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Ep.259: Cannabis Feminist

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.259: Cannabis Feminist

Ep.259: Cannabis Feminist

Galia and Jackie join us…who each have experience in Tel Aviv and Palo Alto, Galia from the later and based in the former and Jackie who traveled to the former but is based in the later. We take the opportunity to discuss some differences between Gen X, Gen Y and Millennials’ relationship with technology and culture and how their respective points of view inform the way they approach their new endeavor. With the basis understanding that the power of cannabis lies in it’s femininity, their looking at the industry with a full stack perspective- as Galia says- through content, events and products. They’re focused on introducing people to the plant through that multivariate approach.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Guy, you're from the ladder and based on the former and Jackie who traveled to the former but is based on the ladder, we take the opportunity to discuss some differences between gen x, Gen y, and millennials, relationship with technology and culture and how their respective points of view inform the way they approach their new endeavor with the basis understanding that the power of cannabis lies in its femininity. They're looking at the industry with a full stack perspective has got, he says through content, events and products, they're focused on introducing people to the plant through that multivariate approach. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic enemy. That's two ends of the world economy from cannabis, feminist, Galya and Jackie Dalia.

Speaker 2: Well, yeah, but there's no age there. That's right. Okay. And did you remove it for? Never had it. Okay. And it's. But it is gone. Yeah, it is. And you're Israeli. That's right in because you lived there. I grew up in Palo Alto, California, right where we're sitting near to here. Um, my parents are Israeli and I moved back to Israel five years ago. So your parents did the whole. They were both in the military thing. They're like Israeli proper Israeli. Uh, they do the Israeli accent, which I will not mimic here. But do you, you, you, yeah, you can. Yeah, exactly. Perfect. Yeah, that's exactly it. How, how proud are they of you? How would they say that they're proud of you? They are very proud. Of course they're very proud of you. Right? But you're not going to do it in their thing. That's fine. So why did you move back there if you were here already? So I was, um, at a time in my life that I was looking for a change. Um, I'd grown

Speaker 3: up in the bay area. I'd been in Palo Alto, San Francisco for many, many years in the technology startup ecosystem and was ready to explore a different ecosystem. I was a venture partner then at a venture capital firm and Israel is a great ecosystem to look for early stage deal flow. So I relocated to Tel Aviv to scope out the technology scene

Speaker 2: and we're going to get to what you found there, but you brought one of your partners, which is Jackie who is also

Speaker 3: in the bay area. Born and raised in San Francisco. Got Israeli Israeli but Jewish. Oh, look at that and go. Oh No. And um, I studied at UC Berkeley and while I was there I was interning with an accelerator in the valley called [inaudible] labs, which is an accelerator for Israeli startups. Oh, look at the, look at this. And after graduation I wanted to move to Israel, but I was told it was winter time and I should go on a nice trip before. So I went to South America, which was the best place to meet a ton of Israelis before moving to Israel.

Speaker 2: But you know that, that's not close geographically right now. But I have one. Oh, scientists. Okay, fair enough. And that's well said. But do you want, can you dovetail those things like how Israel became when his heirs. How, how did you, what, why not?

Speaker 3: I, um, I took study abroad time in college and went to South America. I loved it. And then I, when I graduated I was, I'm very adamant about moving to Israel and I graduated in December and I spoke to all my Israeli friends. Okay.

Speaker 4: It's winter, come in the summer. I go back to South America.

Speaker 3: God, I did, um, and it was wonderful and I got to find out about kind of what's happening in the entrepreneurial community. They're mostly between Brazil and Argentina and it was interesting, but at the time it was really just starting. Um, so I just kind of made a point to really travel and get to know really the eastern side of South America and it was incredible.

