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Ep.269: Derek Riedle, Civilized

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.269: Derek Riedle, Civilized

Ep.269: Derek Riedle, Civilized

Recorded at Lift Toronto, Derek Riedle from Civilized join us and discusses the crossroads of the media industry- where it is now and how he looks at where it’s going. He went to college in Halifax wound up back in is home of New Brunswick  and eventually was invited by a friend to California. He had been all around the world but never to the Golden State, so we went. After a few hours he called his wife and a month later they were looking for a place. He’s an old agency guy so he knows that agencies are hard businesses to scale. His moment of cannabis enlightenment came when he was at a nice dinner in Venice where he everyone in the restaurant was drinking beer wine and spirits while he was huddled behind the restaurant, behind a dumpster with his vape pen.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Derek Reidel. According to the lifter, Ronald, Derek Reidel joins us and discusses the crossroads of the media industry, where it is now and how he looks at where it's going. You went to college and Halifax, wound up back in his hometown of New Brunswick and eventually was invited by a friend to California. He'd been all around the world but never to the golden state. So we went a few hours later, he called his wife and a month later they were looking for a place. He's an old agency guy, so he knows that agencies are hard businesses to scale his moment of cannabis. Enlightenment came when he was at a nice dinner in Venice where he noticed everyone in the restaurant was drinking beer, wine, and spirits while he was huddled behind the restaurant behind a dumpster with his vape pen. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two aunts in the word economy. Derek Reidel.

Speaker 3: Aw, you're too kind. I feel like you're a guy that's done this before, so you know, that's it. So thank you for the water. You're welcome. Alright. Derek Reedley. Oh, did I say write down a little bit? Yeah, that's right. Dell high, right? Yeah. Yeah. So do you get that often? Uh Oh yeah. Look when, when somebody reads it, it's mispronounced. If I say it, you can't spell it. It's a tricky, tricky name. Reedley. Reedley. Alright. It's easy now. It, it's. Yeah, exactly. Now that you've said it, all right, so first off just set the stage and also to give me an opportunity to take a sip of water if I don't know what civilized is. Share A. Okay, well thanks for the tea up chairs at cheers. A civilized is a media company that creates content for motivated, productive people who choose to enjoy cannabis but don't define themselves by it.

Speaker 3: So we skew a little bit older. Oh, sorry. Speak to an audience that, uh, is a little bit more mature. Okay. Why such specificity when creating a media company? Well, that's what you do when you're building a media company. You, you define your tribe and you create content that speaks to them. So it's, we're, we're just, we're just following the model that media companies have followed for forever, which is doing it for the digital age. So, uh, and understanding that as the model, what kinds of things do you cover? What kinds of things can I expect? What kinds of things will I see versus what I certainly will not see a, we don't do a whole lot of weed porn. Okay. We're actually, look, we're, we're, we're a media company and our flagship property is a, is on the web, civilized.life and uh, really, uh, what we do is we, we create content not about cannabis but about people who enjoy cannabis and the things they like.

Speaker 3: So we view that as the lens through which our tribe views the world. Uh, so we talk about politics, we talk about tech, we talk about travel and tourism, we talk about things that interest guys like you and me. Right? Okay. Um, and I have recently found out that we are middle aged men. Yeah. I don't know where you. Yeah, it's crazy. Yeah, I know. We did that happen. Well, keeps going. The only thing worse than 240 just turned 41. I likewise. I think we might be the same exact age. I'm 46. Oh, we are not the same exact age. So, so let's, uh, let's understand where you're coming from so that we can understand where you are. Where you from. I'm from a small city in eastern Canada about St John, New Brunswick, a show, you know, you get on a plane at Pearson, here you go a couple hours east and you wind up in God's country.

Speaker 3: I love Toronto, but there's no place like New Brunswick A. I spent half my time there, but my wife, my kids and I live most of the era of Venice, California. Okay. Ryedale high were then where Greece was filmed. That's exactly it. What? Oh, wait. Is Ryedale highs greasers that uh, uh, what should we call it? I thought that that was with a Spec Noli no, no, no. It's grease spicoli. Yes. But Colin. Oh, fast times at Ridgemont high. Ridgemont high. Okay. So there you have it folks. I'm in the middle of nowhere. You know, clowns to the left to meet jokers to the right here. Right. So then how do you go from St John? Where'd you go to a college? Uh, look, I'm an east coast guy. I moved around a lot when I was a kid. My father worked for a company that a lot of Torontonians will recognize because the water tower is out on the Gardiner expressway.

