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Ep.280: Guy Rocourt: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.280: Guy Rocourt: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.280: Guy Rocourt: MCBA Spotlight

Yet another military veteran in the cannabis industry, Guy Rocourt joins us and shares that he joined the military in the 90’s which led him to unique thoughts about the service. All in all, as opposed to being a risk taker, Guy’s thinking as to why military veterans are in cannabis is that when you’re in the military you’re taught to abide by the constitution, which by the way, says nothing about cannabis. Guy says that when you’re enlisted you abide by the uniform code of military justice which is much more structured in regards to your rights and responsibilities. And so as a military veteran he doesn’t understand why cannabis is illegal- it does not compute.  And in addition to that, military veterans gravitate towards industries that need change.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Guy Rocourt, yet another military veteran in the cannabis industry. Guy Rocourt joins us and shares that he joined the military in the nineties, which led him to unique thoughts about the service all in all as opposed to being a risk taker. He's thinking as to why military veterans are in cannabis, is that when you're in the military, you're taught to abide by the constitution, which by the way says nothing about cannabis. He says that when you're enlisted, you abide by the uniform code of military justice, which is much more structured data in regards to your rights and responsibilities, and so as military veteran, he doesn't understand my cannabis is legal. It does not compute. In addition to that, military veterans gravitate towards industries that need change. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanical enemy. That's two ends of the word economy. Giro court. So is this great?

Speaker 3: Is this French Canadian? I know my parents were actually Haitian. Aha. So that's how that makes sense. First Generation American, my dad's name was also. Gee, where'd you grow up? I grew up in New York City, primarily Queens, Manhattan. I went to aviation high school in Long Island city shaft. Okay. There you go. Aviation. Yeah. Maybe. So, yeah. When I was young I thought I, uh, I got a f, a power plant and mechanics license was a vocational school that also prompted my military career. I was in the military. Thank you for your service. Thank you. Back when we were in the Cold War. Yeah, I enlisted in the navy. I did boot camp in San Diego, which they don't have anymore. And then I eventually went back to Groton, Connecticut and was in the submarine service for two and a half years. And then I got an rotc scholarship, but I didn't go back new power like I wanted because the cold war ended.

Speaker 3: I don't know if you guys remember the Cold War ended. It was a big deal. I remember the first one you're talking about the first. Yeah, the first one with Bill Clinton, like downsizing and I literally thought peace on earth because I had spent like well on just once with with Ronald Reagan. It was after the Cold War. No, so basically the. Well, I should say it's not the Cold War ended, the Russian empire collapse. There we go, right? The Soviet Union collapsed and then that seemed like, oh, the largest enemies off the table and just being young and naive. And then in Liberal Arts College I was like, Oh, this is great. Like, you know, now we're done. Right? And everything's fine, everything's fine. Nothing will ever be wrong again. And I literally justified like turning in my rotc scholarship under the guise of like, they're like there'd be no viable military career because the military is clearly going to be downsized. Um, yeah. So then that led me into film, which led me into an entertainment which led me into weed.

Speaker 4: Alright. So we're gonna we're going to take those steps, but I do want to kind of cover your military service because it is shocking to me how many folks in this industry have a military background. It is far higher percentage wise than I think any other industry with the exception of course of defense, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah. I mean, look, I think that when you're in the military, you are taught to abide by the constitution and clearly the constitution doesn't say anything about cannabis, in fact, what's written on hemp paper, uh, if you have any us history or you love the US in any way, you know, that we paid farmers to raise him a, I'm a big hemp, save the world guy. Um, and so by extension, marijuana or resonance, cannabis as medicine is just a natural extension of that. Uh, and a lot of the stuff that's happened recently, I'd say since the end of World War II, it's just not part of the constitution. You know, there's a lot of things that have changed in our nation that in the military you become very cognizant of, right? What, what, what are you getting at there? In the military, you become very cognitive. So it is you, you, you, if you're in the military and you are part of the state, and in a way you're not part of the nation, you're part of the UCM Jay.