Speaker 2: And you said there's a connection between Argentina and

Speaker 3: real reality of Israelis will finish the army or decide they want to take some time off and then they go to South America and backpack. Um, so it was great to be traveling alone and kind of knowing that I had community. Israel is a very friendly

Speaker 2: indeed. Well, if you're the right person, right? So you, the Buenos Aires thing is the second time you went to South America. Where, where, what country were you in the first time? Yeah,

Speaker 3: I was actually in what else? I is also, but I spent time in Patagonia in the south of Argentina or US middle country. Um, my dad is from Sheila and I went to go spend some time. They're very skinny, very skinny. Very Long. Very Long. Yeah. But the people short. Interesting. I like to say diminutive. Nice. Um, but either way it became summer of 2013 and that's when I moved to Tel Aviv. I came home to San Francisco. Oh yeah. Did my laundry and then I got into a plane and went to Tel Aviv where I with all the Chutzpah that a young 20 buck would have stepped in and was like, Hey, I'm from San Francisco, is worked in the valley. I want to work with your companies. And I started picking up clients and then I partnered with the municipality of Tel Aviv to actually get investors from around the world to come in and learn about the different startups in the ecosystem and why Israel, why Tel Aviv. I mean people were coming from Germany in China and Taiwan and Italy and saying what's happening here? And it was amazing to teach them and show them,

 

Speaker 1: Guy, you're from the ladder and based on the former and Jackie who traveled to the former but is based on the ladder, we take the opportunity to discuss some differences between gen x, Gen y, and millennials, relationship with technology and culture and how their respective points of view inform the way they approach their new endeavor with the basis understanding that the power of cannabis lies in its femininity. They're looking at the industry with a full stack perspective has got, he says through content, events and products, they're focused on introducing people to the plant through that multivariate approach. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic enemy. That's two ends of the world economy from cannabis, feminist, Galya and Jackie Dalia.

Speaker 2: Well, yeah, but there's no age there. That's right. Okay. And did you remove it for? Never had it. Okay. And it's. But it is gone. Yeah, it is. And you're Israeli. That's right in because you lived there. I grew up in Palo Alto, California, right where we're sitting near to here. Um, my parents are Israeli and I moved back to Israel five years ago. So your parents did the whole. They were both in the military thing. They're like Israeli proper Israeli. Uh, they do the Israeli accent, which I will not mimic here. But do you, you, you, yeah, you can. Yeah, exactly. Perfect. Yeah, that's exactly it. How, how proud are they of you? How would they say that they're proud of you? They are very proud. Of course they're very proud of you. Right? But you're not going to do it in their thing. That's fine. So why did you move back there if you were here already? So I was, um, at a time in my life that I was looking for a change. Um, I'd grown

Speaker 3: up in the bay area. I'd been in Palo Alto, San Francisco for many, many years in the technology startup ecosystem and was ready to explore a different ecosystem. I was a venture partner then at a venture capital firm and Israel is a great ecosystem to look for early stage deal flow. So I relocated to Tel Aviv to scope out the technology scene

Speaker 2: and we're going to get to what you found there, but you brought one of your partners, which is Jackie who is also

Speaker 3: in the bay area. Born and raised in San Francisco. Got Israeli Israeli but Jewish. Oh, look at that and go. Oh No. And um, I studied at UC Berkeley and while I was there I was interning with an accelerator in the valley called [inaudible] labs, which is an accelerator for Israeli startups. Oh, look at the, look at this. And after graduation I wanted to move to Israel, but I was told it was winter time and I should go on a nice trip before. So I went to South America, which was the best place to meet a ton of Israelis before moving to Israel.

Speaker 2: But you know that, that's not close geographically right now. But I have one. Oh, scientists. Okay, fair enough. And that's well said. But do you want, can you dovetail those things like how Israel became when his heirs. How, how did you, what, why not?

Speaker 3: I, um, I took study abroad time in college and went to South America. I loved it. And then I, when I graduated I was, I'm very adamant about moving to Israel and I graduated in December and I spoke to all my Israeli friends. Okay.

Speaker 4: It's winter, come in the summer. I go back to South America.

Speaker 3: God, I did, um, and it was wonderful and I got to find out about kind of what's happening in the entrepreneurial community. They're mostly between Brazil and Argentina and it was interesting, but at the time it was really just starting. Um, so I just kind of made a point to really travel and get to know really the eastern side of South America and it was incredible.

