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Ep.284: Stuart Titus

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.284: Stuart Titus

Ep.284: Stuart Titus

A PhD in the field of physiotherapeutics, Stuart Titus joins us and shares his experience treating patients as he says more in the British style than the US style of therapy. He continues, here in the US if you need surgery, you’ll be in the operating room tomorrow morning. But in other countries it’s as much as an 18 month wait so you have to do a lot to keep a patient comfortable and under control until they can get into the operating room. Stu shares that athletes and professional sports teams utilize this type of therapy. Athletes would come into his office in the offseason and that’s where he found out about cannabis. His patients were using cannabis to control pain, reduce inflammation and help with sleep issues- and he was intrigued.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: a phd in the field of physio therapeutics. Steward Titus joins us and shares his experience treating. Patient says he says more than the British style than the u s style of therapy. He continues here in the US. If you need surgery, you'll be in the operating room tomorrow morning, but in other countries it's as much as an 18 month wait, so you have to do a lot to keep the patient comfortable and under control until they can get into the operating room. Skew shares that athletes and professional sports teams utilize this type of therapy. Athletes would come into his office in the off season and that's where he found out about cannabis as patients were using cannabis to control pain, reduce inflammation and help with sleep issues, and he was intrigued. Walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handicapped economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Stu Titus, do I call you Dr Titus? Oh, I call

Speaker 1: you up either way. I mean it was very formal maybe at the beginning of the precinct. You know, whatever Dr. Steel is just fine. Okay. Right. Well, let's make sure we understand this, this and his phd, his phd degree of what, of what I was a phd in the field of physio therapeutics, so I treated patients, pain, injury rehabilitation, more in the British style than the US style of physical therapy. Well, let's go ahead and break that down right now. You know, because we've got the folks that listen, understand cannabis and its issues as far as the science as far as the technology, as far as the practitioning of medicine. We'd love to know a little bit more. So when we talk about the British style versus the American, what do you mean? Well, I'm talking about physio therapy, just the way that it's been taught and utilized. Now, many of these physio therapists, uh, in overseas countries really now, you know, here in the US, if you have an injury and you need a surgery, you'll probably be in the surgical room tomorrow morning.

Speaker 1: But many people overseas, it's an 18 month wait. And so as a physio therapists, you have to do a lot to keep that patient comfortable under control. Utilizing a limb or whatever to the best of their abilities until they can get in the operating room for that necessary surgery, so we learn a little different techniques and technology. We utilize them, what you might find in traditional physical therapy here in the US. Got It. Because I was a practitioner of this style and many sport teams, they're athletes on season, we'll get this type of therapy, but I was practicing with the general public and there were only a handful of practitioners such as myself doing this for the general public or the general. Basically lot of athletes in the off season would come into my office and here I found out about cannabis because almost to a person, I mean all the contact sport people were using cannabis to either control pain, reduce inflammation, help with sleep issues, and I was so impressed with the number of people using this.

Speaker 1: I said, my Gosh, okay, maybe there's some real science. Let me attend one or two of these medical cannabis symposiums. And one idea was that this was. This was going back to the mid 19 nineties. Early on. Yeah, very early before we even had a regular cannabis says symposiums, uh, here in theu , s which really started about 1998. Sure. But over time, I mean, the research on these cannabinoids are the extracts from the cannabis plant family. Absolutely incredible. I was blown away. I didn't even realize the US government, for example, held a patent on the Nih side, the therapeutic use of cannabinoids. Six, six, three. Oh, five. Oh, seven patent the oxidants, neuroprotective and all the research going on around the globe. I was just absolutely astounded. And Public Company started out in March of 2009 in California Medical Marijuana Inc. I became involved just as an investor to start with, but over time have taken on an increasingly large role with the company.

Speaker 3: AlrIght. So, you know, getting, getting back to the patent, right. Uh, when you learned about that and realized how it's squared with the fact that cannabis is a schedule one substance here in the United States and elsewhere, what did that make you think as a practitioner of medicine? Seeing patients come in knowing that cannabis was helping them, realizing that we've got it scheduled one way, but we also have a patent for it to be medicine as the federal government. W w, what did your mind do?