Speaker 1: Derek Reidel. According to the lifter, Ronald, Derek Reidel joins us and discusses the crossroads of the media industry, where it is now and how he looks at where it's going. You went to college and Halifax, wound up back in his hometown of New Brunswick and eventually was invited by a friend to California. He'd been all around the world but never to the golden state. So we went a few hours later, he called his wife and a month later they were looking for a place. He's an old agency guy, so he knows that agencies are hard businesses to scale his moment of cannabis. Enlightenment came when he was at a nice dinner in Venice where he noticed everyone in the restaurant was drinking beer, wine, and spirits while he was huddled behind the restaurant behind a dumpster with his vape pen. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. That's two aunts in the word economy. Derek Reidel.

Speaker 3: Aw, you're too kind. I feel like you're a guy that's done this before, so you know, that's it. So thank you for the water. You're welcome. Alright. Derek Reedley. Oh, did I say write down a little bit? Yeah, that's right. Dell high, right? Yeah. Yeah. So do you get that often? Uh Oh yeah. Look when, when somebody reads it, it's mispronounced. If I say it, you can't spell it. It's a tricky, tricky name. Reedley. Reedley. Alright. It's easy now. It, it's. Yeah, exactly. Now that you've said it, all right, so first off just set the stage and also to give me an opportunity to take a sip of water if I don't know what civilized is. Share A. Okay, well thanks for the tea up chairs at cheers. A civilized is a media company that creates content for motivated, productive people who choose to enjoy cannabis but don't define themselves by it.

Speaker 3: So we skew a little bit older. Oh, sorry. Speak to an audience that, uh, is a little bit more mature. Okay. Why such specificity when creating a media company? Well, that's what you do when you're building a media company. You, you define your tribe and you create content that speaks to them. So it's, we're, we're just, we're just following the model that media companies have followed for forever, which is doing it for the digital age. So, uh, and understanding that as the model, what kinds of things do you cover? What kinds of things can I expect? What kinds of things will I see versus what I certainly will not see a, we don't do a whole lot of weed porn. Okay. We're actually, look, we're, we're, we're a media company and our flagship property is a, is on the web, civilized.life and uh, really, uh, what we do is we, we create content not about cannabis but about people who enjoy cannabis and the things they like.

Speaker 3: So we view that as the lens through which our tribe views the world. Uh, so we talk about politics, we talk about tech, we talk about travel and tourism, we talk about things that interest guys like you and me. Right? Okay. Um, and I have recently found out that we are middle aged men. Yeah. I don't know where you. Yeah, it's crazy. Yeah, I know. We did that happen. Well, keeps going. The only thing worse than 240 just turned 41. I likewise. I think we might be the same exact age. I'm 46. Oh, we are not the same exact age. So, so let's, uh, let's understand where you're coming from so that we can understand where you are. Where you from. I'm from a small city in eastern Canada about St John, New Brunswick, a show, you know, you get on a plane at Pearson, here you go a couple hours east and you wind up in God's country.

Speaker 3: I love Toronto, but there's no place like New Brunswick A. I spent half my time there, but my wife, my kids and I live most of the era of Venice, California. Okay. Ryedale high were then where Greece was filmed. That's exactly it. What? Oh, wait. Is Ryedale highs greasers that uh, uh, what should we call it? I thought that that was with a Spec Noli no, no, no. It's grease spicoli. Yes. But Colin. Oh, fast times at Ridgemont high. Ridgemont high. Okay. So there you have it folks. I'm in the middle of nowhere. You know, clowns to the left to meet jokers to the right here. Right. So then how do you go from St John? Where'd you go to a college? Uh, look, I'm an east coast guy. I moved around a lot when I was a kid. My father worked for a company that a lot of Torontonians will recognize because the water tower is out on the Gardiner expressway.

