definitely.

Speaker 4: 00:03:47 So you're doing one of these edible events on the side side. On the side?

Speaker 2: 00:03:52 Yup. I was just, I plan one event a month for all of 2014 and I contracted it all out from the very beginning of the year. So it wasn't, it was something I was doing for falling on a Friday night a month,

Speaker 4: 00:04:05 getting to know everybody in the space. Now. Did you, is that what made your introductions to the space or did you know all those? That's a good.

Speaker 2: 00:04:13 No, I didn't know a single person. Nobody knew. No one knew my name, like no, I didn't know anyone around here. Um, I just really, the idea was cemented itself when it became news that like this is really going to start occurring on January first 2014. Like nothing's going to stop this. This is happening. Amendment 64 is being enacted. And so, I mean I'm a parent of two. I was working a full time job or that, how do we travel all over the state, so I just wasn't that tapped into what was going on here and so I was like, honey, I think I think I could start throwing parties where everyone gets to get high because we live in Denver. Right, right. Great. And I think, I think I'm going to try doing that. So we'll see.

Speaker 1: 00:01:10 Jane West, Jane West joins us and gives us background on her initial foray into the cannabis industry at a bull events. But before all that, and after a key two weeks, Jane switched paths from a potential career in environmental law, move to New York City and found a place producing events. One of her events was to take place just four days after nine slash 11, and Jane takes us through her experience on that day and during that time in New York City, within six months, she married her husband and moved to Denver on down the line after her employer relieved her of her duties due to seeing coverage of one of her edible events with an idea in mind to bring cannabis women together. She eventually crossed paths with jasmine hub and the rest, as they say, is history. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Jane West

Speaker 2: 00:02:01 being raised for multilevel homes. And that's just happening right now. That's why the traffic is because of the construction. So as soon we're going to fill those homes with people with cars. So I'm going to get even worse. This is very 19, 84 of you. Soon we will fill those. Yes, Holmes with PBS and then cars. So the traffic that I've experienced here different than four years ago, you agree? Definitely completely different.

Speaker 3: 00:02:28 Um,

Speaker 2: 00:02:29 Jane West, what ride this is this not craziness. It's been pretty groundbreaking. It's been very, it's been a very interesting couple of years. So 2013. I meet Jane. She's running edible events. Yes. Yeah, pretty smiley. Everything's great. I do these things. You wouldn't believe it. They're fantastic. Yes. That's happened. Yes. And then there was like a little bag which was great. And there were recognition rate. There was a spotlight right away. Totally. Everybody noticed well. And all these journalists came to Denver in the beginning of 2014 to like cover the story and you can only go to so many gross. Sure. And there were, there were less than. What else might you. He's over there. Right. And so it's like, wait, I can go to a party where there's live music and food and everyone's getting high like that, like. So I had a big, I had a long press list of every event and just carried. Sure. Yeah.

Speaker 4: 00:03:28 Alright. So the let's just do the whole thing. Okay. So the edible events edible. So you started to do those, but that was, was that after or before

Speaker 2: 00:03:42 the moment of reckoning? That was before. Yes, definitely.

Speaker 4: 00:03:47 So you're doing one of these edible events on the side side. On the side?

Speaker 2: 00:03:52 Yup. I was just, I plan one event a month for all of 2014 and I contracted it all out from the very beginning of the year. So it wasn't, it was something I was doing for falling on a Friday night a month,

Speaker 4: 00:04:05 getting to know everybody in the space. Now. Did you, is that what made your introductions to the space or did you know all those? That's a good.

Speaker 2: 00:04:13 No, I didn't know a single person. Nobody knew. No one knew my name, like no, I didn't know anyone around here. Um, I just really, the idea was cemented itself when it became news that like this is really going to start occurring on January first 2014. Like nothing's going to stop this. This is happening. Amendment 64 is being enacted. And so, I mean I'm a parent of two. I was working a full time job or that, how do we travel all over the state, so I just wasn't that tapped into what was going on here and so I was like, honey, I think I think I could start throwing parties where everyone gets to get high because we live in Denver. Right, right. Great. And I think, I think I'm going to try doing that. So we'll see.

Speaker 4: 00:05:00 Okay. So, so edible events, you talked to your husband, you're like a, hey, you know, this is what I'm going to do because you're an event person. Yes. Right.

Speaker 2: 00:05:07 But I was producing events, um, large scale events for high school students at the time and so they weren't quite as, why do high school students need large scale events? What does that mean? Well, we, we, we planned events around both of Obama's inaugurations and actually rented museums on the National Mall in stage from there and then students came from all over the country to watch the inauguration.

Speaker 4: 00:05:31 Okay. Well then let's now take it at all the way back because how do you find yourself on the mall during the inauguration? Do you have to know what you're doing? You're doing? Yeah. So where did you grow up?

Speaker 2: 00:05:45 So I. Oh, I grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which is the city of festivals. Despite that being the best, whether it is. We have a giant downtown fairgrounds called summer fest that has festivals like every single weekend where you can get, I would imagine, a fair amount of sausage. Yes. Right. Yes. During. Especially during a German fest. And also October fest is twice. They do that. So yeah. So I grew up in Milwaukee and I went to school. I'm in Madison, Wisconsin for my Undergrad and then I traveled. I went to, I moved to New York City.

Speaker 4: 00:06:19 Well we'll get to New York City, but this, the green bay packers in the Milwaukee brewers. Do we care about these things? You know, Brett Farve, how much were you?

Speaker 2: 00:06:30 He was, he was really good and nice and handsome and a good and he made everyone in Wisconsin and very, very happy. So yes to far.

Speaker 4: 00:06:42 Yes. And have you ever been to the frozen Tundra

Speaker 2: 00:06:45 to take. I used to take students on in high, in college. On these camping trips that lasted four days and we drive over Sanson and so we used to go to lambeau field and they, there are, they're really an incredible football team. Like they were practicing, they were practiced across the street from where the main locker rooms are and every morning and every night local kids would ride their bikes down and then the football players get on the back of the bikes and they ride them across the street. Like this happens twice a day, every day. It's just, it's

Speaker 4: 00:07:14 just knitted into the fabric of the community. Totally. So. Okay. So, so here's Wisconsin and also I'm hearing a lot of like coach type counselor type teacher. What is that about?

