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Ep.283: Paige Figi, Coalition for Access Now

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.283: Paige Figi, Coalition for Access Now

Ep.283: Paige Figi, Coalition for Access Now

Mother of Charlotte’s Web inspiration Charlotte Figi, Page Figi returns to share the latest on the Cannabodial bills the Coalition for Access Now has in both the House & the Senate. We review her experience with CBD as it related to Charlotte’s seizures. We discuss the alternative bill in the Senate which would reschedule not deschedule CBD as Paige’s bill does. And we discuss what YOU can do NOW to aid the bill to passage by taking action and connecting with your elected officials who work for you. Finally, we talk about your patient and business CBD options in a forecasted rescheduled world but we also take the opportunity for Paige to share red flags and dog whistles to look and listen for when evaluating current CBD offerings.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Paige Figi returns, mother of Charlotte's Web Inspiration Charlotte figi Paige Figgyreturns to share the latest on the canal, the dial bills, the coalition for safe access has in both the house and the Senate. We review her experience with CBD as relates to Charlotte seizures. We discussed the alternative bill in the Senate, which would reschedule not dea, scheduled cbd as pages bills does, and we discussed what you can do now to aid the bill to passage by taking action and connecting with your elected officials who worked for you. Finally, we talk about your patient and business cbd options in a forecasted rescheduled world, but we also take the opportunity for page to share red flags and dog whistles to look and listen for when evaluating current CBD offers. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the Hana can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Pitch Fakey,

Speaker 1: and that's all I think that. Yes, of course, of course. The breakfast of champions. Did you ever read a Kurt vonnegut's breakfast of champions?

Speaker 4: No, I haven't read the.

Speaker 1: Oh, mine. That's required reading for.

Speaker 4: Okay, I'm writing that down. I'm going to read the book for.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, it's as far as like humans. If you're a human, I suggest that you read it. Okay, so in. You're one of those people, right? Yeah. I am born and bred human page figgy. I, so how do you introduce yourself if folks don't know you? Right? So I've talked to you a few times on the cannabis economy podcast. So most of the folks listening do know who you are, but you know, now it's been awhile since uh, the, the TV, right. So, uh, what, uh, you know, how do you kind of, um, introduce yourself.

Speaker 4: Most people know me through the CBD and Charlotte's Web as Charlotte's mother and the one who started the, the help start the company and that sort of thing. What I've mostly been doing since six years ago is on the political side and, and you know, keeping the tension on cbd and the information, the research and getting the word out there. But um, but yeah, mostly known as the mom, the Charlotte's mom, she's the child with epilepsy who has been using cbd for, I think it's the longest person that I know of at, at a daily dose of CBD. It's six years, but of course their cbd and every bit of cannabis. So, but the specifically what she takes and the same dose in the same oil for six years. But that's how most people know who I am, but I've been working on the political front, the same thing. I've been doing this every day for six years on the cbd issue

Speaker 1: and just, uh, right before we get to the politics of it all. Um, you know, I met, I had the pleasure of meeting a Charlotte and she's up and around and you know, absolutely engaged. And that wasn't the case before cbd, is that right?

Speaker 4: Right. That was not the case. She was a, she was in a bad state. She was in hospice. She was on oxygen and a feeding tube and we had brought her home. We didn't know how long she had left. It was really, really bad, like know catatonic, worst case scenario for epilepsy, seizing all the time. And uh, you know, and, and the whole story was that we started this, I tried this with her from, from old data, from European and Israeli data and that this was an anticonvulsant. But when I was really hoping for was it's just sort of an end of life comfort, you know, at that point it really doesn't. I don't think laws should apply when a person wants to die with dignity and so it was we didn't care that was controversial or what we were doing at the time. It was just to give this child who is in extreme agony, the end of her life is what it looked like to everybody.

Speaker 4: Give her something and it turned out that while we were giving her to comfort her was actually what was the thing that stopped her seizures when nothing else has worked in her, her medical life and she's 10 now, so she. She's running around, she's in school, she's doing great. She talks, she's eating on her own. She hasn't been in the hospital and the entire time we've used this and she's not on any drugs because they're only treatment so it's. So it's crazy story and how it started, but it's not just one kid anymore. It's like people use this, dogs and animals are using this, so it's a. it's, it's a shocking that we didn't have this information. I didn't have this ready to ready to go, ready to try as our next treatment and it was a. So I'm just trying to help continue that, get us out there for people who might want to try it.