Speaker 1: Guy Rocourt, yet another military veteran in the cannabis industry. Guy Rocourt joins us and shares that he joined the military in the nineties, which led him to unique thoughts about the service all in all as opposed to being a risk taker. He's thinking as to why military veterans are in cannabis, is that when you're in the military, you're taught to abide by the constitution, which by the way says nothing about cannabis. He says that when you're enlisted, you abide by the uniform code of military justice, which is much more structured data in regards to your rights and responsibilities, and so as military veteran, he doesn't understand my cannabis is legal. It does not compute. In addition to that, military veterans gravitate towards industries that need change. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanical enemy. That's two ends of the word economy. Giro court. So is this great?

Speaker 3: Is this French Canadian? I know my parents were actually Haitian. Aha. So that's how that makes sense. First Generation American, my dad's name was also. Gee, where'd you grow up? I grew up in New York City, primarily Queens, Manhattan. I went to aviation high school in Long Island city shaft. Okay. There you go. Aviation. Yeah. Maybe. So, yeah. When I was young I thought I, uh, I got a f, a power plant and mechanics license was a vocational school that also prompted my military career. I was in the military. Thank you for your service. Thank you. Back when we were in the Cold War. Yeah, I enlisted in the navy. I did boot camp in San Diego, which they don't have anymore. And then I eventually went back to Groton, Connecticut and was in the submarine service for two and a half years. And then I got an rotc scholarship, but I didn't go back new power like I wanted because the cold war ended.

Speaker 3: I don't know if you guys remember the Cold War ended. It was a big deal. I remember the first one you're talking about the first. Yeah, the first one with Bill Clinton, like downsizing and I literally thought peace on earth because I had spent like well on just once with with Ronald Reagan. It was after the Cold War. No, so basically the. Well, I should say it's not the Cold War ended, the Russian empire collapse. There we go, right? The Soviet Union collapsed and then that seemed like, oh, the largest enemies off the table and just being young and naive. And then in Liberal Arts College I was like, Oh, this is great. Like, you know, now we're done. Right? And everything's fine, everything's fine. Nothing will ever be wrong again. And I literally justified like turning in my rotc scholarship under the guise of like, they're like there'd be no viable military career because the military is clearly going to be downsized. Um, yeah. So then that led me into film, which led me into an entertainment which led me into weed.

Speaker 4: Alright. So we're gonna we're going to take those steps, but I do want to kind of cover your military service because it is shocking to me how many folks in this industry have a military background. It is far higher percentage wise than I think any other industry with the exception of course of defense, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah. I mean, look, I think that when you're in the military, you are taught to abide by the constitution and clearly the constitution doesn't say anything about cannabis, in fact, what's written on hemp paper, uh, if you have any us history or you love the US in any way, you know, that we paid farmers to raise him a, I'm a big hemp, save the world guy. Um, and so by extension, marijuana or resonance, cannabis as medicine is just a natural extension of that. Uh, and a lot of the stuff that's happened recently, I'd say since the end of World War II, it's just not part of the constitution. You know, there's a lot of things that have changed in our nation that in the military you become very cognizant of, right? What, what, what are you getting at there? In the military, you become very cognitive. So it is you, you, you, if you're in the military and you are part of the state, and in a way you're not part of the nation, you're part of the UCM Jay.

Speaker 3: And it's all about the constitution, right? It's all about you, Sam j. just, you know, a uniform code of military justice, which has much stricter in terms of like your rights and responsibilities. So, uh, you really value your civil rights. So it's a civilian. You have certain rights, the right to privacy, right to search and seizure. These things, you don't have those under UCM Emj. So that's a sharp contrast knowing that the military, like you can't get title, you can't even get a tattoo in the military because you're military, you're property of the US. So when you give yourself over like that, usually if you're smart, you're paying attention to, well, why am I doing this? Why am I putting, what are the values of the nation? And the minute you really respect the values of freedom and the nation, whenever there are laws that are just don't make sense, you're going to be vocal about it.

Speaker 3: And I think military people gravitate towards industries that need change or areas that need change because erroneous laws usually because of self interest bodies, uh, have, have come to light, you know. So the reason why canvases has prohibition is not because it's really bad, we know that it's because at one point somebody had a financial interest and was able to lobby Washington and make changes. Right. But your take on, on military folks coming into the industry is almost as a sixth sense. You and others realized that this industry needs the help of people that have been trained like you. Oh, well no, I just say that it's unjust, right? It's not, it's, it's, it's, it's not. You know, I think if you're in the military, you believe in 100 percent freedom in a way. Right? Like, that's what we go out to defend. And so if people are being prohibited from doing something, it better be for the right reasons and that we need to restore American's rights.

