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Ep.262: Shanel Lindsay: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.262: Shanel Lindsay: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.262: Shanel Lindsay: MCBA Spotlight

Shanel Lindsay joins us and shares her personal journey. A lawyer she was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst but her treatment wasn’t solving the issue. Enter cannabis. Shanel began experimenting with decarboxylation. Over weeks and months she improved her process. And when medical cannabis was passed in Massachusetts a lab opened up close to home so Shanel worked with them to continue to improve her process eventually leading to her manufacturing a device. Her thought for others was you shouldn’t have to know how to process Willow Bark to get Aspirin- it’s the same thing with cannabis, you should just be able to push a button and get what you need. So she’s now got the device and it’s been 16 years of no issues with her cyst thanks to cannabis.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: A lawyer. She was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst, but her treatment wasn't solving the issue. Enter cannabis. Shanel began experimenting with decarboxylation over weeks and months. She improved her process and when medical cannabis was passed in Massachusetts, Ilab opened up close to home, so chanelle worked with them to continue to improve our process. Eventually leading to her manufacturing a device, her thought for others was you shouldn't have to know how to process, will have arc to get aspirin. It's the same thing with cannabis. You should just be able to push a button and get what you need. So she's now got the device and it's been 16 years, have no issues with her system. Thanks to cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Chanel, Lindsay, we have. I've been

Speaker 1: on a journey together on email. We have to get this conversation recorded, but we're here and here we are doing it. Look at that. So I want to talk. You basically have two different jobs in this space, right? A couple of different hats, right? One's legalization ones. Dr. Box. Am I even saying that right? Decarboxylation, but you could just say dekalb for short, D car. Well that's easier. Certainly. Which one do you want to do first? We can. Let's talk about legalization first. Do that. Alright. So you're in Massachusetts. Yep. And how would you, how would you say it's going? We're in May of 2017 because podcast land. So who knows when we're talking. Yep. That's when we're talking. How's it going there as we speak? Well, it was a historic November last year became the first state on the East Coast to legalize and from December 15th on, people in Massachusetts have now had the right to cannabis

Speaker 3: to use cannabis. They can have 10 ounces in their home. They can grow six plants each. So on the freedom side and on the personal liberty side, you know where their people are. Have that ability can now. Awesome, right. The second piece though, which is the implementation of the industry, that's the part where we are still battling our state legislature right now. So even though we, as the people and citizens past this initiative, the legislature has decided that they'd like to tinker with it a little bit. So how much of this is the same thing all over again? Right? Because we had a little bit of a hesitation the first time with medical. Oh yeah, yeah. Perfect. So when we were drafting this initiative, um, we really look at medical and all of the things that didn't go right there and try to position this new law to be implemented quickly to have a really good governing agency.

Speaker 3: So we changed the governing agency on medical. It's our department of public health now it's this new commission. Um, so I still do have a lot of faith that we are going to be implemented quickly. There are some timelines within our bill that have already been pushed back about six months, but our state reps and the governor and the senators are saying that they're committed to getting it up and running pretty quickly. But you're not gonna see anything open as far as um, adult use sales until the end of mid to end of 2018. So that's when people can expect to be able to come. So this is now going to be after California. This will be after Canada, you know what I mean? But we'll get there, you know. And so you're fine going this slow because we're doing it right? Is that, you know what, within the initiative, it already was January of 2018 so it got pushed back to July at this point.

Speaker 3: And if it's, if it happens within that time frame, um, I, I would be happy with that. Well we don't want is to be pushed another year. So do you feel that that could happen, but I feel like, you know, they're probably going to be some other little delays just as part of the process. But I really do think we'll see things something open by the end of 2018. Absolutely. All right, so we've got that goal and we will check back in then and see how accurate we weren't. Exactly. So you sound like a lawyer know. Thanks. I think I am a lawyer. Right? So is that what brought you into cannabis? Let's understand. Let's make sure we know why you are so well versed on what's happening as far as legalization in Massachusetts. Yeah. So, um, having that skillset of a lawyer definitely was what got me invited to the table to come and draft in addition to my experience with cannabis and I in my business experience with cannabis.

