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Ep.256: Crash Barry

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.256: Crash Barry

Ep.256: Crash Barry

Recorded back in January in a parking lot, Crash Barry joins us and discusses the history of cannabis in Maine. Going back to the late 60’s through his time in the Coast Guard in the late 80’s & 1990’s cannabis was grown outdoors. As a participant on the other side of the War on Drugs, Crash saw cannabis driven indoors. After Crash was done with the Coast Guard, he realized his calling and became an author, penning Marijuana Valley- a tome that’s out of print but still available if you look for it. In it, Crash documents the Maine cannabis economy leading up to legalization in 2009. Crash is now on the hunt for good genetics and loves the fact that he’s able to test and know empirically what’s in what he grows.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Crash. Barry joins us and discusses the history of cannabis in me going back to the late 19 sixties through his time in the coast guard in the late 19 eighties and nineties, nineties, cannabis was grown outdoors as a participant on the other side of the war on drugs crash saw cannabis driven indoors. After he was done in the coast guard, he realized his calling. It became an author pending marijuana valley, a tome that's out of print, but still available if you look for in it, crashed documents, the main cannabis economy leading up to legalization in 2009. He's now on the hunt for good genetics and loves the fact that he's able to test and know empirically what's in what he grows. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Crash barriers,

Speaker 2: medical versus recreational. Those were all kind of manmade constructs. You know, I view cannabis as a flower and herb. I'm feeling when we think about medicinal verses recreational. There's this kind of battleground being crafted and I believe all cannabis. I believe all cannabis is medical, whether it's recreational or medicinal. I'm with you there. It's all about wellness and for me it's all about making sure that when we talk about patient access, when we talk about patient access, I mean I want to make sure that people get really good, clean, potent cannabis and under the way it went with medical in Maine, there are some really good cannabis out there and there's some really bad cannabis out there. So we should probably say that this is crashed battery, right? Yes. We should probably let people know. You've written a couple of things, right? If you're documented, you're a documentarian of sorts, a cultural anthropologist.

Speaker 2: Okay. I like that. Do you mind if I'm also a cultural. Oh, thank you. Thank you. I appreciate that. Anyone that's curious. Yeah, it was a cultural anthropologist. There you go. So where, where does this all begin? A mainer. Well, I've only been here for 25 years, only a quarter of a day, a quarter of a century. I was born in Western mass, but I came here to live in a remote remote Maine Island and go lobstering. That's how I got here. After being in the coast guard, I was in the coast guard fighting the war on drugs. There you go. Nineteen eighties. I don't want to. I usually say thank you for your service. I, I, I feel like you wouldn't want me to thank you for that. You know, it's funny. I, I, I look back at that time period now and just shake my head. We. There was a period of zero tolerance and a lot of people that don't remember that period of zero tolerance where if we discovered a fishing boat with a seed on, it has a seed.

Speaker 2: You can see that you can see as a a joint. Oh my goodness. Not even the owners joined like a crewman is joy. So to go from the nineties, is that what? We're 87, 88 Reagan slash Bush, the first Bush and that's when the war on drugs was really going nuts and I think that's what drove. When we talk about the modern candidate cannabis economy, we drove it inside and in Maine it's always been a traditional outdoor industry and when you sat inside, I've wanted to know if you meant indoor grow and yes. Did meet into this and say you're more about sun grown. That's where I think sun grown is where it's at. I think it's going to return to that. I think that the artificial environment of growing indoors is a side effect of prohibition, I believe. Interesting phrasing by the way. I know I'm talking to a writer, a side effect of prohibition.

Speaker 2: It's fantastic. Well, you know what I much prefer than just straight sungard is greenhouse grown. Sure. So you can send the roads. Yeah, and in Maine we have wonderful summers and there are strains that do wonderfully here and it's been an industry in Maine for 50 years. How long? I mean, when we talk about the modern cannabis economy, we don't. We're talking years five, six, seven, 10, 15 in Maine. It's been 50 years. Serve multigenerational marijuana. Growing families. Okay. Well let's. Because I, when I usually talk about multigenerational, it usually goes to Emerald Triangle and obviously it is there. Please take us back to share with us that history. If it's five decades long, how did it begin and all that. I think a lot of it, if you think about the late sixties, let's start a real starting point there. There are a couple different movements that were, and this is historical data that I've gotten from people in the know and there were from source reputable sources that were there, you know, so there are different all over the state.