Speaker 3: There we go. All right, so mine was free the weed and I, and yes, you're right, there are a lot of military folks in our interest in it, just in Papa and Barkley. We have to, yet, we have a guy that just came out of Iraq who's like, you know, somewhat disabled, but he's totally, uh, you know, he's got some ambulatory issues, but he's awesome. Uh, I have an air force vet. I'm Yvette Papa, who's after this was an air force who's named, who's named our company is named after it was Yvette. One of our outreach corporate outreach programs is with vets. Of course, you know, the Va in California has kind of backed off, but I'd love to. I'd love to be able to donate products to them. We're working on that actively. Um, and then of course cannabis for Ptsd I could go on for like an hour about why that's the right move and we'll certainly cover that.

Speaker 3: But you say the va in California has kind of backed off. What do you mean by that? Right. So basically the Va, uh, said that in states that allow medical cannabis, a vets can go out and get a script without feeling that they're going to lose their benefits. So the whole thing with federal funded institutions is you're always afraid that the feds are just going to steal their, their funding back. That's why. So they might be pro cannabis, they might be understand the science, but at the end of the day they're going to be like, look, if I engage with you, if I even let you sponsor and you know, some, you know, conservative fed tries to be a stickler, I could lose my federal funding and that can't happen. And I, and I appreciate that. I wonder though, if that has changed since the news that came out yesterday today about sessions actually going to Congress and saying, Hey, please, uh, you know, that Rohrabacher Farr, roar backer, Blumenauer amendment, please don't do that again so that I can come after medical marijuana.

Speaker 3: I wonder what that does to the Va, which is always not on solid ground. Right. Wait, is that it? You know, and that's why we continue to have trouble because, you know, we had the coal amendment, it seemed like at the Attorney General's office, you know, under cold, like I said before, sessions. Well, yeah, they were. Yeah, they, they, they were being a hold and they're being, they were just saying that we're going to allow the states to dictate and therefore if you're in a state and you know you have a federal institution, but yeah, no, just essences, you know, without seeing anything that it's just, yeah, he's just not a friend of the movement and I believe he's completely off base, you know, it's like, it's just, it's, I don't understand how learned people are missing such large swaths of science. It's not so black at the very least.

Speaker 3: It's not so black and white. So I think that, you know, as a learned person to have such a black and white stance on a complicated issue just shows a level of ignorance. Right. And it's new for me and all the other citizens here. It's disrespectful. It's like you're not taking it seriously talking about the will of the people. You have more. You have so many states that have voted right. So now your constituents that voted, now you need to do your job. It's not about you making decisions, it's so narcissistic. It's like the will of the peoples here, you may not agree with it, deal with it. Those are things I don't agree with. Right. But I'm still trying to be a citizen and still trying to be at the table. I would imagine you didn't vote for our current president, for instance, but you know, hey, that's what the voters voted for.

Speaker 3: Right. And I'm dealing. Look, it's so funny. Uh, you know, I, as a patriot, I wanted to, you know, I, I definitely was like calexit, right. You know, it's like, that's it. California seceding from the Union. This is, this is a nightmare right now. Uh, I, you know, ever since the inauguration I had been wearing nothing but black because I'm in mourning for our nation. It's like something terrible has happened. Um, I could go on and on and on. Let's refocus on you in the past, if you're currently wearing all black, right? You were wearing red, white and blue, or at least some camouflage you get. When did you come out of the military? Oh, so I left the. You weren't wearing a camouflage in the navy, but. No. Yeah, I was wearing my uh, dungarees um, I love the navy officially in 1992, I guess.

Speaker 3: Why? Well, I was already in college on my rotc scholarship. Like I said, the Soviet Union collapsed and they were down. Was asked why he said I'm out because of this. Oh, well no, I mean it, it just was a success, you know. So first of all I'm a big proponent of liberal arts education, right? The difference between our country, let's say China is trying to want to offer kids vocational school and they make engineers like that. We offer kids, you know, a four year liberal arts core where they get to be free thinking. I mean I think that's what the founding fathers wanted us to be as free thinkers. And so here I am free thinking a city kid like now you know, having on the military now in a four year school and yeah, with the swallow, the Soviet Union and downsizing, which allowed me to turn my rotc scholarship.