Speaker 2: And you said there's a connection between Argentina and

Speaker 3: real reality of Israelis will finish the army or decide they want to take some time off and then they go to South America and backpack. Um, so it was great to be traveling alone and kind of knowing that I had community. Israel is a very friendly

Speaker 2: indeed. Well, if you're the right person, right? So you, the Buenos Aires thing is the second time you went to South America. Where, where, what country were you in the first time? Yeah,

Speaker 3: I was actually in what else? I is also, but I spent time in Patagonia in the south of Argentina or US middle country. Um, my dad is from Sheila and I went to go spend some time. They're very skinny, very skinny. Very Long. Very Long. Yeah. But the people short. Interesting. I like to say diminutive. Nice. Um, but either way it became summer of 2013 and that's when I moved to Tel Aviv. I came home to San Francisco. Oh yeah. Did my laundry and then I got into a plane and went to Tel Aviv where I with all the Chutzpah that a young 20 buck would have stepped in and was like, Hey, I'm from San Francisco, is worked in the valley. I want to work with your companies. And I started picking up clients and then I partnered with the municipality of Tel Aviv to actually get investors from around the world to come in and learn about the different startups in the ecosystem and why Israel, why Tel Aviv. I mean people were coming from Germany in China and Taiwan and Italy and saying what's happening here? And it was amazing to teach them and show them,

Speaker 2: well, what was, why do you think it was this magnet for? Because now everyone knows, right? But, uh, over the past few years it's become really a hub. Totally. Why? What is it? Is it the,

Speaker 3: there is a lot of components. I think one of them is the army where young people are trained to work in groups together really well. They're getting an amazing education as far as technology goes. Software goes hardware, kind of all of the above. And they graduate and they know they live in a small country and they're ready to make global impact. They want to participate in other markets. They don't just want to stick with a population of 6 million people. They want to reach further. And um, Jews are constantly told to keep learning, critically thinking, analyzing, come up with a better idea, put it out there. And Israelis are fast adopters. So I think it's a great place to Beta test

Speaker 2: Dolly. Is that what you found when you got there?

Speaker 5: Israel is actually an incredible landscape to pilot products, especially tech products. Um, everything that Jackie said is, is absolutely a clickable. It's part of the DNA of the culture also to work on your own idea as opposed to work for others. Um, so you got a lot of entrepreneurs, a lot of stuff. Steam. What is that? It's people who want to have a startup.

Speaker 2: Oh, I see your, uh, Israeli accent much better than Jackie's. Although I will say your pronunciation of Chutzpah was spot on, you know? Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 3: Of course.

Speaker 2: No. So, uh, so as far as, as far as what you got, what you saw when you got there, you, you, you see this landscape and where did you jump in? What, what, uh, what got you?

Speaker 5: Yeah. So at the past few years I've actually been diving deeply into currency and the alternative currency community. Which is also cryptocurrency, which is very strong out of Tel Aviv, blockchain, blockchain, exactly. Um, and Kenetech. It's been incredible to realize that the innovation that happens in Israel on the aggro tech side and on the scientific research research side and on the genomic side combined with their, a legality of medical research that they've had for decades now, um, has actually a lent itself to a booming Kenetech

Speaker 2: industry as you saw when you came out for the conference. Um, there is a lot that happens there on the science side a lot that happens on the hardware side a lot that happens on the agriculture side. So it's been fascinating to see from a venture capital perspective, the different landscapes that vcs normally look to Israel to supply technology to now blending into cannabis. Yeah. But you're not supposed to put yourself on the line. Right? You've got your vc roots and we talked about Jackie's kind of like entrepreneurial-ism we felt it, but were your parents entrepreneurs or where's this coming from for you? As my father was an entrepreneur, he came to the valley, to the Silicon Valley in the late, early eighties for computers to be in computers, to be a networking. So I've grown up around technology all my life. I've watched the carphone turned from a suitcase to a razor and everything in between.

Speaker 2: So the technology evolution is very natural to me. Um, and I've been an entrepreneur my whole life. Um, the venture capital stint was a moment of, of learning the IC. Okay, fair enough. That was the foreign piece, if you will. So, um, my dad has a story about that. Those initial carphone, those big suitcases, a guy walks into the restaurant that he and my mother were eating at any pops his phone down and it's early enough that no one may be in the restaurant had seen one even. So everybody's kind of looking over and wondering how this guy's got to be so important and all of a sudden the phone rings and he picks it up and he goes, Hello Ma. So he's just talking to his mother on his car phone. It's very impressive, like a suitcase. It looked like a suitcase. Exactly. I'm Jackie. Of course. You're, I feel like a different age than me. Right. Is of course also much younger than me, but when we talk about this shit, does it sound crazy to you? What are you thinking when I say things like this?

