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Ep.272: Noelle Skodzinski

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.272: Noelle Skodzinski

Ep.272: Noelle Skodzinski

Washington State and Noelle Skodzinksi have July 1st, 2014 in common as a start date in cannabis. Inspired by the poet/novelist James Dickey, Noelle went to school to be a journalist and found her way into PR before finding a job in journalism down the line. After moving to Philadelphia, Noelle held down three jobs to pay the rent and keep writing. She waited tables and truly learned how to deal with people in that environment- an insight she brings forward to her work today. She parlayed her initial job as a writer into landing a job as an editor for high end magazine which focused on craftspeople like blacksmiths, glass blowers. So she was already used to dealing with folks that were unto themselves- which is why the cannabis industry made sense to her when she found it.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Noelle Skodzinski Washington state. Noelle Skodzinski July first 2014 in common as a start date and cannabis inspired by the poet novelist James Dickey. No one went to school to be a journalist and founder way into pr before finding a job in journalism down the line. After moving to Philadelphia, Noel held down three jobs to pay the rent and keep writing. She waited tables and truly learn how to deal with people in that environment and inside. She brings forward to her work today. She par later, initial job as a writer into a landing, a job as an editor for a high end magazine which focused on craftspeople like blacksmiths and glassblowers. So she was already used to dealing with folks that were unto themselves, which is why the cannabis industry made sensor, which he founded. Welcome to cannabis economy.

Speaker 1: I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social about the habit. Can economy. That's two minutes in the world economy. Noel's Kaczynski? No. Well No. In the beginning. I mean, how many people just go right there with your name? I'm a lot. Yeah. I don't get it as much as I used to, but yeah. Do you feel that that's the, uh, religious industrial complex, uh, coming down or not? I'm just kidding. I'm kidding. We're not going to. Exactly. So how do we pronounce the last name? Skids. Inscape. And if we were Polish, like my girlfriend, let's go jet ski. There we go. See, it's different. It is. We do this for the Americans. When I first got married, my husband said it was good, didn't ski, but I'm like, none of your family pronounces it that way. So I'm not saying that to. They know, you know, it's just the family know that that's how to pronounce, do know. But they go with Schizo and ski. They actually sometimes say Gadinsky and skip the z altogether. But I say skip Zinsky. Right. So my husband says it because you're saying you make the, they make the z silence, which would, I mean that's to a Polish person. That's like a blast for me to, to our religious

Speaker 3: name. Alright. So first off, I mean you've been doing this, you care about this, right? When did we start the magazine? So I co founded it and started working on it in July. Two thousand 14. Officially launched the website and the newsletter in September 2014. And um, so you're on the timeline of the Washington adult use initiative? Yes, yes. Everything had kinda just started to get going and um, within a few months I had reached out to Gie media which publishes greenhouse management, nursery management, produce grower. They have a whole horticulture group. I knew the president of the company called him and said, would you be interested in buying this? Um, the, the man that I co founded it with was kind of interested in getting it going and then selling, exiting, exiting.

Speaker 3: I wanted to stay with it. So, um, I called someone that I knew, I knew we would fit in with their business and I'm within three months we signed the papers and we're now owned by GIA media and we're part of their horticulture group. So. And I'm the editor, so I'm ecstatic the now let's go all the way. Well, it's about it yet. We're going to make it longer. So where were you born? Smithtown New York. So you know that I'm from Roslyn. Did we have this conversation now? Both Long Island people? Yes. I actually moved out of there when I was two years old, but my relatives are on long island. So you go out there periodically? Yes. As a two year old. Did you move with your parents are alone? I hitchhiked down to Jersey, moved to Jersey there. Ish. Now I am there now.