Speaker 3: So I was able to have two years of essentially free school and back away from my commitment. Right? Yup. And so I just took that opportunity when it came up and you know, school in what and then you jumped into media. How. Yeah. So I was in, I went to a school called Rochester Institute of Technology, yet our state, New York. I was a physics major. I was going to go back, new power. Um, there's always a girl involved, so I was dating this girl and she was doing exposure latitudes for filmmaking and like, you know, seeing the light and how you paint with light and exposure, you know, high exposure in the background versus less exposure in the forgotten. Of course it was simple math to me seeing the literal light. Yeah. The, yeah, the literal. I um, I uh, you know, I started helping her with that and then of course all of a sudden, you know, while I enjoyed physics at one point, you know, as it happens at college, I switched my major and became a film major.

Speaker 3: Uh, I made a couple of films, got a real passion for it. I didn't realize how passionate I was until I came back from New York. And that was right when the low budget film making movement was exploding and essentially that was turning point in the world where the price of making media started to drop and he started to see like real productions being made for under a million dollars before making the movie was an expensive thing. And so that's how I made that switch going digital as opposed to film, obviously technology, like at the time added, like the, the idea that you could scan film in at the, at a negative level, never make a work print and only work on the computer that really started to change the price of just cinema. Um, and then the everyday like, you know, at first I was one of those kids in college was like digital, they'll never take over film.

Speaker 3: Film is magic, but now I know about it. Exactly. You speak of avid. And that's of course the editing process. So both of them making out in the editing process, cheap, cheap, cheap computers basically came to filmmaking. And uh, that, that started to change the price of stuff. And so I was also lucky enough to be a young professional in a market that was normally about nepotism and very close by film unions, but this usually a budget thing blew up, so I was able to find a fast track all the way into the directors guild. I am a member of the director's guild. And so I was the first. I made my way all the way up to first assistant director, which is like being shopped for him in, on a movie set for. What's that? For what a movie. So, uh, several movies, I did a movie with Montel called a little pieces.

Speaker 3: I worked on a movie called Washington Square, which was like a Disney movie. Um, yeah, just, uh, just lots of days quickly, just quickly backtracking to Rochester just to describe what a garbage plate is for the folks. Oh yes, definitely. Yes. So Nick, Tom, who's garbage plate, uh, I guess it's two patties, cheese over macaroni and potatoes and some sauce that is typically eating it two in the morning. And then of course the hot dogs on top of that, which is ridiculous. I haven't heard, I haven't thought of that in a while. And then stomach remembers that make tacos. That's exactly right. When I think about that in my stomach. That's exactly right. Um, you mentioned you met Montel Williams on set. Uh, that started a relationship really. So it was also in the military also was a, he's a cryptologist and he did a lot of work on submarines.

Speaker 3: I think it's all declassified now, but he was part of this agenda where we went in and literally hooked recorders to Soviet underwater Soviet lines, so they deploy seals, they'd hook and he was a crypto. He speaks Russian. Um, so we immediately bonded and the way I read a film set was very similar to the way a submarine runs or the way a military ones, like with the planning of the day and these kinds of things, um, in addition to a call sheet and whatnot. Um, so he was doing a low budget movie. I actually turned it down at a second interview with him. We became friends almost immediately, like we just had a bond. So he did this movie, he asked me to stay on postproduction supervising and then basically got me, you know, an extended job. I never actually worked on the show. Um, yeah.

Speaker 3: And then we just had this nine year relationship of like I worked at paramount helping him on some other stuff like getting him into Jag and doing all kinds of, just stuff that brought you to California. So then at one point he had a business development office as part of his deal at paramount here on the lot in Los Angeles. And so I flew out to start to head that up with another gentleman and yeah. And that also because he was also doing the advocacy at that point, he had already come out with his book and was famous for the quote like in the eyes of the law, I'm a criminal because here's the standup guy that, you know, the show was on for 17 years. So the show is still running and you know, lots of families of people are looking to them with respect and he's very vocal about his cannabis early on.