Speaker 2: Paige Figi returns, mother of Charlotte's Web Inspiration Charlotte figi Paige Figgyreturns to share the latest on the canal, the dial bills, the coalition for safe access has in both the house and the Senate. We review her experience with CBD as relates to Charlotte seizures. We discussed the alternative bill in the Senate, which would reschedule not dea, scheduled cbd as pages bills does, and we discussed what you can do now to aid the bill to passage by taking action and connecting with your elected officials who worked for you. Finally, we talk about your patient and business cbd options in a forecasted rescheduled world, but we also take the opportunity for page to share red flags and dog whistles to look and listen for when evaluating current CBD offers. Welcome to canvas economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the Hana can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Pitch Fakey,

Speaker 1: and that's all I think that. Yes, of course, of course. The breakfast of champions. Did you ever read a Kurt vonnegut's breakfast of champions?

Speaker 4: No, I haven't read the.

Speaker 1: Oh, mine. That's required reading for.

Speaker 4: Okay, I'm writing that down. I'm going to read the book for.

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, it's as far as like humans. If you're a human, I suggest that you read it. Okay, so in. You're one of those people, right? Yeah. I am born and bred human page figgy. I, so how do you introduce yourself if folks don't know you? Right? So I've talked to you a few times on the cannabis economy podcast. So most of the folks listening do know who you are, but you know, now it's been awhile since uh, the, the TV, right. So, uh, what, uh, you know, how do you kind of, um, introduce yourself.

Speaker 4: Most people know me through the CBD and Charlotte's Web as Charlotte's mother and the one who started the, the help start the company and that sort of thing. What I've mostly been doing since six years ago is on the political side and, and you know, keeping the tension on cbd and the information, the research and getting the word out there. But um, but yeah, mostly known as the mom, the Charlotte's mom, she's the child with epilepsy who has been using cbd for, I think it's the longest person that I know of at, at a daily dose of CBD. It's six years, but of course their cbd and every bit of cannabis. So, but the specifically what she takes and the same dose in the same oil for six years. But that's how most people know who I am, but I've been working on the political front, the same thing. I've been doing this every day for six years on the cbd issue

Speaker 1: and just, uh, right before we get to the politics of it all. Um, you know, I met, I had the pleasure of meeting a Charlotte and she's up and around and you know, absolutely engaged. And that wasn't the case before cbd, is that right?

Speaker 4: Right. That was not the case. She was a, she was in a bad state. She was in hospice. She was on oxygen and a feeding tube and we had brought her home. We didn't know how long she had left. It was really, really bad, like know catatonic, worst case scenario for epilepsy, seizing all the time. And uh, you know, and, and the whole story was that we started this, I tried this with her from, from old data, from European and Israeli data and that this was an anticonvulsant. But when I was really hoping for was it's just sort of an end of life comfort, you know, at that point it really doesn't. I don't think laws should apply when a person wants to die with dignity and so it was we didn't care that was controversial or what we were doing at the time. It was just to give this child who is in extreme agony, the end of her life is what it looked like to everybody.

Speaker 4: Give her something and it turned out that while we were giving her to comfort her was actually what was the thing that stopped her seizures when nothing else has worked in her, her medical life and she's 10 now, so she. She's running around, she's in school, she's doing great. She talks, she's eating on her own. She hasn't been in the hospital and the entire time we've used this and she's not on any drugs because they're only treatment so it's. So it's crazy story and how it started, but it's not just one kid anymore. It's like people use this, dogs and animals are using this, so it's a. it's, it's a shocking that we didn't have this information. I didn't have this ready to ready to go, ready to try as our next treatment and it was a. So I'm just trying to help continue that, get us out there for people who might want to try it. You,

Speaker 1: you mentioned that she's talking and I feel like when I met her she wasn't verbal. I wonder if that was personal because she just didn't care for me. Right.

Speaker 4: So really liked men. No, no, she's, she has a severe syndrome so she's going to continue to decline by the definition of her genetic problem. It's not going to. This isn't a cure and it's not fixing her everything wrong with her, but it is calling her seizures and so she'll continue to decline. Is it, you know, she has little ups and downs but, but she will continue to decline physically, verbally, mentally, that sort of thing. But she's, they're astounded by how well she's doing. But um, but yeah, she has days where she's quiet but she's um, she's pretty chatty today.

