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Ep.252: Chris Schroeder, Somatik

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.252: Chris Schroeder, Somatik

Ep.252: Chris Schroeder, Somatik

Recorded in March of 2017, Chris Schroeder from Somatik joins us to take us through his cold brew coffee with a flexible functional dose of cannabis. Regarding the delivery system, Chris is introducing newcomers to cannabis through a product with which they’re already familiar. Avid users have noticed the partnership with Ritual Coffee- a made in the bay area icon. Chris points out that there are myriad parallels between coffee and cannabis in that there are connoisseurs, there are people that drink it all day long and yet there are some that can’t drink it past 3pm. No matter what, if you have a relationship with coffee, you have a relationship with caffeine. Originally from the bay area, Chris came to cannabis as a patient and is happy to be operating a company in his hometown.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Chris Schroeder recorded in March of 2017, Chris Schroeder from somatic joint. Just to take us through his cold brew coffee with a flexible functional dose of cannabis regarding the delivery system. Chris's introducing new commerce to cannabis through a product with which they're already familiar. Avid users have noticed the partnership with ritual coffee, a made in the bay area icon. Chris points out that there are myriad parallels between coffee and cannabis and that there are kind of soars. There are people that drink it all day long, and yet there are some that can't trick it past 3:00 PM, no matter what. If you have a relationship with coffee, you have a relationship with caffeine. Originally from the bay area, Chris came to cannabis as a patient, is happy to be operating a company in his hometown. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends in the world economy from somatic Chris Schroeder. I know. So Matt, are you going now? Are we going?

Speaker 2: Yeah, of course. Yeah, we just start. Your sister, um, somatic is definitely have that, right? Right. Yeah. And there's a k in their case at the end. Yeah. Yeah. Which makes sense. Yeah. That's where it would be. I mean it can be wherever you want. It could be a silent case exactly at the beginning, but it's not. So let's just make sure, because this is a new thing. I mean, you're out there, right? We are. How many retail establishments are you within? Yeah, we're in six dispensary's now and we wanted to keep it kind of small at first just to make sure it was working and makes your customers like it was selling or getting reorders all in the bay area. On the bay area. Yeah. And so now we're just starting sort of our sales uh, effort. Okay. And when you and I are talking, it's march of 2017.

Speaker 2: That's right. But because it's podcast landed, you know, who knows, but you know right now is six dispensaries who knows where you'll be next. Right, right. Um, but before we get to that, what is it? It's coffee and cannabis. Yes. So how do you say it? A, I say it's a really delicious cold grew and fused with just the right amount of cannabis interest in. What I mean by that is a lighter amount of cannabis in order to kind of just give people a nice balanced feeling. It was really looking for a, what I call a flexible functional dose. Um, so how many milligrams is it? Fifteen milligrams for an eight ounce bottle. Um, and you know, that's still for some people laughably small and for some people are way too big. Right? So, you know, that's the nice thing about cannabis. Everybody's different. Absolutely. And it's on the big end for me because I'm in New York and not in California, so I have no, uh, you know, tolerance.

Speaker 2: I have to start low and go slow is I have to do well. I use cannabis every day and it's still a, it's still two doses for me. Interesting though. Um, so why do we need this again? What's the point here? Well, I think the point is to give people something that tastes good and that they might already have a relationship with. So it's really came about with cannabis, helped me quite a bit with a physical injury recovery and it's helped with like mental health, general life anxiety, enjoying yourself more, being creative, um, because life is stressful. It is stressful just generally. It can be. It absolutely is. I'm with you there. Right. And uh, I, you know, I have a lot of friends who are interested in trying cannabis but it's still pretty intimidating to them. They don't know how to best ingested or how much to take.

Speaker 1: Chris Schroeder recorded in March of 2017, Chris Schroeder from somatic joint. Just to take us through his cold brew coffee with a flexible functional dose of cannabis regarding the delivery system. Chris's introducing new commerce to cannabis through a product with which they're already familiar. Avid users have noticed the partnership with ritual coffee, a made in the bay area icon. Chris points out that there are myriad parallels between coffee and cannabis and that there are kind of soars. There are people that drink it all day long, and yet there are some that can't trick it past 3:00 PM, no matter what. If you have a relationship with coffee, you have a relationship with caffeine. Originally from the bay area, Chris came to cannabis as a patient, is happy to be operating a company in his hometown. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends in the world economy from somatic Chris Schroeder. I know. So Matt, are you going now? Are we going?