Speaker 3: Christy, Christy cookies moved around a lot, lived here for a bit when I was a kid into a uh, yeah, in Toronto, uh, lived in Halifax, but move back to New Brunswick when I was about 11 years old. We went to high school there, went to college in Halifax. Okay. Uh, and was quite content with my life on the east coast. After college I sort of accidentally wound up back in my hometown. Yeah. And fell in love with it. I wasn't in love with it when I was in high school, but I fell in love with it when I got a little bit older. Uh, and in my forties I was 48 and 42. A friend of mine invited me to California to, um, uh, he was filling a doc just asked me to come down and check it out. I've been all around the world, but I'd never been to California.

Speaker 3: I kind of said, yeah, all right, I'll, I'll go. I was there about three, four hours and I went, oh, okay. I called my wife, she came down a month later and we started looking for a place. All right. So, uh, had you been in media? Uh, I'm a, I'm a, an agency guy. Was Twenty seven. I started a communications agency, which still operates. In fact, the president of that agency is right there. Cynthia Goodwin, revolution strategy, which has a significant cannabis practice. Um, uh, uh, and you know, agencies are hard businesses to scale though. Sure. So about the same time that I found California, we were also looking to move into new things that we could scale. Content was the obvious one because we could incubate it within the agency. Sure. We developed a television show that we were wrapping that television show on my wife's birthday, January 24th, 2015.

Speaker 3: We were at a beautiful restaurant in Venice and everybody in the restaurant was, you know, drinking beer, wine and spirits. And I found myself behind the restaurant beside the dumpster with my vape pen. And it was at that moment that I said, this has got to change and we're going to expand this culture to include people like me. So let's get to that. Right? So, uh, you, we've got prohibition is what we call it and you guys are making your way through that here in Canada. What you're talking about is the fact that you felt like a criminal and you shouldn't have. Yeah. And in California, I mean, there's obviously extremes. Like I'm sure you have to hide your cannabis use a little bit more if you're in the midwest or in Braskem a California. I mean the, the, the, the, the, the, the medical market has really been a mask for the, for the, for the rec market.

Speaker 3: But yeah, I felt like a criminal. Um, and even though I was in California and it was, it was something that was more or less welcomed everywhere here I was up behind the dumpster right now. Dee, do you also have a thought the other way as far as folks kind of imbibing with liquor, alcohol, dee dee care on that end. Are you just coming from it from this perspective? I'm a guy who loves to drink beer until I was in my mid thirties. I'll tell you my cannabis story. Yeah. Uh, I'm, I, I experimented quite a bit in college. Sure. Uh, and then went out into the work world, you know, 23, 24. I started working for ad agencies and you know, 25 years ago the, the, the work culture wasn't cannabis culture. It was a drinking culture. Right now you're out doing business development, you're shaking hands, kissing babies, you're having a few beers.

Speaker 3: You toasted Lube lubing up your, your clients, right. That's it. A show. I didn't leave cannabis. It just on purpose. It just sort of faded from my life. He drifted, he drifted, you know, if I was at a party once or twice a year and somebody hold out a joint, I was there, sure. But it just wasn't something I ever bought or had with me. It wasn't an active part of my life till I was in my mid thirties friend of mine, you know, a couple of beers on Friday night made it awful. Tough to get up with our young kids on Saturday morning, you know, take a shift a and a friend of mine who was a fellow father said, why don't you just want you to start consuming a little bit more cannabis? And I said, Huh? And, and over the last 10 years, alcohol is all but faded from my life. It's now the thing that I'll do a couple of times a year, right? Because I can't deal with the empty calories, the sugar and the three day hangovers, right. You know, one day of nausea when they have depression and one day of no productivity, I can't do it anymore. So cannabis is my, is my crutch of choice.