Speaker 3: I love him. Um, I am very close to my dad who's an older, not tech generation though. Always had a car phone, always had a cell phone. I remember all of that stuff. It was hard to get him to actually let go of that old tag. He didn't want a phone that did any more than calling.

Speaker 2: Yeah. That's all he wanted his text messages through it on the screen. That was more than one line. The motorolas were just said the phone number that's telling you that. I got it. I remember before there was those ancient sounding thing that I say

Speaker 3: it's not ancient. And um, I feel close to kind of both worlds.

Speaker 2: Let me ask you this. Are you, do you consider yourself a gen Y or a millennial? I consider myself a millennial. Okay. And so what is the difference between a millennial and a Gen y person?

Speaker 3: I don't know if I can answer that.

Speaker 2: Watch this. Do you consider yourself, do you consider yourself a Gen y millennial?

Speaker 5: I'm right on the cusp. I probably feel more like a Gen y. The millennials, the difference. The difference is I'm listened to the difference. You're just shaking your head. No, listen to the difference. The difference is when you started using facebook. I really do think so. What do you mean? For me it was towards the end of college. It wasn't an embedded part of my college experience to be posting and sharing kind of the social side of my life digitally in real time, real time. Whereas everyone who came after me, it was acculturated to that in the time when you're being the most social in real time and just a tip of the cap is, is that, is that, is that a fair statement? That is a fair statement. Like you posted everything in real time is the point.

Speaker 3: Yes. When facebook first came out I was in high school and exactly and I went to private high school, so I was invited to be a part of it because our was on the network on every school was um, but they also had a photo sharing thing which was you create a whole album. It's not just posting in real time, so people would wait to accumulate an album, get that ready and then posted and then kind of wait for people to go through an album, not just doing one off photos, one off photos. I feel like it's actually more recent than we might remember. Given how long facebook's been around college or. No, not really. Not really, but I'm also not very like let me post everything in real time. Not My forte, which is sometimes why I'm not sure if I consider myself a millennial, would I consider what makes me a millennial and I feel like Golly, on the same page as that we are very global. We spend time and feel comfortable in multiple cities around the world. We speak a couple of different languages.

Speaker 5: Oh, well you had me. I was going to be a millennial until you said that a couple of different language. I only speak, well, I speak two languages. English and love.

Speaker 3: Oh Wow. Well that pretty far to say that counts. Um, and with that it's also just an open mindedness towards what's new and what's on the edge versus like I didn't really grow up with that. I'm not used to that. I don't care. I'm feeling intimidated. I think millennials are, once you kind of dive into it and her saying it's kind of cool to go with the trend rather than hurting shape or being a sheet.

Speaker 5: Yeah, no, I. Then I'm again, I feel like they're a person personality aspects that I have that are certainly

Speaker 3: definitely have them. You've got them, you know what I mean, or should be in the same thing. Like birthday age doesn't really define if you're a part of millennial, which is why it's a weird thing to college generation because when I first heard the term a couple of years back, I thought it was like a personality type. Like do you participate in this part of the world? Are you extroverted or are you a millennial? Right, right. And Yeah, I dunno, I find it interesting. It's interesting. Some

Speaker 5: people think it's a pretentious term now.

Speaker 2: Sure. Well, some, uh, it's, it's comes with the whole thing, you know what I mean, but the words are different than they used to be. So let's, uh, talk about people then and so when did, uh, we meet each other? When did this whole thing happened?

Speaker 5: So it's very interesting, as Jackie said, she was the judge of that by the West. Sure. It's very interesting to me. Jackie was in Tel Aviv as she mentioned. Yes. Um, I had just begun hosting these trips called Eden to Zion, which were, um, so that's e, d, e, n. Yup. Okay. We're a group trips for, um, members of a community called the summit community at the time it was summit series, the thing, exactly. Doing events every year for millennials or millennials, spirited folks who were entrepreneurs, instigators, artists, movers and shakers, freelancers, you know, liberated people. Um, and I was part of that community when I lived in California. And when I moved to Israel, I was very passionate about building a bridge from America to Israel for this community. And so I curated and created these trips, uh, in partnership with a foundation to bring 50 and then 90 and then 90 people year after year from the community to Israel.