Speaker 2: Yeah, of course. Yeah, we just start. Your sister, um, somatic is definitely have that, right? Right. Yeah. And there's a k in their case at the end. Yeah. Yeah. Which makes sense. Yeah. That's where it would be. I mean it can be wherever you want. It could be a silent case exactly at the beginning, but it's not. So let's just make sure, because this is a new thing. I mean, you're out there, right? We are. How many retail establishments are you within? Yeah, we're in six dispensary's now and we wanted to keep it kind of small at first just to make sure it was working and makes your customers like it was selling or getting reorders all in the bay area. On the bay area. Yeah. And so now we're just starting sort of our sales uh, effort. Okay. And when you and I are talking, it's march of 2017.

Speaker 2: That's right. But because it's podcast landed, you know, who knows, but you know right now is six dispensaries who knows where you'll be next. Right, right. Um, but before we get to that, what is it? It's coffee and cannabis. Yes. So how do you say it? A, I say it's a really delicious cold grew and fused with just the right amount of cannabis interest in. What I mean by that is a lighter amount of cannabis in order to kind of just give people a nice balanced feeling. It was really looking for a, what I call a flexible functional dose. Um, so how many milligrams is it? Fifteen milligrams for an eight ounce bottle. Um, and you know, that's still for some people laughably small and for some people are way too big. Right? So, you know, that's the nice thing about cannabis. Everybody's different. Absolutely. And it's on the big end for me because I'm in New York and not in California, so I have no, uh, you know, tolerance.

Speaker 2: I have to start low and go slow is I have to do well. I use cannabis every day and it's still a, it's still two doses for me. Interesting though. Um, so why do we need this again? What's the point here? Well, I think the point is to give people something that tastes good and that they might already have a relationship with. So it's really came about with cannabis, helped me quite a bit with a physical injury recovery and it's helped with like mental health, general life anxiety, enjoying yourself more, being creative, um, because life is stressful. It is stressful just generally. It can be. It absolutely is. I'm with you there. Right. And uh, I, you know, I have a lot of friends who are interested in trying cannabis but it's still pretty intimidating to them. They don't know how to best ingested or how much to take.

Speaker 2: And I wanted to create something that would be easy for them to try. It wasn't too strong of a dose. It's something that um, you know, it tastes good and I wanted to pick something would help normalize people's view of cannabis and Min Max matching it with something like coffee, something. Most people have some sort of relationship with. Sure. And there's a lot of parallels between coffee in cannabis, like in the way that we've developed kind of soars and education in the way that some people drink it all day long and the way that some people can't have it past 3:00 PM. I'm one of those people, right, or it shouldn't, uh, and in the way that people have, you know, they're sort of ritual around how they use caffeine in cannabis. Uh, yeah. So that's where the, you know, that relationship with a newer user or a lower, uh, you know, uh, not so often user.

Speaker 2: When is, what are you hearing from, you know, now the drought there from the dispensary's, from the consumers themselves, when do they like to have this unique kind of thing? Because I did and I can tell you my experience, but I wonder what else you've heard. Yeah, I mean I've had some people of me, they start the day with it, you know, some people, it's thereafter after lunch sort of slump. Some people it's the weekend, like take some before I go on a weekend adventure. Like a hike. Yeah, that'd be perfect. Do you have been surprised by people using it in a lot of different ways and not just people that are new to cannabis? Like, like I said, I use cannabis every day, but some people that are pretty avid users are still really enjoying it. Just I think because it tastes good. I mean that's the main thing is it tastes great.

Speaker 2: Just like coffee, good coffee. It was what you did, right? Yeah. Yeah. So we actually partnered with a company called ritual coffee roasters. They're in San Francisco, they're kind of purveyors of single origin grower to roaster coffee, um, and they focus on, uh, you know, working directly with farmers in countries around the world to get coffees that you can't find anywhere else that are ethically sourced, sustainably sourced, and just taste really, really good. So we formed a partnership together. I went down to rituals headquarters once a week and I'd worked with their educator and their roaster and their team and we'd do like blind taste tests. We'd try different means, different roasts styles. So we really put in a lot of work together to figure out what kind of being blend and brew type would work best with a cannabis beverage. And the idea was to kind of, um, you know, make the coffee the star and hopefully make the cannabis flavor pretty subtle.

