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Ep.268: Random Vaughn

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.268: Random Vaughn

Ep.268: Random Vaughn

Recorded at Lift Expo Toronto, Random Vaughn joins us shares a history of Washington state legalization. He explains the process of getting a medical card, getting 15 plants and becoming a collective garden way back when. You did a bit of paperwork and could enter the industry after 30 minutes at a doctor’s office in his words. Random and his team have serviced over 30K patients and he discusses how he and his team approached cannabis wellness with the patients and consumers that visited the collective. And then Random shares getting relicensed for 502 and what happened in Washington when the state went from offering medical cannabis to a overtly adult-use market. He’s matter of fact about the facts on the ground.

Transcript:

Speaker 3: random vaughn recorded at lyft expo. Random vaughn joins us and shares the history of Washington legalization. He explains the process of getting a medical card, getting 15 plants, and Becoming a collective garden way back when you did a bit of paperwork and could enter the industry after 30 minutes at a doctor's office in his words random and his team has serviced over 30,000 patients and he discusses how he and his team approached cannabis wellness with the patients and consumers that visited the collective. And then random chaIrs getting re licensed for five. Oh two. And what happened in Washington when the state went from offering medical cannabis to an overtly adult use market, he's matter of fact about the facts on the ground. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Random vaughn. So a random, which states

Speaker 1: from lazy. Utah's zuni. Are you from Washington, Washington, where we have our retail, uh, dispensary's a recreational and medical. Yeah. Then we're also in Oregon as well. Oh, you are? Yeah. You've gone south. Yeah, I mean it's not very hard to get down to portland from Washington as you know, around here. So, um, there are two states that were some of the first to get recreational, they went about it completely differently and so that's one of the reasons I love coming to these kinds of events and getting a chance to talk with people like you giving some insight of what we've done, right, what we've done wrong, and hopefully what people can take advantage of that. That's exactly where I want to start because as Canada works on federal legalization of adult use, cannabis, figuring it out as they work on this. Let's just talk about federal adult use in Washington state, how those regulations caMe to be and what that meant to the mediCal market in the state.

Speaker 1: And then let's talk about how that comPAres to how Oregon did the very same thing. Okay, leT's. Okay, let's. A lot of questions. I'm not, I'm just setting the stage for us. Okay. So let's. I mean, that's the big thing is I want anybody listening to be able to take something away if they're looking at investing in this space, wanting to work in the space, wanting to get into recreational weed. So the big thing is, is what happened in those two states? What's going on in California is obviously politicians. We voted on it. Canada seems to be going about it. They've listened to the people and they're going through a legislation really kind of forced the hand of the government saying, hey, no, we want this. We've had medical for 17 years, 18 years in some states, and so we said, okay, we're going to be on the forefront as your Alaska said, California the first time didn't pass it.

Speaker 1: and so when Washington went recreational, it was, okay, now we got to figure this out. Is the government even going to let us do it? And so we were definitely on the, you know, the bleeding edge and a lot of people definitely felt some pain going through that and they did a lot of things wrong. I don't know how much we want to dive into that. So I do want to dive in. So for you, let's just take your personal experience. When did you get into cannabis? I got into cannabis around 2010 on the medical side, you know, things were the wild west, especially in Washington. So how did you do it? So we got medical cards. You went down to a doctor and got a medical card and then you got 15 plants. You can put 15 plants next to another 15 plants and that was a collective garden and this was this little snippet in the legal laws that allowed people to grow things legally and then you just had paperwork to make sure that if you even got rated you weren't going to go to jail and you'd have some grounds to stand on.

Speaker 1: And so that's really how it started out. You could literally start growing cannabis, entering the industry in 30 minutes at a doctor's office and you know, in Washington our medical system definitely had some leniency like California does is do you have back pain and you get your medical card. now I am totally pro that having the requirements amilcar should be low. You cannot, everybody gets a benefit from marijuana and there are no, you know, the green effect, have you smoked too much weed and we don't know what is wrong with you and they have no diagnosis, so I have never seen a real case of someone having an overdose and so I believe that getting more marijuana, more thc or cbd into hands of sick people however you do that I think is a massive benefit on society. And The one thing I will say, especially for the United States, every state who that's had a MediCal marijuana has a, has had a decrease in overdoses of other drugs.