Speaker 2: 00:07:29 You're pulling these informant. Yes. So that was kind of always, yeah, organizing people on a large scale to learn and have great experiences.

Speaker 4: 00:07:38 Totally. But there's a student thing, like as a young person or either of your parents, teachers,

Speaker 2: 00:07:44 they're not, but they're very teach or like in how they like let you explore that. Is that, that's how you say that? So, um, yeah. And yeah, so that kind of a is a straight is a

Speaker 4: 00:08:00 I think from them. Okay. And then did you, when did you first. Where did you camp counselor or when did you first realize that you'd liked kind of bringing people together?

Speaker 2: 00:08:08 Um, in high school I watched the movie, I had never gone to summer camp and then I watched the movie Indian summer and I was like, oh my God, I want to go to summer. I got to go. Right. But I was too old because I 16. And so that's what. So I went and became a counselor at a summer camp in Wisconsin. That's also the first place I suppose.

Speaker 4: 00:08:27 Oh my God, I think it's funny though, that your relationship to summer camps in movies is Indian summer mind meatballs. Got It. But so okay, let's talk about that first time. I mean, how life changing was it? How you know, how much of a relationship did you have right from the jump?

Speaker 2: 00:08:51 I had an incredible first experience and I think like first experiences with cannabis are also really important and which is why legalization is so promising because when it's not wrong and illegal and illicit and more on the open you, you, there's no like anxiety or worry or concern the first time you're trying it and so you have, you're much more likely to have a positive first experience, which I did not turn negative. Exactly. You're not like in someone's basement and you don't know what's happening and smell suits and their mom's knocking on the door like all

Speaker 4: 00:09:23 and everything's right. Right.

Speaker 2: 00:09:27 So, um, yeah, no, I was like in like a field under the stars are like horses over in the distance and it was just like the best night. Oh my God, this is like very positive in the out in the nature experience, the nature and the nature and with fellow counselors with, well now I feel like I'm like,

Speaker 4: 00:09:49 you don't have to make it. We're not. I know what I'm saying.

Speaker 2: 00:09:59 During a training in the beginning of the summer before there were youngsters present on.

Speaker 4: 00:10:05 Oh, I see what you're. I see what you're. So this was early. Yes, because before that it was at the very beginning of the summer when I'm doing staff training and kind of just like dove right into it. And so you dove right into that and then, you know, as far as when the kids came, were you a natural right from the beginning as far as a counselor, it's like, okay folks, let's go here, let's turn. They were allowed and I'm good at like barking, you know. And that works with small children and adults and adults. Definitely teenagers respond well to you know, barking as soon as you call it.

Speaker 2: 00:10:39 So um, yeah. So I just kind of. And also a great way to spend your summer and to also be able to travel and explore things while you don't have a budget for that. So you just sign up for cool stuff that

Speaker 4: 00:10:53 brings you places. Yes. Alright. So just one more thing on your mom and your dad as far as kind of key lessons before you get out the door. What do you think? What'd you take from dad?

Speaker 2: 00:11:06 Uh, so my mom started, my mom, raised my brother and I, and then when she was 42, I'm not for, which is one more year for me. So when she is right, we are exactly. Oh, okay. Got It. Okay, got it, got it. So congratulations on getting to the other side. Likewise. So when my mom, so my mom raised us, but then when she was 42 she went back and became a realtor and like right away, like was rookie of the year and totally into sales. And so like I grew up around her like hustle, hustling deals and this is that we going to do this thing, um, but also like being able to have her own life and oh now we're going to go here for awhile because I manage my own business. So, um, and like in charge her own destiny. Yes, exactly. So, um, and so I was only in like fourth grade when that happened. So

Speaker 4: 00:12:03 I don't know what that is because like my mom passed away 11 years ago, but I have no idea what your path was like I can't relate to.

Speaker 2: 00:12:15 I only can do it now that I have a kid that's almost a fourth grade before that I had no sense of like if a child is walking behind me, like how old that child was sort of like, it's hard to tell. But as far as your father how much? My Dad's awesome. He a big. He's always been a dedicated cannabis on later in life. So he's always later in life he became super into cannabis and uh, so anyways, he loved all the parties in 2014 was into that. Yeah. Like he was like, oh my God, okay, I'll just go. And so actually what ended up happening, this really funny of all my parents, they came to my very first event in January and I loved it and my dad was smoking joints and my mom was talking to everybody and then they kind of became like that cute old couple because there were so many, like I said, news crews around there. And people are like, oh, you guys are doing a tour of this. And then basically, honestly the people doing the tour like, shit, we gotta find 18 people because like CNN is coming and I got two guys signed up, right. So they would always call my parents are tired. Parents would be like, sure what we're going on a tour. And then like, my dad would just. So they're in the background of if someone did like the search for them, you would find them in the background of lots of stories in quarter one of 2014.

Speaker 4: 00:13:45 Oh, I love it. So it's funny. That is funny. All right. So uh, as far as them. So tussled for mom, kind of fun. Loving from dad, is that what I'm getting?

Speaker 2: 00:13:56 They had big parties at our house all growing on big fourth of July parties like hundreds of people and siblings. One brother. He lives in Denver. Sell solar energy solar. You should [inaudible] name's Eric runner. He's single. He's 39 years old. You can find his facebook profile under Erik Brunner. He's gonna love that. His sister did that. He was Whitewater raft guide. Yes, so he's in shape, loves to ski, loves to Ski. He owns his own home in the highlands.