Speaker 2: So you're really just tasting a great coffee that has a nice bonus right there. Yeah. Also there's this, right. All right. So obviously we're talking to somebody that was a Barista at starbucks for 10 years and now this is what you do. No. So let's go all the way. But where are you from originally? A Bay area. Oh, so you're from here? Yeah. Yeah. I was born in Palo Alto. Stanford Children's hospital. Look at you a little Ronald Mcdonald that coming by the nursery. So your parents were in tech or what? No, my parents were hippies that moved out of here from Ohio and my mom was an artist and my dad is a therapist and they just, uh, were attracted to the bay area and then we moved up north by Lake Tahoe and that's Kinda where I spent most of my childhood there up there. Got Not necessarily Palo Alto up by Lake Tahoe right up there.

Speaker 2: Being like the elevation of. Yes, yes. There's no. Um, and then came back to the bay area for college. I've been here again ever since. Where did you go to college? It's called Dominican University. It's up in Sandra fell. Really small. Little Americans can go. Yeah. You said Dominican, the Dominican, sort of a, a sect of nuns and church. Interesting. So are you, do you have your faith that. Is that an important thing to, you know, so a Dominican says we're a Catholic by heritage, not by practice. And that is kind of what I say. Yeah, that's what I say to, you know, we went to some Catholic things all through growing up and then as an adult it's sort of like part of my heritage of my practice and I practice like a little bit, but I should practice more I guess if want to be good at it right now it makes perfect.

Speaker 2: Yeah, exactly. That's what they say. Alright. So what did you. Well, how did you find this school? I've never heard of it. I apologize for my ignorance. Yeah, no, it's just a really small school. I was just looking for things that were in California that were in sort of the bay area, like a new one that'd be just want it to stay. Why do you love this place? So much like you want it to be here forever and you know, we're uh, in the gateway headquarters, so there's the gateway train as I call it, really Amtrak. But, you know, it's also the BP treat bpg train. Train. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think that train noise is a great example, right? I'm sitting in a really cool office that we. Cannabis incubator across the street from Amtrak. Two steps from the bay in Jack London Square.

Speaker 2: Like where else would I want to be? What's wrong? Yeah. Name the things that are wrong with that. Yeah, it's going to be about 70 today. Um, you know, it's just a. no, I mean it's a really diverse, it's a diverse area. It's diverse, uh, socially diverse economically. It's maybe not diverse politically, but it's a little bit of a liberal Mecca, but it's just a fun. It's a fun place to be and it's one of the only places I've ever been where, uh, if you have an idea, you can make it happen. You can actually turn it into a company and then become a billionaire. It's not just necessarily who you know or what you're bringing to the table, it's just if you have a really good idea, you can find someone that will support it, which is cool. So then what did you major in at?

Speaker 2: Was at Dominican University? Dominican University of California. Okay. Um, what was your major? A mass communications mass communications. So this is like, you know, this is like pre facebook, so you know, it'd be like learning how media works at Radio and television, do journalism, newspapers and magazines started as a classical music major, uh, as uh, someone that plays something to do. I would sing and sing really, uh, and uh, but you know, when I did it, I did it for two years and it was kinda like what I loved about music was being part of a community and a group and being in courses and classical music performances, a lot of practicing by yourself. So classical. So I love classical music but don't know anything about it. So like Beethoven's ninth is what comes to mind because there's a moral aspect to it. I mean, during that time you're looking at a lot of like Italian and German Arias, so a lot of pieces where you to go up and maybe there's like a accompaniment with a piano or a violin or maybe it's a four part sort of chamber chorus where there's four of you.

