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Ep.289: Max Zavet, Emblem

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.289: Max Zavet, Emblem

Ep.289: Max Zavet, Emblem

From an undisclosed location in Toronto, we have a casual conversation with Max Zavet, the CEO of a publicly traded licensed producer in Canada. As an introduction, he discusses the Emblem logo which features Artemis the greek goddess of nature, but we move into a conversation about the licensed producer community in Canada and how Max and his partners were early entrants into legal cannabis- they were the 15th group. Max explains how back in 2012 he was reading press releases on how the government was considering changing from a grow your own system- the MMAR- to the more tightly controlled and regulated system we have today the MMPR. He was dead set on being involved, and he found a way to do just that.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: from an undisclosed location in Toronto. We have a casual conversation with Max Zappa at the CEO of a publicly traded licensed producer in Canada as an introduction and he discusses the emblem logo, which features optimists, the Greek goddess of nature, but we move into a conversation about the licensed producer community in Canada and how Max and his partners were early entrance into legal cannabis. They were the 15th through Max Explains How back in 2012 he was reading press releases on how the government was considering changing from a grow your own system, the NMA, or to the more tightly controlled and regulated system we have today. The MMPR, he was dead set on being involved and he found a way to do just that. We're going to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Maxavenue. Suitable both. Now you've

Speaker 1: got four eyes on you, man, because you talk with your hands is what it is a little bit. Yeah. No, but it's stupid. Like the whole political thing is, is dumb. I'm sure of it. And, and here's how I know this right? I've now, here's why I think that I've now I, I read a spectrum of news, so I got my Apple News App, right? And, and everything goes in all the way left all the way right in the middle over here, over there. I read it all and I'm quite sure that most of the people that are giving me information about what's happening every day in the, what do we call it, news are just trying to like, uh, you know, get me crazy one way or the other. Just poke. Yeah, they're just poking me. That's all. Who are the winners and losers from today? What happened today? That's what I'm looking for. Max. Thank you for allowing me to a rant before I even introduce you. Max Zavidow, correct. I mean, that's a good name. Come on, you got an x to Z, you, it, you got

Speaker 5: three syllables. Maxavenue, although believe it or not, um, you know, when you were picked, uh, uh, to be on the baseball team or the hockey team in school or, or, or it was a, you know, you were picked for anything in class. Uh, having the letter z was a awful for teachers that went out in alphabetical order and sure, but it wasn't too bad when teachers alternated between, uh, between alphabetical and the reverse. Right. So backwards alphabet Max's first today. So I had some of those teachers and call them a more democratic ones and there wasn't so bad then because I'm Adler. I was always at the front. You got it. I graduated and I graduated third in my class. Congrats. Well because of Jennifer Cardy and Marnie Adler, right? Nothing to do with grades. No, definitely not. I was further down as far as that's concerned.

Speaker 5: Now, same here. We are here in Canada. I like to affectionately call it Canadia. And by the way, you multiple times said Z and not said. Are you considering your audience? I am. Okay. So it's a zed y, y, zed. That's the airport said. Yeah. I just want to make sure. So it said a V, e t? Yeah. I often say it's a zebra, apple, victor, Edward, Tom, which of course it is, which of course it is if you're an air traffic controller, uh, your colleague, Lupita, who's wonderful, has just brought us water. That was parched. I mean, this is just wonder, but she brought me one or two. I mean, come on once. Exactly it. And that'll be it by the way. So you'll hear it later. So what are you doing here? Um, well, I've been graciously invited by you to come and talk about cannabis and.

Speaker 5: Oh, I don't mean like hearing. Oh, okay. Okay. How did you just show up with that microphone in your head? No, no, no, no. Emblem health. What do we need to know? Um, what do you need to know? Well, I think we're one of the most exciting, uh, licensed producers in the marketplace today. We're a publicly traded company. Take that Bruce Linton. Yeah, you got it. We got a three main verticals. We have a high quality flour production vertical that will merge or, um, uh, evolve into the adult use market flower production. We'll talk a little bit more about that later. Would you call that craft cannabis? Um, I would call it high quality cannabis. Why are you not calling it craft cannabis? Craft cannabis generally is a moniker we give smaller operators and we're going to be a pretty large operation, but we will be employing a grow methods that are similar to what craft growers do because we'll grow in smaller scalable rooms. Craft cannabis at scale. You got it. So by the way, pay it forward. That's for you guys, but you have to credit me. So it's craft cannabis at scale by Seth Adler and emblem. Maybe we'll have a sep adler strain.

