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Ep.276: Kim Cargile, A Therapeutic Alternative

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.276: Kim Cargile, A Therapeutic Alternative

Ep.276: Kim Cargile, A Therapeutic Alternative

Excitable patient’s rights advocate Kim Cargile, joins us and shares that roughly half of her time is dedicated to educating local and state government’s on the reality of the cannabis industry. A Therapeutic Alternative was founded in California’s capital of Sacramento 9 years ago and four year’s ago Kim joined that team with the understanding that she would continue her work as an advocate. Kim notes that the mission of her shop will be the mission of all shops in California based n the legalization legislation kicking in. The goal of course- safe patient access with sensible regulations. And to that end Kim uses the fact that the ship is in the capital city to literally showcase best practice to state government officials. Thanks to Mary’s Nutritionals & Highroad Consulting Group for supporting the episode.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Excitable patients' rights advocate Kim Carr, Gal joins us and shares that roughly half of her time is dedicated to educating local and state governments on the reality of the cannabis industry. A therapeutic alternative was founded in California's capital of Sacramento nine years ago and 40 years ago. Kim joined that team with the understanding that you would continue her work as an advocate. Kim notes that the mission of her shop will be the mission of all shops in California based on the legalization legislation kicking in the goal of course, save patient access with sensible regulations and to that end can used as the fact that the shop is in the capital city to literally showcase best practice to state government officials. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the board economy. Kim Carr guile. First things first,

Speaker 1: Kyle is not cargill. That's a good clarification. Thank you. Right? Yeah. Well, many people I'm sure think that your cargill. I've seen some negative comments on facebook posts about it. Sure. Then there's the relationship with cargill, the company. Yes. Which I would imagine is different. They have a different vision than you have. Yes, exactly. Very different. Well, let's start there. Right? A therapeutic alternative. Why don't you just kinda take us through the vision and your mission and why you're doing what you're doing before we talk about anything. Well, I'm, I am, first of all, a patient's rights advocate and about half of my time is dedicated to educating local and state governments on the reality of the industry. And so a therapeutic was founded nine years ago in Sacramento and the capital city of California. So therefore I'm taking on the position as the director, um, which was four years ago. I stated I would take on the position if I was allowed to continue work as an advocate. And so what we've been able to provide a therapeutic alternative is the highest quality of products and service that we can as well as a happy and healthy work environment for everyone that works there and a means of educating government and the public at large.

Speaker 3: The last piece is the kind of other piece that you said, I'll do this if you let me do that. Yes. As far as the other pieces, the first things that you mentioned, that's it should be every dispensary, right? Well, it should be. It's actually, it will be next year when regulations are put into place in California, California. Which brings up the fact that you're right there across the street, uh, in quotation marks from the capitol. Right. Do you have interaction at the shop level with legislators? You know, the folks that are running the government in California, are they able to come in and actually see, oh, this is one of the most boring places on earth, this dispensary thing?

Speaker 1: Yeah. You know, a picture's worth a thousand words. And from the time a government official enters our door to the time they leave, which is about an hour later, they, you can see it in their eyes, they get it finally, you know, we've had so many conversations in their offices time after time after time, but after a tour, at a therapeutic alternative, a fully transparent to our, we go over everything they could answer and they can ask any question just as any patient could, just as any patient could, but we go a step further into security provisions and, and how we handle cash and you know, how we store products and pro product labeling and even manufacturing processes. So we definitely go more into depth than we would for a standard patient. And we do those tours almost biweekly now. Great. So, um, the thing about California is an order to apply for a state license next year. Yes. You have to first have a local permit and with other, with 400 localities in California,

Speaker 3: uh, I like to call them fiefdoms by the way. But, but I digress, right?

Speaker 1: There are very few that are actually allowing for the commercial cultivation. And sales and manufacturing of cannabis, right, so, so this is going to be, once again, a long process from the 20 years ago when we started to try to implement proposition to 15 in California too. Now we're trying to implement the regulations with the local government level. So we do a number of tours with local governments throughout California and state legislators and state regulators. Right, right.