Speaker 2: Are you a baritone or you a baritone or a base? Kind of. Depends on. Oh, you can go all the way down. You can go all the way down. Did you do, uh, also the, um, what's that called? The acapella stuff? Or was that kind of thing that would be beneath you, wouldn't it? A classical vocalist? Well, no, I mean classical vocalists are probably the original acapella people ride that we had a, what we called a magical, not magical, a magical like Al Madrigal yet chamber chorus. And that was, what was it? Let's see. There's 16 people each. There's two. There's two people for each part and kind of like Noah's Ark. Yeah. So basically says basically all, all Acapella, if you will, but really, really beautifully boring pieces. No, but I want to hear it though. Why Boring? Why would it be boring? Slow or.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Is, you know, it's not exactly like a beat to the lungs. What? What's your take on Barbara? Barbara ship. Why is that so difficult for me to say what's your shop? Yeah. What's your take on barbershop? Love it. Wow. I can't even say it. Barbershop quartets? Yeah. Wow. That's exciting. I do love it. Yeah, that's great. Okay. I love that too. Like in very small doses. Yeah. But like the uh, the whole concept I love. Yeah. That's. And that's pretty fun too. I mean we used to go and do like caroling in our little chorus and I said the closest thing to something fun like that that we did interesting. Um, but it was a cool platform. I get to sing with the in symphony for a while and oh wow. Do you know a lot of fun stuff, but it just, it was clear that it was more like a hobby, not a passion for a career because I've, I didn't know that you could do that even.

Speaker 2: Yeah, because I don't walk around singing anymore. So you know, oh, I need one. I don't mean, you know, I didn't know, but now I'm glad we discussed it. So then when, when did you realize that you're like, okay, I'm not going to make money from my vocal cords, it's more going to be what? Yeah. Um, I mean, yeah, I think I just turned my eyes to like what else really interested me. And then I've always been a big fan of psychology and how people think that's the dad, right? Yeah. Right. And uh, and just general like I'm curious about people and, and what gets the message across and so natural extension was communications. Sure. And so that's how we got to mass communication gets messy. So you and I are both old people is, is how this sounds now, right? Because you said pre facebook and so for many people that are listening it's like, well what does that even mean?

Speaker 2: What, why would they. You mean there was that. I mean in fairness, there was facebook on Stanford's campus. Sure. If you went to like a large university, there was facebook when I was in college, but not for my small college. Not to be like lead in specifically and be part of campus x, Y, or z. So you are are accustomed Kinda guy. I'm Ben Larson from gateway was just saying yesterday that he thinks that there is generation y, which is separate from millennials. Millennials being in his opinion, 85 to 2000 vets when they were born. He thinks generation y was born between 1980 and 85 and before that his generation accent before that is boomers. Well, I'm in. That could be true. I mean I still had to plug into a modem and dial up. Right. So you remember things like that. So you think you so generation, does that make you.

Speaker 2: I don't know. What year were you born? Eighty one. Yeah. So then as far as Ben Larson is concerned, your generation y, as far as other people are concerned, you might be a millennial now. Do you consider yourself a millennial? I don't run. I think that is a pretty big cultural difference. I think when I think of millennials, I think of people who've grown up sort of with all digital wireless Internet from, from as long as they can remember, I think it does change their, the way that they communicate and um, their relationship to technology in a different way. But for us it was like this magic thing that had just come and for them it was just always there. Right. And it's not a huge difference. Uh, but I think it's, it, it's enough to change the way you kind of process information and build community and think about sort of organizing and making stuff.

Speaker 2: Yeah, absolutely. And so then you get your degree in mass communications, which um, you know, obviously was obsolete the day that you graduated. Yep. Yep. As we're discussing. Uh, and so then where did you go? What did you do a actually wanted to retail for awhile. How so? Well, I said I had this part time job and it just kinda kept it because I really liked it, like at the gap. Yeah. Basically as a commander, republic really is. Wow. So we were this really large store and I was fortunate to get on what we call the visual merchandising team. Oh. So that's a real job though. That's not just like, let me fold this chair. I was the men's visual merchandising manager, which means you're really in charge of like the bottom line of making sure that units are moving in, that you're hitting sort of your sales goals at a store level.

Speaker 2: At the store level. Yeah. And what was really exciting about it was realizing that, you know, you're not just making things pretty, that these, these actually do affect whether something sells or not, which is an extension of psychology is. And that is basically marketing. And so then I decided, all right, I'm really into marketing psychology meets communications meets like pretty kind of merchandising. And so then that turned into kind of going to work for a smaller company. One was called wildlife works. That was my college internship at Dominican, which we found in a binder because, you know, again, there was no, uh, there's no craigslist probably back then either.