Speaker 1: Crash. Barry joins us and discusses the history of cannabis in me going back to the late 19 sixties through his time in the coast guard in the late 19 eighties and nineties, nineties, cannabis was grown outdoors as a participant on the other side of the war on drugs crash saw cannabis driven indoors. After he was done in the coast guard, he realized his calling. It became an author pending marijuana valley, a tome that's out of print, but still available if you look for in it, crashed documents, the main cannabis economy leading up to legalization in 2009. He's now on the hunt for good genetics and loves the fact that he's able to test and know empirically what's in what he grows. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Crash barriers,

Speaker 2: medical versus recreational. Those were all kind of manmade constructs. You know, I view cannabis as a flower and herb. I'm feeling when we think about medicinal verses recreational. There's this kind of battleground being crafted and I believe all cannabis. I believe all cannabis is medical, whether it's recreational or medicinal. I'm with you there. It's all about wellness and for me it's all about making sure that when we talk about patient access, when we talk about patient access, I mean I want to make sure that people get really good, clean, potent cannabis and under the way it went with medical in Maine, there are some really good cannabis out there and there's some really bad cannabis out there. So we should probably say that this is crashed battery, right? Yes. We should probably let people know. You've written a couple of things, right? If you're documented, you're a documentarian of sorts, a cultural anthropologist.

Speaker 2: Okay. I like that. Do you mind if I'm also a cultural. Oh, thank you. Thank you. I appreciate that. Anyone that's curious. Yeah, it was a cultural anthropologist. There you go. So where, where does this all begin? A mainer. Well, I've only been here for 25 years, only a quarter of a day, a quarter of a century. I was born in Western mass, but I came here to live in a remote remote Maine Island and go lobstering. That's how I got here. After being in the coast guard, I was in the coast guard fighting the war on drugs. There you go. Nineteen eighties. I don't want to. I usually say thank you for your service. I, I, I feel like you wouldn't want me to thank you for that. You know, it's funny. I, I, I look back at that time period now and just shake my head. We. There was a period of zero tolerance and a lot of people that don't remember that period of zero tolerance where if we discovered a fishing boat with a seed on, it has a seed.

Speaker 2: You can see that you can see as a a joint. Oh my goodness. Not even the owners joined like a crewman is joy. So to go from the nineties, is that what? We're 87, 88 Reagan slash Bush, the first Bush and that's when the war on drugs was really going nuts and I think that's what drove. When we talk about the modern candidate cannabis economy, we drove it inside and in Maine it's always been a traditional outdoor industry and when you sat inside, I've wanted to know if you meant indoor grow and yes. Did meet into this and say you're more about sun grown. That's where I think sun grown is where it's at. I think it's going to return to that. I think that the artificial environment of growing indoors is a side effect of prohibition, I believe. Interesting phrasing by the way. I know I'm talking to a writer, a side effect of prohibition.

Speaker 2: It's fantastic. Well, you know what I much prefer than just straight sungard is greenhouse grown. Sure. So you can send the roads. Yeah, and in Maine we have wonderful summers and there are strains that do wonderfully here and it's been an industry in Maine for 50 years. How long? I mean, when we talk about the modern cannabis economy, we don't. We're talking years five, six, seven, 10, 15 in Maine. It's been 50 years. Serve multigenerational marijuana. Growing families. Okay. Well let's. Because I, when I usually talk about multigenerational, it usually goes to Emerald Triangle and obviously it is there. Please take us back to share with us that history. If it's five decades long, how did it begin and all that. I think a lot of it, if you think about the late sixties, let's start a real starting point there. There are a couple different movements that were, and this is historical data that I've gotten from people in the know and there were from source reputable sources that were there, you know, so there are different all over the state.