Speaker 5: Um, and we called the trip Eden Design Because Eden, Utah is actually the permanent home now have this community. Right? So the trip was amazing and there was an amazing woman on the trip named Jess who is our third partner, not here. I was intent on her coming on the trip. I was so passionate about what she was doing in organic skincare and natural products or activism against toxic chemicals in the beauty industry. She came on the trip, she made travel kits of all her products for the entire trip. It was a beautiful thing. And Jess is in childhood. Friend of Jackie's, when jess came to Israel on the trip, Jackie who was living in Tel Aviv, came to meet her and the three of us had a nice long hang sash at the Carlton Hotel in one of the free time windows with another friend of ours, Brian, who actually was my boss at the venture capital fund at the time who also came on the trip. So it was a nice collision of worlds. I met Jackie, we fell in love. Um, I had already been in love with jazz, so now we had a threeway sure female love. I'm leaving it alone. That was years ago. Since then the three of us have worked together in different configurations on different projects. Um, and today we find ourselves finally stepping into the full power of our relationship, uh, around cannabis feminism. Perfect.

Speaker 2: Going to get into. But first I want to know as far as you know, we heard a little bit about jess and she's not here, so we'll just talk a little bit more about her and then we'll be done. But childhood friend is this person.

Speaker 3: What about Jessica? A soft is also from the bay area and she, I remember when I was 15, she became a leader in safe cosmetics. Yeah, she was a hit then, a huge advocate for. We need to know what ingredients are in our products. Did you know that your skin absorbs everything you put on it? Did you know that these things that are in all of our shampoos and anything you find at Walgreens? Not Good, not clean. Guess what? The US hasn't banned any of these toxins. [inaudible] three of them and while the UK and in Europe has actually banned thousands of them. Why? So she really took a stand and made herself known even as a teen. I mean everyone hangs out with each other, but she was doing real work so she totally. So she walks in with this one, so she invited. Well first my side.

Speaker 3: Hey, I'm coming on this trip. Oh, cool. What trip? I don't know. Sends me the itinerary. Yeah, she's a good swift summit. It's fabulous. I am floored. They're having meetings with people that I've been trying to meet. They're going to the best restaurants in town. They're staying at the Nice hotel and I was like, what trip is this and how do I get on? And she's like, well actually it's a really closed container. You can't just come like, let me first. Let me ask Alia. She put it together. Spoke to Ghalia. It's a no hard, no hard. No, it's going to be. I was like, what about one of these talks? And she's like, let me ask. You know what? We really can't bring anything else to pass. Thanks so fine. We have 30 minutes before dinner, x night. I'm there. I was like, what's going on? And I want to see her. My friend was visiting from San Francisco in Tel Aviv. I need a car.

Speaker 2: What I love though is that you get like a real hard nose and it's like personal. It's like you personally are not good enough twice and then you're like, yeah, I'll take the 30 minutes I'm in.

Speaker 3: Yeah, yeah. Well I still want to see my friend because they're traveling around the country and they. I like the. I don't take no for an answer. It's actually going to a fabulous dinner that I was like, well, if they come before and still I met. Golly, I love affair still the hard. No, you can't join for this dinner. So I went from hotel room catching up. Boy, talk to this wonderful session that you've asked. Mentioned still. Uh, no. Well, yeah, still no because now the cohort had gotten to know each other and who am I walking in and you know what I respect it. I've been on trips in groups like this where you can't just have someone show up midway through and like, you know.

Speaker 2: So then let me ask you this. When did it become like, okay, actually we're going to let her, meaning obviously not on that trip, but when it was like, oh, you know what, Jess, uh, Jackie, we should kind of let Jackie and from moment one just just said that you did not onto the trip, just not onto the trip, which was a, you know, a Mashup of a lot of collaborators. Um, and was not open to the public. Gotcha. But when did you notice that that was maybe the third leg to what you were?

Speaker 5: No, come one the same way that I felt about jess when I met her. It was very clear from moment one. Alright. So what are we doing here now? Let's get into it. Right? So cannabis feminist is currently a blog, but generally a movement. We believe that the power of cannabis lies in its femininity. Well sure, of course it does. Of course it does, right? Thank goddess. And we're looking at the industry from that lens and it's a really full stack perspective. So cannabis feminist puts out a lot of content that women care about that's related to women or that is looking at topics from a women's perspective or through a woman's Lens. Um, we are working on TV content around this concept. We host cannabis women's circles right now we're doing the mostly in la, but they'll come to San Francisco and then beyond we have 20 to 30 women get together in a beautiful location.