Speaker 3: No, there were binders. That's so amazing to like make myself sound so old, but I think this is, I know, but I mean, I, I would imagine if you actually, if you go back and there's like 200, whatever episodes, this is a fascinating thing to me because of what you said, uh, which is what I feel and think which is generation x people you know, think and act a certain way, a millennials think and act a certain way. Boomers think and act a certain way. And then, you know, I think Ben has a point here about this, like you guys in that five year period because you're not generation x, but you're also not millennial if you're looking through a binder, right? So you don't sound old to most of the people, but what we do have, which is pretty cool. We were still on

Speaker 2: the side of the cust that's like, you can be whatever you want to be like if you dream it, you can do it where there's a will, there's a way. Um, and I think for the most part that's true and I think it's become more and more true for millennials. Uh, as new economies have been emerging with a, the job hopping and such are just like, what is the job and like what constitutes a career and how do you make an income. I mean, there's so many ways to do it, um, that weren't around for the baby boomers, boomers or gen x or even us. Exactly. So, um, you know, future of work is what they call it and it's all, you know, Tim Ferris, you know, have you read anything by Tim Ferriss or haven't listened to anything by him. He's a, it's in, it's an interesting thing.

Speaker 2: So, uh, so, okay, great. So we're in marketing now, so we went to this, uh, you know, kind of a internship that we found in a binder and then where did we get an actual job? Yeah. So, uh, that actually turned into my first real marketing. So then what company was this, what was called wildlife works and they have this really cool innovative sustainability model and their goal was to help save endangered species in Africa and they looked at sort of the reasons that we're causing, um, sorta degregation and poaching. And it was really down to economic viability for the communities they, uh, you know, they didn't have enough to eat or enough viable source of income, job options. And so it was founded by Mike Christian ski and he thought, well, what if instead of putting aid towards like blocking off a piece of land or creating a sanctuary and putting gardens there, what if I partner with the community and I give them sustainable jobs, I give them skills that they can use anywhere, not just for me.

Speaker 2: And I helped them sort of build a community. So he went in and helped teach them all how to, um, so, which is a skill that they can use anywhere for anything, shouldn't have to be working for wildlife works and uh, built a factory. I'm created a wildlife sanctuary around it in partnership with the community, help them build some schools and some infrastructure. And from a sustainability perspective is pretty wildly successful. I mean, they brought a couple of species off the endangered species list. Um, they, one of the coolest things I thought was a, a, a child of the community member went to college. That's the first time anyone had really had any education and let alone a secondary education in a formal way and it was really cool. They actually are still around and they have a show on animal planet called Ivory Wars, which documents them and their work to sort of stop poachers encroaching on the Savo, eastern Western national parks where the elephants migrate because if you know how to make a shirt, you don't necessarily have to sell that Tusk.

Speaker 2: Right. Well then in the idea was that the shirts are being sold to protect the schools and so the animals have to be there in order to make the story true so that people want to buy the shirts so you get a great in from the community. And um, so I came in again, you know, like when facebook's just started, but like facebook pages help them launch a retail store. Um, and uh, had a, had a really fun time working for something that I felt like had a really positive impact on the planet and had a really, really innovative model. Like, no one had really done what Mike had done in that way before, which is why I think people got really attracted to it and why it's still successful today. Well then why would you ever leave something like this? Well, there's, you know, there's a lot of ups and downs.

Speaker 2: So we opened a retail store and we put a lot of capital into it and then, you know, we had a little economic kickup as did the rest of the country. The globe. Yeah, I heard about that. And so, you know, while they've worked, really pulled in and focused mostly on, it's a broad activities and less on. It's a infrastructure here. So, so we parted ways and then I started working at a really cool local company called Rick Shaw bag works that again was mission driven and they had admission to revitalize manufacturing and urban cities like San Francisco and uh, to make a kind of cradle to cradle sustainable products that could be recycled, um, at every step of the way. Why cradle to cradle to cradle to grave? Well, because the grave is like the trashcan got it. So cradle to another different cradle, so cradle to cradle is that like every, every, every ingredient in the product can be recycled or up cycled into something different.

Speaker 2: Fantastic. And oftentimes when people up cycle things, they actually are using tactics to make it stronger or to make a new material out of it that then make that byproduct not recyclable anymore. So we might take these bottles and recycle them into, I don't know, a shirt but add 10 cell to the shirt to make it stronger or shiny or a stretchier, but the 10 cell makes it not recyclable anymore. So we would use a lot of sort of nylon products and things like that that are really sturdy and durable but essentially are still just bottles and that can infinitely be recycled again and again. So you can take a. I mean you would never need to throw a shaw bag away because they last forever, but if you want to throw it in the recycling bin and it could just be recycled there you go.