Speaker 2: It's a big state and uh, but only certain parts of the state can you grow outdoor. You go too far north, forget that's hemp because that's where we should be growing up north main and such. When we get to the, what I call the marijuana belter interior balance about 50, 60, 70 miles wide. It's about 40 slash 50 miles inland. And it goes basically the whole runs parallel to the whole stretch of coast. There were pockets of people throughout that area, Vietnam veterans, that's a back to landers. People who return to the land, hippies, that kind of stuff. That all happened and because mine is so rural and a lot of abandoned agricultural land, a lot of agricultural land abandoned get this after the civil war. Right. And then the paper companies came in and clear cut the mountains of farmland that grew up into trees. So suddenly growers have south facing hillsides where they can log pro mix and on their shoulder.

Speaker 2: Right. I don't even think it was back then. No, but up until recently it was. Yeah. I mean I've heard tales people login x longer than you and I would want to walk to get to their special spa. You know, and what happened was people started growing really wonderful cannabis in Maine. People in New York needed it. People in Massachusetts needed. So there was a candidate economy gorilla where lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots of marijuana. Cannabis grown in Maine when other places had a mystique main green bud grown outdoors with love. Now when that's the case, there's been a lot of that. There was a lot of garbage. We need to, okay, well, let's, before we get to the garbage, we'd, let's stay with the, uh, with the quality cannabis, if you mentioned it. Fifty years of history all the way up through while, I don't know, I'll pick a year.

Speaker 2: Two thousand nine, 2010 was the first summer you could grow. Talk about the difference between before 2009 and after 2009, that summer of 2010. That was actually, I wrote an entire book about it. Uh, and that summer jacket just in case, right? Can I get it on Amazon? Sure. That. Yes. Actually you can though. It's out of print for legal reasons. It is available out there. Marijuana values is what it's called, but it was a very weird transitional period because it was so brand new. Right. And so if you were grown in your backyard, you're worried that the cops were going to come. And if you were used to growing out in the woods, you're like, hey, it would be a lot easier to grow this in my back yard than lugging bales or Promac. So, you know, into the middle of the woods. So there was a kind of a, a weird window of wild west meets people with spreadsheets maybe, you know, and people that had very specific gorilla techniques versus more agricultural botanicals techniques.

Speaker 2: I think in the old paradigm we'd, we may see more a folk folk farming weird things that we wouldn't do anymore because we have testing and we know how to grow more and we share information about what are the right nutrients to use and how to grow organically. Before 2009, my information wasn't readily accessible. Maybe on the Internet there was a little bit. But so when legalization through medical came, we saw an upswing and high quality because people were able to pay attention to it. Like it was a tomato in their garden as opposed to a weed in the woods. Right. There you go. Okay. So you had two ways to go. Once regulations came in, one was dispensary's, uh, and the vertical integration that came along with it. And one was home depot or a caregiver caregiver model. Right. Let's talk to you about the caregiver model, right?

Speaker 2: Because they won't even let me in a dispensary. Is that funny? That's why we're outside Chevron in the call here because they wouldn't let us in the door. I'm surprised that in Frisk me just ask a question. Yeah, just sensories are out of my range of. I can't even begin to imagine what goes on inside there, but I know what goes on out with caregivers. There you go. And the caregiver models a wonderful model where it allows a caregiver to have up to five patients, six patients including themselves with their patron, six plants per patient, so you could then grow 36 in the summer, take care of everybody all year round for you to grow indoor and the industry industry have quotations of caregivers took off because suddenly you could pay $275 to the state and legally grow cannabis for your uncle or your cousin or whatever.

Speaker 2: Mainstreaming something that's been going on, as I say for 50 years, but in a way that it was kind of cottage industry ask. Sure. As opposed to gorilla and testing. Right. Safe patients. The ability to do it right now saying everybody does, but the ability and testing is the biggest thing to me, that's the biggest. Oh, I love talking about it. We just got back today or yesterday on canvas with, through the summer. We're doing some uh, strain chase and we're looking for CBD right somewhere and blah blah blah. You don't know until you just asked it, right. The, what we call a titration titrating, taking it yourself and figuring out what it does to you is good. But it isn't the science. So that's there. Right? So we had four plants that uh, all did well and we were under the impression that possibly there were some cvd and sure enough there was so genetics right now or are kind of, you're on the hunt for good genetics.