Speaker 2: Excitable patients' rights advocate Kim Carr, Gal joins us and shares that roughly half of her time is dedicated to educating local and state governments on the reality of the cannabis industry. A therapeutic alternative was founded in California's capital of Sacramento nine years ago and 40 years ago. Kim joined that team with the understanding that you would continue her work as an advocate. Kim notes that the mission of her shop will be the mission of all shops in California based on the legalization legislation kicking in the goal of course, save patient access with sensible regulations and to that end can used as the fact that the shop is in the capital city to literally showcase best practice to state government officials. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the board economy. Kim Carr guile. First things first,

Speaker 1: Kyle is not cargill. That's a good clarification. Thank you. Right? Yeah. Well, many people I'm sure think that your cargill. I've seen some negative comments on facebook posts about it. Sure. Then there's the relationship with cargill, the company. Yes. Which I would imagine is different. They have a different vision than you have. Yes, exactly. Very different. Well, let's start there. Right? A therapeutic alternative. Why don't you just kinda take us through the vision and your mission and why you're doing what you're doing before we talk about anything. Well, I'm, I am, first of all, a patient's rights advocate and about half of my time is dedicated to educating local and state governments on the reality of the industry. And so a therapeutic was founded nine years ago in Sacramento and the capital city of California. So therefore I'm taking on the position as the director, um, which was four years ago. I stated I would take on the position if I was allowed to continue work as an advocate. And so what we've been able to provide a therapeutic alternative is the highest quality of products and service that we can as well as a happy and healthy work environment for everyone that works there and a means of educating government and the public at large.

Speaker 3: The last piece is the kind of other piece that you said, I'll do this if you let me do that. Yes. As far as the other pieces, the first things that you mentioned, that's it should be every dispensary, right? Well, it should be. It's actually, it will be next year when regulations are put into place in California, California. Which brings up the fact that you're right there across the street, uh, in quotation marks from the capitol. Right. Do you have interaction at the shop level with legislators? You know, the folks that are running the government in California, are they able to come in and actually see, oh, this is one of the most boring places on earth, this dispensary thing?

Speaker 1: Yeah. You know, a picture's worth a thousand words. And from the time a government official enters our door to the time they leave, which is about an hour later, they, you can see it in their eyes, they get it finally, you know, we've had so many conversations in their offices time after time after time, but after a tour, at a therapeutic alternative, a fully transparent to our, we go over everything they could answer and they can ask any question just as any patient could, just as any patient could, but we go a step further into security provisions and, and how we handle cash and you know, how we store products and pro product labeling and even manufacturing processes. So we definitely go more into depth than we would for a standard patient. And we do those tours almost biweekly now. Great. So, um, the thing about California is an order to apply for a state license next year. Yes. You have to first have a local permit and with other, with 400 localities in California,

Speaker 3: uh, I like to call them fiefdoms by the way. But, but I digress, right?

Speaker 1: There are very few that are actually allowing for the commercial cultivation. And sales and manufacturing of cannabis, right, so, so this is going to be, once again, a long process from the 20 years ago when we started to try to implement proposition to 15 in California too. Now we're trying to implement the regulations with the local government level. So we do a number of tours with local governments throughout California and state legislators and state regulators. Right, right.

Speaker 3: So everybody that's coming through Sacramento, not just peek, folks that are stationed there get a chance to

Speaker 1: actually see an operation if they haven't seen one yet. When you say they walk out and they get it, what do you mean they get it? What does that mean? In other words, what has transpired in that hour? You talked us through that, but what do you think they understand that they didn't understand when they walked in? I think that's a deep psychological change. The stigma has been erased. They see we're not criminals. We're not drug dealers were not there to hurt the community. We're there to help the community. We care about our patients, we care about the consumers, we care about the environment. We're just like them. We're actually just like them. Government officials go into government to make the world a better place and we're in this industry to make the world a better place also. So they get it, they trust us and they, um, you know, believe what we're saying when we answer the hard questions. Right? So you're answering my hard questions, but for you, these are easy questions just because you know what you're talking about it. And my question is why? Why do we have Kim who is so well spoken and clearly gets this whole thing? How did we get you in cannabis? What happened?