Speaker 4: So when you jumped into cannabis with civilized, it's not like you're just, Oh, jumping in on this as an opportunity, a business, you're coming at it from a patient or consumer

Speaker 3: perspective. Certainly consumer perspective and an observer's perspective. You know, I knew I wasn't the only guy. Right? Uh, you know, a lot of the work that I've done has been in the energy fields, in the forestry fields and a hell of a lot of political stuff in my, in my thirties. I know Chuck Rafiki was up here. He was the guy digging, digging graves. I wasn't that far in, but I hold the light for guys who were doing that a few, a few times. Uh, no further questions, right? You know, but I knew politicians, bureaucrats and ceos and profs and you know, everybody from all walks of life and you know, all you do is you get to. I was reading those tealeaves and seeing where things were, where we're going. And also it was a very personal thing. I just, I literally didn't like feeling excluded.

Speaker 4: There you go. You mentioned that you knew people from all walks of life. I'm going to throw you a curve ball if you don't mind because it turns out that your in media and it turns out that media all of a sudden is the new thing that people have an issue with. It's almost the new cannabis, right? So I'm just gonna serve that up like that. Look for your first comment and then take it from there.

Speaker 3: Well, look, we're, we're fortunate to be in a, in a space that really isn't very adversarial and we're not, we don't practice much. Gotcha. Journalism buying back, we don't. Uh, and there are, there are lots of those in traditional media and cannabis media who practice that. That's just not our bag. We tend to be positive and try to build bridges and cast light on positive things that are happening.

Speaker 4: Totally understood. As somebody that uses that Lens to report, what advice would you give to your colleagues in news media?

Speaker 3: Uh, where was it? The guy got body slammed yesterday. Say it again. Did you see the guy that there was a, there was a guy running for that Senate, Montana, Montana, you guy. The guy got body. So the body slam. Exactly, yes. Don't go, don't, don't get into media. And in

Speaker 4: Montana. So I am asking you question as a Canadian, who lives in the US who is a media guy? The story that you're talking about is a guy from the media asks a guy running for office a question about policy and gets body slammed. So we have reached no matter what your thoughts are on what happened. Yeah. That seems to be broken as far as, uh, what we're trying to do here. Observe and report. So, so what, what, you know, what kind of advice do you have for folks that are, uh, in news media? What, what advice do you have for, for politicians, the folks that you used to work with and you know, that know that you used to report on what's happening here? And again,

Speaker 3: it's a big curve and maybe outside the strike zone. Yeah, no, that's fine. Look, it's, it's, it's to me, I think the world's going a little bit crazy right now. A genuinely now, uh, the fact that facts don't matter and that the golden rule and common courtesy is, is just disappearing from a life really written more than just media. Just life generally disturbs me. I'm really, really fortunate that I come from a part of the world where, you know, I was explaining this to somebody last night, I have to Sorta demeanors and I'm always a friendly guy, but when I walked down the street in Los Angeles, I, you know, I might catch somebody's. So if I do, I nod, but I don't seek that out when I'm in New Brunswick. I seek that out because chances are I know are, I know somebody who does, so it's just, it's a little bit more tight knit and a little bit more community oriented and I think we try to bring that Zeit geist to what we're doing here.

Speaker 4: Cannabis, that's exactly what I was just going to. I was going to bring you back to that. So, uh, turns out you do what you do for a reason, right? So now that you, now that we kind of defined a, this audience that you have and that you speak to, um, and that, that audience comes with the advantage of not having to, uh, you're not a, you don't have the weight that news media has. Talk about the conversations that you have with readers, talk about the conversations that you have with subjects about the media itself.

Speaker 3: You know, generally the conversations we have are with really, really interesting people who are doing interesting things in cannabis. I had chance to go to Alaska and speak and really spent three or four days just exploring the culture and what we're finding across the board is that, you know, the range of behaviors and people's mentalities are, you know, it's the same range everywhere. It just people skew and the population's skew differently. Uh, it is, it is, it is incredible to me to get up into Alaska and have a conversation that I could be having a with you or uh, with, uh, with, with anybody that's here in with their attitudes towards cannabis. We kind of tend to think that Los Angeles is the media center for the United States and globally. Toronto very much the same. But there's people that, you know, this tribe exists everywhere.