Speaker 1: 100 of the states and the numbers go uP. The longer you've hAd medical marijuana and more people get access to without question, and these are numbers that need to be pointed out to our attorney general, but let's digress. How many licenses did you wind up with as far as the medical side? So on the medical side, I mean it took several years. We had four retail locations. We at that point, we didn't know growing. We looked at it as saying, hey, to make this work, we are great at providing customer service, being there, being open from 8:00 AM to midnight, always being there for our patients doing delivery back in those days it was illegal. And so that's, that's a fulltime scenario that you are really providing. And so if you are good at customer service and you're good at retail, get into it. But a lot of people come into it as like, oh, I just want a better margin and then really have a tough time in retail.

Speaker 1: So just do retail if, uh, if you can take us through patient experience. So what kind of dosages were you providing to patients? How many patients did you have going through the four stores? Just give us some metrics so we understand. Yeah. So in approximately four years we had about 30,000 patients. Um, and with that, I mean in Washington, the prescription you get really was, you now get to go decide what works for you. It's not based on some arbitrary, okay, you need 10 milligrams and those kinds of things. It's you can figure it out, consume, try those kinds of things. Do you like edibles or do you want topicals? Do you want to consume flower? Do you want concentrates? What is going to help relieve your pain, your ptsd, whatever that is. And so that was kind of the breadth of us. On the medical side.

Speaker 3: random vaughn recorded at lyft expo. Random vaughn joins us and shares the history of Washington legalization. He explains the process of getting a medical card, getting 15 plants, and Becoming a collective garden way back when you did a bit of paperwork and could enter the industry after 30 minutes at a doctor's office in his words random and his team has serviced over 30,000 patients and he discusses how he and his team approached cannabis wellness with the patients and consumers that visited the collective. And then random chaIrs getting re licensed for five. Oh two. And what happened in Washington when the state went from offering medical cannabis to an overtly adult use market, he's matter of fact about the facts on the ground. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host seth adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. Random vaughn. So a random, which states

Speaker 1: from lazy. Utah's zuni. Are you from Washington, Washington, where we have our retail, uh, dispensary's a recreational and medical. Yeah. Then we're also in Oregon as well. Oh, you are? Yeah. You've gone south. Yeah, I mean it's not very hard to get down to portland from Washington as you know, around here. So, um, there are two states that were some of the first to get recreational, they went about it completely differently and so that's one of the reasons I love coming to these kinds of events and getting a chance to talk with people like you giving some insight of what we've done, right, what we've done wrong, and hopefully what people can take advantage of that. That's exactly where I want to start because as Canada works on federal legalization of adult use, cannabis, figuring it out as they work on this. Let's just talk about federal adult use in Washington state, how those regulations caMe to be and what that meant to the mediCal market in the state.

Speaker 1: And then let's talk about how that comPAres to how Oregon did the very same thing. Okay, leT's. Okay, let's. A lot of questions. I'm not, I'm just setting the stage for us. Okay. So let's. I mean, that's the big thing is I want anybody listening to be able to take something away if they're looking at investing in this space, wanting to work in the space, wanting to get into recreational weed. So the big thing is, is what happened in those two states? What's going on in California is obviously politicians. We voted on it. Canada seems to be going about it. They've listened to the people and they're going through a legislation really kind of forced the hand of the government saying, hey, no, we want this. We've had medical for 17 years, 18 years in some states, and so we said, okay, we're going to be on the forefront as your Alaska said, California the first time didn't pass it.

Speaker 1: and so when Washington went recreational, it was, okay, now we got to figure this out. Is the government even going to let us do it? And so we were definitely on the, you know, the bleeding edge and a lot of people definitely felt some pain going through that and they did a lot of things wrong. I don't know how much we want to dive into that. So I do want to dive in. So for you, let's just take your personal experience. When did you get into cannabis? I got into cannabis around 2010 on the medical side, you know, things were the wild west, especially in Washington. So how did you do it? So we got medical cards. You went down to a doctor and got a medical card and then you got 15 plants. You can put 15 plants next to another 15 plants and that was a collective garden and this was this little snippet in the legal laws that allowed people to grow things legally and then you just had paperwork to make sure that if you even got rated you weren't going to go to jail and you'd have some grounds to stand on.