Speaker 1: Alright. What kind of stuff does she like to talk about? Out of interest

Speaker 4: is, you know, she talks about her family, she talks about her animals. She like, he has her favorite color, she has her favorite thing. She likes to do stuff, so she also uses a computer to talk. She has a machine where she can, uh, electronic voice. We'll talk for her. So she has that as well, right? Yeah, it's tough. I mean, it's tough to watch that sort of slow decline with this syndrome, but we're, I still can't believe she's alive. I can't, I can't believe she made it a decade with how bad, how bad things were. So we just live everyday like, you know, a lot of gratitude and, and enjoy her.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Let's just enjoy the day. Exactly. Speaking to the medicine, cbd is available online for me and so I wonder what advice you would give to parents to folks that are looking to cbd is a solution. When you are looking for cbd, what are you to take into account? How do you evaluate the medicine?

Speaker 4: So this is what I did six years ago. When it didn't, it didn't exist and no one knew what it wasn't cbd. It was never dial and there was very difficult to get access to it or lab tests for that matter. So what I, I say the same criteria when people ask what should I try and how much should I do? I say just treated, and this is funny because people don't even treat their drugs like this. I would say treat it like a pharmaceutical, but how, how deep do you look into pharmaceuticals? I just had a, a climbing injury surgery and I didn't really look too deeply. The doctor gave me a prescription. You trust that. And, but there are, there are certain rules in it on a, on a drug and for, for a name brand drug it can't have more than five percent margin of error.

Speaker 4: So that's one thing I required in the seat when I first started with Charlotte. The plant from seed is, is very malleable. It can change. So I required it was genetically, um, like a, like a tissue culture instead grown in a field of seeds. And so that requires a sterile laboratory. I required a, can't have a margin of error greater than five percent. It has to be lab tested by a third party laboratory. It has to be grown, safe and organic. No pesticides or or fungus sides and that sort of thing. It has to. It can't have these things in it. If you're to concentrate these down and give it to a sick person that's potentially dangerous or fatal. We don't know. I had high standards for, for how this is done. The price can't change, the oil can't change the bottle to bottle those, those farm to farm can't change. And so I required that just like any drug she was on for epilepsy, if we went to a generic drug, these things changed and she was in the hospital. So I just treated it like a very conservative, like a drug, like pharmaceutical and research the heck out of it. And, and I would say if it's your health, if you're taking it for your health or for your wellbeing and your not sick, look into it and make sure your source is doing these things for you.

Speaker 1: Excellent. And if I, um, you know, you can get all of those things. Uh, but the medicine is still debatable. What are the red flags? Are Dog whistles even five, you know, I'm looking online, I'm looking at the bottle. It's, that all adds up. Are there any additional red flags or are um, kind of dog whistle terminology to stay away from,

Speaker 4: you know, I've been using the same source for forever. They, they list their, their milligrams. There should be amounts listed. There should be lab testing. So it, if they're growing it organically because it's not a plant that, that can be allowed organic standards yet where they can't have that organic farming standards yet. If someone's growing organically, they're paying to do that without that stamp of organic. They're going to yell that from the rooftops. So it will say grown under these guidelines and they'll shout that and they'll shut the lab testing and they'll, they'll, they'll yell these things. I don't trust that typical a multilevel marketing, you know, this is the best or any superlatives. This is the best thing on the market. This has the most cbd and the in the world that I don't trust the superlative words. They should have number, actual scientific data and numbers on there. So just dig a little deeper and I, and I don't trust anything that I can't, um, if it's not grown in the United States, it's, it's grown from a different source of him. Um, if they're shipping marijuana, if it's grown from marijuana and they're shipping that over state lines, that's a highly illegal. So, you know, just look into the company and look into the product

Speaker 1: and you did say two different things there. So I want to make sure though the one is the cannabis piece and you know, shipping over state lines. The other is international. You did say go for us grown and how come just so we're clear?

Speaker 4: Well, we can import hemp that we can import seeds and stock of him, but flowers, what we're, what we're dealing with here. So a lot of states have passed to him regulation where they can farm him and United States, Colorado. I'm in Colorado and we're now a legal state. So flower can be grown here. It's what you do with it after you've gotten the state approval that, okay, this is held, grown in Colorado. It doesn't exceed the THC levels. What you do with it after, if you choose to ship it to you in New York is the company in your decision, but, but if it's grown here, you can visit the farm, you know, they have state standards that they're pretty stringent and pretty strict requirements. So I just would trust it here. I wouldn't trust anything grown in China. They have very different pesticide regulations, if any. And so I would trust the United States and, and, uh, the, the pesticide and the spraying of the crop here versus international.

