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Ep.263: Cassandra Farrington, MJBiz Daily/MJBiz Con

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.263: Cassandra Farrington, MJBiz Daily/MJBiz Con

Ep.263: Cassandra Farrington, MJBiz Daily/MJBiz Con

Cassandra Farrington joins us and takes us through her background. Born and raised south of the Mason Dixon line, she went to the University of Alabama to study communications and marketing. A self-described introvert, she had a couple of good initial positions but went back to get her MBA. Upon graduating, her Fortune 100 job moved her to Denver.  Serendipitously, an old business associate called at a moment which Cassandra was ready to move. Her operational experience made her the perfect fit. And that phone call turned into her running Marijuana Business Daily and the Marijuana Business Conference. However, those ideas were not the first ideas. But they were the ones, as you know, with the most explosive growth.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: cassandra farrington. Cassandra farrington joins us and takes us through her background. Born and raised south of the mason dixon line, she went to the university of Alabama to study communications and marketing, a self described introvert. She had a couple of good initial positions, but went back to get her mba. Upon graduating her fortune 100 jobs, moved her to denver, serendipitously in old business associate called it a moment which cassandra was ready to move or operational experience, made her the perfect fit and that phone call turned into her running marijuana business daily and the marijuana business conference. However, those ideas were not the first ideas, but they weren't the ones, as you know, with the most explosive growth. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the hammock can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Cassandra, farrington. Can we go through syllables?

Speaker 2: Cassandra, farrington. It's very involved actually, especially when you add my maiden name. It's like a bazillion syllables. And how are you doing with that? You know, it's why I dropped the middle maiden name most of the time to stick straight. You see, I didn't even ask you because I felt like we weren't going to talk about that. So we're not. So uh, where are you from on earth? I claim that I am from Alabama. It's where I spent my most formative years in tuscaloosa. Went to the university of Alabama. Roll tide. Roll tide. Absolutely love it or hate it. Where were you born though, if it wasn't? No. Durham, norTh carolina. Right. so still like not above the mason dixon line, not above the mason dixon line. In fact, I lived up through when I was in college up all the way through college. I lived south of the mason dixon, most of it in Alabama, but I, my dad was in the military and they had come from.

Speaker 2: My dad's from New York, my mom's from Missouri, that's where they met. It was in Missouri and they moved around quite a bit in their early years of their marriage. So while I consider myself from Alabama, I'm not from that traditional southern family that has like that generations long tail. Two things I noticed you did say missoura. You also said Missouri, which was interesting right after it, and you noted that your father was from New York, which is why I feel, I, I now understand why I feel comfortable with you. I'm from New York and I was reading some northeast energy and I guess that's what it's from. Is that fair? Could be, you know, my dad was very much a. I'm a renaissance man. He was a little bit of everything. Our favorite joke about him was that dad was always right, which was really annoying most of the time, but was really useful when you had a physics test and it was 10:00 at night and you really didn't get it.

Speaker 2: So there's no sarcasm in that. Dad was actually always right. Here's the point, actually. Always right. And it was really annoying. All right, so he military guy a thank him for his service and what, uh, air force an airman is a flyboy first kind of came out for a while and went back to school on the gi bill. Went through medical school and hence the renaissance man or renaissance man. He's a medical doctor. He was, he was an orthopedic surgeon. Look at that. I mean, that's amazing. So this is something to kind of aspire to as a child. You see this man, right? Indeed. He, uh, he was very weLl read and I'm just very worldly wise and expected that of his family and the childRen he was raising and for as traditional and conservative as he was personally. He, one of the things I always admire about him was his openness to, to just whatever the generation behind him was brinGing.

Speaker 2: Huh. Whether that was, he had no interest in the music that we listened to and he refused to listen to it fine. But he absolutely acknowledged that that was our music and he had no problem with us listening to it. He just didn't want to hear it. I gotcha. Same thing, you know, kind of again, I, I, I like to think that he is not with us and he was definitely in declining health when I started this business. I don't know that he ever really understood that I was moving into the cannabis arena, but I like to think that he would definitely have been very supportive while he himself was very much supportive of that. Just say no, I'm mentality through the eighties and we preach that at home. All those sorts of things. I think he would, would've seen where they, uh, where research was going, where the culture was going, where public opinion was going and would have had that open mind.

