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Ep.273: Jesse Ventura

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.273: Jesse Ventura

Ep.273: Jesse Ventura

Former soldier, governor and wrestler Jesse Ventura says that cannabis gave him his life back- without it he says he wouldn’t have a quality of life today. Someone close to him developed an epileptic seizure disorder. After being treated with drugs that didn’t work, they went to Colorado found cannabis and found a solution. Now that that person is seizure free, Jesse says both of them have their lives back. He’s always been a supporter of legalization and although he’s been in the military and was a former professional athlete who could come to cannabis through CTE or PTSD, it was dealing with epilepsy as a caregiver that was the catalyst for him to be active in cannabis. As a former Gov, Jesse adds that cannabis tax dollars are real dollars for any state budget.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Jesse Ventura, former soldier, governor and wrestler Jesse Ventura says that cannabis gave him his life back without it, he says he wouldn't have a quality of life today, somewhat close to him, developed an epileptic seizure disorder after being treated with drugs that didn't work. They went to Colorado, found cannabis, and found a solution. Now that that person is seizure free, Jesse says both of them have their lives back. He's always been a supporter of legalization and although he's been in the military and was a former professional athlete who could come to cannabis through cte or ptsd, it was dealing with epilepsy as a caregiver. That was the catalyst for him to be active in cannabis. As a former governor, Jesse ads that cannabis tax dollars are real dollars for any state budget. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy.

Speaker 1: That's two ends in the word economy. Jesse, Ventura, Jesse, the body. Jesse the mind, Jesse Ventura, former governor. Governor, thanks so much for giving us a few minutes. No problem. Alright, just did the keynote here at the cannabis world congress. Yep. You know, a very much appreciate your insight and your thoughts here. I'm just, if you could, for the folks that didn't see that, why is this such a passion for you? Well, it looks a passion for me because Sha cannabis gave me my life back. We, without it, I would not have a quality of life today and it wasn't me at all. It was someone very close to me, developed an epileptic seizure disorder. Right. And was getting. She's years two to three times a week and, and the person got put on four separate pharmaceutical medicines of them worked. It was trial and error. Finally, in desperation, we went to Colorado and we got the drops under the tongue doesn't even make you high cbd.

Speaker 1: The seizures stopped immediately and the person is not have a seizure since and now it's no longer drops under the tongue. Now it's in a pill form and the person takes the pill once or twice or three times a day and is completely seizure free today, which ultimately gave me my life back because anyone that's ever dealt with seizures knows that a seizure doesn't just affect that person. It affects everyone around them. Sure. Because you can't do anything and you have to ride the seizure out and it's very frightening and that's any caregiver, any kind of ailment, you know. My mom was sick for three years, unfortunately passed away, but that, that caregiver network around her, we all had that sickness. Sure. You all suffer right with. That's it. And so cannabis gave me my life back there. You got this person now takes cannabis, uses it legally and does not have seizures anymore.

Speaker 1: I was surprised that that was the story because I figured you were going to get up there and maybe talk about cte. Maybe talk about ptsd. Maybe you know, you've been in the military, you've been a professional athlete. You, you're built as someone that could come at it from that point of view. Sure. Oh absolutely. But to me, this is the most dramatic thing that happened to me. And this is the catalyst. I've always been a supporter of legalizing marijuana. I grew up in the sixties. Right. You know, it's the least of the recreational drugs. I mean, if, if he, if you put it with tobacco and alcohol, they're both worse. Oh my God. Yeah. Way Worse. Tobacco's highly addictive. Physically. Now Cannabis, you can be mentally addicted to it. Sure. But it won't physically addicted. You now can't do it. The tobacco will. Yeah.

Speaker 1: Alcohol can kill you without question. Every year we read about binge drinking at college where young people die because they overdrink well, again, if you die from cannabis, you'll be go down in history books because you'll be the first if you overdose, right? Yeah. You'll be number one. Leave your mark on society. So little. It might be something people will try to attain, you know, get to, I don't know. Yeah, I got. But uh, you know, and to me it's also the economic issue. Yeah. People are crying for jobs, they're crying for workforce out there. And you can have as many people working in the cannabis industry as you do the tobacco industry and the alcohol industry know how many hundreds of thousands of jobs are there in those will you, you even mentioned some of the jobs that are being built, if you will, in Colorado brand new jobs because of this.