Speaker 4: 00:14:24 Oh yeah, this is good. We'll look at. We'll look that up. I guess I'll send you a link to his page. All right, so then when did you, you know, you do the Wisconsin thing. That's fantastic. I think a Wisconsin. I know all the Ohio state really doesn't like Michigan. I think it was constant. Doesn't either. My husband's a Buckeye. Oh look at that. And then you guys don't get along either as far as football. We've run, but you've assimilated. Fair enough. When did you, I

Speaker 2: 00:14:52 mean, was it direct from Wisconsin to New York City? I was living in New York City and that night I met my husband. So I'm asking is when you're coming from college, did you go direct? Oh, sorry. Yes. I actually, I thought I wanted to be an environmental lawyer and so I was like the stars in the trees, trees and stars and stuff and I'd never been to Oregon. And I applied to Lewis and Clark, which was for environmental law and um, and I was super excited about it. Uh, that's what I was going to head in the fall. And then I spent like two weeks doing this internship with a bunch of environmental lawyers and I was like, I miss this, I've made it, I've made a mistake. Right. I do not want to be second year, we're just, there were just a lot. No, it was actually, it was more like all like, this is being a lawyer, this is like, like I wasn't, not even like, I don't think we're like cleaning baby seals during lunch, but like still I was like, no, I have too much energy too, as much as I'm going to need to sit to be successful right now.

Speaker 2: 00:15:57 So moving your stuff. And then did you just jump right into events? I'm pretty much, well basically, you know, events or something that no matter what business you're in, at some point in time you have to gather people together. And whether that's around a meal or like a marketing launch, there's a lot of details involved. And a lot of people are adverse to managing those details and um, yes, exactly. Yes. So no matter where I was working I always just kind of gravitated towards like, okay wait, well what do we have to do? Who's in charge? Let's make this happen. So, um, and then I ended up working for UNICEF and that was just awesome. Like I knew I wanted to travel the world and I wanted to like, you know, see new things and having opportunity to work with UNICEF, which is the largest communications network in the world.

Speaker 2: 00:16:49 Um, it was really cool. I never got to travel. I never went anywhere, but it was, yes. But I worked in the Ghana building and things were cool, right? No, no. So, um, and actually I spent 18 months in my life working on a three day event called a special session on children which was scheduled to happen on September 15th, 2001. So I mean, I mean we invested a year and a half in like trying to make this whole thing happen. And then nine slash 11 occurred. And like every, like nothing, never knowing. Got On air, but no one went anywhere. The entire like event, like it never even occurred really. Of course not. Right. Well, I mean even later it wasn't like, oh, we'll do this in a year from now. It was like, oh, we're so that means you were in New York. I was. So we have to talk about this. Okay. Yes. Because some of our listeners, you need to refresh their memory.

Speaker 4: 00:17:51 Well, not even that. It's, it's more, you know, let's remember what that was. Definitely, you know, because if you were planning an event now when something happened and it didn't happen on the day you would, you would postpone it and then you're good. But fruit for me, hearing you say it never happened. That makes all the sense of the world because of it was completely devastating to everybody in the world. Everybody in the country. But specifically in New York City it was a, um, obviously the ground shook but it, it really didn't resettle.

Speaker 2: 00:18:26 Yes, definitely it complete. It completely changed like the city to me. And I had only lived there for two and a half years. Right. So like, I can't even, it was a different place after, after that day. Right. So yeah, and I was in, I was working at the United Nations at the time and then, so I was in Manhattan, um, and we went uptown though, right? No, we went downtown. We were down. We went down after the first one hit, we had partners down there and we all, we went downtown to build structures and we started building structures. But then after a while, like there were no, it wasn't a car, it was either people had gotten out or the hadn't, there wasn't triage occurring, there wasn't a right in right. And then, and then there was so much smoke and people started talking about, um, what was the, like a bio hazard bio materials.

Speaker 2: 00:19:25 So like people start or like something, an agent, like an intentional terrorist agent. You could have been inhaling or so someone that started happening and then they came and picked us all up and we all left and went to give blood and then we all just went on the pilgrimage. Most people have like stores that do the walking over the bridge, like most people in New York City haven't walked over. One of the metro bridget ever. Brooklyn Bridge Shore. Yes. But even that, like people who I never did the, you know, and so most people who are in Manhattan that day have some like, pilgrimage story of just simply trying to get back to their homes, you know. So. So I got back to my house and I had an answering machine. I didn't have a cell phone.

Speaker 4: 00:20:13 Yeah, that was. Well no, but that was, I was, I was a late adopter as well, just right. And I was like, I'm never doing it. Exactly. I want my privacy. You'll never know what I am. Oh, I have a cell phone. Right. I would never post something every 20 minutes from my house. That's ridiculous. The concept that, that makes no sense whatsoever. Exactly.

Speaker 2: 00:20:36 Um, yes. And there was a, the only, the message on my answering machine was from my future husband and then we like talked all night that night. And then within like six months I left New York and moved to Denver.

Speaker 4: 00:20:48 Yeah. All right. So then now let's go into the story of how you met him because obviously that, that machine message was, if that wasn't the final needle on a haystack.

Speaker 2: 00:20:58 I never met him just five weeks earlier and in a bar and in. Do you remember which one? Black Betty on metropolitan. Sure. This was like the heyday. Oh yeah, it was at the Bedford stop. You know, I lived across the case of the site and move to help house. I moved to when they kicked us out of the place on second Bedford was across from black betty. I metropolitan. There you go. So these were fun times, right? It was fun because nobody knew what it was. Like it was happening and something was happening. You could tell every day something was changing, but like you didn't know where it was going to go.

Speaker 4: 00:21:35 Well, and that's my, you know, when you said you lived in Brooklyn, I was like, oh, I remember them. So 1999. But Polish. Yeah, exactly. I look in my time out in New York and I'm like, people are moving to Brooklyn Navy, they're going to get the same one, but like you there, I'm in the East village. I'm like, why would I move from the East village to write one and then now Brooklyn is the East village, East village, midtown. So whatever. I still love these villages. Oh sure. It's quaint and less less traffic than midtown. Yes, yes, yes. But, uh, all the accoutrement uptown if you will. Anyway. Alright, so you're in black betty. Can you get a good croissant? You one again? I'm not going to tell you where. But um, so you're in black betty. Is this this just drop dead gorgeous guy is. He was pretty handsome.

Speaker 2: 00:22:31 He, um, has this move called the stair. That's about it. Really. He got stairs, glass was broken and then I went and got him a new one because that's like your glasses broken. It was like, oh, it's okay. And I was like, I got them in your glass.