Speaker 1: And so that's really how it started out. You could literally start growing cannabis, entering the industry in 30 minutes at a doctor's office and you know, in Washington our medical system definitely had some leniency like California does is do you have back pain and you get your medical card. now I am totally pro that having the requirements amilcar should be low. You cannot, everybody gets a benefit from marijuana and there are no, you know, the green effect, have you smoked too much weed and we don't know what is wrong with you and they have no diagnosis, so I have never seen a real case of someone having an overdose and so I believe that getting more marijuana, more thc or cbd into hands of sick people however you do that I think is a massive benefit on society. And The one thing I will say, especially for the United States, every state who that's had a MediCal marijuana has a, has had a decrease in overdoses of other drugs.

Speaker 1: 100 of the states and the numbers go uP. The longer you've hAd medical marijuana and more people get access to without question, and these are numbers that need to be pointed out to our attorney general, but let's digress. How many licenses did you wind up with as far as the medical side? So on the medical side, I mean it took several years. We had four retail locations. We at that point, we didn't know growing. We looked at it as saying, hey, to make this work, we are great at providing customer service, being there, being open from 8:00 AM to midnight, always being there for our patients doing delivery back in those days it was illegal. And so that's, that's a fulltime scenario that you are really providing. And so if you are good at customer service and you're good at retail, get into it. But a lot of people come into it as like, oh, I just want a better margin and then really have a tough time in retail.

Speaker 1: So just do retail if, uh, if you can take us through patient experience. So what kind of dosages were you providing to patients? How many patients did you have going through the four stores? Just give us some metrics so we understand. Yeah. So in approximately four years we had about 30,000 patients. Um, and with that, I mean in Washington, the prescription you get really was, you now get to go decide what works for you. It's not based on some arbitrary, okay, you need 10 milligrams and those kinds of things. It's you can figure it out, consume, try those kinds of things. Do you like edibles or do you want topicals? Do you want to consume flower? Do you want concentrates? What is going to help relieve your pain, your ptsd, whatever that is. And so that was kind of the breadth of us. On the medical side.

Speaker 1: We obviously had a very large geographical footprint. I think we covered well over a hundred miles because we had delivery as well, so we really went. I mean I'm just saying no. Are collectives would drive 20 miles out, deliver somebody a single gram if they needed it. We weren't doing it for profit. That's been a little tough going from medical to recreational. I even think up here in Canada, a lot of people have that concern of going from medical to legalization. Decriminalization and a lot of people vote for it just to decriminalize it. They don't want the recreational data's wanted you to criminalized. So let's talk about that inflection point. Vote comes in and 2012. Yes. July. First 2014 is when adult use. Is gonna happen? Yeah, for sales. So go from 2012 to July 1st, 2014. What did you have to do? Oh, to get. Oh my god.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Okay. So on retail and I'll just give us. I don't think canada's going to do this, but they might wash. These are saying we are giving this history because you never know. Exactly. So the worst decision in my opinion is Washington came up with a lottery. They thought the most fair way to do was just pick names out of a hat and anyone who got that got the golden ticket and now you can open up a retail store. There was definitely some backend deals going on. I'm not going to go into those kinds of things, but what that did is it stopped stores from opening up because everyone just applied and it created a very weird system, but basically you needed to find a location and our lottery pay money, get more money to the government. That's what they were going for. They wanted a bunch of people buying lottery tickets to generate revenue and so you had to literally find locations and signed leases with landlords and the landlords were getting all this money when you don't even know if were ever going to get a license.

Speaker 1: And of course this is again from your, on the ground dispensary point of view. Exactly. And uh, as far as you know, going from four licenses to what you wound up with, what did you wind up with? We have, what did you have to do? Oh my word. I had a staff of five people working literally 10 hours a day doing nothing but calling real estate. That's the one thing. Real estate becomes the big linchpin, especially on the retail side. And you need to always be looking for real estate. It's one of the reasons why us now on the recreational side, our franchising, because there's no way we can be everywhere looking for locations everywhere, those kinds of things. So we've, we've gone out and said, hey, we want to partner with people. Are you in Colorado? Are you in toronto? You want a brand that's doing the marketing, delivering a high quality of service so you can be successful if you know how to make a great burger at home.

Speaker 1: Yeah, but I don't. I bet you don't know how to sell a million billion burgers like mcdonald's does. maybe you want to team up with them. And so that's the thing of what we've gone into is realizing that ticket, a thing of this. There are big companies in Canada, but in the United States there is not one single brand in every recreational and medical state. Currently. There is not all 50 states are allowed. So if you can picture, we're not even utilizing the opportunities that are there in an industry that is trying to become. And that's because you can't do it on your own. So that's my big thing is it's all about relationships. It's all about partnerships and that's what, especially if on like the last guy, if you're not going to magically know how to go public on the New York stock exchange and currently in the United States, we can't, is what are you going to do to compete as these big, big grows are going in and going microaggression if we want to get into that, I really don't think is the key.