Speaker 3: So, um, back when I was in college, which was at University of Pennsylvania. Where are you from? I'm from Boston, originally, born in, born and raised Massachusetts. Born in Boston. I've lived all over the state and all types of different communities and um, I left only for four years to live in Philadelphia when I went to law school and then for Undergrad and then I came back for law school at Northeastern and when I was at Penn I had, my son was born and um, he's 16 years old right now, which is remarkable. I'm looking at your face, which doesn't make sense that the math doesn't, but I guess it does. Yes. And, uh, and I appreciate that, but after he was born I got an ovarian cyst and um, it's very painful and um, it's something that kind of grows over time and you have to have it surgically removed and it, uh, it's a lot of pain and inflammation and my doctors at that time, they wanted to put me on really high doses of painkillers including Acetaminophen.

Speaker 2: A lawyer. She was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst, but her treatment wasn't solving the issue. Enter cannabis. Shanel began experimenting with decarboxylation over weeks and months. She improved her process and when medical cannabis was passed in Massachusetts, Ilab opened up close to home, so chanelle worked with them to continue to improve our process. Eventually leading to her manufacturing a device, her thought for others was you shouldn't have to know how to process, will have arc to get aspirin. It's the same thing with cannabis. You should just be able to push a button and get what you need. So she's now got the device and it's been 16 years, have no issues with her system. Thanks to cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Chanel, Lindsay, we have. I've been

Speaker 1: on a journey together on email. We have to get this conversation recorded, but we're here and here we are doing it. Look at that. So I want to talk. You basically have two different jobs in this space, right? A couple of different hats, right? One's legalization ones. Dr. Box. Am I even saying that right? Decarboxylation, but you could just say dekalb for short, D car. Well that's easier. Certainly. Which one do you want to do first? We can. Let's talk about legalization first. Do that. Alright. So you're in Massachusetts. Yep. And how would you, how would you say it's going? We're in May of 2017 because podcast land. So who knows when we're talking. Yep. That's when we're talking. How's it going there as we speak? Well, it was a historic November last year became the first state on the East Coast to legalize and from December 15th on, people in Massachusetts have now had the right to cannabis

Speaker 3: to use cannabis. They can have 10 ounces in their home. They can grow six plants each. So on the freedom side and on the personal liberty side, you know where their people are. Have that ability can now. Awesome, right. The second piece though, which is the implementation of the industry, that's the part where we are still battling our state legislature right now. So even though we, as the people and citizens past this initiative, the legislature has decided that they'd like to tinker with it a little bit. So how much of this is the same thing all over again? Right? Because we had a little bit of a hesitation the first time with medical. Oh yeah, yeah. Perfect. So when we were drafting this initiative, um, we really look at medical and all of the things that didn't go right there and try to position this new law to be implemented quickly to have a really good governing agency.

Speaker 3: So we changed the governing agency on medical. It's our department of public health now it's this new commission. Um, so I still do have a lot of faith that we are going to be implemented quickly. There are some timelines within our bill that have already been pushed back about six months, but our state reps and the governor and the senators are saying that they're committed to getting it up and running pretty quickly. But you're not gonna see anything open as far as um, adult use sales until the end of mid to end of 2018. So that's when people can expect to be able to come. So this is now going to be after California. This will be after Canada, you know what I mean? But we'll get there, you know. And so you're fine going this slow because we're doing it right? Is that, you know what, within the initiative, it already was January of 2018 so it got pushed back to July at this point.

Speaker 3: And if it's, if it happens within that time frame, um, I, I would be happy with that. Well we don't want is to be pushed another year. So do you feel that that could happen, but I feel like, you know, they're probably going to be some other little delays just as part of the process. But I really do think we'll see things something open by the end of 2018. Absolutely. All right, so we've got that goal and we will check back in then and see how accurate we weren't. Exactly. So you sound like a lawyer know. Thanks. I think I am a lawyer. Right? So is that what brought you into cannabis? Let's understand. Let's make sure we know why you are so well versed on what's happening as far as legalization in Massachusetts. Yeah. So, um, having that skillset of a lawyer definitely was what got me invited to the table to come and draft in addition to my experience with cannabis and I in my business experience with cannabis.