Speaker 3: And so a lot of underground growers are just showing us and sharing information and knowledge with us and yeah, it was awesome. So being introduced to that community in California has ge jumping in. So what happened there? How did you get in? So yeah, so the first time believing that that I saw a great indoor grow was in Vancouver. We went to Vancouver and Toronto was invited by these folks to speak and then they took us to Victoria Island, uh, where they had essentially a small house. It had been turned to regret in the minute I saw it. I was like, oh my God, I could do this. And I've been reading and books. And I turned out I had a small three bedroom in chinatown that I was paying nothing for that. I was planning on moving. So I move out of this training time place and put a couple lights.

Speaker 3: Then I meet my partner at the time who had Crohn's disease, a real true patient and had left like mainstream media. He worked for Time magazine. This guy went to Harvard electrical engineer. So it was great partnership and I was also traveling, so he and I started one, life becomes two lights become eight lights and it literally, no pun intended, just started to grow. Um, and before you know what the revenue is real, I also never thought I never wanted to come into this as a criminal or to be against the law. I thought the people of California had spoken in 1996 very clearly and assume that Sacramento would do something and at 2002 I was certain of it. And of course, 10 years later, plus almost 20 years by 2016. And even now, we still have nothing from Sacramento. We still act in a gray area.

Speaker 3: It's an awesome spirit of tolerance in California. Don't get me wrong, but Sacramento has done nothing since the people spoke in 20, in 1996 and technically has done nothing since we spoke just last November. Although it's, they're working on, they're working times are different as far and, and uh, you know, having said all that, you were, you know, operating in this space, let's call it a gray market. And uh, you know, doing well, making money. How did it compare to your day jobs? Money? Well, yeah, so, you know, the most interesting thing is now I'm really, really vocal and it's because I felt, I think I spent many years not like not telling people my way to security. I made a choice, first of all, let me just say, like, I think by 2005 I made a. So it was like, I don't think you can be an advocate and raise a family and cannabis effectively unless you're really willing to take some risks.

Speaker 3: Um, and I decided, you know what, I'm just going to go completely dark. I figured anytime now legislation will come out and I'll be able to come back into the light and yeah, I feel like I dropped off grid technically for 10 years where I was just doing some freelance commercial work. So I had some like verifiable income. My wife had a job, but as far as most people knew, it's like, you know, I just worked freelance and I really cut my growing privately, had a few contacts. Um, yeah. So I, you know, I said when we were walking on our way to, you know, we're here at the NCAA event and it's a, you know, busy and bustling and loud, uh, and on our way to turning on the microphones, I said, you know, I know your name, I've seen you around, but the brand is new.

Speaker 3: So, you know, that's kind of a old days. When did old days turned into new days or so I think around 2012 I had learned how to make vape pens, right? Like I got a guy, he was like, oh, you should be making you late because it was interesting and I didn't think too much of it. And of course it wasn't skinny enough. I was like, Eh, this is. But I didn't think about the newbies. I sent some. I sent them to New York. Um, and people loved it. They just loved it. And before you knew it, I was in Colorado with these vc guys, money in their hands looking to prop me up to make vape pens for them. And instantly this vape pen concentrate company was born in a permanent fashion. And all of a sudden it was like, I, I, so out of respect for them, I scaled back all my operations in California because I figured when they took the 10 fingerprints and uh, you know, in my med card in Colorado, I was like, Oh my God, I'm being investigated by the NSA.

Speaker 3: Like I said, my daughter was applying to the Naval Academy at the time, so I scaled back everything that was in the gray market, totally moved to Colorado to do it under my license and my built a mip. And then all of a sudden I'm traveling back and forth from La to Denver talking to everybody that I could talk to everybody, like, you need to send the first national. And you're like, oh, so what do you do? You know, everybody's talking business. I'm like, I work in cannabis. And they're like, what? I'm like weed. And they're like, oh yeah, I heard about that, you know, and just couldn't stop talking. And then of course when we got our first marketing company, they were of course trying to get me out his thought leadership. So I started talking at Ncia and started talking at Mj Biz conferences. Uh, and then yeah, I just found I couldn't shut up and I'm super passionate about it and yeah, I spent a long time schooling myself.