Speaker 1: Okay. Let's just bypass that for a second day. They call that craft up here from. But let's, we will come back to it. I just want to make sure that we get all of this as far as kind of the change in your business. So yeah, speak to, you know, we talked about the medical patients that you were servicing. Talk about those same medical patients now that you service what they have to do, what product you have from that for them and what product you don't have for them. That's a great question. So the big thing that got screwed in Washington, I'm just going to talk Washington, Washington, Oregon, done a differently. California's figuring out. So let's just talk about Washington. This is my big concern about for Canada is that based on legalization recreational funding, they're going to get lobbyists and they're going to change the rules.

Speaker 1: It doesn't matter what decides this year. When Washington got it, everything was cool in 2012, 2013, 2014. There are two separate sandboxes. You can't recreational, can't touch medical. Go stay over there. And they said, hey, we don't like this. We want all the money in our sandbox. And so they paid lobbyists, they got new bills through, they got new thing sign. And guess what? They combined it all and they shut everybody else out again. And we got to just say that, that is your opinion of what happened. And uh, your favorite. The stories. Yeah. Let's go back and read this note. I want to talk one day in, one day in Washington and they close down. One day they closed down 10,000 medical dispensary's in one day and now there is 400 recreational dispensaries to serve as everybody in Washington. So yeah, I guess it is just my opinion.

Speaker 1: Indeed. Indeed. what I'm getting at though, I want to talk about the patients as far as what you are serving them now versus what you were struggling for. That's what I'm saying. You know, instead of taking it from the business slash government perspective. Yeah, let's talk about it from the patient perspeCtiVe. The pAtient perspective is if someone was trying to get a topicals edibles, all that, they have been completely disservice because the dosage are these ridiculously low 10 milligrams. Some states it's five milligrams and it's like, how much do you expect me? I don't want to smoke flower. I don't want to consume rso directly, and so they have gotten a massive disservice. Yes, the prices have come down, but at least in every state right now, medical patients are still paying the excise tax, which makes no sense, but the governor's not willing to give up those taxes and so that's the big thing that's really hurt medical patients is right now in Washington.

Speaker 1: They said, okay, there is no difference between medical, dry flower and recreational, dry flower, let's not kid ourselves. And so for you, you only get sales tax off. I think that is a massive disservice to the people who fought and got medical marijuana for almost 20 years and that is my concern for Canada and that is my concern for every state that's coming online, so Canada obviously federal government, they are letting the provinces decide what to do and then the cities within the provinces decide what they wanted to do and they do that in every state in the u. S as well. So that's why I want you to take us through. You just brought up the excise tax. Yes. Talk about the medical patient and the taxation that they are paying and the adult use patient and what a taxation they are paying. Okay.

Speaker 1: so in Washington we have on purpose the highest excise tax in the country. They're proud of it. They want it. They want to be those guys. So we have a 37 percent excise tax currently and I'm going to take you back a little bit. That's actually less than it started out as. Right. Okay. Then on top of that, we have sales tax where a lot of places have sales tax and we have basically most places is about nine point eight percent, almost 10 percent of a sales tax. So medically you don't have to pay the sales tax, you're still paying the much higher, a 37 percent that is now at the retail standpoint. So it was only once when the law was written in Washington, there was a 25 percent tax at the producer of the person who grow it. There was a 25 percent tax at the processor and then there was a 25 percent tax at the retailer.

Speaker 1: Now that we can do simple math, that 75 percent wait, that's actually compounding. And so if you do the compounding, that's actually a hundred and five percent tax. And that is why all the recreational guys got together and did everything they could to destroy medical is because the taxes were so high, they couldn't compete with people that didn't, weren't paying the taxes. So now though we've got exercise plus sales tax and that's about 50 percent, 45, 49. And the add on a city tax potentially on a county tax. Who knows? Exactly. So you're over 50 percent. Yep. What are patients telling you in Washington? You've been servicing them since 2010. what are they telling you now in as we make our way into the summer? 20 17? Well, I think patients, everybody longs for the old days and the one thing that Oregon is still doing better than the old days.