Speaker 2: Or you could just start with hemp, right? Yeah, yeah. There's that. So. Okay. So that sounds like a fun thing, but then you went to something else because you were telling me about the fact that you worked at a jawbone. Yeah, yeah. Well, I realize I live in the bay area my most of my life and I'd still never done tech tech, right. So I wanted to do that. And uh, by this time I was really into the Internet, so most of my job was digital marketing and a kind of website optimization, ab testing and getting kind of applying psychology and marketing to like how people make purchasing decisions. Yep. Um, and we ab testing, I, I just, uh, talking to someone that appreciates psychology, you know, what, what's your take on the fact that we're going to give this group, this, we're going to give that group that we're going to see what the reactions are.

Speaker 2: You know, how do you come to ab testing as a kind of a unlicensed psychologist? I call myself, by the way, an unlicensed anthropologists. Um, I think it helps you make A. I mean, it's really about making hypotheses, right? So you're kind of asking yourself a question and you're trying not to validate your preexisting sort of notions of what trying as hard as you might like, why is someone doing this or not doing this? But the answer is usually a Ui or ux thing. It's not usually marketing or psychology really. It's about usability. Like it's, if you make it easy for someone to understand or to flow with, um, you can guide their behavior. Yeah.

Speaker 3: It's not you. It's me. Yeah. Alright. So now you're all digital, right? So where does this cannabis coffee thing come up? I mean because this, you know, is not digital. This is a thing.

Speaker 2: Well, I mean, yeah, but nothing I've done has been digital, right? Uh, well you were a job on doing the digital stuff. Yeah. But we made a physical product that I thought was really cool. You know, we made a, a Bluetooth headsets, speakers and fitness trackers. Every product, every company I've worked for has been a product company. Fair enough. And so basically I feel like, you know, my most of my exposures to products in some form. So I wanted to make product, but I wanted to do one for me, right. I liked and I wanted to, uh, I guess do something that I thought really did have a positive impact on people, but maybe people didn't know how to utilize it or how to experiment with it or how to feel comfortable with it. Um,

Speaker 3: but where did that start? It. So you know, your relationship with cannabis and then because basically, um, without using the word enabler, uh, it, it seems like you have to use that word without using that word, but I did. You're exactly right. Uh, because I'm, I'm, I, I want to use it as a crutch as opposed to use it definitively. You seem to have an extremely positive relationship with cannabis yourself and it seems like you also want other people to understand, you know, at least in part your positive relationship. Like why, how did you get to, you know, it's so specifically I'm spreading the, you know, the kind of magic of this plant to me, that's how I take it.

Speaker 2: Yeah. I mean, I think just like anything else, cannabis isn't for everybody. Sure. Um, I would just want people to have a way that they feel comfortable with experimenting with it to see if it's right for them. I want people to be able to try it for the first time and have a positive experience. Why is that your drive, I guess is my question. Um, I guess, I mean because it hasn't really had, has, had a positive impact on my life. Uh, you know, it helped a lot with a severe physical injury recovery. Yeah. What happened, what we tell them to fully ruptured discs in my l two l three spine and I'm 66. So you're that tall, know you're tall. But that's crazy. Yeah. So I'm really tall and so it's basically repetitive stress injury from bending at the waist all the time to reach short counters, short chairs duck through doors through bart.

Speaker 2: Yeah. You know, it's, you're doing the wrong thing all the time. Um, and so I had this injury is pretty severe, you know, it wasn't able to really walk for a month. I had like, oh my God. Yeah. I was on disability for a while, uh, in a lot of pain and that's still something that exists every day. I have to do work every day and I'm in pain at some point every day, but cannabis helped me to better understand the relationship between my, between my mind and body and um, and uh, help with that physical therapy. So there's like one thing of teaching yourself how to do it and there's this other way of feeling what you're doing in a way that I think makes sense, at least to my brain and when I'm using cannabis that really just ties those two together in a way where I feel like I'm really learning that internal conversation type of thing.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Just not just the physical therapy that I'm doing, but why is it working? Why isn't it working? And like, you know, just more in tune with the kind of holistic side of my body. Um, and then it's also been a huge a help with, you know, overall mood stabilization and creativity and anxiety and things like that. So I think it, it can have a really positive benefit for people. And I don't want to suggest that, uh, it does or doesn't for any person, I just want to help them be able to have a positive experience in trying it so they can find out for themselves. Yeah. Yeah. Hey, it works for me. This is how it might, we know. Here's an introduction to how it might work for you. Understood if it doesn't. And I think, you know, cannabis also is great at building a community and I think great at sometimes finding common ground between people who don't always see that they have common ground.