Speaker 3: It's like many years watching the grass grow, reading about cannabis and stuff like that for folks looking to get in. Um, as far as the vcs finding you, you finding them whatever it was, what do you think they saw in you? When you say cash in hand? It's kind of a situation everybody would want to be if they're interested in a VC relationship. What was it that they saw in you? Well, I had a couple of things. One, I was lucky, knock on wood to have a very clean record. So while I was, had depth, great depth of campus knowledge, one of the things in Colorado is you can't have any charges at all, not even a pot charge. Uh, so that was important too. I was able to get, get a, a, uh, where they call it the nod from the med to own one of these licenses.

Speaker 3: Um, the other thing is I had a very specific skillset and the ability to make vape pens, not a lot of people in the cannabis industry had that at that, at that time. A lot of countries, a lot of time, a lot of people can make concentrates in. I had the Chinese connection because I was already doing the vape pens. So it's kind of a turnkey operation for them. I'm like now lots of money pouring in a, it was a lesson for me because I jumped early and the reason why I'm not an operational control of that company is because it was just green. It was just money right now I have now like my partners and Papa and Barkley. Not only are they well funded but they also have green hearts. I. Cannabis is a real thing for them. So when did that, you know, when was the brand born?

Speaker 3: How and why? Who's Papa who's barking? So yeah. So, uh, you know, like I said, I stood up this company in Denver, Colorado and basically kind of stepped back from it in 2015 and like let them have operational control just because they weren't advocating hard enough. Right? They just wanted to make some money and I'm like, no, we got to continue to push the movement. There's a lot of things in the Colorado laws that I'm like, the concept of public use is important to me. Like I want to go to high times events like we do here in California. They also tried to come to California and didn't realize the marketing list. So I was like, okay. So I'm like, that's still my company and I'm like trying to figure out my way and still speaking and I meet my partner Adam Grossman who has a passionate story, which is why I appreciated him.

Speaker 3: He had basically made his first version or the pain balm to help his dad come out of hospice and it worked and he was already a canvas believer, but that made them a true believer. And that's who pop is. Barkley is the dog that also gave his dad comfort, so we have this bomb we're going around. He comes from the financial world, our other partner, Lee and our other partner or Ellie [inaudible] and Scott Gordon all working in the financial world, but all having really green hearts, like really, really being passionate about the plant, just never able to talk about it. These are all guys that had raised money for other things and this was the first time they did their own private thing. They went out to their friends and family and we raised a nice trunch of money. Six and a half million dollars very quickly. Last November we started getting together in around June or around this time.

Speaker 3: And then like in October we went out, asked them friends and family for some money and they gave it to us and we immediately started to pursue a compliant version of Colorado here in California. And of course he was still gray area, but we managed to in a year, secure the first permit in Humboldt county out of the city of Eureka for manufacturing. We want to high times awards, right? Uh, you know, we have professional packages on our board. We have Orrin Devinsky who's the, uh, FDA, uh, overseer for the EPA dialects trials. We have a berry, harmon, she's the former Cmo of cvs. So we have high powered professionals interacting like any other corporation. It's just that all these professionals, all our money comes from people that are passionate. They maybe have held their tongue like I did about their cannabis use and their candidates passion until it wouldn't cause, like, you know, affect their day job.

Speaker 3: But now that they've jumped in the pool, we have the full access to their resources financially and intellectually green hearts. Yeah, I lost important. Race is important because right now I would say to people, getting in, that's an important. There's lots of money. So be careful. Choose wisely and don't just take money from somebody that just wants money, that wants to be in it and make money. Making money as the American. That's our, that's, that's a given. That's the underlying thing that makes us all. We all know that's American. That's right. So you know, you, it's about making money. Who you make money with is, is, is really the test of character, right? So if somebody offers you $100,000,000, but they're like, you know, Jeff sessions, maybe you should say no. Right? But if you know somebody that you has a, has a passion for cannabis, wants to help patients.

Speaker 3: I mean, look, I believe in recreation, but everyday, especially with our women's products, I mean we strategically decided to start with wellness products. Let me say that we wanted to make sure that this was about patients and about cannabis as medicine. Recreational is a byproduct and our definition of wellness is definitely expanded. I mean, I believe that wine is part of wellness. You go home and have a glass of wine to relax, enjoy your kids and your family. That is a form of wellness. There's always potential for abuse and such, but I don't advertise that. I'm not telling people to do more. I'm offering a service offering products to help wellness, to improve your life, improve your life. We promise to talk about ptsd and veterans and ptsd in general, but on that issue, where are you? What are you doing? What do people need to know?