Speaker 3: So I went to New Brunswick. I'm sorry, rutgers in New Brunswick. Seven. Oh, three, seven. Oh, three, seven, one, three, eight, one, seven, eight. One seven I think is. I don't know the area code up there. I don't remember. I want to tell you how long it's been since I was in college, so I went to college there, moved into Philadelphia. Wait a second, hold on. Where'd you go to school? Rutgers. Scarlet Knights? Yes. What did you study? Communications. Journalism. Um, intercultural communications was my focus. I had intended to go into the Peace Corps. All of this adds up to where you are now, by the way, which is wonderful. Which I'm sure your parents are happy about. They are actually very excited. Why did you know that that was what you were going to do? In other words, when did you find the words or when did the words find you?

Speaker 3: Um, I used to write poetry from when I was a child. Um, and then I started to write short stories. I also took a large number of poetry and creative writing classes in college. Um, English classes. I took as many, you know, electives as I could in that area. Um, got out of school and pretty much knew I wanted to go into editorial. Started out in pr which was on the other side, so I got kind of familiar with it from that angle and then was able to kind of parlay that into my first job with a publication where the poets, who were the poets that inspired you to write your own stuff? Um, my favorite probably James Dickey, not, I don't know that that many people are familiar with him, but he actually wrote, um, what? I'm drawing a blank on the movie. Everyone would know it.

Speaker 3: Um, Star Wars. No, it's a ned beatty was in it. The canoers go out, Burt Reynolds, they go out into the woods. Oh sure. A deliverance he wrote that book. He actually, I think I wrote two books only. Um, the other one is on the alum. I don't know if I pronounced that right. It's the center star of the Constellation. Um, uh, what is the constellation Vega. Anyway, so he also wrote a book. It's fantastic. And um, his poetry really kind of a, I think was the first that I really got attached to and kind of drove me into, changed my writing a little bit. So in other words, I'm trying to get inside the mind of a writer. So you read this, I mean I can't call it deliverance. Inspirational, right? No, but definitely narrative story. Yeah. Surprising. Fascinating. Totally different way for your mind. It's in the book.

Speaker 1: Noelle Skodzinski Washington state. Noelle Skodzinski July first 2014 in common as a start date and cannabis inspired by the poet novelist James Dickey. No one went to school to be a journalist and founder way into pr before finding a job in journalism down the line. After moving to Philadelphia, Noel held down three jobs to pay the rent and keep writing. She waited tables and truly learn how to deal with people in that environment and inside. She brings forward to her work today. She par later, initial job as a writer into a landing, a job as an editor for a high end magazine which focused on craftspeople like blacksmiths and glassblowers. So she was already used to dealing with folks that were unto themselves, which is why the cannabis industry made sensor, which he founded. Welcome to cannabis economy.

Speaker 1: I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social about the habit. Can economy. That's two minutes in the world economy. Noel's Kaczynski? No. Well No. In the beginning. I mean, how many people just go right there with your name? I'm a lot. Yeah. I don't get it as much as I used to, but yeah. Do you feel that that's the, uh, religious industrial complex, uh, coming down or not? I'm just kidding. I'm kidding. We're not going to. Exactly. So how do we pronounce the last name? Skids. Inscape. And if we were Polish, like my girlfriend, let's go jet ski. There we go. See, it's different. It is. We do this for the Americans. When I first got married, my husband said it was good, didn't ski, but I'm like, none of your family pronounces it that way. So I'm not saying that to. They know, you know, it's just the family know that that's how to pronounce, do know. But they go with Schizo and ski. They actually sometimes say Gadinsky and skip the z altogether. But I say skip Zinsky. Right. So my husband says it because you're saying you make the, they make the z silence, which would, I mean that's to a Polish person. That's like a blast for me to, to our religious

Speaker 3: name. Alright. So first off, I mean you've been doing this, you care about this, right? When did we start the magazine? So I co founded it and started working on it in July. Two thousand 14. Officially launched the website and the newsletter in September 2014. And um, so you're on the timeline of the Washington adult use initiative? Yes, yes. Everything had kinda just started to get going and um, within a few months I had reached out to Gie media which publishes greenhouse management, nursery management, produce grower. They have a whole horticulture group. I knew the president of the company called him and said, would you be interested in buying this? Um, the, the man that I co founded it with was kind of interested in getting it going and then selling, exiting, exiting.