Speaker 1: Jesse Ventura, former soldier, governor and wrestler Jesse Ventura says that cannabis gave him his life back without it, he says he wouldn't have a quality of life today, somewhat close to him, developed an epileptic seizure disorder after being treated with drugs that didn't work. They went to Colorado, found cannabis, and found a solution. Now that that person is seizure free, Jesse says both of them have their lives back. He's always been a supporter of legalization and although he's been in the military and was a former professional athlete who could come to cannabis through cte or ptsd, it was dealing with epilepsy as a caregiver. That was the catalyst for him to be active in cannabis. As a former governor, Jesse ads that cannabis tax dollars are real dollars for any state budget. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy.

Speaker 1: That's two ends in the word economy. Jesse, Ventura, Jesse, the body. Jesse the mind, Jesse Ventura, former governor. Governor, thanks so much for giving us a few minutes. No problem. Alright, just did the keynote here at the cannabis world congress. Yep. You know, a very much appreciate your insight and your thoughts here. I'm just, if you could, for the folks that didn't see that, why is this such a passion for you? Well, it looks a passion for me because Sha cannabis gave me my life back. We, without it, I would not have a quality of life today and it wasn't me at all. It was someone very close to me, developed an epileptic seizure disorder. Right. And was getting. She's years two to three times a week and, and the person got put on four separate pharmaceutical medicines of them worked. It was trial and error. Finally, in desperation, we went to Colorado and we got the drops under the tongue doesn't even make you high cbd.

Speaker 1: The seizures stopped immediately and the person is not have a seizure since and now it's no longer drops under the tongue. Now it's in a pill form and the person takes the pill once or twice or three times a day and is completely seizure free today, which ultimately gave me my life back because anyone that's ever dealt with seizures knows that a seizure doesn't just affect that person. It affects everyone around them. Sure. Because you can't do anything and you have to ride the seizure out and it's very frightening and that's any caregiver, any kind of ailment, you know. My mom was sick for three years, unfortunately passed away, but that, that caregiver network around her, we all had that sickness. Sure. You all suffer right with. That's it. And so cannabis gave me my life back there. You got this person now takes cannabis, uses it legally and does not have seizures anymore.

Speaker 1: I was surprised that that was the story because I figured you were going to get up there and maybe talk about cte. Maybe talk about ptsd. Maybe you know, you've been in the military, you've been a professional athlete. You, you're built as someone that could come at it from that point of view. Sure. Oh absolutely. But to me, this is the most dramatic thing that happened to me. And this is the catalyst. I've always been a supporter of legalizing marijuana. I grew up in the sixties. Right. You know, it's the least of the recreational drugs. I mean, if, if he, if you put it with tobacco and alcohol, they're both worse. Oh my God. Yeah. Way Worse. Tobacco's highly addictive. Physically. Now Cannabis, you can be mentally addicted to it. Sure. But it won't physically addicted. You now can't do it. The tobacco will. Yeah.

Speaker 1: Alcohol can kill you without question. Every year we read about binge drinking at college where young people die because they overdrink well, again, if you die from cannabis, you'll be go down in history books because you'll be the first if you overdose, right? Yeah. You'll be number one. Leave your mark on society. So little. It might be something people will try to attain, you know, get to, I don't know. Yeah, I got. But uh, you know, and to me it's also the economic issue. Yeah. People are crying for jobs, they're crying for workforce out there. And you can have as many people working in the cannabis industry as you do the tobacco industry and the alcohol industry know how many hundreds of thousands of jobs are there in those will you, you even mentioned some of the jobs that are being built, if you will, in Colorado brand new jobs because of this.

Speaker 1: 8,000 of them are not on unemployment now. That's it. Just the jobs. And that's just a short time. Two point $4 billion to the Colorado economy. Now that's going to drop, you know, as more states legalize. Sure. Right. So they right now Colorado's the place. That's it. That's exactly right. It's a destination one. But you've had some dealings with state budgets, you know, you, you, I hear both sides of that coin of like, well that's not real money for the budget or you know, I know. So it is. So there comes in a form of tax. So talk to us as the government, your mommy. Okay. And if you can get 300 million new dollars every year to government, you can spend that on anything you want to scope. That is real money. There you go. It is not fabricated. Plus, here's the part that you have to look at.