Speaker 1: There we go. And so it's also a, hey, it's made in America were patriots, right? Why not patriots small piece as opposed to large peak because then that gets into football and we're not here to discuss that. So, so now moving into the politics of it all. Um, you know, you and I have talked about the bill that you had and now we've got kind of a new round going. So, you know, uh, what I love is you're not taking any chances. You've got a house bill, you've got a Senate bill, you're, you're taking this from, from every angle. Right,

Speaker 4: right, right. And um, so the, the, the same bill as it was last session, this is the 115th Congress. The Senate bill is, is Senate bill 1008, one zero, zero eight and it's the companion to the house bill, which is house bill two, two, seven, three. And they're bipartisan. They're logical. This is US Canada dial issue. We're just talking about cbd and hemp. So there are bills out there for marijuana, for the whole plant. There's, there's bills to reschedule it. And we know if we're watching the political news about this stuff, we know about these bills and we know we, you know, if you want to really get into all the politics of passage and, and it's a Republican Congress and it's a Republican. Most of the committee chairs are Republican. It's a very, very strict Republican attorney general who is opposed to marijuana. Right? So this is a, this is the same village as a logical model.

Speaker 4: I have not changed horses. I've been pushing this exact point, I believe in many other things, but this particular thing is a logical and a in a high chance of passage. So this is how it was written with all these people involved in, in mind that said this, this can pass. We all agree with this, this isn't going against these beliefs. And so it was written with everybody involved and so that's why it's so bipartisan. It's, it's got a heavy leadership and it's, and it's both sides agree with this. And, and there's very little opposition. The opposition comes from financial people who are, who are, who want to own this for themselves, pharmaceutical companies that we can talk about that as well, but the bill just needs support. And then like we talked about last time, we talked on the phone and it's a hectic time.

Speaker 4: It the and you know, they still have a job. It doesn't matter what, what new flames are tossed into this, uh, this mess right now in DC. There's still daily lots and lots of bills that need to take to people taking a look at and lots of work to be done. And so we can get distracted and we can watch this, this TV show unfold or we can continue to keep, you know, watch it be distracted slightly, but we can still get this work done in Congress, can still get this work done to, to pass these bills.

Speaker 1: And so, you know, your bills are a, as you said, it's extremely specific as far as can I have a dial is concerned. So what, what do the bill say in, in Layman's terms? As far as what we're trying,

Speaker 4: right? Yes. It's a very, very simple builds short bill. It's not a complicated take. CBD and Clara, everyone disagrees on the legal status, but congress is not confused. They believe cbd as a schedule one drug. It is in the controlled substances act and they would like to remove it. There is no other schedule. It should be. It does not a two instead of three. There's no other definition cbd fits into. We do have enough information and research. We don't need that to reschedule it. So they agreed it should be descheduled. It should be a dietary supplement. So the bill just take cbd d schedules that takes it off. The controlled Substances Act fixes a mistake that was made when cbd was lumped in with, with cannabis. So that is, there are hundreds of things in the plant. The plant itself is listed in the controlled Substances Act. No, not each of those things is listed. CBD is not listed, but it, it, they believe and, and these are the people who write law or law want to take that out, fix this mistake and deal with, with the rest, live in a different manner, but they, they urgently want to do this with this bill. And that's all it does. It doesn't hurt anybody. No one can explain why the existing law is written as it is. Who is this law protecting to keep cbd a schedule on drug? Who's, who's abusing this.

Speaker 1: Right? And so when we speak of they, there are names that we would not expect that are associated with this best. So you know, I'm a guy that loves the cory booker idea of dea scheduling the entire plant. Let's do it. You know, he doesn't have any other sponsors on that bill, so I'll say that. So you don't have to. Let's get into the names that are associated with your bill in this Republican Congress.

Speaker 4: Okay. So the author of the House, Bill Scott Perry out of Pennsylvania. He's had parents started with parents asking for, for him to, to to sponsor and an author something years ago, couple years ago. So He's Republican and in Pennsylvania and he had before Paul Ryan, Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan was on the bill. He can't, he can't cosponsor any bills anymore as speaker, but he was. I was actually one of the first people in is I was the first person sally and I, another mom went to dc and we were the first people in his office and when he first became speaker, but right before that he had put his name on the bill and supportive it. So he's a very strong Republican. All of this. So some of the house names are kind of shocking to people. Improv probably being the most, but the senators on the bill are strong leadership.

