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Ep.285: Leonard Marshall: MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.285: Leonard Marshall: MCBA Spotlight

Ep.285: Leonard Marshall: MCBA Spotlight

Two time Super Bowl champion and organ donor Leonard Marshall returns to share his thinking behind donating his brain to CTE research. He says that he thought about the lives that could change and he thought about his father. He says he wanted to do something with his own life that his father couldn’t do with his. Leonard shares that he is a child of segregation and that he initially could not use the same bathroom or play in the same playground as white people in the south. And so, he’s interested in making a difference not based on his race, color, creed or nation of origin but make a difference as a man and empower the will of parents on their children to open up a mindset around traumatic brain injury and head trauma.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Leonard Marshall Returns to times Super Bowl champion organ donor Leonard Marshall Returns to share his thinking behind donating his brain to cte research. He says that he thought about the lives that could change and you thought about his father. He says he wanted to do something with his own life that his father couldn't do with his lender chairs, that he's a child of segregation and that he initially could not use the same bathroom or play in the same playground as white people in the south. And so he's interested in making a difference, not based on his race, color, creed, or nation of origin, but make a difference as a man and empower the. We'll have parents on their children to open up a mindset around traumatic brain injury and head trauma. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Leonard Marshall. So you've done because I don't know you that well, but I. I

Speaker 2: did last year we talked, which means you've done two things twice. One is win a superbowl and speak to me. That's true. There you go. That's true. That's true. So welcome back. Thank you. All right. The big news right is this donation thing, you know, it was big news is yesterday's news now, but it was big news but not for me. And I'll tell you why. Okay. You're putting your money if you will, or your money maker in this case where your mouth is. That's true. So how did this come up if, if you, if you allow it, how did this come to be where you said, you know what I'm going to do? I'm actually going to donate my brain for cte research. Well, I thought about the process involved with the brain donation and what

Speaker 3: lives it could change and the fact that, you know, I had such a, such a success in athletics that a part of my legacy and the legacy of my father would be the lead behind things that he couldn't and things that he couldn't do with his life that I could do with mines. You know, I'm a child of segregation. So up until 1967, 68, I couldn't use the same bathroom with you in the south. I couldn't play in the same playground with you in the south. So now that I'm able to make a difference, not because of my race, color, creed, or nation of origin, um, I can now make a difference as a man and I can empower the, we'll have parents upon their children to open up the mindset. Will young people think about when it comes to traumatic brain injury and head trauma as well as some of the other illnesses associated with playing tackle football at an early age.

Speaker 3: So the biggest misnomer, I think, to parents that put their kids in these programs is not knowing who's going to coach, train and teach their kid how to play tackle football between the ages of eight and 12 years old. It's imperative that they know that that guy is not something Monday morning quarterback or some guy that had an ax to grind because he didn't play professionally and he wants to use their kid to get that euphoric feeling that you get for me, the winning championships, winning superbowls playing and suppose are saying I've been there and done that. So I think that is, that is something that needs to be accounted for and, and be to be taken in terms of inventory when it comes alive of America's youth. Uh, we talked about coaching last, correct? Correct. So, so, like that, you know, that's the reason why I decided to donate my brain.

Speaker 3: I got Ya. But you know, understanding that we spoke about coaching last time, talked about coach parcells talks about what works, what doesn't work. Talked about the fact that he treated you guys like men, right? If I'm a parent and my kid really wants to play football and it's a little kid, you know, eight to 12, and she said, what should I be looking for in a coach? You know, you said the general, you know, make sure he's not trying to live vicariously through your kid. I should look, I should look at his certification. Yup. I should look at where he was trained. He was trained and the integrity he represents both on and off the practice field as well as the organization that he's involved with. If a guy comes from USA football, NFL certified, it becomes from offense defense, football, you know, he's an nfl certified.