Speaker 2: Things that will have cbd in them if that's what you want or skinny weed or whatever, you know, it's like, so you can't qualify that unless you have a scientist look at it and say, this is where it's at real quick with skinny, skinny, skinny weed. I'm surprised you're learning about this from a knucklehead in Maine. Skinny weed is weed that makes you not want to eat and when we look at cannabinoids, thc, everybody would, oh, it gives me the mind cheese, you know, but when we look at other ones, particularly HCI v early scientists point to the fact that it's almost like an appetite suppressant, so I believe there are some like Hollywood stars that are pushing this stuff, like they have a strain called skinny week, but me, but traditionally I'm getting kind of Geeky here, but land, race, street, a land race strains from East Asia and Africa are higher in Thcv, which also is good for ptsd. Other things like that. So you're looking for those strengths.

Speaker 3: We would never know if we couldn't bring it to a lab and get tested. If you can only grow the 36 plants within, you know, your caregiver community that you'd set up. How many different strains are you growing? Right now? We're running like running 10 strange. Okay.

Speaker 2: Some of those are for more experimental purposes than anything because. But we have, what are we like to call our oge strains? I mean, Oji not like, Oh gee, uh, uh, West Oji for main, you know,

Speaker 3: so take us through those just because we haven't obviously spoken to a bunch of people from Maine and there is such a bridge as we're talking about cannabis culture, cannabis community that has been here forever. So talk about some of the, those strains that, uh, mainers know and love. Blueberry would be number one, how come

Speaker 2: it was extremely well. She grows really well outside. She can be a giant and she also is very resistant to mold at the end of the season and powdery mildew. And that's because of her genetics. Um, we can go into a long dissertation why powdery mildew or mold goes for something that's, there's a atmospheric environmental concerns, but there's also a strain built in resistance in certain strains. So blueberry, it was great to get this. The opposite end of the blueberry is mother of Berry, or some people call the mother of all berries, but mother of very mod, our friends at West are going to get them out of stuff soon. And here's the long and short of it, mother of all buried. Okay. Cross Endeca Sativa, Ruder Alice. Okay. A ditch weed. Uh, what that does is makes it so that she matures much earlier because in addition to an outdoor grow season in Maine, we have an outdoor stuff to season in Maine and it corresponds with other seasons and main hunting seasons.

Speaker 2: So there are legitimate reasons to be out in the woods, hunting, bear or weed. So this strain was developed in Maine probably. We're talking about eight years now, 10 years now, uh, to be harvested in late August, early September. It's not an auto flower, but it's, you know, it's a weird plant. You can't put it out until after June 21st because of a photo sensitivity. So if you grow that right, it's a wonderful plant. And also deploy. It's winter here. Yes, because it's still in September. That piracy. But you're avoiding the fees because one thing is weird to think about that, that that's, uh, uh, a side effect of a, of a, what I view as an agricultural enterprise. I mean, I've worked on all sorts of agriculture. I worked dairy farms, I've worked blueberries. Blueberries are where normally you don't have to worry about people stealing your milk.

Speaker 2: Yeah, you do have to worry about people stealing blueberries. Oddly enough, which is strange that people go to the blueberry barrens up in May and they'll, they'll, they'll go rake in the middle of the night. They call it midnight raking. I'm like, oh my goodness, that's hard work. First of all, raking blueberries is really hard work. So to do it in the middle of the night. But I mean people do things, you know, and so as we see, hopefully more of a shift, a lot more people growing that the thieves won't be as prevalent like maybe the ribbon we've got repping, um, well, you know, uh, with more folks paying attention, obviously going to have to be on the up and up. You're going to get the protection. Oh yeah. This is one of the things I had predicted. And then it also uses jokes for a little while, for a couple of years and then suddenly became true.