Speaker 3: Yeah, so I think what people need to know is that cannabis is nontoxic. I think people need to understand that when you go to the doctor, you give them a blank check, which is ridiculous, where they will give you something laden with side effects and especially as it relates to ptsd. Most people go through two or three different cycles of different very toxic prescriptions before they might find something that works for them. Usually the side effects include suicide and it's just crazy where cannabis should be the first line of defense. The first line of defense for people with Ptsd night tremors and a variety of other indications should be cannabis. Because worst case scenario, maybe you're a little sleepy and we don't use the word stone anymore. Maybe you're dysphoric. Maybe you can't operate heavy machinery. Right? But okay, those are, those are pretty chill side effects, right?

Speaker 3: Sure. Uh, so yeah, I, I think for PTSD, the first thing they should be doing is using cannabis to try to mitigate that anxiety. We know that that's one of cannabis is a primary strengths, right? And yet it's the last thing. It's not until you literally almost committed suicide that perhaps as a last ditch effort, you're getting prescribed cannabis last exit on the highway type. It's, it's not, it's not. Right. So you did use the word a euphoric. I know what that is. I get it. No, I understand. So euphoric. I know what that is. I get it. Dysphoric. Can you go ahead and define that so that I can start using it for one? Yeah. So basically what happened is, you know, in Pharma they don't say stolen, right? It's dysphoria. Basically the idea that let's say you have vicodin prescribed to you or oxy prescribed to you and this was take one an hour and you realize what an hour doesn't work for your body weight.

Speaker 3: You take two and then you're kinda like dysphoric. Right? In our world it's stone, it's just, it's just a term. Words are powerful, right? And when they say, when, you know, when I get a patient like, oh, well I don't want to get high. I'm like, drop that word right, because if you are sitting in front of a doctor and they gave you oxy and he's like, Oh yeah, you know what, you might be a little just forest, you might be a little out of it. You, you'll just take it and be like, fine, sure. Right. If he said, oh, you're going to be stoned and you'd be like, what? Wait a second. So it's like, again, it's just cannabis is coming from a different place and all the terminology around it is drug culture terminology that is used to be disparaging, right? So we can change the dynamic by changing the vocabulary.

Speaker 3: So instead of saying to somebody, Oh, you might get a little stone, you might be like, you might experience some dysphoria. Do you mean you might be a little dizzy? You mean you might be a little sleepy? It just, it just changes. It just changes the mindset. I love it. I have a feeling this is our first conversation and I hope to have more if you don't mind at all when I cut now, where are you operating out of? So I'm move around a lot. We have corporate offices in Los Angeles, we have our manufacturing facility in Eureka. I occasionally still pop into Denver. We are also producing with sage, a cannabis in Massachusetts. There are first a licensing deal, so papa and Barkley products will be available in Massachusetts. So I was there last week. I'll probably be there like in a month or two and we actually really stand it up.

Speaker 3: We're looking to partner with a helping hands in Nevada to bring our product there and then also as just professional, I haven't been to the company but I have some partners that are doing some stuff in Jamaica and some partners that are getting, trying to get licensed in Hawaii and that's all from just being here and these kinds of events and meeting folks and whatnot. Uh, so yeah, look out man. Yeah. But mostly you can catch me in Los Angeles or Eureka. Okay. Driving. Where's Eureka? Eureka is five hours north of here where we are in Oakland. So it's the real nor cal. It's almost at the border of Oregon. It's part of this area called the Emerald Triangle, which is humble county, Trinity County in Mendocino County. Arguably it's minimum 40 percent of all the cannabis grown in the nation comes from there of course. And so that's why we decided to pursue it there.