Speaker 1: There's been a series of fortunate events over my lifetime in past lifetimes. Let's start at the beginning. Where are you from? California? I am from California, but I was born in Florida, but my parents were both from California. They went to Florida. I was born at home to hippies. So won't go into the details of the cannabis. But you stayed. How long did you stay in Florida? So I was in Florida titus three. Three. So you don't really remember that. And then we went direct to California. So yeah, I've been in California the rest of my life in California, always. Nor cal. Okay. And were, well I moved around quite a bit and lived in various parts of northern California, um, such as Siskyou, humble Sacramento. Um, yeah. So the officer there go. So the capital, the Emerald Triangle, a little bit of everything. Yeah. I graduated from Humboldt State University.

Speaker 1: Okay. Now let's stop there. And the rest is history. What was your major at Humboldt State University? Well, I actually started out as a cellular and molecular biology major. Are you serious? Yeah. Studied that for five years. And then I started working my way through college as a personal fitness trainer, Yoga instructor in cannabis cultivator. So all of that is health related, I guess. But why did we decide? Because Science, I mean we need the scientists. Right? And you were right there on the precipice. Why? Why not? Why did he say, well, you get to choose some classes to take for fun. And so by the time I asked my counselor, how do I get out of college, they taught us how to get into college. No one ever really said, this is how you get out. They said, well, over the years taken so many psychology and social justice classes you could actually graduate today with, you know, this is seven years after I started college.

Speaker 1: So ready. Thanks for letting me know. Yeah. So, um, I could graduate today with a degree in liberal studies with a minor in psychology and a focus on social justice, you know, on the honor roll on Dean's list as a presidential scholar because I wanted to go to medical school, um, all while using cannabis medical cannabis patient. But um, so it was kind of like the medical cannabis industry was kind of like a perfect marriage of the science and the social justice and the law. I grew up homeschooled working in a law office with my Stepdad. And so all of these little pieces came together.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. What year was this? So we get a sense of the regulatory, a situation on the ground.

Speaker 1: Yeah. So this was 2006 when I graduated college and started managing dispensary's and became a patient rights advocate, which was over a decade ago,

Speaker 3: and in 2006, what was it like on the ground? Give us a sense

Speaker 1: every day that I would go to work, I would think today's the day today we're going to get rated against, go into my head. I'm going to prison. Um, and that's how we start every morning. Every morning that would go through my head.

Speaker 3: But you had, you know, raid preparedness drills and all of this, right?

Speaker 1: Oh yeah. We, uh, we did it within dispensary and then I started going to other dispensary's and re training with him and we were well trained and so we were prepared and we prepared on many levels. One of the things we actually had to do to prepare was I'm filming a documentary, just a private document of our patients. So if we were rated, we could prove what, why were we doing what we're doing, you know, who were we helping? What are we actually doing? We wanted to just show the truth. Once again, a picture's worth a thousand words and so I had an opportunity which really changed my life because this was really the turning point where I said, okay, I'm uh, I'm in like, I'm going to do this. And um, I got a one on one chance to interview a number of patients with different illnesses and disorders from completely different walks of life,

Speaker 3: different diseases, different walks of life that, you know, this kind of person that, that makes this much money, this kind of person that used to be a in our military, this kind of person that you know, has no legs all the way up and down and through

Speaker 1: exactly one after one day after day and one night I woke up and realized, wow, like this is serious. You know, I had thought about medical cannabis and knew about it and grew it and worked in the dispensary, but I didn't quite get to the depth when I was interviewing these patients and working in the dispensary that first year that this was serious. This was life or death for some people and they were not able to speak up for themselves. They were afraid to lose their jobs, lose their kids, lose, are housing, lose their healthcare, lose their education rights, all these rights that they had, none of under proposition 2:15. And so I woke up that night and I was like, wow, I actually need to do something about this. This is like, if I know about this and just keep going with the rest of my life, then how will I ever sleep again? Right. And so I woke up the next day and um, I said, okay, let's do more, let's do more. And I had a great boss who's been an advocate and activist for her whole life and who works with Jack hair and um, it's a big part of the industry. And she's, she was like, yeah, you, she'd been inspiring me all along. Was like, yeah, you want to do this. Okay.

Speaker 3: Is this someone name that we all know?

Speaker 1: Maybe Andre special was going to guess that it was Andre. And so, um, she had been telling me this, but I didn't get it. I didn't really get how deep this was and how we were in the capital. And we had to do something about this. And so, um, I started collecting letters from patients and mailing them 10 years ago. We were a million things still, of course, to the city council and to the mayor every week we started going to, or I started organizing patients for sitting in it simply meetings and joined a sans, joined normal and just started really doing everything I could to keep pushing everything forward.