Speaker 1: Well, I was immediately appall because my gosh, with a huge amount of research on these cannabinoids, I, I was just absolutely dumbfounded. You know, why we're not actually doing this and that we're all really being lied to with this, you know, unfortunate war on drugs and uh, thinking that cannabis is the most evil substance on the planet. And when you study the endogenous cannabinoid system and plant based cannabinoids and how they react and you say, my gosh, these are absolutely vital and necessary nutrients for the optimal health performance of the human body. You say to yourself, how can this possibly be? And the fact that now for three and a half generations, we've all been cannabis or cannabinoid deficiency, we see the unbelievable increase in disease and pathology throughout the globe. I mean, you know, it's just kinda goes hand in hand. We're all basically cannabinoid deficient

Speaker 2: a phd in the field of physio therapeutics. Steward Titus joins us and shares his experience treating. Patient says he says more than the British style than the u s style of therapy. He continues here in the US. If you need surgery, you'll be in the operating room tomorrow morning, but in other countries it's as much as an 18 month wait, so you have to do a lot to keep the patient comfortable and under control until they can get into the operating room. Skew shares that athletes and professional sports teams utilize this type of therapy. Athletes would come into his office in the off season and that's where he found out about cannabis as patients were using cannabis to control pain, reduce inflammation and help with sleep issues, and he was intrigued. Walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handicapped economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Stu Titus, do I call you Dr Titus? Oh, I call

Speaker 1: you up either way. I mean it was very formal maybe at the beginning of the precinct. You know, whatever Dr. Steel is just fine. Okay. Right. Well, let's make sure we understand this, this and his phd, his phd degree of what, of what I was a phd in the field of physio therapeutics, so I treated patients, pain, injury rehabilitation, more in the British style than the US style of physical therapy. Well, let's go ahead and break that down right now. You know, because we've got the folks that listen, understand cannabis and its issues as far as the science as far as the technology, as far as the practitioning of medicine. We'd love to know a little bit more. So when we talk about the British style versus the American, what do you mean? Well, I'm talking about physio therapy, just the way that it's been taught and utilized. Now, many of these physio therapists, uh, in overseas countries really now, you know, here in the US, if you have an injury and you need a surgery, you'll probably be in the surgical room tomorrow morning.

Speaker 1: But many people overseas, it's an 18 month wait. And so as a physio therapists, you have to do a lot to keep that patient comfortable under control. Utilizing a limb or whatever to the best of their abilities until they can get in the operating room for that necessary surgery, so we learn a little different techniques and technology. We utilize them, what you might find in traditional physical therapy here in the US. Got It. Because I was a practitioner of this style and many sport teams, they're athletes on season, we'll get this type of therapy, but I was practicing with the general public and there were only a handful of practitioners such as myself doing this for the general public or the general. Basically lot of athletes in the off season would come into my office and here I found out about cannabis because almost to a person, I mean all the contact sport people were using cannabis to either control pain, reduce inflammation, help with sleep issues, and I was so impressed with the number of people using this.

Speaker 1: I said, my Gosh, okay, maybe there's some real science. Let me attend one or two of these medical cannabis symposiums. And one idea was that this was. This was going back to the mid 19 nineties. Early on. Yeah, very early before we even had a regular cannabis says symposiums, uh, here in theu , s which really started about 1998. Sure. But over time, I mean, the research on these cannabinoids are the extracts from the cannabis plant family. Absolutely incredible. I was blown away. I didn't even realize the US government, for example, held a patent on the Nih side, the therapeutic use of cannabinoids. Six, six, three. Oh, five. Oh, seven patent the oxidants, neuroprotective and all the research going on around the globe. I was just absolutely astounded. And Public Company started out in March of 2009 in California Medical Marijuana Inc. I became involved just as an investor to start with, but over time have taken on an increasingly large role with the company.

Speaker 3: AlrIght. So, you know, getting, getting back to the patent, right. Uh, when you learned about that and realized how it's squared with the fact that cannabis is a schedule one substance here in the United States and elsewhere, what did that make you think as a practitioner of medicine? Seeing patients come in knowing that cannabis was helping them, realizing that we've got it scheduled one way, but we also have a patent for it to be medicine as the federal government. W w, what did your mind do?