Speaker 3: It's like we, I really want to make the Emerald Triangle and definitely humbled like the Napa Valley of cannabis all. It's like you go to these areas and there's a pirate towns, like all the restaurants are great inexpensive, but the town is shitty. Like they're not getting the revenue yet. There's all this potential there. But because of the black market or the gray market, they haven't been able to access it and I want to. So we were sponsoring between every Tuesday we have a disabled persons coming into just opened our boxes. Right. And like, yeah, every Tuesday we don't have boxes come from China flat pack and we get these kids to expand them. Um, you know, we want to, we have citizens outreach for seniors. We're sponsoring the baseball team. It's like community involvement and community involvement. Exactly. Mendo by the way, given a humboldt a run for its money, these shorts and the inside world and I feel bad for them because they're so close to the grape farmers, you know, our, our industry is held to the highest standard.

Speaker 3: It's beyond generally regarded as safe. And I heard a story just yesterday about a gentleman who purchases this awesome farm. It was actually closer to an apple orchard and the apple guys we're spraying using a plane, some kind of toxic stuff and it like missed it over to his crops and ruined his crop right now. Yeah, of course apple's can be washed. They have a skin, a cannabis, an interesting fruit. It doesn't have a skin, right? So it's very exposed. It can't be washed off. It's like from dust and everything. So, you know, growing cannabis is a diff, is a much harder skill outdoors. And when all of a sudden your neighbor, you know, totally puts some pesticide on your crop that now it can't be used. It's devastating. And, you know, uh, so he's now trying to figure out how to put bushes and the, I guess there's some low flying things that can happen if his neighbor is amenable, you know, maybe.

Speaker 3: Yeah. So the cool thing about a further north is there's less traditional agriculture to deal with, but yeah, Mendo and to noma it's like, wow, those are prime spots and they have money and of course they want to pivot their money into these industries. And other farmlands want to be like, oh, well here's a new cash crop. Sure. Just the soil stuff in the air. It's going to take a while for that to happen. And I don't think that the cannabis industry should ever move back to generally regarded as safe. Uh, I know there's some argument around that. Some people are like, oh, well we're just held to such a high standard. And I'm like, so they should be held to dysphoric standard. Exactly. Alright, three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What's most surprised you in cannabis? What's most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of Dee Rowe Corps life, do I pronounce thej yet? Giro courts life one track one song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: Well, you know what, it continues to surprise me how people can be in denial. Like just straight up, like just like, just stick to their knitting like believe yet. Like jeff sessions, like just a 100 percent reefer madness. And I'm like, and meanwhile with a drink in their hand and I have nothing against alcohol. I'm just not a prohibitionist. And it's like you can't tell me the three ways, three quarters away through your bottle of wine, how bad weed is. I don't want to hear it. There you go. Everyday. Surprise because it's still happening every single day. Now what's most surprised you in your life? Um, what's most surprised me in life is a. wow, that's a big question. I like to think of it as the biggest question.

Speaker 5: Um,

Speaker 3: well, I mean, I, you know, I, I, you know, I've grown older in this business and so what you'll do for your kids, you know, and how the focus is on them. I think that if I did not have kids, well I might be in jail. You know what I mean? It's like I think that having kids grounded me and allowed me to stay a course where, you know, yeah, look, when you're in the gray market and you're already going against the grain, it's easy to get swept up in things that are much more nefarious. It was funny. Cannabis is not a gateway drug, but cannabis businesses a gateway, you are already outside the box and you have to check yourself to stay righteous. You know? So I feel like everything I've done in cannabis has been while not against the law in line with the constitution.

Speaker 3: Like I feel like I've always done the right thing. You know, I never lose sleep at night. I know I'm doing the right thing, but I was definitely presented opportunities where I could have done things that weren't exactly right. You know, not all drugs need to. Again, I'm not a prohibitionist. I do believe that adults should make their own choice, but um, I've, everything I've done, I'm proud of and uh, I think, I think my kids are probably key to that because if I was just a young man or an older man just out in the world, I might've done things. That word is honorable, you know, so I think your kids is what I see in the mirror. It's like I'm doing. My kids need to see the right face. That's who are modeling for. There you go on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be. I guess it's going to have to be free weed. The sound that they play on Danny Danny Danko podcast. Fair enough, very much appreciate it. Defender of the US Constitution, Giro court. Really appreciate it. Thank you.

Speaker 1: And there you have Giro court. Very much appreciate his service to the country. As I told him. I really appreciate talking about his thoughts on veterans and veterans work in cannabis and why cannabis works for veterans. Constitution doesn't say anything about Canada. Appreciate that point of view. Thank you for your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.