Speaker 1: Just to clarify that the medical old days, you know, all the years have we had to spend surgeries. They had products that they could get that specific to their needs. I mean the big thing is is when you've closed down regulations, and I hope Canada opens it up here a little bit, where if you want to get in then you can get in, you apply business or like there is no reason that you decided that there should only be a hundred and 50 coffee shops. That's it. I've decided there's only a need for 150 coffee shops. So basically a lot of states and he maybe even counted as done that in marijuana. That makes no sense. So they've created these monopolies to say that they can't do all the work and the regulations and those kinds of things. You are not letting the market decide they are.

Speaker 1: Washington is not letting the market decide. California appears to not going to be interested in letting the market side. Oregon is still the hold out on letting the market decide. Colorado was doing that. And so the big thing is, is I belieVe patients and customers always get better product, better prices. If you let the market decide, yes, there is going to be some blood in the water of people invest in taking that risk, entering the space. And. But what it does is it drives prices down. That means people are getting a better quality product at a better price. So you just brought up Oregon. We've been speaking about Washington state for the most part, Oregon, which is, uh, the neighbor. Yeah, exactly. Um, and the other way from Canada. Yeah, exactly. We're going the wrong direction. Take us through the setup there. Uh, and how it is so different.

Speaker 1: Okay. So what data site is, they are like, we're just going to set up these rules. If you meet the zoning and you mean the county, you just apply for a business license that you do in any other business and then you go through the process and wait to deal with the olc or the oha and you get licensed and you open up. The other thing that they did, which Colorado did, is they had retail existing for medical and they just said, okay, well you guys already licensed and we're tracking everything already now your recreational and so no one moves. No one did anything because you already had to meet your zoning for license. It wasn't wild west there before, so they already had an influence structure to go from. They grandfathered in adult use on top of medical. Exactly. Respecting the medical market. Exactly.

Speaker 1: Very. They just basically said we're not changing anything for you and then we're just going to let all these other people participate and that's a couple of years ago now. How do prices currently compare in Washington state to Oregon? Washington state? Because it had a bit of a headstart. Yup. Is massively cheaper. Massively. How so? So you're getting ounces in Washington between 50, you know, and upward. I mean really top top shelf stuff. Two hundred to 50. Okay. And so in Oregon your whole sale is kind of closer to that. And the reason is, is because they're just waiting to turn on all these growers. They, Oregon is going to be much, much cheaper because they will have much, much more production. The thing is they're just behind on the olc getting those places licensed. Okay, fair enough. So some of that is uh, the machine figuring itself out yet.

Speaker 1: How does though taxation compare, if I'm paying a 50 percent as a patient in Washington state, what am I paying an Oregon? Oregon is at the retail and it depends because of the county and those kinds of things yet. But you'Re somewhere between 15 to 20 percent and no sales tax. So they basically just added a sales tax on just weed. And so in the long run that is going to be, it's going to be much cheaper. And so a lot of the best stores, retail, like even up here, it'd be like, well, where do I want to be? I want to be near a border or something like that because oh, those guys, it's not legal and they'll drive over. So in the early days, the best places to be was down in vancouver, right next to the border and of any other state that didn't have it.

Speaker 1: And that's going to completely flip on those guys. Unfortunately, when prices and products all catch up, um, I will say that Oregon, at least right now, is doing a better job in their testing labs. I don't know if we don't need to get into it, but up here there's a lot of great testing going on in Washington specifically. There's basically fraud going on and there's now investigations finally. And people had been hollering about that for years. So you as an operator, it costs a lot of money to test obviously. Right? And it costs even more money to test. Well, so yes. So what would you say there? Let's dive in there. Okay. Let's dive into testing. So the one thing is, is if you've been smoking weed for a long time, you know that it's not about the thc. Okay. And we're getting more and more information about the terpene profiles and hoW that actually affects.

Speaker 1: And I believe that is really, really important. Right? And so the thing is, is the big thing where the fraud comes in is let's say you have a testing lab and let's say I have a testing lab, okay? We don't want to compete on price. That makes no sense. Then neither one of us make any money. So how are we going to compete? Who would you as a grower go to you or me? If you had to give product, you give the same product to you, you get a 20 percent thc tests. Will they give the same talk to me, I give them a 30 percent test result which greatly affects sales. The general consumer looks at the number and reads it as gospel. Okay? And they, I've stood in my retail store and looked at someone's looked at two products and they've said 25 point one percent, 25 point two percent.