Speaker 1: Well, I was immediately appall because my gosh, with a huge amount of research on these cannabinoids, I, I was just absolutely dumbfounded. You know, why we're not actually doing this and that we're all really being lied to with this, you know, unfortunate war on drugs and uh, thinking that cannabis is the most evil substance on the planet. And when you study the endogenous cannabinoid system and plant based cannabinoids and how they react and you say, my gosh, these are absolutely vital and necessary nutrients for the optimal health performance of the human body. You say to yourself, how can this possibly be? And the fact that now for three and a half generations, we've all been cannabis or cannabinoid deficiency, we see the unbelievable increase in disease and pathology throughout the globe. I mean, you know, it's just kinda goes hand in hand. We're all basically cannabinoid deficient a. Yup.

Speaker 1: It's remarkable. So let's make sure that we understand who you are. Let's go all the way back. Where you from? I'm from long island, New York originally. Look at that sort of raised here. Close by where a lucas valley, glen cove, oyster bay area. It's very nice. Rosler. Oh yeah, right. Right. Close by. my grandfather was a medical doctor chief of medicine that glen cove community hospital. And uh, that's where I learned a little bit about medicine growing up, make house calls with doctors with the black bag, you know, make house calls on weekends and that sort of thing. And times were different so to speak. Different back then for sure. Did you know that you were going to kinda go into some sort of medicine when you were in high school? They're on long island. What were you into a. Well, I was mostly into golf growing up and played a lot of golf in high school and planning for the scholarship to a school down in Florida.

Speaker 1: You look like a golfer. Oh, well back in the day I was, you know. Okay. Right. Okay. It was fun. What was your handicap? I think I'm supposed to ask you. Well, I mean I, I won our club championship, I think it was nine times a lone island. Look at that. That was runner up in the met amateur one year. At one point I think I had a plus two handicap. Okay. So, uh, I was a good player for a little bit right now. Not quite good enough to get on the regular tour, get to the next level after kicking that around for a little bit, I decided to come back to New York and work on wall Street. okay. Where did they put you? So I was uh, well most of my career with credit suisse first boston, this bond trader and underwriter on the fixed income side.

Speaker 1: Nothing. Stock and equity and all that, but csfb correctly. Yes it is. Yes sir. All right. And uh, what did we end? Wasn't it? Uh, did you guys buy dlj or did they buy you or what happened with that? So we wound up, yeah, with all the mergers and all that. But yeah, going back, that was one of the targets are original but yeah. Alright. So, so fixed a fixed income. He said extend coming. Yeah. So what, what was it like? What are we talking about? Late eighties. So this was uh, the late 19 seventies, the 19 eighties. How old are you? Sixty one. Holy cow. You look good. Oh, well thank you. I appreciate it so much. So late. Nineteen seventies going into the 19 eighties. This is the, you know, I'm sure you've read liar's poker. Oh, laura spoke. Yeah. If I started a few years before I'm Michael Lewis did, but that was pretty much it, you know, the rise of solomon brothers, the mortgage bond market, I watched that grow up from absolute ground zero.

Speaker 1: Of course junk bonds, michael milken. Uh, but back then it was very interesting. We had some very, very high interest rates, a federal reserve chairman, paUl volcker, but decided to clamp the screws on the economy and just raise and raise and raise these rates. And so we had short term treasury bills, you know, 17 percent plus all these cds, bankers acceptances, 23, 24 percent a longterm treasury bonds, uh, you know, 14, 15 percent. And I was in the municipal bond sector and you know, obviously this was not a great time to be involved in the markets, but a very interesting to see what happened with these high interest rates and we drew a lot of money in from overseas and eventually cooled the economy down, interest rates came back down and the rest. But, uh,

Speaker 3: so what can, can you square the circle because I, uh, we hear and read all about how interest rates the fed should stay out of it and maybe not even raised interest rates. And the interest rates are about two percent something. Where are they now?

Speaker 1: The 10 year treasury bonds about, uh, you know, two point one, five percent or something like that was what, when you were trading or trading. I mean they were, you know, uh, around 14, 15 percent.

Speaker 3: So is that a lot of noise when I hear, you know, and we can't go above two point whatever.

Speaker 1: That's a lot of noise, right? Gosh, I remember you have fed funds trading in excess of 20 percent on certain occasions and all the rest. So yeah, we've really had some, uh, interesting volatility over the years, the last few years it's been relatively muted, but they can just show you what happens to economies when things get out of proportion and certainly the federal reserve has many tools to help stimulate the economy as well as dampened it. If it gets a short excessive.

Speaker 3: So we maybe it's possible that we shouldn't necessarily abolished the fit. Is that, is that fair?