Speaker 5: Usually a woman owned location, either home or business. We've done them in beautiful tea houses. We've done them in beautiful gardens, um, and we have a lovely evening together using cannabis products, reviewing cannabis products. I'm eating beautiful organic fruit, drinking tea, having great conversations either about cannabis or about life in general, um, and it tends to bring up a lot of connective tissue between like minded women who really are coming to the circles from a variety of angles and perspectives, cannabis users and non users alike. Um, business people, uh, lawyers, entertainment, people, entrepreneurs, investors, um, mothers soon to be mothers won't be mothers. Really women from, uh, from all parts of the rainbow. I'm getting together for these lovely alcohol free evenings around campus.

Speaker 2: So there's a little bit of sense of community. There's also kind of this, um, media piece, but you guys, as you told me, you're not stopping there. There's also a product piece. So

Speaker 3: we're launching a skincare line that, as you can imagine, because safe cosmetics and high quality skincare is such a priority or we have super high quality oils that we're infusing with cannabis to have an amazing skincare product line that women can use for their face, for their body, creating other products as well that are fun maybe with Thc, but most of it is about healing and the beautiful medicinal piece of marijuana that's not even about getting high like a lot of the products we see now, but really about healing and taking care of ourselves and how this is. This could be an alternative from maybe over the counter drugs that you're taking to heal yourself from something or maybe it's helping you relax and we want to bring women who maybe don't have Mary Jane on the brain. They haven't tried weed, right? You don't want

Speaker 5: to smoke it, they don't want to eat it or they're curious. Maybe they haven't been exposed. Maybe their exposure to it is there a pimply 14 year old brother on the couch eating pizza. There's a whole gamut of reasons and regardless we want to say, hey, this is safe, this is good for you and nourishing and this could be the thing that you need that actually helps you unwind from whatever is whatever your reality is.

Speaker 2: Fair enough. And so we're, we're throwing around this word feminist, right? And what, but how do you see that word? What is the definition of that word? Is it only a female community?

Speaker 5: Absolutely not. I'm men can be cannabis feminists as well. I feel like I'm one, I feel like you're one to the word feminism to us is about love. It's about love and it's about respect. Um, so we are looking at everything from how the plants are grown to how we talk about the products to who works in the company is to how the money is raised, how contracts are negotiated all from this place of Win-win. Um, and hopefully love. So it's not limited to females by any means, but we do find it a feminine perspective on the world and we're trying to bring that to the content, to the products. And then also to how we do business and how we move in the world.

Speaker 2: Yeah, I am. You know, Jackie did a good, a job of explaining why we're going into products and we talked about jess who obviously has that had that vision way back. Um, why jump in there though? You know the ass. I get it with the community and the media. Why not just stop there?

Speaker 5: So cannabis is the first industry, multibillion dollar industry to come online since women have become empowered in the workplace. It's an enormous and amazing opportunity for women to really lean in. And so that's the answer to why not. Why stop there, why stop there, right?

Speaker 2: We have this opportunity. It would be short sighted of us not to jump in with both feet

Speaker 5: type of thing. Yeah. It's not only that, it's an opportunity, but it's important when you look at this, do this, we should do this. When you look at the different verticals in business and in life, be it politics, finance, banking, real estate, environmentalist, ism. All you see is men making decisions. Um, and I'm talking historically maybe in the last few years, we have more of a presence of women still not enough at the high ranks and in the decision making forums, especially in business, certainly especially in business, but also in politics. And if we look back hundreds of years, a lot of the infrastructure that we have in place from roads to the economy, the infrastructure was laid by men in times when women were not at the table. Absolutely not. I'm not talking about the last five or 10 years or 20 years. I'm talking about the last hundreds of years, if not thousands of, of patriarchal culture. And so, uh, we find a high likelihood of correlation between that and some of the Meta problems that we see in the world where we're not really thinking through the entire chain of repercussions of our decisions, how things play out for week or populations, what is truly just what's really good for people, what's good for our future. Um, and I think women as kind of the mothers of the future, the mother's literally of our future, um, are well positioned to actually make some better decisions and lay some healthier infrastructure.