Speaker 1: cassandra farrington. Cassandra farrington joins us and takes us through her background. Born and raised south of the mason dixon line, she went to the university of Alabama to study communications and marketing, a self described introvert. She had a couple of good initial positions, but went back to get her mba. Upon graduating her fortune 100 jobs, moved her to denver, serendipitously in old business associate called it a moment which cassandra was ready to move or operational experience, made her the perfect fit and that phone call turned into her running marijuana business daily and the marijuana business conference. However, those ideas were not the first ideas, but they weren't the ones, as you know, with the most explosive growth. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the hammock can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Cassandra, farrington. Can we go through syllables?

Speaker 2: Cassandra, farrington. It's very involved actually, especially when you add my maiden name. It's like a bazillion syllables. And how are you doing with that? You know, it's why I dropped the middle maiden name most of the time to stick straight. You see, I didn't even ask you because I felt like we weren't going to talk about that. So we're not. So uh, where are you from on earth? I claim that I am from Alabama. It's where I spent my most formative years in tuscaloosa. Went to the university of Alabama. Roll tide. Roll tide. Absolutely love it or hate it. Where were you born though, if it wasn't? No. Durham, norTh carolina. Right. so still like not above the mason dixon line, not above the mason dixon line. In fact, I lived up through when I was in college up all the way through college. I lived south of the mason dixon, most of it in Alabama, but I, my dad was in the military and they had come from.

Speaker 2: My dad's from New York, my mom's from Missouri, that's where they met. It was in Missouri and they moved around quite a bit in their early years of their marriage. So while I consider myself from Alabama, I'm not from that traditional southern family that has like that generations long tail. Two things I noticed you did say missoura. You also said Missouri, which was interesting right after it, and you noted that your father was from New York, which is why I feel, I, I now understand why I feel comfortable with you. I'm from New York and I was reading some northeast energy and I guess that's what it's from. Is that fair? Could be, you know, my dad was very much a. I'm a renaissance man. He was a little bit of everything. Our favorite joke about him was that dad was always right, which was really annoying most of the time, but was really useful when you had a physics test and it was 10:00 at night and you really didn't get it.

Speaker 2: So there's no sarcasm in that. Dad was actually always right. Here's the point, actually. Always right. And it was really annoying. All right, so he military guy a thank him for his service and what, uh, air force an airman is a flyboy first kind of came out for a while and went back to school on the gi bill. Went through medical school and hence the renaissance man or renaissance man. He's a medical doctor. He was, he was an orthopedic surgeon. Look at that. I mean, that's amazing. So this is something to kind of aspire to as a child. You see this man, right? Indeed. He, uh, he was very weLl read and I'm just very worldly wise and expected that of his family and the childRen he was raising and for as traditional and conservative as he was personally. He, one of the things I always admire about him was his openness to, to just whatever the generation behind him was brinGing.

Speaker 2: Huh. Whether that was, he had no interest in the music that we listened to and he refused to listen to it fine. But he absolutely acknowledged that that was our music and he had no problem with us listening to it. He just didn't want to hear it. I gotcha. Same thing, you know, kind of again, I, I, I like to think that he is not with us and he was definitely in declining health when I started this business. I don't know that he ever really understood that I was moving into the cannabis arena, but I like to think that he would definitely have been very supportive while he himself was very much supportive of that. Just say no, I'm mentality through the eighties and we preach that at home. All those sorts of things. I think he would, would've seen where they, uh, where research was going, where the culture was going, where public opinion was going and would have had that open mind.

Speaker 2: So someone that thinks for himself is certainly what he was right there. So few of those these days it seems. I think the same thing, cassandra, I think that this whole solution to everything, we're not going to get into it, but the whole solution, everything is. If each of us just goes ahead and things for his or herself, wouldn't that be an amazing development? That's all we got to do that's really starts and stops with that. So here you are in Alabama. What's it like being cassandra farrington as a little child who wasn't farrington at the time, but like what was it like growing up in Alabama? Like what were you doing? What were you into a typical small town Alabama stuff? I was in the swim on the swim team, getting good grades, being a big, a pretty reasonable model, child, occasional forays to one of my favorite cities in the world, which is new orleans aha and maybe not being such a model child in those instances.