Speaker 3: So, um, back when I was in college, which was at University of Pennsylvania. Where are you from? I'm from Boston, originally, born in, born and raised Massachusetts. Born in Boston. I've lived all over the state and all types of different communities and um, I left only for four years to live in Philadelphia when I went to law school and then for Undergrad and then I came back for law school at Northeastern and when I was at Penn I had, my son was born and um, he's 16 years old right now, which is remarkable. I'm looking at your face, which doesn't make sense that the math doesn't, but I guess it does. Yes. And, uh, and I appreciate that, but after he was born I got an ovarian cyst and um, it's very painful and um, it's something that kind of grows over time and you have to have it surgically removed and it, uh, it's a lot of pain and inflammation and my doctors at that time, they wanted to put me on really high doses of painkillers including Acetaminophen.

Speaker 3: And I was very worried about my liver longterm damage to my liver. And in fact I was very right to be concerned about that. But if you are a lawyer or a doctor, you're a regular person as far as medicine is concerned. How did you know to be concerned? So there were rumors back then that large doses of acetaminophen would lead to liver failure. And now that has been confirmed. In fact, I think it was last month of very large comprehensive report came out showing that Acetaminophen tylenol is a factor in one out of three liver failures in the US. Um, and so, you know, it's something that, there are many things within our society that are kind of deemed harmless that after awhile we find out are, you know, I'm really things that we have to be careful about and Acetaminophen is one of those things.

Speaker 3: Um, but at that time I had always had a preference for cannabis in college. Alcohol just has never really agreed with me even to this day. It's just not, you know, it doesn't, it makes my stomach hurt and not feel so great. And so, um, oh, and by the way, as far as our, uh, stigmas are concerned with cannabis, you're at the University of Pennsylvania, which is a pretty good school. I graduated with good enough grades to get a law degree at northeastern, which is also a good school. So you're using cannabis and you're using it responsibly and you're using it for wellness. Oh, absolutely. And I think that, you know, that's something, at least that stigma, I feel like it's starting to crumble. Absolutely. Because I absolutely found that cannabis helped me to focus to, um, uh, to really just remain in that best state without having to resort to other things like caffeine or some, some other, um, uh, the popular drugs that people like to use.

Speaker 3: But anyway, I was using cannabis as a medicine. I mean, I'm just as a relaxing or whatever. And after I got this ovarian cyst, I thought, you know what, I'm, I'm going to try to really use this as a serious medicine. And I knew that there was obviously no medical marijuana program in Philly or in Boston, but I knew on that people in California at that time for a couple of years then had been, this is, um, early two thousands, like to literally 2000. And um, and I knew that people were using it as medicine. I thought, you know what? I'm getting ready to go to law school. I'm a pretty smart cookie. I can probably figure out how to make some cannabis medicine already have this and I'm using how hard could it be? And little did I know that actually there really is a lot of science behind it and the first thing that I encountered when I was I'm starting to make this medicine was this concept of decarboxylation.

Speaker 3: And for people that don't know, decarboxylation is really the fundamental underlying process of cannabis use and consumption because thc and cbd, all of the cannabinoids that people are looking for are actually stuck in this acid state, in the raw plant. So think of it like a key in a lock. If you were to eat that raw plant, the cannabinoids, they're just not the right size to fit in your receptors and they'll just bounce off. They just won't fit into that lock. And this process of releasing this molecule, this carboxyl group to turn that Thca the acid form into bioavailable thc. It actually, it's a form of, it's a function of time and he in temperature, but it really is very tight scientific process. And back then, you know, 16 years ago I was going and I was very surprised to see that there was actually no real science or data behind this that everybody was decarboxylated was really basing it off of like one or two tests from back in the early nineties and there wasn't enough data points for me to feel comfortable.

Speaker 1: Now let me ask you a question here. All right, so there's not enough data points for somebody that studies little analytical, that's fair. But as we discussed earlier, you're not a doctor yet. You had some, you know, kind of, uh, thoughts around medicine. Yup. Now were you a scientist?