Speaker 1: And chose the higher one, right? I mean it makes it, it's kind of universe, but that is the general consumer and we can't be angry at them. They're going off the information they have. They have other things to do. They can't be, you know, we'd kind of soars all of them. What are you doing to provide clarity to the patient? Do it as much as we possibly can. We try and communicate it. We try and provide. We have a copy of every test result and which labs and we tell people which labs always test. I'm not kidding you, we have flower on my shelf right now. Guarantee it. Testing a 41 percent, 41 percent flower. Have you ever smoked? Concentrates like now where is this like bullshit, right? But you have a testing lab willing to print it and you consumers that want to buy it.

Speaker 1: So unfortunately as a retailer I have to provide them that service. I can tell them to please buy something else. Like don't waste your money. But that's the thing. The clear solution to that would be a lab of labs provided by the state. Of course they need to have, so what most states have done is we're not politicians, we're not scientists. You guys figure out how you test this thing. I don't know anything about it, but you guys do your thing and each lab has gotten to come up with our standard practices. They've not given one standard practice across the board and that's where all the front, that's the state job and obviously here it'll be the federal government's job. Yep. The final three questions, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 1: What has most surprised you in life and then on the soundtrack of your life? One track, one song that's got to be on there. Okay. First things first though, we did just spend a whole session just talking about Washington and Oregon. We didn't really ask you about you at all, but what has most surprised you in cannabis? I think the thing that has most surprised me in cannabis is I'll be honest, how quickly it's been changing over, which is great. I like being on the right side of history. Sure, and I can, I know for a fact in my bones it's going to be full legalization in most likely the world in my lifetime and so I love being on the right side of history and. Okay, so witH that, I'm just saying no, 2010. There were still raids. I had, I had 16 officers surround one of my shops.

Speaker 1: I've had, I've seen the fda come in and just go down I five closing and so to go from there to like a few years later we're, our attorney general is fighting the federal attorney general incident. You ain't coming in and taking away our weed. Wow. That has happened really, really quick. And so that's, that's I think the biggest thing that surprised me is that actually politicians are on our side now once they have it, where Washington state cannabis is already one 20th and growing in our total net annual revenue. Right, okay. It's been around for not even three years. That's mindblowing. Absolutely. that is with all of the problems that you are. Exactly where they kept messing it up. Imagine if it was going smoothly. Uh, what's most surprised you in life? You know, obviously growing up I never thought I was going to be in this industry.

Speaker 1: I never thought I'd be on a stage talking about this kind of stuff. Yeah. But I definitely take a, a very wanting to give back and seeing. I've seen a lot of people get hurt, gone out of business, lost a lot of money entering the space and no one wants to talk about people are losing money in wheat. I even think there's a thing like green in the green, you know, and like guys, there are a lot of people going out of business I know to producer processors who put in millions of dollars into a grown in Washington and literally just recently went on a business in the last 60 days because they can't compete. So this is a space that is highly, highly competitive. You'll real players in it and as more money gets in it's going to be more competitive. And so that's, I'd say is the thing that's most surprised me in my life is being, being here with you.

Speaker 1: Absolutely. And you bring up a growing up. I mean, I got to ask you, I've never met another guy named random. How have you met another guy? You do like all these podcasts, you're in the industry. How have you never met? Anyways, I've met a bunch of other randoms, but yeah, the parents. My parents were hippies and uh, just uh, you know, like that shows what my age is. My parents had a late shot and it was right at that time. So. Got it. Do you have any siblings? I do have a sister. And what's her name? Cat. Okay. I think I got the better name please. I'm not named rainbow. That is the one that I'm always like, if I was named rainbow, that would be the, that'd be a tough one to be a tough one. Uh, so it's, it's good to have you here.

Speaker 1: Random. Not rainbow, uh, on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. The last guy sets such a good answer. He did not like, I'm not good with titles. I will just say this. Yeah. nothing. Beatles. So I really don't care what's on the soundtrack, just nothing. Beatles related I data. I've never had that answer. I don't understand it. Why? Why did the beatles annoy you? I, I just think the beatles are a generation and they were phenomenal in their generation, their design, my generation. And so I don't, I just have a tough time when people are like, oh, you're 19 and you just, you connected with the beatles message. I just, I gotcha. So music is an extremely and completely subjective thing. Yup. Understanding that your wrong. Random von legit gentlemen say so much preciate it. And there you have random vaughn.

Speaker 3: what is medical cannabis and who is permitted to dispense it? These two questions I fear we will discover the answers to in California and Canada. I don't know what's going to happen. I don't like what's possible. Thanks for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.