Speaker 1: Well, I think that's fair to say. Should be more market barometers rather than leaders.

Speaker 3: That's fair. And I feel like janet yellen is doing that now. Right? Does that feel like that?

Speaker 1: I feel like more of a market follower and just adjust rates in combination with movements in the market, the market cycle because she raised rates yesterday, nothing happened. Right. And that's what we want is what you're saying. Be nice to have a more stable environment and all these crazy swings, all the volatility. But that's not, I mean come on, what can we let us just do what we can do? Right? I'll for sure. But I mean, it would be nice to have a little bit more money available for capital formation, you know, back at how can we do that? How can we do that? Well, I certainly think that incentives can be put back in place for businesses or tax incentives or what have you, to start businesses to hire people, employed people, people economic sense of the word. Now you see a tremendous.

Speaker 3: Were you talking about repatriation? Well, I know you're not talking about the cannabis industry in

Speaker 1: general and there we go. Tremendous developing business that truly is sweeping through America. We now have 30 states with medical cannabis laws on the books. Certainly we believe that the underground black market is about $120,000,000,000 annually just in cannabis bud itself, much less all the ancillary businesses. And you know, my gosh, if we could just legalized cannabis, this would probably foster a tremendous growth in our gdp. You see what's happening in Colorado, Washington, I mean, no sign of recession at all. Uh, housing prices are up, employment's up, people are happy. Crime is down. Uh, you know, it's just a wonder why we're not really doing it.

Speaker 3: Opioid crisis under control or more under control in those states. Ten years, 25, 30 percent lower opioid overdose deaths. It's incredible. All numbers, whether they be a leading indicators, lagging indicators or just plain numbers are in the correct direction as far as legalizing cannabis for sure. And you see the state treasuries,

Speaker 1: Washington, Colorado, where they experiment has gone so very well. I mean the extra $150,000,000 plus tax revenues for the state. Any state treasurer. I even spoke with the state treasurer and Pennsylvania and he was very broken. It was because he sees what's going on in these, you know, legal states. My gosh, why can't we do it here?

Speaker 3: Look at what we can do with all this money for sure. For sure. So, uh, then let's talk about, uh, you know, just because you're a smart guy with a suit and tie on, right? So I gotta ask you these questions so at least I have the suit and tie. That's exactly right. That's exactly right. And you know how to answer questions. I guess whether you're smart or not, that's a different. Your wife will tell me I get this right. Is that right? Yeah. So, um, so, you know, our, our, uh, our attorney general jeff sessions right after not saying stuff and not doing stuff after not saying anything and not doing anything, all of a sudden it comes out a couple of days ago. I'm sure you saw it. he writes a letter to congress saying, hey, the rohrabacher farr amendment that you guys have in there that says we can't come after medical marijuana businesses that are state legal, I'd love for you to take that amendment and rescinded because I want to come after those businesses because right. The controlled substances act of 1970 is still the law of the land. So this amendment that you have, this is very much in my way. I'd like to come after cannabis businesses. When you saw that news, what did you think? Well, you know, we've seen a few things from, uh, uh, attorney general sessions over the past few months here, and certainly, uh, he's looking to turn the clock back. We're

Speaker 1: going back to the racial segregation back in the 19 sixties and governor wallace and all the problems back then. I think we've evolved a little bit more as a society and certainly when yoU look at the majority of americans and recent polls favoring medical cannabis and even a majority of americans now favoring recreational facilities because it's gone along so well and certainly if you look at alcohol and other wayS for people to wind down after an active day, relax and start to feel good about themselves again. If you look at cannabis being 114 times safer than alcohol. Yup. And you see what's going on in Colorado. You don't see all kind of bar fights breaking out. There's a piece, decreased crime, et cetera. You just have to say, I mean is this guy for real and he's even been invited by governor hickenlooper of Colorado to come out and see, hey, this is what's going on out here. This is the economic growth this is fostering and you're going to get in the way of that. I don't think so. at least not in my state.

Speaker 3: So as a business guy, I'm asking you, up until a couple of days ago, the last thing that we had was reports from that closed door meeting and folks that are conservative, folks that are friends of mine pointed to that meeting and the reports coming out of it and said, hey look, see he's not gonna do anything. Everything's all right. So, uh, what, what would be your suggestion to business owners or folks that would like to be advocates for medical cannabis or plain old adult use cannabis in terms of what we can do as constituents, what we can do as business owners, what we can do to, to make sure that, uh, we get what we need to get, which is have the government get out of the way. Right? I mean, don't, don't conservative people like that. Oh, for sure. Definitely. Yeah. This is something if the government would just now, if he's away of this business and he's a state's rights guy, does he come after state businesses? Right, for Sure. I don't get it. I know it's a. Can you tell me what he. Can you understand what he understands or not?