Speaker 2: So I have a question for me. Always is, um,

Speaker 2: guy, you'd just get, did a good job of kind of giving us a historical picture of all this. Right. And we did a good job of explaining that you're a millennial and so when, you know, I want to kind of really hone in on what your thoughts are as far as growing up in a, in a different society than we're talking about. Right. You know, women's suffrage, you know, we're not, that's not where we are anymore, but we kind of still are. And do you feel that way? Like how do you see it as, as a younger woman, you know, as a millennial woman?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I grew up, uh, I went to a private all girls school, k through eight, feeling very empowered as a woman or learning about our history, um, but learning about famous American women and there have been examples of amazing women leading in politics and in business around the world. Not as much in some ways in America. I guess I'm just thinking about the election which don't even want to get into literally not going to go there and literally not going there, but, um, but it has been different and it's honestly been something I've been learning more about as I'm in the workforce. I mean, today's event has been wonderful, but there were five women sitting in a hundred person presentation room. Right? How does that make me feel? You know, Ooh, cool. I'm a cutting edge woman, but no, we need more women here participating.

Speaker 3: And it creates an odd dynamic. It always does. Do we have to carry ourselves the entire time? Well, yeah. Are we going to do that anyways? Yes. But, um, it's fun. I mean connecting with the couple other women here because we've all introduced each other to ourselves. We've all met, we've all had great chats. Uh, if there was more of that, it would just be more enjoyable. I think the whole kind of group would loosen up and that might be a metaphor for bigger things happening around, but I totally see this as something that's doable. Yeah. I heard this name, Jessica came up with the name. I loved it. It's, it kind of. It has a nice little, you know, cannabis, feminist, feminist. Yeah. Great. Like I love the way it sounds and what it means and that word is coming up a lot where it is, it was a great that you asked to define it because it does need to be defined because so people have skewed version of what it means. And um, and for me it feels tangible. Feels real. It's something I can really sink my teeth behind. I see that.

Speaker 2: Thank you. As opposed to behind because you're not taking a bite out of it. If you sink your teeth behind it, it just, it fit as far as physics is concerned, it doesn't mind, oh, this is a different conversation. That's a different podcast for Christ's sake. My God above the board, please. For God's sake. Yeah indeed.

Speaker 3: Um, but yeah, it feels. I see the cracks in the ceiling. It's really exciting and I'm onboard with women that I love and trust is a big part of it is um, being able to just be super open and honest about exactly what we're doing throughout this process of starting a company and talking to people and all having separate meetings and coming back together and sharing. It's a very different dynamic from when I'm working with mostly male teams and what we want to do is inspire other women to get involved in this space and saying, hey, this doesn't have to be cutthroat girl on girl the way some women have felt in more corporate offices which just are male driven culture and saying, we can create our own culture. We can, we can lead other women in the right direction. We know other women doing similar things like women grow and it's amazing. People say, Ooh, is that a competitor? It's like, no, you're completely missing the point. This is amazing. This is exactly what we want to see and, and, and we know these people, you know, you're, you're highlighting amazing people in this space and we're all kind of trying to do our work to get to know each other too, because if we're really in it to win it, we're going to know each other for a long time. Yeah.

Speaker 2: Yeah. There's only one was willing to swelling there. There's only one women's network. That's enough. No, that's not the point at all. Alright. So one last question before the three final questions. When Jackie says what she just said with which is she can see the boulevard here. With that, we can just, you know, run down what's in the way, you know, what are the hurdles that are still there that you guys have to just kind of knocked down? Well, first of all, in the cannabis space, of course there's a lot of regulatory hurdles. So how do you structure the company? What's the best way to do it? Is it a collective? Is that an LLC is a Cayman Cayman Islands? UVC, interesting. Crypto hedge funders in cannabis, you know, the options are different, but it's the same level of complexity, right? Um, so those are the, the regular hurdles. Of course, all startups have their hurdles. How do you get funding? How do you get a team together? How do you decide, how do you make the hard decisions? How do you put your brand together? So all exists,

Speaker 5: I would say for us at cannabis feminists, um, the main hurdle, the main kind of short term hurdle is getting financed by women. This is the challenge because many parts of the stack you can, as Jackie said, find women that are leaning in, um, whether that's growers, cultivators, people that are setting standards for healthy marijuana products, dispensary's, it is still very hard to find women financing these businesses. It's hard to find financing for these businesses in general because of the regulatory uncertainty perhaps, or the newness of the industry, but it is very, very hard to find women

Speaker 2: engage at Cannacon [inaudible] dot com. If you are a woman that finds this story interesting and you'd like to put some money behind it, how about that? Amen. All right, so a woman, so the goddess willing, so the three final questions, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. I'm going to ask you what has most surprised you in cannabis? We're going to ask you what has most surprised you in life and then on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. That's for each of you. So what has most surprised you in cannabis, Jackie?