Speaker 3: No, but I was a lawyer and I have somebody who's treating myself. So it was really important for me. So how did you even know to look at d car? How did you even know to, you know what I mean? It goes down to basic research and they are going to start doing something like making a medicine. You're going to go start and look. And you know what? I don't think it really would have mattered if I had a medical background because the doctors don't know this stuff. No one knows. You're exactly right. And so I go and I, um, I kinda glean whatever I can get from all of the varying and as much information out there. It's a lot of conflicting information as well. So I basically distill what I think is the best way to do it and I start making topicals and edibles and guess what, they're really, really helping my ovarian cyst. I'm dealing with the pain of dealing with inflammation. Inflammation. I never in these 16 years have had to have that ovarian cyst removed. I never had to have the surgery. And you know, I'm, I'm very, very healthy when it comes down to um, you know, overall health. But specifically, um, you know, with my reproductive health, that's great.

Speaker 1: Would never say that cannabis cured your ailment, but it's been 16 years of no issue.

Speaker 3: Correct. And it's, I've managed the pain, I've managed the inflammation and um, you know, it's been excellent for me.

Speaker 1: And again, not 16 days or months, six years years. Absolutely.

Speaker 3: And, and avoiding that very serious chance of liver damage, which would have been my alternative. And so, um, even though it was helping me and I was enjoying using the medicine and making this, there were some really big problems with my process or with the process of making these medicines, number one, it was very smelly. Um, I would almost have to clear out the entire house and worry about my neighbor smelling when I was making this. Number two, it was a really difficult process and at the end of the day I was using a lot of cannabis and had no idea how much was in my resulting product. So no way to accurately dose or even though if you had done this really kind of important process of activation. Right? And so I'm just kind of stabbing in the dark for 16 years. But again, becoming an expert at the end of the day.

Speaker 3: And then finally a medical marijuana passes and Massachusetts. And that was the big change. All of a sudden there was a laboratory that opened up about a half hour away from me and I started going in and getting my medicine tested and what do you know after 10 plus years is 12 years at that point that I had made, making this, I was still even expert me, was wasting about 40 percent, 30 to 40 percent every time I was making it. And which is Thursday and Friday, if you look at it as a week. Exactly. So a significant amount and when you're talking about very expensive cannabis, I mean this is hundreds and hundreds of dollars a month. It's just, you know, going out the window. And so I went and I started doing this whole battery of testing at this laboratory, MCR mass cannabis research labs. And I was actually talking to the owner who's a good friend of mine now.

Speaker 3: Um, and he, they do all the testing for the dispensary's in mass. And he said he know Chanel, you are my fourth client. That then number four. Yeah. And it's just so it shows how far the industry has come, you know, in these last couple of years. And um, so what we found was that the time and temperature for that decarboxylation process that I mentioned, it is so tight for time and temperature that there is no way to properly do it in the home without getting lost and it really is so tight, meaning just a couple of degrees in a couple of moments makes all the difference. And whether it's an oven or a crock pot or a toaster oven, none of those can achieve the parameters needed. And so once I had done that research and found out what those parameters were, then I started out on the process of developing a device that could meet those parameters because I knew that cannabis had been great for me.

Speaker 3: But I saw, I started to see so many other people who could be benefiting from this who would never have the time or desire to go through all of that process and trial and error that I went through. You just said that you can't do it at home. Even if they had gone through all of that, they still end up with a product that they couldn't trust. So you can home grow, you can't home decor. Correct. Exactly. Well now you can because we, so, so I went and it was really a journey, a labor of love on my own part of creating something that I wanted, but it was also a way to make sure that so many more people would be able to access this medicine on and be able to get an accurate dose. And really what we're seeing, you know, when you look at our patients and our customers, there's such a breadth of individuals that are using our device.

Speaker 3: It's people that have been using and making cannabis medicine for 20 years. Um, and then it's also people are brand new who I often say to people, you don't have to know how to process willow bark to make aspirin. And same thing with cannabis. You shouldn't have to understand all the science. You should just be able to press a button and get what you need, which you can now, like you said. So take us through kind of developing the device to be, to get to a place where your ally. We got it. Absolutely. It's about six years, right? No. So it was a three year journey and so I'm a. I'm a lawyer. So the first thing I did was start working on patents. So I worked on the patents for about a year and half and I'm at the same time. Started developing the vice. So I knew, you know, the good thing is I had been doing this for so long that I knew what was wrong with the oven and why, how we needed it to do.