Speaker 2: So we really need that. Now you realize that, right? I mean the whole world is kind of angry at each other, you know? Yeah, exactly. So if we could all Kuhn by aisle a little bit, I think the world would be a little bit of a better place. Like literally give an inch on either side, no matter where you're coming from. Everyone just step into the middle a little bit. Yeah. No matter what direction you're just assuming we all know there's the middle all step into the middle. Yeah. Let's do the Hokey pokey. You know, uh, I mean, I think that the ideal would be if everybody could find a way to flex to the left and to the right of their own viewpoint, whatever it is, whatever it is, can you just step two steps to the left and the right? Because what I can tell you about physical therapy is it all comes down to flexibility.

Speaker 2: Now. We're not flexible in our bodies and we're not flexible on our viewpoints in the world. Kind of the same thing. You're going to break something, you know, so we just gotta be flexible and cannabis helps me get flexible. I like it. It works for me. I'm in, I'm 100 percent in. Um, you know, I, I just want to ask you a couple last things. I have three final questions which I'll ask you a, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. But before that you looked away because we're sitting here together and I thought to myself, he looks like Vincent Van Gogh. Have you ever heard that? Because you have this kind of blonde slash red beard, you know, you do have both years. I should point that out only when I'm looking towards you though, right? Yeah. Oh, there's only one.

Speaker 2: Exactly. I have heard that one you have or twice before, but not often. Not Regularly. Like literally, maybe twice. But it's like now I feel like it's uncanny. But you're saying it's not really. I mean, because who knows? I just have that impressionist painting to look at who can say. Yeah. All right. So, uh, that he uh, did you know, did you hear the story about what, what the, what happened with the ear? He cut off his own ear to an mailed a tid. A woman I think. Right? To tell her that he was in love with her or something. Yeah. You don't know. Now I just want to talk to you about Vincent Van Gogh, right? For no reason. I mean maybe Vincent Van Gogh needed some cannabis. Yeah, I think so. He's Dutch. The Dutch election is today, speaking of opposite sides of the thing and keep my fingers crossed.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Well we'll see. See what happens. Um, all right, so I'm glad we talked about Vincent Van Gogh. Is there anything else that we should talk about before we, uh, you know, get to the last bit. I'm like, let go as far as expansion. Like how much do we want to be a gigantic, like, you know, are we talking about the, the, the, the, the folgers, the, the, uh, you know, the brim. Do you remember Brianna? No, I mean I'm, one of the reasons they partnered with ritual is because they are a single origin coffee provider and so it's always going to keep it on the smaller side compared to folgers, right. But large enough that we can still be a national brand. A ritual can grow with me to um, a good size and I think, you know, I want to keep it in the specialty coffee world.

Speaker 2: Um, but you know, being in the bay area, I'm sure you see there's lots of specialty coffee around and I think that's because it, it tastes good and I think people feel good when they know that their coffee's coming from a sustainably sourced place where people are being paid. Fair, fair trade wages. Yeah. And you said there's, I always get weirded out when there's the fair trade blend at starbucks because it's like, so are the rest of them just, they're not fair trade. This is the fair trade blend. Yeah. That I personally wouldn't call attention to the fact that the rest of my coffee isn't. No, that's where you get into the fact that a starbucks must be a corporation if, if they can have a decision like that. Yeah, they do. That is, if that's branding they choose. It's like, okay, we should probably have other conversations.

Speaker 2: This is what your but whatever, you know they're doing fine. I think. Well, and who knows where they started. I mean, I don't know, you know, when they had one coffee shop in Seattle, if they thought they'd be. And literally international, probably the most well known coffee company and the non. Yeah. Um, it used to be the third place. It used to be work home and then starbucks. But they've gone away from that because there are fewer seats there now. There used to be couches, you remember that? Yeah. They don't do that anymore. Yeah. I, you're a coffee guy, right? I mean, I should talk to you about coffee. Yeah. What would you, what's the Best Cup of coffee you've ever had in your life?