Speaker 3: Okay. Uh, in most cases that he played the game and he played the game current to these times, you know, he had some sort of formal certification behind them. So because he knows what's happening on the guy to watch out for is the guy who never really did it. There you go. And who has that ax to grind or has that chip on his shoulder more or less what? He's vicariously trying to live his life through somebody else's child. Let me throw something out of left field to go ahead. Was watching Jesse Ventura speak. We got a chance to talk to him. He said, you know, the brain injuries will go down if you take the helmet's off, if you make them play with no helmets. What do you think? There's a wwe is something crazy with the. He mentioned rugby. They don't have any pads and helmets.

Speaker 3: Well, why is that misguided? That's extremely misguided. I'll say, well, the NFL players getting bigger, faster, stronger every year, right? I mean, if you look at football now, when I came into game mid, thought I was too damn big. Okay, good old bill parcell is made. These jokes about me being six foot three and 290 pounds and having a way me on the New Jersey Turnpike, these defensive tackles now at 3:50, if you're not three slash 15 plan d tackle in the NFL, you shouldn't be in the league. You're saying you used to be huge. Now you're tiny, tiny compared to, to, to, to today's play. That's it. I mean, uh, you know, I, I can think of names. I mean, uh, you know, Ted Washington, you know, uh, Jerry Ball. I mean, I get Michael Dean, Perry, William the fridge, Perry, right. Get on tons of guys that played during my era.

Speaker 1: Leonard Marshall Returns to times Super Bowl champion organ donor Leonard Marshall Returns to share his thinking behind donating his brain to cte research. He says that he thought about the lives that could change and you thought about his father. He says he wanted to do something with his own life that his father couldn't do with his lender chairs, that he's a child of segregation and that he initially could not use the same bathroom or play in the same playground as white people in the south. And so he's interested in making a difference, not based on his race, color, creed, or nation of origin, but make a difference as a man and empower the. We'll have parents on their children to open up a mindset around traumatic brain injury and head trauma. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Leonard Marshall. So you've done because I don't know you that well, but I. I

Speaker 2: did last year we talked, which means you've done two things twice. One is win a superbowl and speak to me. That's true. There you go. That's true. That's true. So welcome back. Thank you. All right. The big news right is this donation thing, you know, it was big news is yesterday's news now, but it was big news but not for me. And I'll tell you why. Okay. You're putting your money if you will, or your money maker in this case where your mouth is. That's true. So how did this come up if, if you, if you allow it, how did this come to be where you said, you know what I'm going to do? I'm actually going to donate my brain for cte research. Well, I thought about the process involved with the brain donation and what

Speaker 3: lives it could change and the fact that, you know, I had such a, such a success in athletics that a part of my legacy and the legacy of my father would be the lead behind things that he couldn't and things that he couldn't do with his life that I could do with mines. You know, I'm a child of segregation. So up until 1967, 68, I couldn't use the same bathroom with you in the south. I couldn't play in the same playground with you in the south. So now that I'm able to make a difference, not because of my race, color, creed, or nation of origin, um, I can now make a difference as a man and I can empower the, we'll have parents upon their children to open up the mindset. Will young people think about when it comes to traumatic brain injury and head trauma as well as some of the other illnesses associated with playing tackle football at an early age.

Speaker 3: So the biggest misnomer, I think, to parents that put their kids in these programs is not knowing who's going to coach, train and teach their kid how to play tackle football between the ages of eight and 12 years old. It's imperative that they know that that guy is not something Monday morning quarterback or some guy that had an ax to grind because he didn't play professionally and he wants to use their kid to get that euphoric feeling that you get for me, the winning championships, winning superbowls playing and suppose are saying I've been there and done that. So I think that is, that is something that needs to be accounted for and, and be to be taken in terms of inventory when it comes alive of America's youth. Uh, we talked about coaching last, correct? Correct. So, so, like that, you know, that's the reason why I decided to donate my brain.

Speaker 3: I got Ya. But you know, understanding that we spoke about coaching last time, talked about coach parcells talks about what works, what doesn't work. Talked about the fact that he treated you guys like men, right? If I'm a parent and my kid really wants to play football and it's a little kid, you know, eight to 12, and she said, what should I be looking for in a coach? You know, you said the general, you know, make sure he's not trying to live vicariously through your kid. I should look, I should look at his certification. Yup. I should look at where he was trained. He was trained and the integrity he represents both on and off the practice field as well as the organization that he's involved with. If a guy comes from USA football, NFL certified, it becomes from offense defense, football, you know, he's an nfl certified.