Speaker 2: Um, but generally keeping it between the lines and making my way in the world. Gotcha. In new orleans, we have food, we have music and we have a way of life if you will. Right. Wonderful. Just culture and lifestyle and ambiance about new orleans that just gets into your soul. Totally. And it isn't like no place on earth. It is like no place on her. Yeah. Alright. So then you go to Alabama, which in itself is like no place on earth, I imagine. What, uh, what did you find to be your major eventually? Um, so I have a communications degree. JournaliSm, I do, that's my undergrad, public relations, journalism, communications, and then from there, you know, kind of embarked on my career which ended up taking more of a marketing angle to that pr and communications side of things. So how did you know that you want it to do that?

Speaker 2: If you're the swimmer person that's getting good grades? Like what was it that kind of was apparent to you? For me, I think it was just about. So I am one of those people. Who is it that I'm not an extrovert at all, but I can play one on tv. You totally can play one. Oh my god, I can pull it off. I had no idea. Five days of a conference, man, I can get myself out there, but I'm going to go home after all this and I'm just going to go into a shell for a week and make up for all that. All of which is great. But I find that communications and media and marketing gives me that avenue to um, to get myself out there without being out there myself all the time. So here's a message, you know, and I'll put that message out, here's a product for marketing, I'll put that product out and I don't necessarily have to be on the front desk, right?

Speaker 2: I'm not necessarily front and center myself and my personality all the time. So we're going to talk about that, but we should probably get to the fact that as a cofounder you have ruined this whole philosophy. You realize that, right? Which health philosophy philosophy of staying behind the sceNes. Oh yes, absolutely. Now, well indeed. And, and honestly when, when my co Founder came to me is she is the, she has a truLy brilliant, my co founder has a truly brilliant marketing mind and is an idea generation machine. Um, anD in her previous company she had very much become the face of things and had become the personality of that. Um, and, and hit the wall with that. That was one of the reasons she sold that previous business. Right? But then she kind of made herself crazy without anything to do for a couple of years.

Speaker 2: And when she came to me, I had been in marketing for a few years, had gone back to school, got my mba at the university of Texas, um, went on to work at six at, uh, at city group, um, had survived the financial meltdown there. Um, and then somewhere after that hit the glass ceiling, hit the corporate wall, um, and she reached out to me at a great time in my personal career development and said, I'm interested in doing something entrepreneurial again, but I'm looking for somebody with more of your background with your operations now that I'd been through with my mba at city inside, so I can come up with the ideas, but I want somebody else to implement them to execute. So originally aT that time I was again supposed to be more of the bus behind the scenes. Exactly. So she calls me in economy and let's connect those dots.

Speaker 2: So you get out of school and you have a couple of initial positions. What was it about the, the positions that you were holding that made you say, I've got to go back and get an mba? So I was in these Marketing roles but had come from that journalism and communications background. So what I lost out on was that business acumen that helped me really navigate the business side of marketing, which is what it's all about. I was more about the communication side and that's, you know, being, especially when we were living in austin at the time. I'm Just looking for that next thing, you know, back to my dad. Always being curious, always on truly if I could be a perpetual student, I. That would be my ideal dream life. How did you wind up in austin? What position was it at the time?

Speaker 2: Um, I was working for a small marketing agency there. My husband and I, my now husband and I moved there. It was it before the last five years. Was it before the past five years? Yes. So can you explain to people who now know austin as it is today? What? Austin was like more than five years ago. So when I moved to austin, I think it was 1998 or so. Yes. And it was a very different place. Um, was it, it was, it started to become what it is now, south by southwest had been going bigger while exactly. um, there, there was certainly this upstart, there was a definitely a drive among the local community to create this live music capital of the world and really make south by southwest something big and really tap into the creative energy of the university and the government and the, and the tech boom was absolutely going on that we had the new direct flights from austin to, to san josE back and forth every single day.

Speaker 2: All of that was going on and that was starting to feed all of that influx of people, ideas, money and energy that has created austin. I mean, how could you ever leave though, right? I Mean, but you did go to, uh, to graduate school. You got your mba and what wasn't in austin that made you have to go someplace else. I guess what does that lately? So when I got out of my mba program, I was working at city group which had an office in dallas, so I was up there for five days a week. And then my husband's still had his job down in austin, um, and then, you know, started a family and when our daughter arrived we had already planned that I would essentially come back to austin and find a new role there, um, until you know, the tech bubble strikes and my husband lost his role just a few weeks before my daughter was born.