Speaker 3: I wanted to stay with it. So, um, I called someone that I knew, I knew we would fit in with their business and I'm within three months we signed the papers and we're now owned by GIA media and we're part of their horticulture group. So. And I'm the editor, so I'm ecstatic the now let's go all the way. Well, it's about it yet. We're going to make it longer. So where were you born? Smithtown New York. So you know that I'm from Roslyn. Did we have this conversation now? Both Long Island people? Yes. I actually moved out of there when I was two years old, but my relatives are on long island. So you go out there periodically? Yes. As a two year old. Did you move with your parents are alone? I hitchhiked down to Jersey, moved to Jersey there. Ish. Now I am there now.

Speaker 3: So I went to New Brunswick. I'm sorry, rutgers in New Brunswick. Seven. Oh, three, seven. Oh, three, seven, one, three, eight, one, seven, eight. One seven I think is. I don't know the area code up there. I don't remember. I want to tell you how long it's been since I was in college, so I went to college there, moved into Philadelphia. Wait a second, hold on. Where'd you go to school? Rutgers. Scarlet Knights? Yes. What did you study? Communications. Journalism. Um, intercultural communications was my focus. I had intended to go into the Peace Corps. All of this adds up to where you are now, by the way, which is wonderful. Which I'm sure your parents are happy about. They are actually very excited. Why did you know that that was what you were going to do? In other words, when did you find the words or when did the words find you?

Speaker 3: Um, I used to write poetry from when I was a child. Um, and then I started to write short stories. I also took a large number of poetry and creative writing classes in college. Um, English classes. I took as many, you know, electives as I could in that area. Um, got out of school and pretty much knew I wanted to go into editorial. Started out in pr which was on the other side, so I got kind of familiar with it from that angle and then was able to kind of parlay that into my first job with a publication where the poets, who were the poets that inspired you to write your own stuff? Um, my favorite probably James Dickey, not, I don't know that that many people are familiar with him, but he actually wrote, um, what? I'm drawing a blank on the movie. Everyone would know it.

Speaker 3: Um, Star Wars. No, it's a ned beatty was in it. The canoers go out, Burt Reynolds, they go out into the woods. Oh sure. A deliverance he wrote that book. He actually, I think I wrote two books only. Um, the other one is on the alum. I don't know if I pronounced that right. It's the center star of the Constellation. Um, uh, what is the constellation Vega. Anyway, so he also wrote a book. It's fantastic. And um, his poetry really kind of a, I think was the first that I really got attached to and kind of drove me into, changed my writing a little bit. So in other words, I'm trying to get inside the mind of a writer. So you read this, I mean I can't call it deliverance. Inspirational, right? No, but definitely narrative story. Yeah. Surprising. Fascinating. Totally different way for your mind. It's in the book.

Speaker 3: So I had read the book first and the way this man wrote was just so descriptive that you actually get inside the mind of the characters. So that's kind of what I, I think I learned from that how to kind of paint a picture, kind of like an in cold blood Truman capote type situation. Yes, yes. I just connected with you. Your eyes lit up and I said Truman capote. Sarah. Then you knew that. How did you know that you could do this? Um, well, I guess I found out by trying, you know, I'm in pr. I was a very successful. I was very young. I was right out of college. I interned for a month. They brought me on full time. I would write articles. Some of them are picked up by USA Today. Um, I did a lot of, uh, still in college. No, I just got out of college right out of college.