Speaker 3: Okay. Uh, in most cases that he played the game and he played the game current to these times, you know, he had some sort of formal certification behind them. So because he knows what's happening on the guy to watch out for is the guy who never really did it. There you go. And who has that ax to grind or has that chip on his shoulder more or less what? He's vicariously trying to live his life through somebody else's child. Let me throw something out of left field to go ahead. Was watching Jesse Ventura speak. We got a chance to talk to him. He said, you know, the brain injuries will go down if you take the helmet's off, if you make them play with no helmets. What do you think? There's a wwe is something crazy with the. He mentioned rugby. They don't have any pads and helmets.

Speaker 3: Well, why is that misguided? That's extremely misguided. I'll say, well, the NFL players getting bigger, faster, stronger every year, right? I mean, if you look at football now, when I came into game mid, thought I was too damn big. Okay, good old bill parcell is made. These jokes about me being six foot three and 290 pounds and having a way me on the New Jersey Turnpike, these defensive tackles now at 3:50, if you're not three slash 15 plan d tackle in the NFL, you shouldn't be in the league. You're saying you used to be huge. Now you're tiny, tiny compared to, to, to, to today's play. That's it. I mean, uh, you know, I, I can think of names. I mean, uh, you know, Ted Washington, you know, uh, Jerry Ball. I mean, I get Michael Dean, Perry, William the fridge, Perry, right. Get on tons of guys that played during my era.

Speaker 3: They will continue to be big guy. Yeah. Now there will be small guys compared to some of these kids out there now. So wide receiver or quarterback or running back, a smaller guy getting tackled by somebody like that and should have some pads. Oh, no doubt. No doubt. No doubt. No doubt. All right. Where have you gone now as far as you said that's old news. What would be newer news for you as far as cte as far as, you know, basically you're an evangelist. They were doing what it looks and all this new. I think we're coming out with new products every quarter, if not every six months. Uh, I think some of the milestones in terms of, um, uh, achievements for the company, I think, or a, a unique, uh, we're going into countries where this product was even. He'll never even introduced.

Speaker 3: I thought of, Oh, we're introducing it to new markets. Um, people are now coming to know what we do and how we do it, the benefit behind him and hit related products. Uh, some of the things we're doing, like what repairer, which is the new vape product that we have and how that's gonna, you know, change the game a little bit and open up some eyes around the marketplace. So, you know, as long as we continued to to stay green and grow, I think we'll be good. It's when we think we're ripe and began to rotten when we got problem. One more time. Say that again. I think as long as we continue to stay green and grow will be okay. It's got that were ripe. Let me begin to the rotten. I see, I see. Can you talk more

Speaker 2: about that? What do you mean? You know, how can I apply that to my own personal life? If I'm listening to you?

Speaker 3: Well, I think as long as you continue to grow as a person coming to understand new ideals, ideology, a folks to be associated with a line things up in terms of your life, your cv and what you do and not waste your time with situations that don't make sense to you in your career development, I think you'll continue to grow. It's when you think you know it all and you don't take that advice and you don't venture down the right paths in terms of your career because you think you know it all, then that's when you begin to rotten and your career goes, bye bye.

Speaker 2: We're, we're all our own worst enemy. That's true. True. So what about, you know, you were talking about a brain injury. We're talking about you know, how we can solve it. What about the NFL itself? We, we, we kind of talked about the difference between when you retired and when folks are retiring. Now. We don't have to do that again, but I'd love to hear further thoughts if you have. I'll

Speaker 3: tell you something that's crazy. Okay. I, this year I went to the brain summit at, at Harvard. Okay. And I got a chance to finally meet the Great Ann Mckee and I gotTa tell you I was impressed. Thoroughly impressed. Yeah. I'm in a room with 350 of the world's best scientists in terms of neurology and effects on the brain. I have come to know people like Andy figure from a company called OCS, ia. Okay. Which has a serum that's derived from Grelin and um, can help with concussions and help humans overcome multiple concussions, if not ct overcome it. Overcome it. How, how is that possible? The inducement of this, of this, of this drug once it gets approved? Yeah, called Grelin. Okay. G R, e l I n we got to look for. It's amazing. Yeah. Okay. Some of the things that I've come to learn that's out there right now that people are working on when it comes to concussions, Tal Protein on the brain.