Speaker 1: Also the savings and how do you mean if you're not incarcerating people for marijuana. There you go. Like, okay, here's your example. When Washington legalized the. I have friends in Mexico that lived there. They told me the first thing they saw in legalization statewide, and I can't tell you how big this is. A 15 percent drop in their judicial budget in Washington state of Washington and I can tell you as a governor, right? Fifteen percent off a major budget like that is mammoth. Mammoth. Alright, let's. So they have 15 percent less money they have to spend on judicial matter. We go more revenue, less cost. That's millions and could border on billions. What are we missing here? Right? Neither of us are mathematicians, I don't think. But uh, well we're missing the common sense of if you're not incarcerating and you're making money off something, it goes from being a negative to a positive.

Speaker 1: There you go. Speaking of going, uh, or, or giving us a positive, you've given us a book here. Want to make sure that folks go out and get that right? Well, it's a book that I wanted to write after the dilemma I faced, you know, in my personal life. So when we did the book camp, I was amazed at doing the research to learn how important cannabis has been to this country. Maybe not now, but years ago. And, and I always like to tell people, yeah, if George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were alive today, they'd be doing 10 to 12 in a federal penitentiary. There you go. Now anybody can visualize there's something wrong with that picture. Absolutely. The father of our country in jail, fathers even, right? Yeah. Tom Jefferson, our third president. Our first and third president would be in prison. It's a remarkable, but you, since this is the.

Speaker 1: We're talking about the marijuana and you imagine the hearings they'd have on Washington and Jefferson today, like they're having an trump with the Russians, the Russians and what they'd be. They'd be. They'd be questioning them on what they're growing on their ranches and. And that's the other thing. When you look at this and you look at the incarceration, how can you go to jail for using a plant? God made that gets into a little bit. Is that what God made it for? There you go. I said that in my speech to God make marijuana to put us in jail. I don't think so. How can you commit a crime against yourself? I said yes, because it's a consensual crime. The only if you use drugs, the only victim is you. Right now, freedom comes with a price and that price is you have the freedom to be stupid.

Speaker 1: Yeah, you go. We have to put up with that. That's it. Here's what I used to say. As governor, you can't make every stupid decision against the law. How do you mean when someone does something stupid? Yeah. You can't make that necessarily against the law. It. It can't be illegal that that guys stoked that he's stupid. That's part of freedom there. It's like, okay. In Minnesota we always face the thing with thin ice on the lakes. Sure. Literal, thin, I. Yes, and every year they tell people, well, it's against the law to go out there because you could break through and drown. Right. Yet stupid people go out on the ice break through and drown. Right. So, uh, you know, it obviously has no effect on their stupidity. It's exactly right. We, even, when we do have laws in place that doesn't work it don't worry.

Speaker 1: All right. So, uh, marijuana manifesto. You know, what else is in there? I, you mentioned some old friends, Hurston and others. I would like to state that everyone should get the book alone to read the intro. Okay, bye. Steve Kubby. Okay. This is a man who we got to do this intro, who was the spearhead to the first medical marijuana being legal in California. Okay. And the price he paid, he got on the dea hitlist. They raided him with helicopters and police because he was legally growing seven plants to keep himself alive as a cubby has non operable adrenal cancer. They gave him a five year death sentence. There was nothing our medicine could do for him. He went on loads of cannabis and Ben as ally has been alive for 35 years now. Unbelievable. And when they put him in prison, he couldn't get his cannabis.

Speaker 1: It became active again. He lost over 20 pounds in prison and finally cooler heads prevailed and they let him out. He immediately moved to Canada where cannabis medical is fully legal. Absolutely it is. And but people should buy the book just to read Steve's story because when you're done, you will be so angry at our government. Right. You, you'll be speechless at how angry you'll be. Talk about that. Right? I mean, how much do you get into. I haven't read it yet personally. Do you get into Harry Anslinger and all that? You know? Oh yeah. We covered the history. We cover how William Randolph hearst did it, so we corner the market on paper. Right. You know, we'd have to buy trees instead of a renewable resource that'll grow 20 feet in a year. We would rather eradicate a tree that only grows one foot in a year.

Speaker 1: Old. Makes a lot of common sense to me. No, it does not know. And also, you know, hearst was part of the money behind the movie reefer madness. Right. Exactly know. And if anybody looks at that movie, yeah. And anybody that's ever smoked pot knows that movie is so ridiculous. Yeah. No, it's, it's, uh, it's reefer madness in and of itself. Right. And we talked about Washington and Jefferson, but there were other points to that, uh, that you, that you did bring up, which is I could, you know, pay my debt to the, uh, you know, uh, to Great Britain with Hap in the old day. There you go. In the old days, hemp or cannabis was used in lieu of money and there you go. And, and it, it was the backbone of our economy until they develop the cotton gin. All closed were made out of it.