Speaker 4: I see. So you're saying even in a remote corner. Yeah, like St John. I mean Alaska. Well, well played, well played. So, um, talk about the cannabis market up there, right? That's something that we have in common, a landmass that, uh, that brings the US and Canada together. You guys see Russia from, from their, from. Yeah,

Speaker 3: it, it, it's interesting. When I was there in the, uh, in the fall and ragged passed, but they had no idea, you know, it was, it was, it was, it was okay to carry it. It was okay to gift it, but you couldn't sell it. They were working through it. And what, uh, what was emerging was this really nascent industry full of people that Alaska has got a real strong independent spirit about it.

Speaker 4: Oh yeah. Yeah. Anyways, I'd have the opportunity to talk to the woman that was setting up the regulations before she just stepped down him. Cindy, uh, whose name I blank blank, I think Cindy Gallagher, I think we'll check back. Um, but she said we are going to do this the Alaskan way, which means I don't care where you're from. Yeah. We're doing it the way that we do it.

Speaker 3: That's what everybody in Alaska says, more, more, more, more so than just saying it. They exhibited the, is a fierce, fierce independence and you know, as a Canadian, that's saying something because there's a big difference between sort of that independent spirit in Canada and the United States. And I've never seen it anywhere more amplified than Alaska.

Speaker 4: Uh, it's also, uh, evidenced in Maine. Have you spent any time in Maine? Will make my city my St John. Yeah, my province borders me. Yeah. So I'm about an hour from the main board. Those are similar places, which is just get off my lawn, let me do what I want to do. Yeah. Um. Alright. So, so going to places and finding the same type of people is always wonderful. So that's one thing, uh, give us a sense of another kind of storyline that you're following, that you have reported on that was interesting to you.

Speaker 3: Well to me we started publishing, and this is going back a ways. We started publishing in September of 2015. Okay. And in September of 2015, uh, the market was what it was in the United States, and Stephen Harper was in, uh, was the prime minister in Canada. We were in the midst of a federal election, but we, we, we literally began to cover the ascension of Prime Minister Trudeau and along with his policy of, of, of a regulated market. So anything that we published with him was, was, was, was consumed so rapidly and so well across the board here in Canada and also in the United States. I mean, Chuck said it earlier, the guy's a star because he's a celebrity and you know, he sells newspapers. He does. And you had kind of front row seat. I wonder what your kind of point of view, uh, was on election day or the day after election day being a Canadian based in the US.

Speaker 3: Because I remember as somebody in America, we didn't expect it. And I spoke to my Canadian friends who served, certainly did not expect a win for Trudeau A. Well look, I watched the returns from my house in Venice. So, uh, aside from feeling really distant, I'd never been, I was quite politically active when I was younger. I really fully retired in 2010 and I, I, I'm nothing but an observer and a comment, a comment. Now that's a, that's it. But, so I felt I felt a little bit withdrawn. Yeah. Uh, but I also felt right it to me, uh, no disrespect to anybody who's on the conservative side of things here in Canada. I have, you know, a time and tolerance for all, all, all political views. Uh, but it all, it had always troubled me that the United States was to the left of Canada on cannabis policy.

Speaker 3: Yeah. So it was like, you know, we've since solved that. Right? I have to say the least. I, uh, no, but I meant that, um, when I was talking about was the fact that it was an unexpected win, uh, that, uh, everybody kind of expected harper to win. And then all of a sudden, true trudeau pulled through. Yeah. A look, I'm not a Svengali, but I was pretty confident he was going to win. He, based on your. Well, I was a late breaker and uh, you know, Prime Minister Harper had been in office for 10 years at that point. You've pissed off everybody at least twice. Sure. And you put those two dudes side by side one and then you give one guy 10 years worth of rocks to carry over the finish line. Justin Trudeau is going to beat him every time one one has changed, one is not a, as far as, um, your time in politics.

Speaker 3: You kind of referenced it a couple times. Give us a sense of what you were doing just so we kind of understand it. Sure. I was a regional guy. I, I, I, you know, St John New Brunswick is a conservative town and in fact, at one point we had one of only two progressive conservative members of parliament in the entire country, Joshua and Elsie Wayne, who was a bit of a legend. So I was often campaign manager, communications director for people that were going up and just having their heads chopped off. Uh, in my early thirties, I accepted a job running a as communications director, uh, for Sean Graham who was running a, as the leader of the liberals. We, he was very close, lost his first election, close enough that he held onto the leadership for a three and a half years and then was elected in 2006. So, uh, I used to run campaigns for him as far as being the communications guy, write me in theU , s

Speaker 4: I, I watched the communications director for the White House go out every day. That seems like it's a tough role no matter who the candidate is. So what are the keys to success for that role?