Speaker 3: Interaction with Steph Sherer of course, at the time, one of my heroes, of course, she's one of everyone's here. And uh, so you were getting the word out, you were now talking to regulators, talking to legislators. What was the message, you know, this is a different time. So it was, was it just basic information? Was it basic education or

Speaker 1: it was still trying to get them to understand that patients had the basic right under 2:15 to use an obtain cannabis. Here's how it works. I just need those two words. That's proposition to 15, those two words.

Speaker 3: And you were educating folks. Here's 2:15 is, is, and this is how it works, right? And uh, and then what happened?

Speaker 1: Well, in 2009, President Obama came into power and people felt much more open, less afraid, and um, many dispensary started opening up and the government realized, okay, the local government, the city of Sacramento, I realized, okay, maybe we do need regulations, right? So I'm over 30 dispensary's opened up that year and the city of Sacramento and the local government and the city council was compassionate enough to understand that these patients go into these businesses needed consumer protection. Sure.

Speaker 3: So did you work with the city to kind of cobble together something of worth?

Speaker 1: Yeah, there wasn't a lot of ordinances back then. And so, um, we worked very closely with the city and the number of advocates and the number of stakeholders to form what I think is the best ordinance in the state of California because all of our 30 dispensary has got to stay open, which is not normal.

Speaker 3: That is not normal. But. So how were the regulations? Tough enough. So if I'm listening and I'm outside of the cannabis industry and you're saying that you're a dispensary and you worked with the state or the city to, to, you know, get these regulations, which everybody passed, I immediately think, well, they're not tough enough if everybody passed. So how would you refute that?

Speaker 1: Well, they were very tough at that time. Now we've worked with the state to implement stronger regulations, which we just passed last year, but in 2010, the ordinance itself went over a number of regulations for the local city of Sacramento, including security measures, security standards, um, patients, um, paperwork, standards, licensing and background checks and zoning regulations and everything that goes into this standard business. A conditional use permit.

Speaker 3: Here you go. So just getting the basics, here's what we. Absolutely, we follow these rules. Now, tell us about these tougher rules that you just kind of put on top of them.

Speaker 1: So once we went through that with the city, we, um, started working with other cities and other counties to try to implement similar ordinances to provide safe access. That was the basis, but as time went by, more and more dispensary's and cultivators and manufacturers throughout California started coming out of the shadows, started brandeen, started the industry, started really evolving when we started to getting lab testing, proper packaging and labeling. We started really developing the industry as we see it today. And with that came a number of needs for our state government and responsibilities for our state government, including consumer protections like mandatory lab testing and um, environmental protections like getting permits through the waterboard and even tax obligations such as getting the seller's permit and paying taxes to the Board of equalization. And as time went by and state legislature saw this industry growing and um, we started listening to the advocates, listening to business stakeholders and organizations such as the National Cannabis Industry Association and the California Growers Association Forum to came on board. We really started to get a strong presence at the capital for our industry. And we pass the medical cannabis regulation and safety act of 2015, which they're currently writing regulations for and will be passed this year in licenses. Will be available next year,

Speaker 3: which used to be the mmrs and now it's Emc Rsa because that's what it should have been all along.

Speaker 1: Yes, true. That was a success.

Speaker 3: There you go. So how are we kind of rolling into next year? So when we're talking, since it's podcast land, we'll say it's May of 2017, so folks understand how we're talking about it, but as we go kind of January first 2018, what are you doing? What are your fellow dispensary's doing? What are other folks in the industry doing to make sure that this whole thing is smooth?

Speaker 1: Yeah. So, um, this is important to actually wrote an article for Dope magazine on this exact thing. What do you need to do to get a license next year? How do we get there? Because there's a number of steps obviously in coming from an industry that was self regulated and you know, didn't have licenses, didn't have permits, was you know, very do it yourself at home type of business. It's, it's a big transition for assault. So I'm at a therapeutic alternative. We're pretty much there. We've actually kind of set a bar and we're pushing for our bar, which is what, which is doing everything that's already in the regulations and isn't legislature except for we do weigh up the urban friend of the patients which won't be allowed, but everything else were covered. So it's not a big transition. We have our local permit, we have all everything in place, but what I'm trying to do is help others.