Speaker 1: Everything. Then when they developed the cotton genet made, it's secondary because they could harvest now with a machine. That's it. And that's always faster and more productive than using people in the field. Made a few other things out of hemp as well. Some important documents, maybe another. Well, I always like to tell people what could be more American and how can we wage a war on something that our our constitution, our bill of rights and Betsy Ross flag are all made out of it. Come on now. Right now as far as the American dream, if you'll allow me. You had a couple of different careers here. Jesse. I just want to cover him real quick. When when you were a young man, you went to Vietnam. Thank you for your service. You also rejected that in the in the room when you got a round of applause for folks thanking you for your service. Why is that?

Speaker 1: Because I'm going through a personal battle right now within myself of A. I don't necessarily ever do this, but I've actually thought if I could live my life over again, would I go in the service knowing what I know today? What are we talking to? Pose to what I know or knew. Then what are we talking about while we're talking about the lives of war? We're talking about how Vietnam was based upon lies. All the wars in the Middle East are based upon lies and their wars that have been fought where there's nothing the military can do to achieve victory and all the hours that the loss of life, and I believe they're all wrong. Yeah, today. Yeah, and in light of that fact, I have many doubts today of, like I said, if I knew then what I know now today the chances are I would not have enlisted, but you did turn to the other veterans in the room and you said, hey listen, you know, don't thank us.

Speaker 1: We did our job well, because any veteran will tell you that any veteran will tell you they're not heroes. They signed on. They took an oath and they did their job. Right. Now maybe you can categorize doing your job is a hero. Sure. In today's world did my bike. They exactly. I got people doing simply do, but, but truly, because the thing you find out about it is you're waging war on people you don't know and have never done anything to you personally. Exactly. And you're and, and I was asked to go kill for my country and like I talked about my country wouldn't even recognize me as an adult to vote, to vote for, to be able to drink. Yeah. I got three cars. They're a running year round here today, by the way. Uh, I've got three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are all asking them in order.

Speaker 1: What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of your life? Jesse Ventura. One track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first though, what's most surprised you in cannabis? What do you mean? What's most surprised me with it? When you came to the plant as something other than, hey, this is fun. When I'm a kid. What's most surprised you about this plan? Uh, what surprised me the most about it is, uh, the, the medical wonders that are happening because of this plan and that this plant is truly a unique thing on this planet because. Because it has such multiple, multiple uses to it. Like no other plant I've ever seen. Once you do a little bit of research, it's infuriating, isn't it? It is. Yeah, because this plant is. In fact, I'll say this. I think the people that outlawed this plant from people being able to use it, they should go to jail. Sure. Yeah, absolutely. You should go to jail for what they've done to humanity. A crime against humanity. What's most surprised you in life? What's most surprised me in my life? Yeah. You've been the governor of a state. You were wrestling superstar, by the way. I saw you in 1985 in Nassau Coliseum. What? I'll tell you what surprised me in our life that we have a corrupt judicial system. Okay, how so? My trial.

Speaker 1: How are we to know that that's corrupt? In other words, help us through this. Well, the fact that I won the jury found for me, the presiding judge found for me and the two appellate judges overturned at breaking their own rules to do it. So therefore not hearing a shred of evidence. They overturned the case because the truth came out. Well, isn't the courtroom the place where the truth should come out? Isn't justice blind and you're saying maybe not so much? I'm saying that we are corrupt today that we have a federal court system that has judges in it that do not follow the law. They follow whatever whim they decide and they live in. They live in an ivory towers where there's nothing anyone can do about it. My hope is that we can do this again because obviously there's so much to talk about with you, but again, while we have the last question one more time, so on the soundtrack of your life, Jesse Ventura, one track, one song that's got to be on there of music. Sure. Sympathy for the devil by the rolling stones. Jesse, Vidar, thank you so much. My friend. Welcome and there you have Jesse Ventura free. Your mind and your ass will follow. That is originally the parliament funkadelic. I think it was redone at some point in the nineties. Jessie obviously subscribes to that. You know, he's a free thinker and I appreciated talking to him, although we didn't really did not have a lot of time at all. So thanks to Jesse, thanks to you for listening. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.