Speaker 1: Cannot understand his point of view. Really, it's just totally goes contrary to all the science. So you can look at the discovery in the mid 1980 is the indogenous cannabinoid system that we all produce. Cannabinoids within us, even, uh, attorney general sessions has an endogenous cannabinoid system

Speaker 3: I know and he can't get away from it.

Speaker 1: Absolutely. And you know, this is a very large self regulatory suspects, the largest self regulatory system in the human body governing a wide range of functions. And it's interesting that the indogenous cannabinoids are very quickly degraded by enzymatic activity, but if you take plant based cannabinoids, these have a much longer shelf life. And yet once you see that these are absolutely vital and necessary nutrients for the optimal health and per function functioning of the human body. My gosh, that you know, these nutrients need to be pressed and there should be a recommended daily allowance of these vital nutrients. The fact that we're all cannabinoid deficient generally has led us down a long gray path of disease and unhealth and lack of wellness and a dependence on the community to a much larger degree than what we should naturally be and we really think these natural botanical products can really elevate not only our overall health and wellness, but also our overall level of consciousness.

Speaker 1: Uh, and as far as my level of vitamin c that I should take daily and vitamin d, you're saying we should be paying attention to our endocannabinoid system. The same one particularly and particularly these non psychoactive cannabinoids because even the us government patent mentions that there are more preferable to use because they don't have the intoxicating side effects, you know, five milligrams of thc and I'd be asleep on your floor here for probably half the day, but it took 50 milligrams cbd this morning and I'm alert, awake, functioning, etc. So that brings us to two. You guys have meds obviously operating all across the country, I would imagine internationally as well. Yes. We're in 44 countries that are nationally. A couple of south american countries have actually approved our product by dr. Prescription for the treatment of refractory epilepsy and now many other indications. So we've had some clinical study and research within Mexico.

Speaker 1: A very exciting and of course we're available online here in the us basis of your medicine is industrial hemp, if I'm not mistaken, hemp and of the non psychoactive cannabinoid cbd, cannabidiol that's been able to be extracted from that hemp plant. Where are you growing the industrial have? Where's the basis coming from? Where are you, you know, uh, is it Colorado? Is it Kentucky? Is it a Uruguay? Right. So our farming operations are in europe and basically we've started over in europe because it's more legal for the farmer to take off a more aspects of that plant from the field than perhaps in Canada. We're only the seed is able to be taken off the field. The stock has to be plowed back in and recycled for next year's crop. However, our extractions come from not only the seed but also from the stock of the plant, just because these are non-scheduled parts of the cannabis plant and we've been able to develop a high concentration cbd and these parts of the plant.

Speaker 1: Do you know, uh, bob hoban hub and very well. Yeah. So the denver, Colorado hoping in phala he's done some legal opinion workforce. Yeah. He, he speaks about the non-scheduled part of the plant, just just like you do all right. So, um, have meds, you know, kinda sometimes has a bad rap as you might have heard. Right. Well, we always get this type of a question. It's just an unfortunate thing that, uh, you know, again, we're involved in litigation about some of these activities. So I don't know if I can necessarily make as much of a comment as I would like to some point we will have more of a public comment on what can you tell us though. In other words, if, if our audience is, you know, behind this industry and they wanna see, you know, great players in the industry and want to see folks doing a great job, what can you tell them, understood that you can't comment on certain things.

Speaker 1: What can you comment on to kind of help bring us along maybe? Well, certainly this is a very new emerging industry. This whole non psychoactive cbd industry. We basically started and founded this all going back to these summer of 2012, so you know, this has been in existence now coming up on five years. The research and all is still a very, very early stage, but obviously there's great anecdotal evidence. So these families with the epilepsy children's seeing great benefit now. Absolutely no as, as far as industry and as far as the plant without question, I'm saying bring folks along on the hemp meds ride. In other words, what, what can you share with them that might kind of maybe turn their opinions around to help you out and have them? Of course, certainly a controversy, a tends to foster innovation, et cetera. I'm sure you know, all our products are triple lab tested.