Speaker 1: So by working as an advocate, continuing to educate local governments because the big step is having a local permit first you have to have a local permit and with bands it's kind of hard. So you have to actually work with the government to implement an ordinance and then you can apply for your permit. So this is a few year process that needs to start now. Right? And so by educating our industry and educating governments, that's how we move forward into getting those local permits in place. Getting everyone signed up for their seller's permit. I'm helping them with brandeen financing's, a big one. Banking and all these moving parts that need to go into place before the end of this year.

Speaker 3: What are your colleagues telling you as you and others? Obviously kind of try to make sure that we all get through this and get over the finish line and all that. What are you hearing from colleagues in the industry?

Speaker 1: Everybody wants it. That I talked to. I mean, even the people who, um, I hear about that are resistant that are up in the hills that you know, her providing out of state and that's the only way they're surviving. They don't take. They could survive under this new regulation market even though they want to be there, they just don't think they can get there. I'm one of the main reasons is financing. So it takes a lot of money to do everything that's needed to get a license next year. And without financing, that's really hard. And a lot of people are entrepreneurs, they've been working for themselves, they have family run businesses, they don't want to take on partners and without bank financing, you almost have to take on partners at this point. So that's the one big hurdle that everyone's having an is just getting enough money, getting the local government on board to, you know, to do the lobbying to get the local government on board.

Speaker 3: And what we're seeing, what I'm seeing is, is cooperatives, right? So in Mendo Mendocino County and in Humble County, there are definitely cooperatives to kind of help with some of this. Right?

Speaker 1: Yeah. And that is um, that is absolutely a wonderful business model is the cooperative model and it's bringing it so farmers cooperative, agricultural cooperative, bringing the farmers together so they have buying power, selling power so they can communicate about pricing so they could pool their money to lobby local and state government for issues that they need handled. So cooperatives is a great way of doing it. It's um, something I absolutely want to help out with and the areas that I'm involved in is like hurting cats though. Let me tell you, it's not easy, but um, but it's another thing, just once again, educating the farmers if the farmers know about it and understand what's being 10, they want to do it

Speaker 3: and it does sound like, you know, I've been doing this show for now going on a few years and it does sound like the conversation with farmers in the Emerald Triangle is different than it used to be. Yes. Right. I think we're focused on making sure that everybody's here and everybody's accounted for and everybody's Kinda, you know, let's all help each other kind of get this thing done as opposed to, no, we don't want that and we're not going to think about it. We're not going to listen and we're not going to talk about it. I feel like those days are over. Is that fair for, for the, for the minute,

Speaker 1: Jordy, that's it. For the majority of people are like, you and I, they want to support their families. They want to have a nice day. They want to, you know, make the world a better place and they care about their communities. They care about the environment. They're not criminals. We're just normal people and farmers and yeah, absolutely. That is the majority of farmers in California.

Speaker 3: Excellent. All right. Let's go back to your establishment one last time because you have a medical director, if I'm not mistaken, I want to talk about your medical director who happens to be sitting here and listening to this whole thing. Um, and I want you to start from the beginning on how you came to know this person and how you came to bring this person on as a medical director.

Speaker 1: Well, I'm so very thankful to have been born when I was and to be able to be in California and to have met some of the heroes of our industry because, you know, a lot of the people here today are here for their first time just joining our industry. And I'm just wanted to say I'm very thankful to be able to have learned from some of the best and to have gone through all the time so far to meet some of these people like Jack Hair and Eddie lab and Dr Molly Fry. And um, I've known her for a number of years. She's one of the people that helps implement proposition to 15 in California.

Speaker 3: And we are talking about Dr Molly fry, just because you mentioned a few names there.