Speaker 4: 00:22:47 Wait a second. So that's the first.

Speaker 2: 00:22:50 Okay, wait, wait, we need to reverse. Wait. No, no, no, no, no. He's a friend of a friend of mine and that friends have it.

Speaker 4: 00:22:59 How do we do this?

Speaker 2: 00:23:01 He was visiting a friend in New York for the weekend. He wasn't even living in New York, not living in New York. He was just visiting a friend in New York for a weekend, for the weekend and that friend really had no room for him to say, but I was going out of town for the weekend, so he said, hey, my good buddies in town. I know you're gonna be out of town this weekend. Can he crash at your place? This guy crashes your press, but the one that I dropped, I went by to drop off my keys from him to stay there and we all went procedurally together. Wait, so then you didn't meet in a bar, you bet in Europe, all of that. Oh, well you asked where were you like thought about it and that late afternoon after I dropped with these ads for Sushi after nine, we're in black betty. And that was when I was like, okay, I think

Speaker 4: 00:23:40 this guy is like staring at me. Wait a second, what's happening? And

Speaker 2: 00:23:46 then that was. Yeah, so then we, the audience so that, but then I believe on an airplane and I literally left from there to go on an airplane because the whole reason I was medium because I wasn't clear on that. Exactly. Yes. And then we just talked to via phone and then six weeks later and then six weeks later than 11 happened. Yeah. From Colorado. He's not, he is. Well, we had a mutual friend, remember they introduced us who is also from Wisconsin. So he actually is also from Wisconsin and at our wedding there were like five people that knew both of us before we knew each other. Yeah. Wow. So then how does Colorado coming into this? Um, he is a geophysicist and to get online. So he lived, he won, he came to go to graduate school in Denver and then I was like, I was like, should I get a job?

Speaker 2: 00:24:36 And he was, well I had to get, I'd be like, should I even get a job or maybe this graduate school thing, it's like more fun than a full time. So I went, I went and got my master's of social work degree. Or You did it, you look that and worked at the cruise room downtown all through a Grad school. How was that? It was awesome. It was actually, well it was, um, it was an interesting juxtaposition because I was doing my clinical study on liver transplant and then at night working at the cruise room bar serving Martinis. So why, why was that your focus? I want it to be an emergency room. Social worker went from environmental law in emergency room, social worker thought went into Grad school. Penguins and stuff. But now I'm going to help the people that are in trial. Yeah.

Speaker 2: 00:25:27 The penguins. So then what? And then what happened to that? Um, well, okay. So I spent one year with the Kempe Center of Denver, which is this incredible group that works with foster kids and that, and I sent the second year at doing the clinical. So doing the rotation with liver transplant. Um, and then I moved, then we moved to Houston, Texas and I had to find a position. I was not expecting that. Sorry. This is a really dark, sorry for everyone listening to this is actually a really dark period so that it's not good. Well, well it's just that. So my husband took a position at a company in, in New Orleans, so we're like, okay, we're moving to New Orleans and that's where we got married. Now we're nearly went, let's go. Have Fun. Absolutely. We're moving to New Orleans, so we get like rent a place on magazine street, Yada Yada.

Speaker 2: 00:26:19 Okay. So then Hurricane Katrina happened. Unbelievable. And then the company, I know you're telling this story. Okay. And then the whole company moved to Houston and we had already signed on. It couldn't be like, oh, we're just doing it because of the New Orleans thing. So just, right. So we ended up spending three years, so we moved it, we had rented the place and we're moving and we're going September first. So anyways. Yes. So we moved. So now we're in Houston. After about three weeks we're, we just decided we couldn't live there. Like it's very humid. Alan, just a climate that I'm, we're not used to and I wanted to be back in Denver, but it took three years to find solutions back in Denver. Meanwhile, as I was trying to find a job in pr, in social work in medicine, sure I took a position with the National Youth Leadership Forum on medicine, which held 10 day conferences for high achieving high school students who want to be doctors. I know. Okay. So I'm like, okay, I'm going to run these awesome educational programs. They get to AP credits. It's an incredible program like doctors come and talk to the students and then also going to learn while I run this program during the summer, all the hospitals in the medical center and then I'll decide whether I want to work. I'll just take my pick. Exactly. Or whatever. Yes.

Speaker 4: 00:27:50 And by the way, this is exactly why highschool students, students need large scale events. We have found the answer to that question.

Speaker 2: 00:27:58 So. So that's. So yeah. So I. But that. I never left that job. I loved it and we ran programs and I worked for that company for eight years, eight years, and that's the company I was working for that had as understandably a very strict drug policy that I violated on national television and so then I was asked to lead from the job after I started the cannabis events.

Speaker 4: 00:28:19 Got It. So, so, so here's the side hustle that the edible events, you've got this job that you love, that you're really good at, that you kind of built for kind of and as far as your emotion now. Right? Let's not go through all that again, I guess. Right. But like when you look back on it from their perspective, from your perspective, from how, how different the conversation is now around legal cannabis specifically gone,

Speaker 2: 00:28:46 what are your thoughts now having been able to digest this?

Speaker 2: 00:28:57 I know I'm glad that now employers can be more progressive and just openly state whether or not testing for certain drugs is something that's a priority to them and then it's just out there and we can decide if you know, this is where I want to be or not. I believe we'll get to some point maybe that there is a classification of job. Sure. Like class a jobs where you. We all just agree these, these people should be as high functioning. I don't need a job and then everything. Other than that you decide with your employer what isn't, is not. Okay. So I just, you know, there's all sorts of professions now. Well, yes. That's all. That's interesting.

Speaker 4: 00:29:44 I understand because it's a delicate subject and one that I think he is an industry. You're talking more and more about now, which is, hey, this is here. You know, let's, let's actually have had the whole conversation.