Speaker 3: What were you covering? That might've been picked up by the, by USA. Pennsylvania tourism was my largest account, so I wrote a lot about a bed and breakfast throughout the state. Railroads. Pennsylvania has a very healthy railroad history as well. I know from the board game monopoly, which is based in New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Yeah. So, uh, okay. So you're writing all of that, you're doing all of that and now it's starting to happen. Yeah. And do you move to Philadelphia? I did. And what was it like Philadelphia. That's two. One five by the way. As far as to five, Philadelphia was a lot different at the time when I lived there. I lived there for about seven or eight years. I'm A. I lived in a very small apartment. I could not afford much. My first job I was paid $15,000 at this ad agency where I was working and doing pr. I'm years. What's your plan for the year? So that was my full salary. So, um, uh, lived in a small apartment and it was not, not nice to work though. The work was great. I loved it. I also had two other side jobs just to be able to help pay the rent. And I'm writing jobs. Non-Writing waitressing and I worked at Victoria secret.

Speaker 1: Okay. I was going to guess either like bartending or waitressing. Wait, what did you learn from being a waitress?

Speaker 3: Um, I guess how to deal with people, you know, what do you mean by that? Uh, people can be very complicated. Yes, there we go. They can be very demanding. And how to kind of respond in a way that takes the edge out of the. Any conversation, um, how to just be super pleasant and serve people and, you know, I kind of feel like that translate and so what I do now, I am serving an audience and not that they're, you know, it's a very complicated audience. They're very nice people, but I have to kind of understand what they want and sometimes they don't even know what they want so I have to be able to bring them that.

Speaker 1: Yes, that's a, the constituency that is angry about something yet doesn't know what they want, uh, certainly shows up as a, you know, a waitress. You can get a table like that. Yes you do. And you know, and, and of course their readers like that. Yeah. Um, so, so I, I always liked whenever someone says that they've been a waiter or waitress, I always like to bring that up because that's also informative. Yeah. I waited tables for one month because I'm not good at it. I was good at them or not. I was good at waiting on one table. Not Terribly helpful. Tables. Exactly. If you're the one table, you love it. The other nine tables,

Speaker 3: not so much in college at Rutgers, in New Brunswick there was a pizza hut and it was only one of four in the country that had a bar inside of it and I waitress there all through college and um, it was a mob scene all the time. College kids, pizza and beer, you can imagine how busy it was. So I probably had 20 tables at a time. Okay.

Speaker 1: So like as far as business models are concerned, that's the way it was a good one. It was a good one. Alright. So you're in Philadelphia, uh, let's, uh, you know, kind of go to the next place where you're making at least slightly more than nothing

Speaker 3: type of deal. Right. So I was hired as an associate editor at a magazine called the crafts report.

Speaker 1: Wait a second, how did you get this associate editor position if you were this lowly writer?

Speaker 3: I worked under a woman at the ad agency in pr. I'm Carolyn neary and she kind of worked very closely with me. I'm learning ap style, learning a lot of things about, you know, refining my work for publication. So that, you know, magazines would just pick it up, they don't have to do work on it, that's what they want. Um, and I had found out about this job, I saw it listed, it was in Wilmington, Delaware, and it turned out the editor there was friends with Carolyn who I worked under. So she recommended me. I got another letter of recommendation from the president and that was it. And I went to editorial and I never went back.

Speaker 1: So you, uh, not only edited but also wrote, I would imagine. Yeah. What were the stories that you were writing?

Speaker 3: So the magazine was for high end craft artists. They are blacksmiths, jewelry makers, glass blowers, very high end. So I would go to the Smithsonian craft show pieces that are thousands of dollars, um, and there was a wide range, you know, but it was a business magazine to help them make a living. So I've always been in business editing more or less, add a couple side, whatever side gigs. Right. Um, so the first, you know, feature cover story that I wrote was on the Wharton Esherick Museum. Um, it's actually his house. He's a famous woodworker and he built everything by hand out of wood, everything, silverware. Well, it's, I would call it by the stairs, the bed frames. Everything in the house isn't native wood and it's beautiful. So yeah. Wow.