Speaker 3: How many products are similar and how the marketing has not yet been on point for people to differentiate themselves. I'm still still. I think there's going to be a branding revolution as far as cannabis goes and how much plastic is being used to sell products. Everything is in a plastic canister. You have your pre roll joined in the plastic thing. I save all that stuff, but I, I wish I could go to the dispensary. Just be like, here's my glass jar. Reuse, reuse this please. Or giving some sort of incentive to reuse it. Something a dollar off the joint. If you bring your own container for it. A lot of plastic and plastic waste and lack of clarity. If products are organic or not, where they come from, where they're grown. It's very just a blatant like the name, you know, gorilla glue. Cool. But like way from where? From who? Indoor outdoor. What does it mean? Were there pesticides on it? Um, people are still kind of playing the whole like, oh, it's so underground we don't know these details. Some places very nice places definitely do and have the answers. I just challenge more people, especially with not selling bud, but selling actual product, selling topical selling edibles. They just have like cookie there. They're not even saying what, what's in the cookie? Right. Okay. Maybe some ingredients. Don't know if you're allergic or not, but what is, what's up with the weed?

Speaker 2: And so there there's a spectrum and you did mention that there are some great players and there some knots are great players and we're going to have to leave. The knots are great players behind. I will say that I think that your kind of prognostication of branding revolution is spot on and also a sustainable revolution is spot on because I keep saying for the cannabis industry not to be sustainable just isn't sustainable.

Speaker 5: Absolutely. What has most surprised you in life? Ghalia? I find myself continuously surprised by how misaligned our infrastructure is to our hearts, which.

Speaker 2: Okay, so how are we getting? When I say infrastructure, I mean,

Speaker 5: I mean our economy. I mean even our, our money itself, the units of money,

Speaker 2: the most Meta. You're talking about everything. The way that everything works out,

Speaker 5: how we handle government and regulation. I'm talking about how we handle conflict between nations. Um, I'm talking about how we handle work, what it means to, to do good work, uh, how we handle poverty, how we handle, um, legalization. It just surprises me time after time that we've built a world that doesn't match our hearts.

Speaker 2: Do you have a potential solution there or lots? Lots of solutions. We're going to start with cannabis feminism and see where it goes that, that's point number one. Fantastic. All right, so I like that. We're at the starting line on the soundtrack of your life, Jackie. One track, one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 5: I know we can hear you.

Speaker 6: Um,

Speaker 2: I'm going to go with spice. Girls. Want to be just a great foundation. Really says it all. You're always have loved the outfits. Thank God they're back in style now. Meaning the spice girls themselves are the outfits both. I mean they looked amazing. Are about female empowerment and friendship and also like what it means to be a woman in a fun, playful way that, that is true actually, that when they came out it was a big thing when they came out and like the whole message is actually the society is kind of catching up with it. Exactly. And the different personality types. It's so fun. I love it. We're going to go with that. She's a millennial. That's clear. Now you've just proved it exactly with a. on a guy on the soundtrack of your life.

Speaker 6: Cool.

Speaker 5: For me, it's one day by. Yeah. Whoa.

Speaker 2: Oh, look at you. Listen, I'm keep doing what you guys are doing. Okay. Don't mess up. I'm just kidding. We don't mess up, fail quickly and cheaply, right, is the easiest thing to say and the most difficult thing to do, but keep going and we'll check back in with you and we'll definitely interview Jessica. How bout that? Sounds amazing. Thank you so much. Got It. Of course. And there you have Scalia and Jackie

Speaker 1: from cannabis feminist very much appreciated the conversation that the three of us had also appreciated. Uh, maybe rediscovering what the word millennial means. It's a spirit, not necessarily an age group. Perhaps. Perhaps. Perhaps. Anyway, thanks to them, thanks to you for listening. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.