Speaker 3: So I knew that we needed to use multiple sensors. I knew we needed to use a heating core, so I started to bring together a team of um, electrical engineers, they're mo engineering specialists and um, and develop this device and then got some funding and brought it to market. And really we, we hit the market at the beginning of last year, 2016 with some Beta units. And really it was about educating people because many people bought that. It was just fine to use the oven because they'd been told that for so long and they really weren't realizing how much cannabis they were wasting and there's this thing in edibles and topicals people really think they need to use like ounces at a time and really when you are decar being well you can, you know, you can feed 10 or 10 people off one grant, you know, because. Yes.

Speaker 3: And so for example, if you have a grant that has 20 percent thc, that's 10 servings of 20 milligrams each and so you really, if you're able to take these tools and the data and apply it, then you can save a ton of money and for people that are on fixed income and that kind of thing, that's making therapeutic doses for less than a dollar. So it really is about, you know, making it available and easily accessible to people. So let's just take you as the example again, right? We have that, you know, that you need to take x, you know, to achieve why with your device. Correct. Give us a sense of how much cannabis you have to buy each week or month and how much you get out and how much it helps and how much you know. Yeah, absolutely. So, um, I took about 25 milligrams as the dose and I take that about three times a day, three times a day.

Speaker 3: And uh, so that's about 75 milligrams a day. Yep. And it would be a, it can be 100 sometimes if it's a, depending on, you know, if, if it's oblation time or something like that, that's giving some additional stress there. Um, so right there, if I have a 20 milligram strain, that means that I'm getting out of one gram that's lasting me more than two days. Um, so that you're talking about, you know, in a week that I'm using what, three point five or four grams, where in the past, um, I was using double that at least seven or eight grams a week on that. Right. So, um, you know, it really makes me happy when we have customers just really unsolicited just emailing, saying, oh my God, like I'm using half and it's still stronger, my, my end honey or formulation or whatever they're making, um, I'm using less than half and I'm still getting a stronger dose so that, that's really exciting to hear.

Speaker 3: Just bringing that power back to the patient. That's what it's all about for me. Um, because you see the industry, you know, the commercial side is really moving forward, but a lot of patients are still in the dark about, you know, this medicine that's really helping them. So that's what we're all about is, you know, removing that stigma too to be able to say, hey, you can know your dose because you know, people are getting it from a dispensary or someplace that has been tested. It really is just a matter of, um, by weight. No one would. That dose is your little tagline. Now your dose, uh, either it's plants, medicine in one step, I think know your dose is great. Thank you.

Speaker 1: You're welcome. People will know as far as, uh, your patent is concerned where this was conceived with your ovarian cyst, so, you know, we'll check back with you to make sure that you filed the patent and all that. I'm sure you will. Um, uh, eh, or, or already have, right. I think you, uh, so we have patent or trademark that know your dose. There we go. Um, so, you know, as far as, uh, other patients that are out there, um, you know, you're doing great things for them. What about other entrepreneurs? Oh yeah. So what would you, what advice would you give them and as far as you've now created this thing, you have this brain which is not a doctor brain, it's not a scientist's brain, but you have used both of those things to conceive of the product that you have. So yes, you're smart. Plus what would be the advice?

Speaker 3: So the advice for me is a from me is do something that you have for me. It came from my own experience, right? Um, this is something I had been dealing with for 10 years and I had an, a level of expertise around that. So my suggestion for people is go with what you know, because guess what other people, they don't know that yet and you can help them avoid all your pitfalls and you can really create some, some good products for people if you have an expertise or a love or a passion for some part of this industry. And, um, and you know, one thing that we're really doing in Massachusetts in that I'm trying to, um, use some of the success and knowledge that I have in this industry to help other entrepreneurs, um, you know, get into the space. So I'm co founder of the northeast cannabis coalition, so we're a group of business owners and we have events like startup events and um, you know, really connecting entrepreneurs with other partners and team members because that's one thing that for me it was really easy to, um, uh, there's so many different opportunities out there.

Speaker 3: Um, you want to be able to explore as many as possible and you really do need a good team and that's something that I've learned over the last year or so is that you get to a point where you're just completely overwhelmed because there's so many things you only one person. And so, um, you know, team building is incredibly important for smart person. That is also a doer, right? I'm getting the sense that you'd like to do the thing. I'm just going to do it, get out of my way back, Lee. And that's a huge. One thing I would say in the cannabis industry and I, this is, I hear this from other entrepreneurs all the time. I need a clone of myself. I need it. And that's what's lacking is you need people could, people that you can trust, the can execute. And what if it's not a clone of yourself is not the advice.