Speaker 2: But uh, I think it's now three years ago, the Ellsworth police department, downeast Maine had sees some plants and then they have to get them back because they were illegal so they'd come back with powdery mildew. So then they have to pay for the and they say, oh, how much weed were you going to get out of this, the, and all go get upon a plan out of that. And you know, pound goes for 2,500 bucks. So he got x number of dollars. So I said at the point that the legislature should mandate that every police department in Maine that wants to bust people for cannabis needs to maintain a clean working grow room with proper ventilation. Eric change all that stuff because their seasoning in it. That's just crazy that the police had to give the stuff back and then pay for it. And then you go, not only maintain a clean working environment but also maintain a fund.

Speaker 2: If they don't, you can actually now supposedly you know, this doesn't come. It may come to fruition soon if somebody gets arrested for stealing from a grower, either a patient or a caregiver, or what's gonna happen when recreational comes in and everyone in Maine, every adult, man, we'll be able to go six to their own. Yeah. That's so awesome. That's what I'm all about. The industry is not. I don't really care what happens with the industry as long as mainers can grow their own cannabis. That's the point for you. Yeah. So, um, but when, if someone does steal from somebody in addition to whatever criminal charge that you can, there's also a way, now you can go after him civilly so people will be able to sue rippers for stealing from them. And then sometimes it feels like, seriously, it feels like I'm in some sort of weird dream that this is all legal.

Speaker 2: This is above all, above board everything. And I'm going to wake up, I'm back in the Coast Guard and I'm like 20 years old. Oh no, that was all a dream. Well, let's get to that. All right. Let's, let's, you know, obviously you know what you're talking about. Obviously you have a specific voice. Let's make sure we understand how that voice was developed. As a 20 years old. You're in the coast guard. What about before that? How does it. How does it guidelines? You get into the coast guard? What happened? Man, I smoked marijuana. This is the craziest. This is one of the crazy and I'm not trying to like set this up as. Oh, what a great story this is, but it is a good story. When I was 10 years old, my parents were very active in the church, Catholic Church school and all this other stuff in the school needed to raise more money.

Speaker 2: My Dad ran the Bingo game. There wasn't. The bingo wasn't bringing enough so they had to have a church festival and so they were going to have this big church festival with gambling and they had to bring in a carnival Krewe to run the amusements and the rides and stuff like that. So we'll see where this dovetails. So I was a tall, extremely tall, 10 year old, and as the right hand man to my dad, when the Carney showed up, they're like, oh, young crash will assist the carnies in their quest to hook up water from the city fire hydrant to the carnival festival grounds. So we unroll these long fire hoses and we got hooked up and then for the first time of seriously. So I would say maybe 1 million times now someone's saying, hey, you guys want some water or maybe that you guys want to smoke?

Speaker 2: No smoke breaks. I'm like that. I'm 10 years alone. Oh my parents smoked cigarettes and my dad smoked a pipe, but there was no cannabis. None. Not In that Catholic and a lot of booze, but no cannabis. So I'm tall, 10 years old, hanging with a bunch of carnies and they pass around. Uh, the first, uh, John and I ever smoked and, you know, I'll be able to say, oh, the first time I smoked cannabis. Now that happened to me the second time. Well, let me tell you this, the first time I smoked cannabis, something happened to me. It was a wondrous thing I've parted friends with, for carnies and then I just rode my bike around the midway as a strategy gets set up and one of the, Connie's a Salami and he's like the, the gun high with. He's like, dude, I need some help setting up this.

Speaker 2: Um, it's a, you know, as the carnival where you use a hammer to hit the thing and the ball goes up. Right. They needed somebody to calibrate it. So young crash went to calibrate that. Again, cross calibrating the whatever device that is and I'm just, I'm just swinging a big sledgehammer hitting this thing and really having like a, I don't know, just a moment and you know, and I mean not that it's destined to a lifetime of working the carnival, but it definitely helped for me as a cannabis smoker. I think I had such a, such a wondrous first experience riding around the midway, but it wasn't even like there are lights going off and it was just this feeling of freedom and, and also a sense of catharsis. Yeah.