Speaker 2: 00:29:55 Yeah. This is one of those questions like what do you do about people working and like what do you do about people driving and what do you do about like this is one of those questions. Were you really on the advocacy side need to consider your answer because the people if presented the right way and explained the way it's rolling out in Colorado, it's extremely reasonable. Exactly. You know, our roads are safer, less students, high school students are using illicit substances like this is working. So as long as you have the right thought out answer that takes into account and takes into consideration those people's concerns, which they are valid, they're their concerns, sure. Then you'll be able to start to like help people think differently about it.

Speaker 4: 00:30:42 There you go. To meet people where they are today, I think we can all do that as a country and you know exactly. I mean we are and you and I both like to bring people together and just philosophically. And it does kill me that our America is two different ones and we don't really talk to each other and I would love a little bit more dialogue. Yes, I agree. So, so. Okay, fine. That day comes and then you're like, well I guess I do edible events all the time.

Speaker 2: 00:31:14 I mean, well okay, so this is where the, that was the beginning of my education in life as an entrepreneur because prior to that moment you like one, two, w nine or w two. What? I don't even know how like, because it didn't matter because I had a fulltime job always, like I started working at the gap when I was like, yeah, that's it. So, um, so this was the first time I was like, oh wait, how does this work? It's not direct deposit. I need to figure out not just the money and yeah. And so, so that was an interesting. That was,

Speaker 4: 00:31:52 were you, did you feel emboldened? Did you feel?

Speaker 2: 00:31:56 No, I was so angry. I mean I like in 2014 I was not like, oh, I'm going to turn all of this around, this is going to be great. No, not at all. And still, I mean edible events was a, was a, was a huge loss leader, but every single step of the way I just, it just made sense to keep going because once the fourth, the fourth. So the first three events, every single one became more and more popular. More and more people actually bought ticket, like actually found it on their own and purchase a ticket to attend. By the fourth one we were talking about doing a brunch cocktail party or whatever. I still could see clearly that this is not a company, you know, I mean event companies also are not like having major exits like people do it because they, it's the passion and they love what they do, but it's not like a scalable business and it's, it's hard to make it a profitable business model if you want the actual experience of every single person to be great.

Speaker 2: 00:32:55 Yes, totally. Totally. You can, as soon as you start cutting corners will make money. But yes. So yeah, so totally. So I knew the events where I had to keep doing them, but I knew, I knew I wanted to do something much bigger and I could just see you can, I couldn't even see. It just could see like blue ocean, like this could go anywhere, what are, what's next. Um, but by then the Colorado Symphony Orchestra had like, reached out and want it and that was so gross. Like that was such a huge important at the time partnership, like the Colorado Symphony Orchestra Organization. Yeah. That yeah, that totally understands that like this is like this is a progressive city. The voters of Colorado chose this and and candidly like, like they wrote actually the New York Times wrote this whole post about how composers through history have used all, you know, heroin and opium and all sorts of substances, not just not something as harmless as cannabis they wrote and I was like, like to inspire them and that this is such a unique combination.

Speaker 2: 00:34:02 And then when you look at how many things are like Beethoven and brews and like wine and beer related, it's so logical that like, that, like that pulled me through the summer. I probably would have. Yeah. So the Colorado Symphony Orchestra events happened out in this huge gorgeous art gallery called on the space gallery on Santa Fe in Colorado. And Michael Burnett was originally a partner. He was designing the space when I was designing the events and he was like, by the summer we're going to have this huge open spaces to me. Amazing. And he and he did and it's gorgeous gallery. So that's where the events occurred and there's big art up on the walls and then we had gone and gotten all these adirondack chairs because a lot of our customers were elderly or older. They want to sit. So where am I going? Right, exactly. Really don't care about. No, exactly. Just like where is this? He got all these Undergrad deck chairs and other seating and then um, and everyone paid cannabis company has sponsored them, sponsor the events and then the individual is paid to attend the events. And at the end of three large events plus a red rocks concert, we had raised a quarter million dollars for the Condom Symphony Orchestra from cannabis companies and I have pictures of the and that was still 2014. So a lot of this money came in and cashed in like bags.

Speaker 2: 00:35:22 Those bags, I mean $250,000 is a lot of money no matter who what, where, when. Absolutely. But at that time too, it was just like, yeah, tens of millions of data. Yes. Yes. Especially for somebody orchestra, which is, was announced bankruptcy that year.

Speaker 4: 00:35:40 Amazing. Yes. So that happens through the end of the year. You still don't think that edible events is going to be a thing even after you know? No, because of the,

Speaker 2: 00:35:51 because of all the issues that occurred with the city on while this was happening, like it was important to like keep a strong face and outward facing and hold the symphony events. But meanwhile, like in April, I'm a swat team, had come to one of my events cited and ticket and everyone there I received criminal misdemeanor charges. I wasn't in a criminal courtroom six times resolving the matter and they put me on probation and I couldn't hold, hold, hold another party until four days after four, 20, 2016.

Speaker 4: 00:36:27 Like I was on probation from holding events. That's what the punishment was like. You could go but just don't do this again. Just. Yeah, well I was, yeah, I was on probation.

Speaker 2: 00:36:37 Fine. And then all the lawyer fees for the misdemeanor charges and then the probation was basically like you cannot operate in this space and have any other currency, blah blah blah.

Speaker 4: 00:36:46 So I've, I have not quite had that experience. I have you as you know, done events in the space and had my bank account and merchants accounts kind of shut down and all that. Explain what it feels like, explaining what it's like to feel like a criminal when you know you're not one.

Speaker 2: 00:37:04 Okay, well my criminal or my experience in this realm like got. At first I was like angry, but in like more of like an indignant way. Like okay, this is like I'm hosting a

Speaker 4: 00:37:21 for that. There's security, there's a shuttle. It's as safe as it gets. I have insurance from Lloyd's of London, which I don't have anymore, but at the time I did and the safest thing, right. This is the safest thing you can be doing and I'm receiving

Speaker 2: 00:37:36 criminal charges when they, you know, there's these beer and liquor festivals and whatever. However, like that changed for me at the very first court date because I've never been in a criminal courtroom. And so in Denver is 80 percent white and I spent an entire morning this criminal courtroom and there was not a single other Caucasian person ever brought before the judge,

Speaker 4: 00:37:57 which is a whole different problem. Another totally will. Yeah.