Speaker 1: All right. So that's what you're covering and now that you are headlong into business writing as opposed to being a PR person that's just trying to get things placed, right? You have a different mission, almost a what did you learn about that industry or excuse me, what did you learn about industry as it's related to writing or reporting

Speaker 3: as far as the business side of it or covering businesses as an editor,

Speaker 1: as a writer, as a cog in the wheel of industry and specifically an industry. What, what did you kind of realized about your role? What did you realize about how the industry worked with you, how you worked with them?

Speaker 3: So I think the biggest thing, um, and I'm not sure if this is kind of what you're asking, but the biggest thing that I realized very early on was that people were relying on this publication to make business decisions on that weighed very heavily on me. So I'm, you know, I, I take it very seriously, probably too seriously sometimes, but you have to because you're publishing information that people are reading and they're saying, hey, this is a great idea, I should do this. And it's affecting their business. And a lot of these craft artists especially, they're very small businesses and they're trying to make a living and you're affecting their. But you also, on the flip side, I got letters, I met people at shows who were like, thank you so much for your work that you do and you know, it's impacted us this way and I'm just, it's, it's very rewarding.

Speaker 3: But it's also a lot of pressure. So thanks for doing it. Let me ask you this. You said sometimes too seriously? Yeah. What do you mean by that? Just that I think it can affect me physically. I'm just with stress. I wake up at 3:00 AM and I'm thinking of should I have done this? Should I have done this? I should've checked this. You read the burden? I do. I do. I tend. I know I need to be more laid back. Come on. I know. I mean it's wants New Jersey. Legalizes cannabis. I'll be a lot more relaxed about it. You and I both know that.

Speaker 3: Anyway. All right. So then that's really where you kind of a fully became what you are now as far as you know. Okay. This is my role in this industry. It's important. I cannot mess this up. And you would probably use different words than mess. Well, maybe not in writing. No. No. So what, what was next? Um, so I was there for I think six or seven years. I actually worked my way up to editor and then I left there and I decided I wanted to freelance for a bit. Um, I had just gotten kind of overwhelmed. I moved up very quickly. I was very young. It was a lot to handle. So I was a freelance writer for about two years, um, and then I served as the managing editor, the interim managing editor for a short period of time for the Jewish exponent.

Speaker 3: I'm in Philadelphia, I'm not Jewish, so it was very difficult job be allowed this. Well, it was, I was pretty much, um, you know, refining headlines, checking copy, fact checking, that kind of thing. The managing editor was on maternity leave for an extended period of time, so they needed someone to kind of step in and help, you know, keep everything going and I had that experience. So, but some of the terminology I didn't know and, but I did learn quite a bit. You learn terminology, you learned, you know, how the whole thing worked. You learned all the hazard and I learned a lot about what was going on in Israel and um, you know, the, the paper was fascinating. We had a lot of bomb scares 'em when I was working at the paper in the United States. Yes. And the United States. So, um, so I did that for, I think that was about six months.

Speaker 3: And then from there I went to North American publishing company in Philadelphia, so they publish business magazines. I think about it was about 16 or 18 at the time. And um, I started out at target marketing magazine and inside direct mail I worked on those for I think less than a year. And then I was moved over, so I, I joined them as managing editor. Um, but I think I was editor of insight direct mail, things get blurry, don't they ask for a period of time. Um, and then I was brought over to another group, the publishing group, um, and there were two magazines. They were, they had different names at the time. They were dying and they brought me over and said, can you try to bring these back to life? And so what did we do? Let's just make sure that we cover that because that's a big piece.

Speaker 3: Yeah. So I rebranded, renamed the magazine, changed the focus. So one of the publications was called print media and it was, the audience was just all over the place. It was for advertisers, advertising agencies and printers and magazine publishers. And to many, it wasn't for all those. So the first reader survey I did for that magazine, I got 12 responses, so I thought this is a problem. The other magazine was booked, I'm booked tech and it was about printing books, um, and kind of the same thing. It was all about the kind of just focusing on printing. And it was also kind of driven heavily by advertising. Um, which is not a sustainable model for publishing it. You can't, you have to provide your readers with the content they need. First you work with advertisers, you get input from them. That's fantastic. They're your partners in the business, but you can't have them say, well, I'm advertising on publishing this article.