Speaker 3: I'm a chronic traumatic encephalopathy and various other forms of head trauma. Something else I've discovered from him finding out how hemp can impact the gastro area. Okay. And in terms of Crohn's or IBS, diabetes, um, pancreatic cancer, things of that nature, you know, are now. So the science is there. Yeah. The scientists, they're the key now for me at election all and trying to help this company grow as, as a shareholder. Okay. Is Too. I was gonna ask to continue to strive to get to markets. Yup. Okay. And try to help us develop a double blind study at Harvard that will showcase the value of him and I'll help, can change the lives of many Americans versus synthetic drugs that are offered to Americans.

Speaker 2: Do we have to wait for that to kind of get back into conversations with the NFL? We know that they came down again saying no.

Speaker 3: Well we recently. Well we keep saying no, but you know, that knows soon to become a yes because you know, the demand is there from players. Players are the game of football. So you know, the more than players talk about what they want, what they need in order to coexist and make the nfl work for them. You know, the powers in numbers. I mean,

Speaker 2: so what would you suggest to your recently retired friends?

Speaker 3: Make noise, make all the noise. You can make all the noise. You can't talk about the value of him. Talk about the value of using thc driven products. Talk about, talk about the science, talk about the fact that Raphael Meshulum you got them. Israel. We talked to him. Okay. Right. Talk. Talk about his work. Talk about um, uh, what he has done, what they're doing in Boston, what they're doing in La, what they're doing in Chicago, what they're doing in Miami, you know, with all these different applications and testing procedures, uh, associated with trying to find a better way to bring this product to market and always keep it alive

Speaker 2: that it's got to be retired players because we saw what happened with the current players, right. Eugene Monroe gets caught. He says something. Right? So it's up to, to the folks that are retired, is that right? Is that about right?

Speaker 3: Well, I think, I think the powers and keep pushing it whether you're young or retired. What about the players association? What can we, what messaging can we do? What can we do? How do we get in there that I don't know. I wish I had that answer. I wish I had that answer. I can. All I can tell you is that the powers in numbers, the more guys that continue to make noise about it, the more guys that say that, look, I'm going to do this whether you like it or not because it's good for me. I got you. I don't want to go down the pathways of being hooked on synthetic drugs and then look at my life three years down the road and I'm thinking about popping heroin. Right? Like, you know, come on, forget it. That's just, that's just ridiculous. So,

Speaker 2: so what I got from our last conversation, what I'm getting from this conversation is, you know, you kinda gotta make sure that you know what you know and behave accordingly. Right? Correct. So I would imagine you're a big fan of personal liberty, meaning being in charge of yourself. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. I take full responsibility. What would you suggest to folks that, uh, liked to argue about politics? So wasted time. There you go. Keep talking. This is a waste of time. That's wasted time, wasted time because you know, it's just a waste of time. I'll keep it clean, keep it pg, know what I mean. Either either left or right. It doesn't matter. You know, it doesn't really matter. You got to think for yourself and thankfully, so if you're go ahead,

Speaker 3: they got to think for yourself and you got to apply yourself or inject yourself into a situation whether it's a whatever it might be. I'm not even going to discuss one particular item, but whatever it might be.

Speaker 2: What about, and let's just go back to your playing days and coaching and when you were really, you know, kind of a, you were the young guy to begin with and then you were one of the older guys as far as kind of a, what you learned as a player and then what you were kind of coaching as a player, uh, to, to the kids coming in. What were your, what were your messages to them as far as, you know, you gotta you gotta be here for practice. You got to be here for you know what, what is the. What is the thinking?