Speaker 2: And uh, aT that point city offered to transfer us to denver where my husband's whole family had grown up, bit based, all that sort of thing. His parents had recently moved back there, so he just hit the ground in denver looking for a job there. And you know, we took the job transfer and with a new kid just that all seemed to work together. We would have been so happy to stay in austin. We have a ton of great friends. It's a wonderful place. It was a 50 slash 50 call. We also couldn't be happier that we've been in denver for the last several years and everything that's come around about that. Yeah, no, totally. Of course, if that hadn't happened, what wouldn't have happened and who knows as far as dallas is concerned as far as city, what was that position? Because it was obviously high enough, big enough, good enough and you were doing well enough in it that they said we want to keep you in, put you here.

Speaker 2: Right? Exactly. So at the time I was in a management associate rotation program for recent graduates of mba programs who are, who are getting experience in several different departments. Um, I was leaning more toward operations and proJect management and that sort of activity. And so that's what I did. And they knew they had a project up here in denver that needed attention. Um, they were largely moving to a work from home type of role for exactly. This was in the mid two thousands of, for my position. Um, and, and those like it. So go to denver, do these projects and then we'll see what happens and you'll be able to work remotely for anywhere in the united nOrthern, north America. So just seemed like a really great fit all around. That set you up for the next decade, at least. I'm sure it did. It did. Until you mentioned the corporate wall.

Speaker 2: You mentioned the glass ceiling. I would like to investigate both of these settings of words. So I'm. The corporate environment is one which certainly has a lot entrencheD personalities, long standing people who have consolidated a lot of power and nowhere where a lot of bodies are buried fair enough. And skeleTons in the closet chairs there. There may be a skeleton or three in the closet in the halls of large corporate entities in the United States to nobody's surprise. So all of that said, I just got into a situation with a manager who just decided that I wasn't that the favorite person by any means. Uh, and uh, because you have the, a personality of a person, it opinions can vary as to to why exactly that may well be part of it. I also, you know, I work for myself and the reason that I do is because I think for myself as well, and I don't do very well in a, in a structured environment where we have to kind of go in this way and go it that way.

Speaker 2: There is, there was certainly some, a large piece of that, um, the fact that I have opinions and thoughts and I can back those up with rational thought. People don't always agree and that's fine, totally fine. but when you're with one of my downfalls was that I felt that it waS part of my role to Say, I hear what you're saying here, here's a Different way we could look at that and even just advancing that, there may be something other than just Plan a out there that may be worth considering. That seemed to not Go over well with the powers that be know there are every person that's ever worked for a Larger organization is now nodding. Along with that is different though I would imagine. Then glass ceiling. Those are two different things. I think that is, um, the and the glass ceiling as well undeRstood.

Speaker 2: Well known, um, especially about. How was it in your case though? I wonder if it was fairly traditional. Um, there were a lot, especially all of those upper level entrenched people largely were male. The very few females who were at those upper levels felt it was just a very cutthroat environment among them because there was a sense that there are only so many positions that are going to be handed out to females. So if you've got one, you need to cut down every single female around you to keep others away from your territory. That's the enemy is what it is. Exactly what we are the enemy to each other type of thing. Yes. Fantastic. so right about them, someone that you had met along the way, your partner kind of gives you a ring, a ding, ding is that she does and says I have been doing this, you know, I did all my whole entrepreneurship stent, sold out successfully, have been sitting around for awhile, kind of going Crazy and I'm interested in doing another business to business media company, traditional along the way that, that we in the company that she and I had originally met at, uh, and, but I, I want somebody to do it with me looking For somebody with an operations background with a good, a understanding of, of some of the nuances and the finance and the hr and some of those traditional areas of business that she is an entrepreneur didn't really have just manage all this stuff over here.