Speaker 1: Yes. Because it's no longer with us, but we're certainly talking about Bob. He lives in Sacramento. So it's funny, I couldn't get complicated. Yes, Dr Molly fry is our medical director and she has been a hero of mine a number of years. She was one of the doctors who implemented proposition 2:15 in the Sacramento Valley and foothills on the eastern side of California, which is very different than the western side of California as far as government is concerned in that server and all that. Absolutely right. And um, so it was no easy feat and because of that whole process she did into having to serve five years for a mandatory minimum and I'm just got out of prison and I was lucky enough to come back in contact with her. I was, um, at the protest when she went into prison that day and I was so happy to hear she was getting out 10, got to, um, get the chance of getting together with her and getting to know her better, which has been such a blessing in so many ways I can't even tell you. And um, she um, has taken on the position as our medical director to make sure that we have the highest quality of service available for our patients and to help educate them and educate doctors and educate the community and is a blessing to a therapeutic alternative into the collective of wonderful holistic healers we have

Speaker 3: there. There you go. I guess listeners should know that when I met you and found out that you served five years, I gave you a big hug and thank you for your surface if I, you know what I mean? Because it is people like you that have brought us where we are today. So more on molly in a month. Stay tuned. How about that? Right? Because you're working on a book and the whole thing. We're going to talk all about that. Right? So look out for it folks. So, uh, that's fantastic obviously that you are bringing in a truly the folks that have the intellectual property, you know, here in cannabis and putting them in an institution like you're a establishment to make sure that, that not only intellectual property gets brought forward, but that we kind of celebrate the past at the same time. Is that fair? Absolutely. Yeah. Alright, so I have three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. The first is, what has most surprised you in cannabis? The second is what has most surprised you in life and the third on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 1: Well, um, it was just actually telling molly earlier today that, um, you know, I knew it was going to be 10 years when I was driving down from Humboldt. I remember the distinct conversation with my husband about, you know, you said how long do you think it'll be until we have regulations in California and this is a legitimate industry in California, and I said 10 years and it's been exactly 10 years. Yeah. But I didn't see this. I didn't see today. I didn't see, um, the national industry. I didn't see all the new people, people

Speaker 3: coming in, which we need them. We're at a very route, a giant trade show. Basically what it is, there are aisles and aisles and aisles of booths. There are rooms and rooms and rooms of sessions and so there are thousands of people here. And is what you're saying. I figured it would just be us those people from way back when and maybe a couple more. Not a real true total complete industry.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I didn't quite understand the depth of it all for sure. And it's really been interesting to watch it all as it evolved and to watch the new companies come in. The new people come in that I never thought I would ever talk to and to watch how they're coming in. The good ones to help benefit the industry and obviously they have to make money. Everyone has to make money. It's just survive. But, um, but there are good companies who are actually, you know, progressive and who are creative and who are thinking about ways to help us without trying to take over the industry. And um, so even though it has been very astounding to me to see this change, I'm encouraging people to work together and to form partnerships and to form symbiotic relationships so they don't take over the industry but they make us stronger and they make us better

Speaker 3: find the companies that kind of have the right mindset, have a shared mindset with you, work with them and try to bring the other folks forward. Type this right. Let's do it together. What has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 1: Oh Gosh. I think that's most surprised me in life is the resiliency of people and the ability to carry on through incredibly hard circumstances. And um, you know, it really surprises me about patients and about people who have fought cancer and patients who have fought aids and patients who had Ms. and how, um, you know, they're able to do wonderful things with their lives and come through the other end. And um, that's one thing that I didn't really understand growing up is that so many people, I've had so many hard lives have had so much hardness and so much struggle in their lives for so many different reasons and yet they come out the other end and continue to, you know, but like a flower continue to make the world a better place. And that's really surprised me and I'm thankful for

Speaker 3: no, as a young person, you think to yourself, well, if I ever had ms, I don't even know what I would do. And then to be on the other side of that and know someone with ms and just see them fighting every day and see the resiliency. I totally am with you. I have a friend that has ms. I have a friend that has crones and these guys fight, fight, fight, and it's kind of awesome to see.

Speaker 1: And it's really inspiring.

Speaker 3: Okay. Kim, on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. So it doesn't have to be the perfect song, it doesn't have to be your favorite song, but definitely along the way

Speaker 2: here, there's at least one song or I'm sure there's a few that certainly are on the soundtrack of your life. It has to be a Tupac Song and only God can judge me. Now. There you go. God can judge me because what's the worth of having anybody else judge you? It doesn't really matter, right? Because if it was true. Anyways, Kim Carr guile. Keep fighting and there you have Kim Carr guile. So that's pretty much the whole thing right there. Kim is a patient advocate. She understands the need for sensible regulations. She understands that lawmakers need to be brought in to the shop to understand exactly what's going on so that we can all serve patients better. Come on, thanks to Kim, thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.