Speaker 3: You're going to put me on the cover that he can't do that separation of church and state it. Absolutely. Well, these magazines had some, some problems. Fortunately the publisher was wonderful and pretty much said, you know, you tell me what needs to be done. And so we rebranded. We turned them into print media, became publishing executive, focusing on magazines, only the whole business of magazine publishing, not just the printing from the executive's perspective. Yes. There we go. Senior level, um, the people who buy the printing as well, you know, that kind of thing. And then a book tech became book business focusing on the business of book publishing from the executive's perspective. Exactly. Yeah. Okay. So now we're getting much, much closer so we're going to skip ahead. Okay. And you are sitting there in a bigger living space then where we left you in Philadelphia, right? Yes. That's kind of added sugars from going, assistant editor, editor, editor, editor to rebrand and stuff. We're doing okay. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Why would noel say to herself, I'm going to do this cannabis thing? Um, I wanted to do something in the cannabis space for several years. Um, I disagree with the laws. I disagree with prohibition. I get very upset that people are put into jail for possession of very small amounts of marijuana. Um, I know people of all different walks of life who consume cannabis and just seeing it happening the way it is. And it's so accepted and has, you know, become part of society. I just felt like I needed to do something with this when things started becoming legalized recreationally, um, I was trying to figure out how I could use my career to kind of get into that space. So I very, uh, kind of serendipitously, I'm connected with a Tim Herman [inaudible] who is the Co founder. It was really his brainchild. So he asked me to do some research for this, for a publication to cover the cannabis industry, a website basically.

Speaker 3: Um, and then so we partnered, um, he told me, put together the whole editorial concept, launch it, you know, he was consulting with another company at the time, so he didn't have a lot of time, although he did call me several times every day. Loved him. A brilliant as entrepreneur. But um, so we launched the website and the newsletter and it just, it took off so quickly, you know, um, our readership went up, we had like within four months, 8,000 email subscribers, I'm thousands of twitter followers, you know, it was just really resonating or traffic was going up and up. And so yeah, that was it. And then you, you described how, you know, the first iteration and then the second generation and that's where you are now and now you certainly do a print publication. And we launched a print publication in November 2015, so it was very, very quick after Ge bought us.

Speaker 3: Um, the, uh, I was extremely happy to be working in print again. I didn't think I would, you know, this model going web to print was not really your traditional model that publishers do. We should talk about that in the Amazon store. That's opening. Okay. That's the same idea. Okay. Anyway, go on. So, um, and then we published six issues last year and we went monthly this year and we launched a conference that was held this March, so even know about Oakland, California. And how did it go? Fantastic. We um, you know, launch. You're a nervous wreck. Well, I, I was slightly stressed. I'm just a lot of pressure, you know, you get. So the sales team sold out the expo within one month of us announcing the event. So the pressure was on me to get attendees there. I'm put together and my, my staff as well working on the program to get people there. So we exceeded our attendance expectations, our sponsorship, extra expectations, everything. It couldn't have gone better. So what are we covering now? So it's May of 2017 when you and I are talking as we make our way into the third and fourth quarters,

Speaker 1: what are you focused on as an editor?

Speaker 3: I mean always focused on priorities for cannabis cultivators. So looking at business models and how they're changing as the industry expands. I'm also looking at horticulture and helping a lot of the growers, uh, upscale incise grow on much larger scale than they had been previously. Automation to help increase efficiencies because of the price pressures that are happening. Sure. Especially in markets like Washington, that's a big deal. And then just keeping up to speed on legislation, regulations. Um, yeah, financial things. We do tax, tax articles and legal advice.