Speaker 4: We have Orrin Hatch on the bill. Cory, it was one of the original authors here in Colorado, a Mike Lee is a very conservative senator on the bill, so we have 12 names on a Senate bill in 21 on the house bill, and we just need constituents to reach out and get more. This isn't. It isn't the big scary. Well, I have to call this Republican and I know he's against marijuana. They love this issue. They want help. They want to look like they're doing something because this is something they get a lot of calls about every day. Cannabis in general, they want to look like they're doing something and this is a. This is a perfect example of some. Maybe it's a baby step. I don't call it that. I don't call it a camel's nose under the tent. This is just, this is what I've been fighting for and been what I've seen. I've seen my own kid, her twin sister takes. This is no having seizures and just thousands and thousands of people I have seen. I seen their medical conditions resolved on this. I can't Unfi I can't unknow these things and so I, you know, it's, it's just sort of like a no brainer to do this and the Republicans agree so everyone agrees and we're just getting a little kickback from the most conservative people who who are going to do things a different way if we don't kind of.

Speaker 1: And when we say do things a different way, what do we mean

Speaker 4: for the people we need on this bill or that committee chair? These bills all have to go through the same committees and Senator Grassley is a staunch, staunch opposition to anything cannabis. He has come almost one 80 on cbd so far. In fact that he has written his own bill with Senator Feinstein, who we also need the support of and they've written a bill that we believe everyone pretty much believes that this bill isn't necessary. It is a pharmaceutical bill, so it takes CBD, it turns it into a schedule two has a timeline. It's just for epilepsy. It's just for pediatrics. It's just for a short amount of time and a drug to turn it into a drug to hand it over to pharmaceutical companies, which I think that lane should exist as well. I think people should be able to access cbd and have it covered by insurance.

Speaker 4: Absolutely, but I think they can exist simultaneously. Drug still has to go through those processes of its own to get to get approval. You don't need a bill for that. That's. That's how it's already done in this country and the company pushing this is a British company. It's not even an American company pushing this bill. They're pushing it at state by state and opposing anything cannabis or CBD specifically related for bills for Stateville passage and they're writing this and trying to pass as federal cbd pharmaceutical only built so if ours doesn't pass, if the CBD dea scheduling bill doesn't pass s 1008 and this one does and it's pharmaceutical bill passes first. It's done. It's all shut down. People cannot access this. They will probably sue everybody who is trying to market and use and sell cbd and people like Charlotte and thousands, millions of other people will will have access to what they've saved in their life and it's try. It will be. It will not end well. It will not look good. I don't know if they totally understand that, but I think they want to help. These senators are trying to help, but if you read their bill, it really does nothing. That doesn't already exist.

Speaker 1: Right. Which is what brings me to opioid induced constipation and stay with me for a minute because there's a commercial on television that I can see and it markets to me, opioid induced constipation pills and so what those are. Those are a solution to what another opioid pill that I've been prescribed has given me this constipation. So now a pharmaceutical company has marketed to me the opioid that gave me the constipation. Now we're going to take a second opioid to ta or a second pill to solve the first pill and so

Speaker 4: did the same company owned both of those drugs?

Speaker 1: You know what? I don't know. We can look into that and see, should be illegal. Exactly. But when, uh, I have taken pharmaceuticals, I have noticed that there are a tremendous amount of side effects that come along with those pharmaceuticals, which would be a clear reason to not want it to be only the pharmaceutical companies that are responsible for cbd. What are Charlotte's side effects for taking CBD Church?

Speaker 4: She doesn't have her side effects. Are she stopped seizing, right? Yes. If that's a side effect, she, she doesn't. Um, she's not euphoric. She's not high, but um, she doesn't have any site, doesn't make her sleepy and I guess maybe it wakes her up a little bit, uh, but as she takes it at nighttime as well, shakes in the morning and at night. So nothing, it doesn't have a side effect. However, I will say that I don't know her baseline because she was in a, she was unconscious when I started her. I put it in her stomach tube right in her stomach. She couldn't swallow and I wanted to show because I couldn't put it in her mouth oil. So I don't know what to compare it to. Um, I tried lowering and raising the dose, I see nothing I see no side negative side effects other than what, you know, the, the benefits we're seeing. So it's like, it's like the advil that's working for your inflammation, but without the side effects. And, and yeah, that's interesting that we are talking about poop and opioids. I was, like I said I had an injury and had an ankle surgery and I was prescribed that, so I've experienced it firsthand and was prescribed another drug for the side effect for that problem.