Speaker 1: We have all kinds of certificates of analysis on every single batch. We've had toxicity studies done by many great companies such as food safety, net services out of Colorado, showing that there are no residual pesticides, fertilizers, uh, there's no heavy metal toxicity that are in the products now. There's no mold fungus, et cetera. And uh, we've gone and, you know, of course there are many companies have now follow this in this space, but we've actually now gone ahead and done some clinical study in research with our products in Mexico on the epilepsy children and I think we're far out pacing what's going on with the pharmaceutical development community here in the United States, were getting better overall seizure reduction all with zero side effects and the only real side effects or that families are importing, reporting better cognition, better emotion, better appetite, better sleep from their children.

Speaker 1: And these developmentally challenged children are now able to better interact with their families and with society where we don't see any of those positives over on the pharmaceutical side. We don't. I agree with you. All right. Any, any last words for folks that might still not be with you? As far as I don't know about that [inaudible] company? Well, certainly, uh, you know, time proves all the, you know, the fact that we've been able to sustain a for five years. Not only have we had controversy, but we've actually been thriving, you know, we're now in 44 countries worldwide. We have a product available by dr. Prescription in Brazil, Mexico, Paraguay, soon to be many other latin american countries. We're just moving our products forward into europe or multilevel marketing company has grown 13 times over the past 14 months. So there are many good things happening with our company or a pharmaceutical development operations and biotech, a nice up and coming biotech stock now.

Speaker 1: Nine, $10 a share, uh, with some very interesting research coming out of europe. I'm very excited about the company where it stands right now in our overall global. All right, well, I mean, you've got to do good for us to do good, right? Because you're a spotlight on you guys, so, you know, that's a. I'm glad to hear all of that. Where are you based now? Where are you living in san diego, California, in there since, uh, 2011. All right. And, uh, yeah, it's just been a great to ride or companies now in public for eight years. Certainly We trade a good number of shares everyday on the otc markets. You knoW, we're trading about 10, eleven cents a share and certainly have a very compelling story we believe for many investors. There we go. All right, still, I've got three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are.

Speaker 1: I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? I would say one of the very surprising things is the absolute, you know, looked in Colorado now 70 percent of the Colorado market are these infused products. Very interesting. What happens when you ingest cannabis? Cannabinoids? Uh, the liver, the really can maybe turn delta nine thc into delta 11 thc, a positive and negative for some people because you eat a cookie and you don't really feel it for maybe an hour or a couple hours. But I'll start loW, go slow. exactly. But once you get it just right, you dial it in just properly, you know, you see the regular cannabIs affection.

Speaker 1: Now those are all turning towards the edibles will already. Interesting trend. Totally. What about the magic of this? In other words, when those first athletes started coming into your office and now what you're talking about with the actual science of it really being astounding because we're literally built for the plant the plants built for us. Absolutely we are. If we are deficient in it, you know, we're gonna have health challenges. That's it. We even see the onset early onset of alzheimer's dementia by research from stanford university is due to an endogenous cannabinoid deficiency. That's it. And some of that a hoot. What the study did you mention [inaudible]. There was also some work write down by you suck a Dr. David schubert schumann. The cannabinoids only reduced brain inflammation, but the accumulation of beta amyloid, the toxic brain protein that leads to alzheimer's, and this is based on the characteristic or the hallmark of alzheimer's disease, and it's just been ashamed that dr schubert has been stymied in future research attempts after his initial findings.

Speaker 1: Yeah, because he can't get the medicine. Can't get the medicine of shame. I've spoken with him. He's a great guy, but yes, for sure. Him absolutely. what's most surprised you in life? Most surprised me in life is how adaptable the human body is to change. Yeah. Both physically and mentally for sure. It is. Yeah. We all seem to have an unconscious resistance to change, but a very interesting how amenable and adaptable we really are to various situations and circumstances. We're a resilient bunch. Us humans, aren't we? We are. We are on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on, I think, play some fucking music. White boy. Oh, that's a well done, stu. Thank you so much. Appreciate it. Great. Pleasure. Thank you again. And there you have to titus.

Speaker 2: So there's litigation there. Go ahead and find out about that if you don't know if you do know, it was nice to talk to stu to let him kind of share his point of view and what they're doing over there. It's all about safe patient access. It's all about responsible players. Got to make sure everybody is being responsible. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.