Speaker 3: A sense of bonding with those carneys that my parents probably would not have approved of, but then for the rest of the festival, which was like five or six days. Yeah, those were my bros, like actual people and actual friends, but I didn't go back and do that again. Now at that point, they may have figured out that wait a minute, as they saw my little bike, you know, that may be because he's tall, but he also might be 10 and he's not trading on spike. What's up? You mentioned your name. It's a family name. How does somebody get named crash, right.

Speaker 2: Jesse? To crash through life and turns out my uncle, my uncle, I'll give him a name drop here. His name is John Lennon. Imagine.

Speaker 3: Oh my goodness. I think the dispensary they called the cops because now they're like, oh, they're out in the parking lot. Yeah. So, uh, you're, you're so is his name actually. John Lennon.

Speaker 2: And he was a sailor. He was like a. he's retired now, but he as a kid, he had a very, a big influence on me because he was a sailor who was on like big ships sailing around freighters and tankers and things like that and would come back and stay with us for a little bit and teach me things like a Bosun chair. A lot of people don't know what that is. It's a sort of chair you would use to paint the side of a boat, a wooden plank with ropes and things like that.

Speaker 3: Oh, when you're hanging on the thing. I've seen it both in charity

Speaker 2: and um, as a young lad going into of her, I just remember that, so, you know, when I was 19 or whatever. And so we kind of, a community college wasn't working out that great. And um, you know, it was a, I couldn't join the military so I, because I was a hippy punk rocker, the eighties, right. So I go, a friend of mine's dad was in the coast guard and I go to the coast guard recruiter because I heard that this was possibly a good escape for me to get out of the situations I was in and I was under the impression that the coast guard was the fire department, the ocean, and they assured me why. Yes. Young. It's the fire department of the ocean. Yeah. Mad sign here.

Speaker 3: All right. So wait. So we went from your, your, your name to the ocean, which is good. I think we kinda got it. I want to make sure that we didn't miss anything. Essentially you had this, a loved one who had experience at sea. You saw that you appreciated it. It hits you with the boats and chair and everything like that. Um, and it also sounds like you were maybe getting into a little bit of trouble, some crash there. Are you worried about crush came later. So what, what, what, what we don't have to dive into. I was, I was, crouched was me. I was crushing through life. I had a different name. We don't have to go there, but basically, uh, what were you finding? What situations, without getting specific, if we don't need to, where are you finding yourself in that the fire department of the sea was all of a sudden a good option? Is that a fair question? Recession or jobs? Uh, you know, if I, I like to a half joke that if I hadn't joined the coast guard, I either would have ended up dead in prison or dead in prison.

Speaker 3: Those were the three options. I don't know. Who knows, but you know, it taught me a tommy the musical. No, no, no. That taught me. Oh, it's fine. You're not going to the coast guard, Tommy. Yeah. I know Tommy,

Speaker 2: the coast guard and I would argue probably any military coast guard gave me discipline that has come in handy throughout my life as a writer, as a worker, as a grower. Uh, also, uh, gave me the opportunity to just witness just the sheer lunacy of the drug war in a way that when you're on the inside there and you see that the incompetence and the mistakes and the mistakes in judgment, mistakes and judicial process mistakes, mistakes, mistakes, we're human, right? And you throw the government in it and you're gonna make it even more of a cluster. It, it, it in conjunction with the drug war in that time period, I was also what I call fighting the war and Haitian refugees, a lot of Haitians were trying to make it to the states and we were picking them up and bring them back to Haiti. Right? Um, that period of my life informed my geo political perspective forever.

Speaker 3: You were actually dealing with the issues that we only speak of as issues.