Speaker 1: And just to back this up, a nice companion episode to this one will be Dave Schubert from the Salk Institute who talks about drug discovery now versus drug discovery when he started, um, being a scientist many, many decades ago. Um, so now let's move on to we the people. I'm Paige, I'm listening to this. I hear Ya. What can I do? Right,

Speaker 4: right. So, so I'm not one to just shout things and be loud. Squeaky wheel without an action, without a way to do anything about it. So we've set up a nonprofit, a five, zero, one c four and it's in DC and it's pushing this bill. It's basically just pushing the bill and trying to get it done at. It's a source for people to go to, to get information into and to just go take action. We're very efficient. We don't. We know people are sick and they just want to get this, this quick, simple mistake fixed in in Washington and Oh, you can go to the coalition for access now.org and take action and you can, you can set up an auto email to go to your senators and house members and you can or you can set up an auto phone call or you can you both for your senators and house members.

Speaker 4: And you could read a script. You can add your story. You can write your own letter, you can use our email and it's, it's set up so you can get the simplest, easiest way possible. A couple of clicks or you can reach out if you, if you're in touch with your, your, um, representatives and senators on your own. You can reach out and call them and have a conversation about this, but if you want the language, it's on the website and it's very simple. So coalition practice now is the, is the nonprofit I've been help helping to, you know, write the spill and work work with all of these senators in DC and they're all in our met with all of them. I haven't met with every house member but they don't want to meet with me any floor of their constituents and people get a little intimidated but we hired them.

Speaker 4: They work for us. The best of them are doing exactly the will of, of of their people in their state. They want to know what you want and like I said before, if, if a senator gets 50 phone calls of their office and there six to 10 or three offices, whatever state you live in, if they get 50 phone calls on an issue, that is a major, major issue. That's how few people. That's shocking. That was shocking to me. Fifty calls it an issue and they are sold that this is important to their people. So that's it. And a phone call is more as quicker and more efficient than a that an email or a letter. But whatever works best for people. I don't. I think it's intimidating for people to have a conversation and with their staff members. So, but it's really simple and nothing's gonna get done if we don't ask. So

Speaker 1: there you go. So whatever level of a kind of action you're comfortable with, there's a ton of opportunities for you, right? And uh, and just do something if you, if you are hearing what page is saying and you want to be supportive of this, um, as far as the money being raised, you know? Yes. I'll take action. Um, if I, if I do donate to the coalition, this is a for the offices or for the first class tickets, plane tickets that you take or

Speaker 4: no? No, I've been, we've been doing this. We, the money goes 100 percent back right into it whenever we need, whatever materials we need or trips we need to go to DC, we, I have a sick kid. Um, and I don't have time to, to not doing this for money. I will do this until it's done. I will continue to fight even if we lose and the thought we'd give this to Pharma. I'm still gonna fight to fix this. This is a human rights issue. I'll do it for free. I'm not good at asking for money, so that's not what I spend my time on. But if people want to donate, we absolutely need the need. The effort. This is a tiny little grassroots effort. This isn't day a big pharmaceutical bill. We don't have a big pharmaceutical industry behind it because we have to pass the bill to have a legal industry. So. So it's been tough. You know, it's been really tough, but it's worthwhile. It's absolutely worthwhile and it'd be cool to see, you know, a group of people and we all kind of know each other and the in this little weird arena of cannabis and cbd, he pulled a pass a bill together. Even if it's not the full thing everyone wants yet, I think be really cool to see a tiny little, almost free grassroots effort passed something and get it through based on, on logic.

Speaker 1: You mentioned the group and there is a real group there in Colorado and now other places as well. You call yourselves medical refugees. For the folks that moved there. Right. For this, I think you were originally Colorado. Um, if I remember correctly.

Speaker 4: Yep. I've been here,

Speaker 1: but the, the medical refugees just speak to that point, you know, as far as the folks that you've met.