Speaker 3: My message to young guys coming into professional football is understand what is going to take for you to get to three years with three ballgames because at three years and three ball games, you become vested, which means that now your benefits kick in as as as a national football league player. Got It. You got to get to, you got to get continuing education. You gotta get to a four, one k, a second career savings plan, a pension, the pension, and then continuing education, which is dumb. The pay for three years of your college once you either leave the game or while you're in the game trying to get your degree, right, so you got to get three years, three ball games. The other stuff you've got to get, you've got to make sure that every year you're in the game, you get a copy of medical records and records that go to University of Michigan every year.

Speaker 3: You need to get a copy of that. Interesting. Why do you say that? Because in those reports will be your medical history. How many times you been concussed? I mean knee injuries, back injuries, shoulder injuries, how many time you had the ice yourself down, what injuries you ice yourself down for, how many surgeries you had? Who was a doctor performing those surgeries? Who was a doctor that checked your knee, your back, your hip, your neck, your spine, your feet, your ankles, your toes. How much toridol where you're injected with to play the game? Did you put a donut on your right rib cage? Did you put a donut on your left rib cage? You see all these interests. I'm talking about absolute. Okay, so these are things that should be critical to you, but that most young kids, because they don't understand the dynamics of. You're in a bit. This is a business for these people. Sure, okay. When this apple care perform and there's no use for this apple your whole day, chuck it and throw it in the Trashcan, nothing happens to you as that paid athlete out there on the football field during the course of your career. Why do you think that

Speaker 2: was? Tom Brady's wife that told us about the fact that he had some concussions throughout the year that we might not have known that.

Speaker 3: Bam, that's a damn good one. And it stumped me today. It happened because it happened that day. I made my brain donation. That happened the day I made my brain donation. What do you think's happening there? What are you doing though? I wish I knew. I don't know. I wish I knew though, but I don't know. I, I myself, I'm my own spokesperson. I got you. Let them do that. Right? But you go shopping. I hate to be like that.

Speaker 2: No, but what you're saying though is if you're glad that information is

Speaker 3: out there, that he did have concussions and pay more attention to it. And what the heck's going on here to tell you it is. I bet you bill bellacheck wasn't too happy about that. I'm sure he wasn't and I'm sure a craft wasn't too happy, you know what I mean? Um, all right. So, so there we are with kind of what we need to be doing a. There we are with what you are doing. Uh, as, as you make your way into the second half here, I know you're doing the elixir and stuff. What else are you focused on? What, what does, you know what, how can we help you? I'm launching a medical device backs. I'm launching a safety device. It's not a medical device. Scratch that. It's a safety device and this device will be in the hands of every male and female that finds themselves in a position where they feel threatened or, or open to civil or sexual assault on a college campus.

Speaker 3: Okay. We've developed my partners and I have developed the tool, a device and I'll show you what the device looks like and there'll be sold to every college and university across the country to the colleges themselves. Yeah. It's called a smart goal. So it's like right in the palm of my hand. This is no bigger than your Keith, the key or whatever your key fob for your car. I got you. So you'll put this device on your key ring. Yep. And what it does is it covers your entire campus. So picture that, that's a map of Lsu. There you go. Okay, that map shows you all the blue lit areas of Lsu, the blue, the blue lit areas being areas where they're most susceptible to crying. Okay. Okay. So it'll be partnered with department of law and public safety on every college campus to to prevent crime on campus.

Speaker 3: Yeah, so the biggest thing right now at city schools is the transgender and gay communities. Also the way fraternities and sororities act on college campuses in terms of hazing and the like the Rub, right? Sure. Okay. So we want to prevent some of that stuff from going on. Department of law and public safety on these campuses want to prevent some of that stuff that's going on. They want to be able to control the environment and control how much data goes out to the public. This device gives them a chance to do that and it democratizes the data. It gives them a chance. Now, what's unique about my device? It's not Bluetooth driven. It is not. Not Bluetooth driven. Doesn't need a cell phone. Does it require you to have to have an APP on your cell phone to use it? You Ping the device. We know within a thousand feet where you are good vertically, horizontally, we know where you are, up to 10,000 feet.