Speaker 2: Well, I mean, uh, honestly the best cup of coffee I ever had was when I first moved to San Francisco and I was walking down the street and everything was new and shiny and I found this really cool cafe that just looked cool. It was like, what is this? And I walked in and it was a ritual cafe and I had a, just a drip coffee, which at the time was prepared with French Press. Sad that like nice mouth feel is a little bit of sediment in it. And you know, I hadn't had any coffee quite like that because ritual really focuses on light roasts. Their darkest roast is lighter than some people's light roast. Got It. Uh, so it just has a different flavor and a different feel and it's always my favorite coffee ever since, which is why I approached them with this partnership in mind.

Speaker 2: Um, there you go. So then we end at the beginning, you see how he did that. I didn't even have to shop the idea around it. Just said this is my favorite coffee. Will you work with me and let's do this place. Yeah. Yeah. Um, okay. Three final questions. Like I said, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of Chris's life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? You do have this wonderful relationship. This might sound weird, but I haven't been that surprised by cannabis. Like it's, it's kind of like what I thought it would be. It's an industry that's trying to become standardized and, and gain some sort of political notoriety. Um, it hasn't been that before. So people are trying to get there.

Speaker 2: It's community driven, uh, mean. I think that's the first, by the way, I'm not saying that I'm not that surprised. I mean, I don't know. I haven't been in it before, but it looks kind of exactly like I thought it would look. I'll tell you what I like about it. I like that it's extremely community driven and that people are always willing to help. Um, you know, I, I don't think people look at each other as sort of competitors were like, I can't talk to you because you do something similar. It's like everyone, most people are in it for the plant and the more the merrier. And I think people are sophisticated enough to know that different products are gonna appeal to different people for different reasons. And so like, let's all just try best and appeal to as many people as possible and help, you know, help the plan. There you go. Um, or a, a new friend, Carson higbee flowers told me you helped the plant and the plant will help you. There we go. Um, so that's why I liked the most about it. No, that's what I was hoping. I was fine though. So I guess I didn't feel super surprised you realized your, uh, that the first time someone's ever said that I'm not that surprised. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Um, what has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 2: I think in general, I'm surprised that there are continuously new communities of people that are always willing to come and support, support each other. Look at Mr Silver lining now. That's positive. Come on. That's nice. It is. I mean, and even in, you know, I don't know in the even in the space that we're at right now where we can all agree that like, no one is very flexible in politics or in social things right now. Um, there are still people that are coming together and are trying and there are still people that um, are really excited about. I don't know. I guess what we can all build together and

Speaker 2: I think that's neat. That is neat. That's pretty neat. I think that's a, a Gen Gen y a saying a neat, neat, neat. And of course I'm just poking fun. Right? But I mean I did grow up on a lot of Mr Rogers. Oh, sort of like how factories work and how to treat your neighbor. Sure. Do you, do you change your shoes when you go home? Like I, yeah, like he used to change his shoes when he walked in the door. He did the sweater in the jacket and then the shoes and I've just never done that. And I wonder. I've homes handles. You do have home sandals. That's kind of. Yeah, Mr Rogers. He, yeah, like I take off my shoes and I have like these sandals I've put on there. My birkenstock is interesting because my parents are hippies. That moved you from my house. It's the birkenstocks. Yeah, sure. Of course. I don't do shoes in the house if I can, if I can remember, but I just, you know, socks. No, no sandals. Yeah. Anyway, a soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 2: The one that comes to mind. So I'm pretty obsessed with radiohead and sure. My favorite band since like 1996. That sounds about right. That's the first album, right? Right. Yeah. And they have a song called spinning plates. Oh Wow. And I feel like that's a good song about life and being an entrepreneur and making sure the plates keep spinning fields. I think the lyrics are just, feels like spinning plates. It just over and over again and that's kind of how it feels doing this and finding out what you love about life, relationships, all that. The whole thing is keep this shit going. Keep Spinning, keep spinning those plates. Chris, very much appreciate it. Now. Song stuck in my head.

Speaker 1: Of course it should be. Yeah. And there you have Chris Schroeder. Very much appreciated. Speaking with Chris, you know, having a, a real conversation, which uh, which certainly went to a couple different places. I, uh, certainly loved the idea of introducing folks to cannabis through new and different means. So thanks to Chris for his time. Thanks to you for your time. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.