Speaker 2: 00:38:01 But that was, that actually was the first day for me that I was like, oh, like, oh, these things started like becoming so much more like powerful and meaningful and had like, um, like, uh, not activist at that point. Well, I don't want to say that because there's people that are real that are really active as every single time.

Speaker 4: 00:38:24 Oh sure. But in that context too, so many facts and figures I had read and seen. But it gave context though. And each

Speaker 2: 00:38:36 person, I feel that doing things the right way in the industry is, at least in part an activist is my totally agree. And that's where you met that guy. Oh wait, okay. There's all this other side. We got a, we got a lot to do. That was when I started getting involved SSDP right. Because I felt like I didn't even have my talking points. I didn't even. I knew what I was seeing was wrong, but I didn't even have like the talking points and facts and information, so like speak eloquently about it at all. Tell me everything, how much time we're going to have to all the other podcasts. We just have like a whole new podcast called like the betty files. What were the initial lessons from betty? Betty older than I had had only heard about each other until we were put in a hotel room together in New York one weekend in the same room, in the same room. Guys are staying together and so and so it got to the point like I just kept saying, this was really early on. This was right after the swat team and I kept saying things and it's just kinda shake her and be like, no, that's not. No. She's like, no. So we need to. And then she'll just start talking and you'd be like, okay, okay. Yes, I see it. I see. Keep talking. So

Speaker 4: 00:39:48 yes. Got It, got it. So we're legalizing all drugs and she's like, yes. Cool. Okay. I'm all for that. Okay, let's do it. Yeah. At least having sensible policies around these. Right. Okay. So then you meet that. Now you know the people. Right. So you've got your friends like Jen Murray because that's what happened. I mean they were all came to the parties and the parties and then check out fire when I was fired was on the cover of the newspaper. So that was the whole thing. So check out this one. Yeah, totally. Actually that was weird.

Speaker 2: 00:40:32 That was how, that's how um, women grow started and that. Right. So there were because of what had happened with an when the news and the media and like the UK telegraph covered my events and women were writing me like how do I get in the industry? How do I, how do I want to be part of it? I can't. I want to hold events just like yours I want to do. I was like,

Speaker 4: 00:40:57 I don't, I don't know. I was like, I don't know. First of all I, I just got fired from my, I'm not doing this or I got fired and I'm a criminal. Reach out to someone that knows what's going on whole betty. No, no, but, but

Speaker 2: 00:41:14 I did it. I could see from the group of women here, like their feet, their network of other female entrepreneurs and business leaders were, was their foundation. Like that was what, how they turn to each other. They trusted each other and especially when it was so gray, then like I was even more important. Actually. Now it's more important because it's too big. And so, um, well that's a whole different thing, right? Right. So by, but then additionally it became obvious that the legally, the law, that the legalization of marijuana was a local issue. Like I can't help someone not in this state being cut. I can help them through education, but like I, I dunno what is happening and you're safe. I have no idea where you are like, and so, but other women in your state are the best people for you to start organizing with and getting connected to an understanding because you're state is just our state a decade ago.

Speaker 4: 00:42:12 So we're, we're getting to the structure of how it all kind of fanned out across the country. But we're. When was that kind of epiphany moment of okay. I think that there needs to be something like women grow and hey there's that, you know, jasmine hub over there. She's good. Like, when did you know?

Speaker 2: 00:42:35 So, um, so I went to. So there is a group of women in Colorado, they all agreed like women gross should happen, right? Not seeing the black and white picture, right? Yes, yes, yes. They're listed on women grow.com under founding members. So they were like, yes, this should happen. Right. And then I went into the summer with just static web page because again, like we all just shared with me my entire career, my entire professional career. I don't have a big digital skill set. So like I don't like this is my first instagram account ever writing to do instagram before this or anything. So I knew I needed help there. Um, I had, I like women grow.com at that point and was just starting to talk about how we need to do this, why women grow, why women grow those words together. Okay, well they're a why women grow.

Speaker 2: 00:43:24 So I wanted something that would not be obviously cannabis fine for many, many reasons, um, like accounts and such, all sorts of reasons. And um, I also just wanted to use the word I looked into it because originally I was like, girls do this and I totally was like, that was, it was going to be heard of all the ideas and it was like, you know, girls grow, we're girl power or whatever. And as I became more educated about what I should and should not name these things, I was like, oh no, women. And also like just it's women running this, right. Um, so, so women and then grow.com was available. I was like, okay, winning girl, there it is, I guess, you know, and, and then that was it and it resonated with other people. I, um, we're just jasmine come in. So jazz. Okay. So, so I was speaking about the starting of women grow at the Jan at the June 2014, um, cannabis industry conference. And

Speaker 4: 00:44:28 she told me she was in the audience, she sees you just went on about how are you going to do this? Right,

Speaker 2: 00:44:35 right. And then, and so, okay. So meanwhile, so I always try to find the company doing what I want to do and then like study what they've done. And so there was a comedy called women two point. Oh, that basically was women grow for the tech space. Yes it was. But they came out late, like they text me is already existed and was already 95 percent men. Right. So, um, but they were working to fight that and so, but, but I liked the way they were doing it, you know, there are like a dotcom entity. And so I was following what they were doing. So after I got done speaking at the conference, Jasmine came up to me, she had worked at women two point zero. Exactly. Yeah. And I was like, oh my God, like totally lost, totally everything. How do they do this? And how does he do that

Speaker 4: 00:45:22 in both of you want to know from each other and that's how that partnership is born. Yup. That makes all the sense of when did you realize, so you knew that you had something because there were all these people kind of connected with the says, okay, well, but someone in your state can help you and that sounds a little bit chaotic. When did you notice that? It's like, oh, wait a second, this is going to be huge.

Speaker 2: 00:45:44 So okay. So the original plan was that okay, Jasmine is building out the entire digital side and starting to run the marketing and getting people signed up for newsletters and whatnot and while I was just talking like the talking has like this is what we're doing. If you want to get involved, sign up. Well informed. As soon as we figure out how that's gonna work, we'll let you know that there's a newsletter that says that. It's like we're figuring this out. We'll let you know as soon as we figure it out. But it's also the original plan actually was that I was going to spend one year working on a Colorado model or like Colorado is a chapter and I've got like 10 cities. Sure. Okay. And then that mom that I was going to find leaders in each state to me in Colorado and do it there, but instead it just went, everything was hypergrowth in the beginning.