Speaker 3: No, the clone of myself is not the advice, the clone of the advice is find good, capable people and bring them on as your team members because it's, um, there's so much going on. You're not going to be able to tackle as much as you really need to, or is that as much as you could if you don't have a good team to lean on us as the wind comes in here, give us more on good, capable people. Meaning I realized my strengths are x and y. I realized that I needed to find z Alpha and Beta. Yeah. So I'm a. I'm an attorney and I'm a. I'm a cannabis lover and enthusiasts, right? So I'm great on the analytical side. Um, I have incredible knowledge about cannabis and I find that that's often the case, obviously in the industry, um, that people have that knowledge about cannabis, but I did not run a business before this business.

Speaker 3: And so for me it was about getting all of the financial education as well. Um, but there's a certain point where you need to bring on, you know, for example, financial services, uh, bookkeeper's, um, and really traditional business services. And that's what I say when I'm talking to people in Massachusetts. I say, use your traditional business skill to help out because a lot of times these cannabis businesses, they have everything they need on the cannabis knowledge side, but really all of that other support when it comes down to salespeople, when it comes down to just the basic systems of your business, those are the people that you need there. I'm ready and willing, and I think that's a great opportunity because that's an opportunity for people that don't know as much about cannabis to get into this industry. And then very quickly you get an education and you're able those people, I think it's a springboard.

Speaker 3: I often look at my company as a springboard for people who'd love to come in and help me grow in an exchange. What they get is, um, really great connections in the industry and a great, um, uh, education, um, that then they can use as they explore what their passion is. One plus one equals three. Absolutely. Yeah. I'm going to ask you three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? The amount of seniors that are starting to use cannabis. Do you know sue Taylor from? Yes. I decklin yes, there you go. Yup. The amount of seniors and I think it's fabulous because they're so cute when they start using again because.

Speaker 3: And to me that is the number one stigma remover because it's really, um, you know, what we see is it's the, you know, the older demographic that tends to still have a little bit of trepidation and, but when their friends and their, you know, classmates will start saying, Hey, I've been revitalized and I'm using this. It's all like the dominoes begin to fall class of 60 whatever. Right, exactly. What has most surprised you in life? What's most surprised me in life? Um, that things don't always go as planned, but you can end up with this incredibly full life that you never imagined. Like for me, I didn't expect to have a child so young. Um, I never expected to that my life would be consumed with, um, cannabis and fighting for legalization and um, and all of these wonderful kind of entrepreneurial opportunities, you know, I, I always wanted an admired entrepreneurs.

Speaker 3: Um, and I always admired those people who said I am when I work. It's almost not, you know, it's not really working because I'm passionate about it and I'd be doing that anyway. And before I thought, man, I really wish I could have something like that, but I could never figure out what it was. Little did I know that it was this thing that I loved all along, which was cannabis and that now has become my life. And um, that I think is probably one of the most surprising things because I don't think that you could have told me I couldn't have predicted that in college. Totally. Totally fantastic. All right. On the soundtrack. Yes. One track, one song that's got to be on there. I think that, um, well it has to be stevie wonder, which you, I mean, you can go with anything.

Speaker 3: We could go with the entire catalog. I think that we would have to go with, um, either ribbon in the sky or um, the, I don't want to bore you, but I love you. That's my song and I don't remember the exact title of it, but that's fine. I'll, uh, I'll mention it in the thing that I'm about to do in 30 seconds or whatever. Chanel is an absolute pleasure to meet you in person because we were going to do this over the phone and I'm a so much better to do it out in the 90 degree weather at the, at the conference. And it was great to meet you and I'm really happy to have had the chance to come on. There you go. Thank you so much. Thanks.

Speaker 2: And there you have chanel. Lindsey, I don't want to bore you with my trouble, but there's something about your love that makes me weak and knocks me off my feet. So that's all songs in the key of life that stevie wonder and Chanel's got good taste in music. Let's just be honest, very much appreciate her sharing her personal journey. And uh, thanks to you for listening. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.