Speaker 3: Well, to be honest, I was more. I was a campaign guy. I was never a an inside guy ever went into government. I like, I like you am, am stunned by the abilities of these folks. I don't think I could do it a stand up and be the voice of, of these guys. And one of the reasons I wound up getting away from politics is because I was always working for outsiders who are always being beat. When I was younger, uh, I learned how to lose. I learned how to lose. But then when I actually helped elect a premier, my personal brand went from that of an outsider trying to affect change to an insider, even though I hadn't changed at all and my mom hadn't changed the way I conducted business the way I. Who was, who was the guy I was. Hadn't changed. Yeah. So it was at that point early in his term, I said, as soon as he's out, I'm never doing another one. I've never, I'm never going to hitch my personal brand a to somebody else like that.

Speaker 4: So that's fascinating to me because once you became an insider, you wanted nothing to do with that. Is that what you're saying? Absolutely. Why you take me through that one. My personal brand was hijacked and all of a sudden hijacked meaning that you were forever associated with him.

Speaker 3: All right. That was, I was, I was an insider and I didn't. I didn't earn what I, what I got a and I was responsible for all the good, the bad things that were happening, bad decisions as well as the good things. People that didn't even know me, uh, had an impression of me because I was a part of that sort of political campaign and I just said, no, I'm, I'm, that's not for me. So you prefer to be the outsider, don't know, but an outsider, but I think I have a stronger independent spirit than most.

Speaker 4: There you go. So, which gets us back to this whole kind of, we've identified our audience and this is who we're going for. Um, you know, if you're not growing, you're dying. It's been said about business. So how much growth is there in simply the demo that you've identified? Do you want to grow that demographic? If you do grow that demographic, how large can it get before your quote unquote an insider? And then you know, kind of represent nothing type of thing. So where do you see the next few years here?

Speaker 3: Well, look, a, the demographic is what it is and it is slowly coming out of the cannabis closet, even as the cannabis closet is destructive, completely abolished around people. They're still going to stand in the footprint there for a little while.

Speaker 4: Well, your audience, because these are gen x and up, right? You know? Right.

Speaker 3: Uh, so, uh, you know, what we do, we struggle with how to, how to treat for 20 because we're, we're bit more of an intellectual take on, on, on things, right. Uh, so what we do is we, we do an explicit and specific poll every 4:20, uh, and we do it with psp research at a Washington and the data that we're finding about the size of this market and where it's going, it really is unbelievable. I mean, aside from just the top line support for cannabis legalization in some manner, you know, 25 percent of North Americans will tell you if it was legal, I would try it. The fastest growing demographic is 55 plus similar. It's growing, it's gonna get there. Our challenge is to create compelling content that connects with these people that they enjoy and we'll come back and continue to enjoy.

Speaker 4: What are the next kind of subject matters that you want to investigate? Maybe that you're on the front end of now. What, what can we expect?

Speaker 3: We are always, uh, looking to speak to interesting people in the business, uh, and, and just interesting people who are doing interesting things and enjoy cannabis. A overall. We've got a couple of interesting things we're working on, uh, on the offline side. Oh, we've got some more entertainment events. Good. Uh, that we'll be announcing a this fall and we've got some significant product that we're developing both short form long form video in our studio. So we've got lots to talk about, kind of look out type of thing and we have a series a open.