Speaker 2: 00:46:29 There were passionate women in all these states that want to start chapters immediately. I hadn't even had my first meeting, so I didn't know, like we didn't have protocols in place yet and I wanted to, you know, make sure the brand state as unified as possible. And basically everyone just did their very, very best every day for like years. Like it just kept happening. Um, and so yeah, so that. So we just really stuck to it. We didn't knew. I know I knew what it took to hold a large scale conference and the type of um, and time and monetary investment that would be needed to do to the quality that I saw fit. So instead we started hosting these parties around conferences where we would be attracting females to attend the conference. And then additionally, the night before the conference, we'll go on a boat, we'll go, the fall was in Chicago. It was awesome. I was like, that's fine. You're not gonna let me smoke pot around here. I can only get

Speaker 4: 00:47:35 both, make my way to international brand spanx.

Speaker 2: 00:47:40 So, um, so we started having these parties and we'd always do the night before, so, so that by Rivera's women like by the next morning like Oh, I saw you make people feel more comfortable and connected. Right. So,

Speaker 4: 00:47:52 which absolutely worked. And you didn't do your first big thing until the next year, which is why the second one coming up is only the second one, not the third one.

Speaker 2: 00:48:00 Yes. Although technically in May of 2014 we brought together all five. So this really is the third, the third one, the women came from 20 different states for sure, but it was, it was small because it wasn't in matter 25 women in a retreat center, but we took over.

Speaker 4: 00:48:21 But that was almost like you just had to do that. It's felt like a total time, right? Yeah, Yep, Yep. Crazy. Right. Alright. So explosive growth, just like literally stratospheric growth and A. Okay, fine. Great. I'm sitting on top of the volcano and then, I mean that's a flash forward, but to flash forward, Jane and Jasmine are going to go ahead and step back what the hell

Speaker 2: 00:48:50 we may grow had grown to the point that we had a lot of incredible positions, have it available we needed and also the skill set that people have to be good startup entrepreneurs are, is not be fitting for a large scale national organization that needs you and you know, administration and brand consistency and all these things. When did you guys first have that conversation with each other? Back in? Well actually I'd like to know her answer. I don't know if we've ever liked recollected this part, but like basically we, we both also had things that we want to do a certain way like and there's nothing but potential and what she and I aren't. The way I used to compare, the way I used to talk to jasmine about it was like we're both the sun and so like if, if needed we could sustain like a planetary system a plague and then she could sustain a whole planetary system in California, which she's doing now like, and so like the idea that we're both trying to like orbit like it's crazy when there's so much out there and additionally when there's a whole nother set of incredible talent that has a vision for the next five years, you know, and so it was, and also like she and I have such like a dual, like have such a good communication relationship like between each other that it's hard.

Speaker 2: 00:50:29 It would be hard for one of us to leave and the other one stays and like had to be bullets or nothing. All or nothing. Yeah. And I also think that it was important. It's uh, it's really important for the transition of power to just make a clean break and give all of that authority and all of that, you know, blank space to the next team that's taking into the future. Um, and with the size of both of our personalities, that just wasn't possible with us still being around a kind of knowledge. Not everybody can do that. Seriously. Well, yeah. Well also for me, I had entered into the space to do something totally different and somehow I was kind of running a big networking event that you had regular, like I wasn't necessarily really doing something totally different. So, um, because we're looking at all these things now.

Speaker 2: 00:51:25 So from the very, very beginning back to edible events, I was not happy with the selection of products in the space. So for each of the events I would set up different like bars of, you know, glass and we had a joint rolling station and whatnot. And in order to do that I would go to all the different head shops and all the different stores trying to find the right thing. Um, and my two biggest issues were that there was not consistency within product. So handmade items you couldn't buy five of and, and then if you break the one you have, you can't just replace it. Right. Um, and then on the other side of the products that are more mass produced, just weren't as sophisticated as I wanted to see. So I'm so right from the very beginning I definitely wanted, I knew I wanted to make like my own vision of the existing products on the market.

Speaker 2: 00:52:22 Mainly glass and things. Yes. And then additionally, like I love smoking flower. That's, that's my main, a way to consume and yes, and flower flower, flower hour later. Um, and, and as so as legalization occurs nationwide, people are going to want not only just like the functionality of a duck out but like more sophisticated design, more forum to that. You're gonna want to take two different strains out with you. Like I have a strain that's very mild and his high cbd that I used before yoga, every time I do yoga. But then on the other side of my duck out, I would definitely want something with like a more of a sativa pickup. Um, and so I, I want to be able to have that out and on the go with me and I wanted to start creating, started designing products for that, that combined form and function and basically were what I wanted to use, like what would I want, what would be practical, um, what would fit well, like, like into my lifestyle because it was using flour.

Speaker 2: 00:53:29 Cannabis can be like messy, it can be like, oh, the bag broke and my, and, and it's just the way we're doing it isn't, isn't, you know, very well thought out. The product had to catch up. Yes, exactly. So then Jane West, so I want it. Yes, yes. And that's, I mean because that's something I've never done before and where I, you know, I really neat if I really wanted my vision to come to life and not have to give up too much equity in my company, I had to do it all myself. So that's what's that has taken all three years. Now you're truly an entrepreneur. Now I really am. I'm really doing something. I've narrowed on the farm for you. Great. I think I think it's all happening as well. Yes, absolutely. I do. I think one of the things that I love most about what I'm doing now is that I'm creating these tangible products and items and before all what I did was create networks, connections, have it cold experiential events, but like when those events are done, when those meetings are done, you're back to needing to do it again.