Speaker 3: There we go. Okay. Now the real uniqueness about it is I am the CEO of this company. Oh, there we go. And I'm in the process of renaming the device right now. We just hired a marketing team yesterday to come in and build this. This company will be partner with verizon, sprint, t mobile and t or one of the big guys. Perfect. They will also retail this product off their stores in their locations throughout the country. So the device is sell about $100 a unit and a recurring revenue recurring revenue for us. The cost monthly for the service is about 10 bucks a month to the campus, to the, to the kit, to the kid until the person Kit Carson. And uh, and we think that a more than 10 to 20 million to 30 million kids, uh, have that device on your key chain.

Speaker 2: There we go. So you're making things a little bit safer. I appreciate that being a passion. Absolutely. A safer for a brain injury as well. We understand why that's a passion. That's right. Let's. If you don't mind as far as the disproportionate effect of the war on drugs on minority communities, what are your thoughts there? I mean, how much do you think about that and how much will legalizing cannabis and you know this is the second time I'm seeing you out of Canada.

Speaker 3: Yeah, right? No doubt. No doubt. I think it will have a profound effect. I think if you take that element out of this and you make it safer and smarter for people to use it and people understand or come to understand why this is available to them, I think you'll change the game and if you look at some of these companies that are out there like mass roots and some of the others that are out there that you'll see where there's some validity to that statement that if you take the crime on a sale at the sale of marijuana, I think you'll. You'll see that

Speaker 2: that will regenerate kind of communities and take the. The kind of the finger pointing away

Speaker 3: because the man. Why does not the drug that's selling selling crack right now, one is to start selling crack. They're selling heroin. Yeah. They sell in a crystal meth that's selling all kinds of crap. Not this, not this, not this.

Speaker 2: Um, as far as so, you know, I've worked with the minority cannabis business association and, and uh, you know, that association is focused on minority ownership within the space, right? You got that name right. You know what I mean? You walk in, you got that face, everybody knows you. What about other people of color and kind of getting involved at an ownership level or at least at a high level in organizations in, in cannabis?

Speaker 3: Well, knowledge is Kima. Front knowledge is key. I mean, the more you read, the more you can identify yourself with this product in terms of knowledge and education and branding and awareness and be able to articulate your message and your delivery in terms of why you're doing this, who you're doing it for, and what's your end game with it. I think that that will now help someone to understand it. Come to you to want to purchase this from you. There you go. So know what you're bringing to the T. I know what you're bringing to the table in terms of what you're selling and you need to know it. If not, if not better than the guy that sold it to you. You're dancing, you know well enough to sell it to someone else. So because the product is the product, what makes it unique is your ability to articulate to that guy why you think he can use this product and for how long he can use it.

Speaker 3: What about just general business, kind of a, an acumen stuff. You know, you, you were smart guy. Um, so you kind of know how to do this business stuff even, you know, when you were a player, what are the three bs? There we go. What are the people, places and perspective. What do you mean? Know the people you're getting involved with, meet them at the same place that they are. You meet them at that same place, see where they are, where they are, and understand the perspectives of why you're doing this or you're doing to change your life, what you're doing it to make money. You have to change their lives and be honest about it. Why are you there? Why are you there? And if you line all that up and it doesn't make sense, walk away. But if it does go balls to the wall because you can only get better if you're in. Go Ben. That's it. That's it. All right, so final question. You, you might have a, you might remember the song you gave me for the soundtrack of your life last time. It might not either. It's the same song or a different one on the soundtrack of your life. Leonard Marshall, one track, one song. That's got to be on the soundtrack of my life. Wow.

Speaker 3: What would be the song? What's the song? Roy Is. Everybody loves the sunshine. That's a good one. Yeah, there we go. Let Martin appreciate it. All right. Got To do this more often than once a year, right? Absolutely.

Speaker 1: And there you have Leonard Marshall. I love the answer to the question. You know what? What can you do? What should you be doing? Talk about the value of using hemp in Thc, German products. Talk about the science. Talk about Dr. Raffi on the show. I mean that's Leonard Marshall known what he's talking about. So I appreciate his time. Appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.