Speaker 1: Sure. And uh, somehow, uh, writing about tax issues is a riveting in this space, isn't it? It's amazing. It's crazy. I could have a whole conversation with you about to age, but we won't. So as far as. So is it a cultivation tilt? You know, how, how, how am I to understand it if I'm like a, you know, extraction manufacturer, what do I read? Cannabis Business Times. Is this just for cultivators? Whatever.

Speaker 3: Well it is. So we just focus on cultivators. However, a large percentage of them have extraction components of their business very large and I would say increasingly so fairly quickly that market is really kind of taking off. So a lot of cultivators are looking into, if they don't have the extraction business, how can they either develop one or partner with extraction businesses to make it part of their business?

Speaker 1: What are people telling you that you said what? You're focused on, what you said, rich, you're focused on covering what are your readers, what are your subjects? What are your advertisers, what are they telling you is we, again, make our way into the second half of 2017. What are you hearing?

Speaker 3: Efficiencies, I think are the big thing. The way technologies can impact the business, um, effect your workflow. Um, a lot of, a migration toward greenhouse cultivation because of expense for one. Um, energy usage is a big deal. The industry is going to be increasingly under the public eye, um, for that. And

Speaker 1: for the cannabis industry, not to be sustainable just isn't sustainable. It's absolutely true. All right, so those are the things that you're covering. Those are the things that they're telling you that is what has happened in your life. No. Well, yes. And so I have three final questions. I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of Noel's life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: Oh my goodness, that's a tough question. Um,

Speaker 3: I want to say I'm surprised that so many people are still opposed to it and fear it. And even people who I know are, you know, they consume cannabis regularly. If they have kids there, they say I'm afraid legalization is going to make it more accessible for children. I am shocked by that. Honestly, I don't. So I am constantly trying to educate people and say like, no one on the black market is going to ask your child for ID. So no, I don't get it going to test their cannabis. No, no, they're not. And so I'm just, I'm surprised that while I know that, you know, the public perception has gone in a different direction, there is still, even among people who are kind of support cannabis, they are not necessarily supporting it the way I feel they should still not getting it, not getting behind the advocacy for it or not keeping up to speed on the legislation and know what's going on. So I'm kind of, I guess that's my, I would say biggest surprise

Speaker 1: freighted with these people's time. I am exactly at this point. I need to tell you that something that you might know, something that you might not know

Speaker 1: you sound like Chelsea handler. Do you know that I do not know that. Yeah. So when you're listening to this, stop it and then go and like put on a youtube thing, but don't look at it and listen to that. Then stop that. Come back to this and listen to it. I will do that because there's the northeast kind of New Jersey and long island thing, you know. So there's that. The, that would be kind of the, your accent a little bit, but you have. I'm totally a somewhat, somewhat. There's depth to your tone. You don't have a voice that's all the way up here. You don't have like a mini mouse voice, you know what I'm saying? You're, you're aware of that. Yeah. So this is why I'm saying what I'm saying. And um, I wonder what your thoughts are. So you'll tell me. I will, I will listen to it on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. What is it? I'm sorry. So the last question is on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that has to be on there. So it's not necessarily your favorite song, it's not necessarily the most appropriate song, but it's a song that would certainly be on the soundtrack of Noel's life.

Speaker 1: That is a really difficult question. I want to say the Rainbow Connection. Perfect. It's perfect.

Speaker 3: Okay. It was either that or peace frog by the doors, but I think I would say the rainbow

Speaker 1: both by the way, have you know frog sensibilities somehow. Yeah. I'm with you on peace frog by the way. All right. Yeah. And I'm also with you on the Rainbow Connection. Someday they will find it. No, the rainbow connection. The love the dreamers. And there you have no else. Kaczynski. I mean two songs that had some or other to do with frogs. He can't make it up. He reminds me of a song I'm in love with the big blue frog. A Big Blue Frog loves me. It's not as bad as it appears. She wears glasses and she's six foot three. Thank you to Noel's Kaczynski. Thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.