Speaker 2: We're not going to need you out front. Right? BeCause that's what she said. Well there was, I don't know that she promised that, but let's just say I didn't think that through and Fair enough. Okay. And so did that mean you could stay in denver? Yes, it did. It did, it did. And what were the initial kind of ideas that you guys started running through and what year was it? So this was in, I'm going to say 2009 I think is when she and I put in our ors together, I call those the 12, 84 days in depth.

Speaker 2: Um, so she, um, when she had already been down this thought process, had a business plan together for what we were looking to do was build this series of subscription sites, subscription websites for very particular niche industries that would tell you what's going on in the industry, what the newest trends are, how to run your business effectively with it. Those sorts of things. And her. And the first business plan she built out was how do we figure out what we're doing and tell other people how to do that as well. So we launched this site called subscription site insider. Whether you're running a fan club website, whether you're running a news daily news, pay wall, these are all subscription sites and there are best practices to attracting and retaining customers, recurring billing challenges, all those things that go along with running a paywall site or a subscription site.

Speaker 2: And since that's what we were going to do, let's go research it and turn it into a profit center. The business model is the business. Exactly. That's fantastic. So that was the first one that we got going. Second one, uh, was a small. It was a thing called which test won, which is all about with an h or without, which as an like, which of these two tests will win as opposed to like turn out better as opposed to like a halloween, which correct. Correct. Correct. Um, and the concept there was about ab marketing testing. Oh, that's such a good idea. Yeah. So you know, you have sample a and you have sample b of your marketing and you distribute each one of those to 10,000 of your customers and you see which one of those winds, which one draws the greater response. And then you analyze why and use that information to develop best practices and track consumer trends. And consumer response trends are our paywall are not paid well, but our, our website sliders, you know, when those pictures move across the website, every 10 seconds, are those effective or are those distracting? What color shirts your button b is? Read the best color or is a muted gray a better color

Speaker 1: for your brand, for your product, whatever it is. Fascinating. All right, so here's a couple of ideas. This sounds brilliant, right? We're going to do this business model. This is also going to be the business. Fantastic ab testing who's not doing it? Everybody should be indeed. And then,

Speaker 2: and then um, about the same time I was seeing all these dispensary's pop up around my nail hometown of denver. Um, and you know, you can't drive down the street without smelling some stuff over there. And came across that article in her, her area where she was living in the northeast. It said that, hey, guess what? Nowadays there are more dispensaries in denver than there are starbucks, which was really true for while. Yeah, that's a thing that was really a thing for a bit, right? We should be paying attention to this. Right? And so we had been over the previous couple of months really wondering what's our next launch? And we had this whole series of criteria. It needs to be a growing industry. It needs to be something that needs professional information about how to run your, your business better. It needs to have at least say, you know, 5,000 potential customers is our business model was, maybe it's a higher price point, maybe it's $500 a year to subscribe, but if you have a thousand of those, you, you've got a nice little business model.

Speaker 2: So you had an algorithm. We had an algorithm. We had this decision criteria. Yeah. Um, and this checked every single one of those boxes. It was an industry where people may have been hot, may have had businesses and been in business for years, but it never kept an accounting record in their life, had never actually faced a real hr problem that they couldn't just make, go away by breaking up with somebody. um, those sorts of things that, that are going to become real now that now that we're having regulated and an actual storefronts and and people walking into these storefronts.

Speaker 1: So you launched the thing and I just got the note from tests that we have very limited time left because you're a busy person, which makes sense, but I guess in one sentence, going from that day one to this day now, when did you know that this was a thing that you actually had? Number one. And number two is when did you know that it was completely and totally as explosive as it is?

Speaker 2: As far as when did we know that we had a thing? Yeah, I'm gonna. I'm gonna. Go back to that old analogy. It's not even an analogy. It's truly a thing about the frog. Like if you put a frog in a pot of boiling water, it will pop out totally. But if you put a frog in a pot of cold water and turn the heat on, it won't pop out. We were the frogs in the cold water. We, it just got so hot around us that we hardly even realized it until we were cooking. Um, and then we looked up and we're like, oh, somewhere along the way this Became a real thing. Um, the moment where we knew it was going to be explosive, um, is, was a period of about four days, right in november of 2012, which was both the Colorado and Washington legalization votes followed two days later by our very first mj biz con event in the northwest in denver.