Speaker 4: Oh, by the way, just so you know, we got a series a open might want to, uh, dropped by Chuck's booth, right? Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. Um, I've got three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of your life? One track, one song that's got to be on there. Okay. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: It's two. It's double edged sword. Uh, one, uh, uh, when I go back to being, you know, the mindset that I had when I was in college and it was just our little thing we would dream about, you know, and not dream, but we would just talk about it. Okay. Imagine it's Sunday, you know, you can believe Jimmy Carter tried to legalize that, you know, it's back and it's done. We, we, I grew up during the world war on cannabis, so it's taken so long, but at the same moment in the last few years, it feels great. Like we're hitting a hockey stick. Growth. Totally. That's exactly right now. And you say we used to dream about it. We used to talk about it in a dreamy way type of thing. That's more accurate. This were ever to happen. Could you, could you imagine it? Hahaha. Right? Yeah. It wasn't like it was ever going to happen.

Speaker 3: No. Now it is. Now it is, uh, and, and now that it is, there you go. It's unbelievable how quick it's, it's, it's going and I mean, you just, you look at Vermont yesterday or today, she vetoed it. He vetoed it, but they don't have a. I mean, look where they're sitting, like everybody around them and they're not going to do it. Literally everyone around. What do you think they're sitting in New York. Really? You think people aren't going to take the train to Boston for the weekend or come across the border up north? Exact God. That's exactly. What has most surprised you in life, in your civilized life, in your civilized.life? Can I get sappy on you? Of course. I, uh, I got married at 26 years old, uh, and I was never a big, uh, you know, I was, I was a guy who had a bunch of two months relationships his entire life.

Speaker 3: Got It. Uh, and then, uh, just was very, very fortunate, uh, to, to run into somebody that, that I quickly fell in love with quickly. Got Married and we've been married 21 years and if you hadn't told me that that was going to happen to me in my twenties when I was younger, I would've told you you're full of shit. So you, you met her? Yeah, I meant the one. Yeah. Yeah. She's, she's, she's the president of our company. She's, she's the business brains and what we do. Congratulations on that. On the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. Does it have to be just one? No, you can do whatever you want. Okay. This answer. Do we have four minutes? No, I'm just kidding. We do. We do a no look. Uh, uh, there would be some pearl jam in my mixed tape.

Speaker 3: Okay. And I have broad diverse tapes. Tastes sure it'd be lots of Pearl Jam on it. There'd be a. and now what's your, just to take the pearl jam tangent. Yeah. Right. What's your take on versus versus 10 a versus t? Yeah. Love them both. Okay. Yeah. I love them. But which one do you prefer versus me too? Yeah, like 10, 10 hits. It's just a little harder, uh, and, and, and a little bit more raw, a little bit more garage, or there's, there's just a little bit more thought and the music. I think also that year when it came out in 1993, let's say, roughly around there. Yeah. It was also on every day. Yeah. Right, right. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I remember listening to it. I was actually at a train station in Venice, Italy listening to it for the first time. So would there be, uh, that uh, a youtube would be some old youtube, like Joshua tree type yet?

Speaker 3: Well, I just saw them in Vancouver, the opening night of the, the, the new tour with three guys that I saw them with a when I was 16 hook in Montreal. No three dudes that from your friends? Yeah, my mom was, I'm trying to get something like the police. Uh, well no comment. Well that's three guys know his old high school buddies. We reunited in Vancouver to go see youtube. They're definitely be some youtube there, but I got one for Ya. Oh yeah. So you've never heard of it before. Okay. STOMP and Tom Connors, have you ever been heard a Sabaton Connors? I have not. He's a Canadian country legend. He died a few years ago. He was born in Saint John, New Brunswick. And if you want to learn about stopping, Tom Connors, a guy who was a drifter all across Canada who turned into a, a country star all begins and ends with a song called the ballad of stomp and Tom, a self penned ballad at, uh, that, that, that he wrote that brings tears to my eyes every time it'd be there for sure. STOMP and Tom Connors. Love it. Listen, thank you so much. That was great. Civilized.life. Go there now. It sounds like you got a great thing going. I can't wait to get to Venice and visit HQ. How about that deadline. We'll, uh, we'll have a beer. All right, perfect. And there you have dirt.

Speaker 1: Reedley, Navy guys and Lyft were great. They played stump and Tom Literally four seconds after that conversation ended on stage. So Kudos to them as far as the Cindy from Alaska. That's Cindy Franklin from episode 28. So check that out. If you'd like, appreciate Derek's time. Appreciate Yours. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.