Speaker 2: 00:54:37 It's part of like being in the service, more service industry. You can't put your heart or mind on the coffee table. Right, exactly. Right. And so, so I identified that fairly early on, but then it was easy to see that there's so many incredible artists who are making products with cannabis and, and growing incredible flower and making amazing infused products do that. Right. But I know some stuff that I would like to see really different consumer. Yes, exactly. Yeah. So that's why we got to this point. So now we've got the first line and then the second line. So the very first thing I ever wanted to create was revised basically dug outs. So, um, when something that looked more like a makeup compact in my purse, that has been one header that had a way to clean it, had a little mirror and couldn't keep a couple of strains and hold my lighter also because we're always digging around lighter, lighter, right.

Speaker 2: 00:55:35 Um, so I see these compacts, so these are the three d designs and then um, the molds are currently final and we're getting the very first ones, the first ones off the machines next week, the beginning of February. So I'm there. So yeah. So, um, we helped with the compact, which is you can carry two strains in and then we'll have the solo which is more like the smallest version and it's kind of the same size and shape as a Mascara and purse. And then we also designed the classic, which was just kind of a reconfigured, redesigned, dug out that allows you to take two strains on you as well and has like a brushed silver finish. There we go. So those are the first three products that I wanted to create. And originally I wanted the tasters to be glass, I thought I wanted black opaque glass and in trying to figure out how to make my products loss, um, I came to like, uh, you learn that glass is just such a unique, specific medium and the only people you have to find people that are absolute top of their game glass experts in order to design it and have it be what you want because it has a mind of its own.

Speaker 2: 00:56:54 And so that's how, that's what led me to graph. So, um, I came to the realization that my first line of products that are coming out this summer won't have glass in them, but my dream of what the shape and feel of a type of bond I would design or bubblers and I've always wanted to bring back the steamroller because I love steamrollers. Um, and I think they're really user friendly because with like oversized carbs and whatnot. So that led me to grab Downing Austin. And once I met with their team and heard all about like Dave story and his rise in the industry and how they've built this incredible business they built, I was like, oh my God, I want to work with you. Yes. And then we met with their team of designers and steven and Micah and Dave and I talked about what I really like pictured it looking like and what we would be using it for and all the function, um, that I was looking for for entertaining with cannabis. And so we landed on these designs and the, and there we landed on these events. All this happened in nine months. And it's the shows you like. We were both just so eager to get this out there and start working here.

Speaker 4: 00:58:06 You, your third child. Well, so then you can go look on the website for all the things you know and get yourself more educated. And I could sit here all day and we could really continue. But unfortunately we can't. Right? So I'm going to ask you the three final questions. I'm going to tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. So the first one is, what has most surprised you in cannabis? Second is what has most surprised you in life. And the third is on the soundtrack of Jane West's live name one track, one song that's got to be on there. But first things first, simply, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 2: 00:58:43 Um, three years. And right now I'm most surprised at how small it still is. The network of like, I, it's actually heartening for me to see so many people still dedicated to what they want to do. Like you, like we're sitting here and this is the look of it and I'll be like, it's really, really cool. Um, so I think that's what surprised me most because when we started women grow, we were like, it'll never, the industry will never be this small again. And that's always true. But it's still great to see a lot of the same people doing a lot of the same things in really like the cause, the band of brothers and sisters so fast. Okay. Uh, what has most surprised you in life will surprise me in life? I'm slightly bigger question. I think I just thought that like I'd be like old and boring by now

Speaker 4: 00:59:36 just to, I have a job and maybe I don't or whatever.

Speaker 2: 00:59:40 Right. I just, I didn't like, I'm just getting started. Like this is everything. It's okay to be forwarding. Um, what? Yeah, I mean I guess so what you're saying is 40 is the new 12? Yeah. I just, I'm like, oh, okay. I guess I thought that or something would change. I guess when I was younger I thought something would change, the adult thing would happen. And so, so that's, I think the most surprising thing because now I say that when I'm like, so I'm like, oh well I'm 60, I'll be boring, but I probably won't be not. I hope not. Exactly. So.

Speaker 4: 01:00:19 So there you go. So maybe it's possible that the whole thing won't be boring.

Speaker 2: 01:00:22 No, I think. Yeah.

Speaker 4: 01:00:24 So that's pretty good. That's a pretty good answer. All right, Shane, on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song, that's got to be on there. Okay.

Speaker 5: 01:00:33 Mm,

Speaker 2: 01:00:35 this is a really hard question because there are so many, like when I get super high at night, I like to play sweet Jane, but that's like, I don't know about because like he's got to,

Speaker 4: 01:00:47 you're talking about, well you're talking about velvet underground, Lou Reed. Yeah, yeah. Well it felt great but I feel like we shouldn't discount that. I liked that one. What beyond say?

Speaker 2: 01:01:03 So like there's so many and then I last year was huge, like lemonade dropped in the middle of the year or when I can do exactly what I needed it, but it was the whole album, like a lot of really strong feeling. I used to play the, you know, because it's an audio. I'll just play it on goop in my house here. Sure. So, um, so that was big for me too. So. Oh, I. So sometimes I like to play the fiance Taro cards, which is where you like have some, you know, just, you know, you'd say you do tear not play. It's a serious thing. Sure. I don't, I'm not familiar. I'm familiar with the fact that there is a thing in my experiences of having my Tarot cards read. You sit down and someone puts down three cars in front of you and then you like correlate between those three cards. Like how so? Sometimes I just play like beyonce tero and I just put my songs on shuffle and the first three songs that come up have a message about that I need to take into the world beyond say Tara. Yeah. Interesting. Oh, I see.

Speaker 4: 01:02:15 I think we have to leave it there dot. I don't know what to say to that is fantastic. I'm so happy for you to take one. In many ways you've had quite a journey up until now. In many ways. This is just exactly so jamie. Nice to meet you. Nice to finally. Oh my God. Nobody can see this and he just reached out to shake. I don't know why I started doing it and I shake everyone's hand now. That's good. But then it does evoke this bottom one reflects the next meeting by and there you have it,

Speaker 1: 01:03:00 Jane West. Very nice to sit down with Jane and spend some time. I knew some of that history, but certainly not all of it. And uh, you know, was a good chat. I certainly enjoyed it. I hope you did too. Thanks so much for listening and stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.