Speaker 4: Right. So when I first started giving us to Charlotte, she stopped seizing the first week, the first dose she stopped. She didn't see the whole first week. I waited a year and a half to, to tell that story publicly I wanted to, I didn't want to mom giving her kid we'd story but had a doctor and we went with CNN and Sanjay Gupta, but it took about 18 months to find the right source that we all agreed on and turned most of it all down. And so after, when that came out, people started moving here for access. It wasn't shipped all over the world yet. And, and you know, imagine moving with your dying family member. It was incredible to see these, these families coming here, most of them couldn't and some of them lost their child waiting to see what to know, what they could do. The families were split and have some had to stay and work and in some of the moms would bring the kid out here and so there was this community that that sort of formed and, and bonds that were made and then so it was very, very real and we got to see firsthand these kids stop seizing.

Speaker 4: It was. I mean it's, I can't, it's hard to. I'm writing a book about this whole thing right now, but the whole whole thing, but it's really hard to put it into words. Still seeing it all because it was just so clear and obvious. And in these senators in states that don't have a illegal cbd a lot, don't get to see it firsthand. They just here, they just here. Who are we? Are we controversial activists? Are we crazy? I don't. They don't know us, but it was crazy to see. So there's a lot of these families that had to move here. I, I had, we started this or set up a company and, and I stepped away from that and I started going back to those states and the deep self is where we really started and to help them pass bills and get these families home and so most of them are gone now.

Speaker 4: Most of them went back home. They passed a bill, they're taking cbd in their home state, but they can't leave the state. They, it's federally still a schedule one substance and they can't go to school and they can't get drug tested if they're a cop and they can't, they can't, if there's still problems betterly if you're on federal grounds, you can't use this and you can't ship this and you can't really, you know. So we have, that's the next step is we passed all these cbd state laws, got the family's home and now we need to pass a federal law to make it all tied together. It's really like boring and simple and that's hard to get people to do anything because it's like this boring simple plot where state reform is so fast. It's not like that in DC. And so it's, you know, it's, it's, I'm going to continue to do this and get the word out because of what I thought was like a miracle. It's like watching, witnessing a miracle and I just didn't want anyone to have to go through that. It was incredibly difficult and those, that first year of, of trying to find this for Charlotte, I just thought this is crazy. This, this is like a vitamin D, isn't this like vitamin C? And so we're making it like vitamin C and easy for people and safe and effective.

Speaker 1: That's fantastic. I just keep going. I can't wait to read the book. You know, how far along are we?

Speaker 4: Yeah. I don't know how to. I don't know. I'd have to keep going back and changing and adding something. Everything's happening so fast. You should, you should try and take some cbd for your poop issue.

Speaker 1: Oh No. I brought it up and I just, I, I do want to be clear here. I, I have no problem talking about poop with you. It was simply the, a commercial that I saw though I'm not a, a patient in need of it. Right. I just want to clear that up. It was just a pharmaceutical advertisement I saw on the television. Gotcha. Again, not a problem if I did have the issue, but, uh, thankfully I don't. I guess everybody poops. That's true. That's true. That's exactly right. Trunk. What's that? Even president trump. So we made it in here somehow. Okay. Um, so I guess to, to end on a lighter note, right? You've given us a song for the soundtrack of your life in the past, whether it's the same, whether it's different. What would you give us today?

Speaker 4: Oh Gosh, that's a good one is my mind probably. Who's that by? Where is my mind? You don't know that song,

Speaker 1: do I not? Or pixies. Oh, the pixies. Oh, so then that, you know what I was friends with a lot of women in college who were very big pixies fans. And so I feel like I understand who your crew would have been maybe in college and, and isn't that. It's a Kim deal is in the pixies. Right. And she and her sister went on to go into the breeders.

Speaker 4: Oh. And they're excellent.

Speaker 1: I mean that's on cannonball is one of the best songs of all time.

Speaker 4: Yes. I haven't seen them in concert. That's a, that's a one of my things. I never got to never get to see them, but that would be nice. It's on the list. That's what we'll do. Yeah. Page. Thanks so much. Keep going. Okay. Yeah. Thank you. Thanks for having them there. You have page figgy,

Speaker 2: so you know, go ahead and do that. Coalition for safe access dot Org. Go do something. There are some very powerful people that are behind that kind of pharmaceutical laden bill, which would not be good for the industry or for patients, etc. Etc. DavE schubert is episode two. Oh, six. Thanks to page. Thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.