Speaker 2: Let's use the theoretical things and immigration, all this stuff. And I see back in the eighties too, we would witness, um, Cubans coming and being welcomed in open arms and being put up in Nice hotels and Haitians. We destroyed their votes and bringing them back to the poorest country in the western hemisphere. It was. That was destroyed by America that still had cruise liners going in and you know, it just was. So it exposed me to just the banalities of government. Yeah. Okay. And makes me more adherent of anything more than natural law,

Speaker 3: which is how you escape up here and kind of found the life that you did. Unfortunately, you and I do not have a lot of time today and come back. I will come back in the summer. How about that? You're hanging out, you know, to the farm and see some real main plants. That's what we'll do. I need to ask you the three final questions now. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of crash Barry's life. One track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? You've come a long way from the Coast Guard, right? Yes. Could we.

Speaker 2: You answered the second question first because then the question would be after the cannabis question would be make more sense. So what was the second question is, what has most surprised you in life? What surprised me most in life is how separate we've become from nature. Are you look for standing in a parking lot surrounded by cars. This is not my territory. I mean this is rare for me to come in here, right? Yeah. Thanks for coming. Oh, pleasure meeting you. So great that you're a man. Uh, the, the soil underneath my feet barefoot, working the land, blah, blah, blah. That stuff is huge and so important. And I've had a professional life of journalists and all this other stuff. No, you're satisfying. Was growing either my own cannabis or tomatoes for that matter. So I'm surprised about how far removed we are from nature.

Speaker 2: Yeah, that's the answer. The second question, what surprised you most about cannabis? It's how cannabis is making kind of inroads to supply people who don't have any connection to nature. Something real. Yeah. And it's, it's, uh, introducing regular people back to nature. Nature is a really magical way of nature and its finest something that makes us so the side effect of cannabis use is euphoria, right? I mean, so if you can be, there's nothing better for me than smoking a big fat joint and going walking out in the woods and just sitting there or going for a swim or do all these other things. I can't imagine. I mean, I could, I probably will get high and go into one of these stores just for another anthropological. Excellent. But that's not my pleasure thing. I can't imagine. That's why cannabis clubs, I think it's great for people to have those, but it's really about getting in touch with nature and the. So that's weird how those two things interact.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. It, it, uh, helps absolutely informed us who you are. Makes a ton of sense. Final question, soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there,

Speaker 2: blinded by the light. And it can either be by springsteen or man for man. Either one. Both. Just take man for band if we have the opportunity, right? Yeah. Just need a little more credit than the boss does a, it's, it's a, it's a song of wackiness. And believe it or not, he wrote that. I know why he wrote it. He wrote it because he was, he was using a rhyming dictionary. He was experimenting, writing songs with a rhyming dictionary. And uh, so the, which one wrote, I thought man for springsteen. Springsteen wrote it. Yeah. So he wrote it as almost a songwriting exercise and yet the visuals and the blind if I. I mean, I don't know. It's like if you try to take it apart lyrically. Yeah. Like what? I would have Leonard Cohen or Bob Dylan or any of my other, uh, you know, Joni Mitchell, anybody like that?

Speaker 2: I liked the Leonard Cohen comes before Dylan for you. But that's a whole different conversation. But he taught, he taught him how to write songs. I write poems, poets. But again, that's another conversation when you come out to the farm in the summer, we'll talk about that, you know, it'd be legal when you come out in the summer and you want, we could go places. I have never, I mean, this is so weird, right? I'm like a marijuana man. I'm like been around, been in so many places where you can buy marijuana. Well, they don't let me in the place where it's illegal to buy. I've never been. I still haven't gotten out west. My wife wants to go out west. She was going to go out to Colorado, maybe out to Washington. Just she's a, uh, she's a caregiver, so she wants to see a topical things like that. She's never been in one of these, but we've never been into a retail establishment or you soon enough. Soon enough. There you go. So that's the song that's crashed at least initially. I appreciate it, man. It's good to meet you. Nice to meet you. Thanks for coming to Maine. You got it. And there you have crashed barry.

Speaker 1: You know the inimitable crash, Barry. I think that that's why that word exists. Certainly a unique guy. Absolutely. A storyteller. Definitely want to visit him again as the summer is upon us. Hope you enjoyed it. Very much. Appreciate your time. Thanks for listening and stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.