Speaker 2: This was the very first one in denver where we had honestly, we had kind of bet the farM on we're going to get together as many of these people as we can in a what? Like this is something that's never been really Done and understood in the cannabis industry before. But we're going to put together true btby live content, get the experts on stage, put together, you know, have a few tabletops and, and let's just see where this goes. And we had a grand total of 400 people come. It was a resounding success. We could not have been happier. 400 huge turnout. Huge, massive turnout and we were, we were hoping for about 2:50 types and we hit 400. We could not believe it. And just to give folks a sense, may tell us about dc, but also tell us the nUmbers and. Sure in las vegas, right here in dc, by the time the show closes we'll have 3,500 people through here.

Speaker 2: We have a 275 exhibitors on this show floor. Um, this coming fAll in las vegas we're expecting 540 exhibitors and somewhere north of 14,000 attendees at that event were $10,000 and that since 2000 and 2012. So in five years we call that hockey stick growth. I think I, I think that is indeed the official business school term for that. Congratulations my friend. Thank you for doing it. I feel like we would love to talk to you again. Be great. I'd love to. I have three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first though, what's most surprised you in cannabis? The willingness of this community to come together and make this happen.

Speaker 2: This is a neck. Sandra said this a couple of times in the crash course the other day. Yup. Yup. Cannabis is a team sport. And people who are serious about cannabis treat it as a team sport. I love it. That's exactly right. And uh, you know, there's a little bit of cattiness here and there, but we're all brothers and sisters, right? Sure. Everyone's fighting for the starting position on the team, right? So we're all in it together. There you go. What has most surprised you in life? Um, the, the human capacity to evolve, change and, and keep an open mind. It's crazy, right? Right. Like the link of how many people have gone from those really dark days of nixonian, um, drug propaganda to where we are today with so many people, not just nationally, but globally. Having an open mind toward cannabis laws. And I love the phrase everyone's saying it now.

Speaker 2: The toothpaste is out of the tube, you know, because no matter what happens on a us federal level, you know, over the next few years here, the toothpaste is out of the tube. You can juSt see it as you walk up and down these aisles. Exactly. It's, it's everywhere. Um, and there's a lot of analogies that people use for that. The genie is out of the bottle or all those sorts of things, but especially the old guard advocates that have made this industry who got this industry rolling back in the 19 nineties and really started pushing things forward and into the two thousands. Those people are still very much involved and they are leading the band and, and are absolutely right when they say this fight is not over and those guys are not going away until at least until this is done federal a cell, no federal legalization adult use worldwide.

Speaker 2: Absolute till that happens. We keep finding. Is that about right? That's it on the soundtrack of your life. one track, one song that's got to be on there, a fight song. That's definitely mine for right now. Um, I have been listening to it a lot of sense. It, it, it speaks to me as a female entrepreneur. It speaks to me as a cannabis entrepreneur. Um, and it just speaks to me as a, as a person. Um, you know, as my daughter, my kids loved that song and it's one that I am very happy to hear them playing on repeat just really quickly because we did talk about it before we turned on the microphones and I want to make sure to keep it here as far as female entrepreneurship and as far as this industry is concerned, you and I both have business to business backgrounds that go back a ways.

Speaker 2: Just talk about how pleased with the fact that this is a truly, you know, it was soMewhat equal industry as far as that's concerned. We are much closer to an equal industry in cannabis than we are in any other industry in the United States or globally. It is in terms of fUll on high level female involvement at the founder, executive director, those super high levels and, and, and business strategy roles. And it just makes me kind of insane because business research shows so clearly that that diversity of thought, of opinion of approach makes an absolute difference in the bottom line of your company. I am so grateful that the cannabis industry has provided a welcome home to people like me who hit the corporate wall, who hit the glass ceiling and had absolutely every single skill ability to move in and make this happen. And they found a home in cannabis and they're making it happen. Exactly. Proving it every day. And now we're going to be able to export that back out to the broader economy. Thank you so much. Appreciate it. It's good meeting you. Really youtube very much. And there you have cassandra

Speaker 1: farrington. I mean, that woman. She's all about hustle, right? I mean, you could, you could hear. I think you can hear it. I was there. But, uh, that is a hustler. Which, uh, I very much appreciate. Very much appreciated her time sitting down with us right in the middle of her event there and very much appreciate your time as well. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.