Speaker 2: from an undisclosed location in Toronto. We have a casual conversation with Max Zappa at the CEO of a publicly traded licensed producer in Canada as an introduction and he discusses the emblem logo, which features optimists, the Greek goddess of nature, but we move into a conversation about the licensed producer community in Canada and how Max and his partners were early entrance into legal cannabis. They were the 15th through Max Explains How back in 2012 he was reading press releases on how the government was considering changing from a grow your own system, the NMA, or to the more tightly controlled and regulated system we have today. The MMPR, he was dead set on being involved and he found a way to do just that. We're going to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Maxavenue. Suitable both. Now you've

Speaker 1: got four eyes on you, man, because you talk with your hands is what it is a little bit. Yeah. No, but it's stupid. Like the whole political thing is, is dumb. I'm sure of it. And, and here's how I know this right? I've now, here's why I think that I've now I, I read a spectrum of news, so I got my Apple News App, right? And, and everything goes in all the way left all the way right in the middle over here, over there. I read it all and I'm quite sure that most of the people that are giving me information about what's happening every day in the, what do we call it, news are just trying to like, uh, you know, get me crazy one way or the other. Just poke. Yeah, they're just poking me. That's all. Who are the winners and losers from today? What happened today? That's what I'm looking for. Max. Thank you for allowing me to a rant before I even introduce you. Max Zavidow, correct. I mean, that's a good name. Come on, you got an x to Z, you, it, you got

Speaker 5: three syllables. Maxavenue, although believe it or not, um, you know, when you were picked, uh, uh, to be on the baseball team or the hockey team in school or, or, or it was a, you know, you were picked for anything in class. Uh, having the letter z was a awful for teachers that went out in alphabetical order and sure, but it wasn't too bad when teachers alternated between, uh, between alphabetical and the reverse. Right. So backwards alphabet Max's first today. So I had some of those teachers and call them a more democratic ones and there wasn't so bad then because I'm Adler. I was always at the front. You got it. I graduated and I graduated third in my class. Congrats. Well because of Jennifer Cardy and Marnie Adler, right? Nothing to do with grades. No, definitely not. I was further down as far as that's concerned.

Speaker 5: Now, same here. We are here in Canada. I like to affectionately call it Canadia. And by the way, you multiple times said Z and not said. Are you considering your audience? I am. Okay. So it's a zed y, y, zed. That's the airport said. Yeah. I just want to make sure. So it said a V, e t? Yeah. I often say it's a zebra, apple, victor, Edward, Tom, which of course it is, which of course it is if you're an air traffic controller, uh, your colleague, Lupita, who's wonderful, has just brought us water. That was parched. I mean, this is just wonder, but she brought me one or two. I mean, come on once. Exactly it. And that'll be it by the way. So you'll hear it later. So what are you doing here? Um, well, I've been graciously invited by you to come and talk about cannabis and.

Speaker 5: Oh, I don't mean like hearing. Oh, okay. Okay. How did you just show up with that microphone in your head? No, no, no, no. Emblem health. What do we need to know? Um, what do you need to know? Well, I think we're one of the most exciting, uh, licensed producers in the marketplace today. We're a publicly traded company. Take that Bruce Linton. Yeah, you got it. We got a three main verticals. We have a high quality flour production vertical that will merge or, um, uh, evolve into the adult use market flower production. We'll talk a little bit more about that later. Would you call that craft cannabis? Um, I would call it high quality cannabis. Why are you not calling it craft cannabis? Craft cannabis generally is a moniker we give smaller operators and we're going to be a pretty large operation, but we will be employing a grow methods that are similar to what craft growers do because we'll grow in smaller scalable rooms. Craft cannabis at scale. You got it. So by the way, pay it forward. That's for you guys, but you have to credit me. So it's craft cannabis at scale by Seth Adler and emblem. Maybe we'll have a sep adler strain. I

Speaker 1: am into that and I feel like it would be a sativa high thc here. Exact, well, very energetic, you know, before it doesn't necessarily even need to be high thc, but it's absolutely a sativa. I'm with you there without question. Okay. So a craft cannabis at scale, which by the way, when you see the logo later, it's going to say that what is going on with that logo? By the way, the red thing, is it two people fighting each other? Well, I've, I've only seen it in passing. Yeah, or is it like someone trying to get up from a chair, know that you should take a better look at it. It's, it's a logo that is a little

Speaker 5: for than, than at first glance and it is artemis is the Greek goddess of a nature nurture. The hunt. Fertility is pat herb's and she's always depicted with a stag. So the, uh, the creature beside or is, is a stag and there's an e in the antlers for emblem which is a little, uh, it's not obvious which I like. So there's layers to it and there's a story behind it. Um, which is something that's a unique as well and we're already that you just told, which is optimistic Greek God of health and wellness. We tell her story as well through our marketing. Um, so if you sign up to a newsletter monthly, you can find out about Artemis is journeys through her gardens and elsewhere.

Speaker 1: That is a good idea. I want to sign up for the newsletter. Well done. Well, consider yourself signed up. Why are we, we have your email, uh, why are we not called Artemis then?

Speaker 5: I'm artemis is a great name, but at the time we chose a name that was um, uh, straddled more, straddled more the, uh, medical and the, and the adult use potential adult use markets. So we felt emblem was, uh, a little bit more, uh, more medical sounding, I'd say that's fair and any, a reasoning for the actual word mom other than it sounds more medical than I think a emblem is something that people are proud to wear something there. And that's something we're about, right. We're not a, we're not ashamed if we're cannabis users. Uh, we're trying to break the stigma. We're trying to make it mainstream and make it a everyone and not a and not how it's been portrayed for the last hundred years, you know, the reefer madness and all that. So, uh, that's very much a part of what we're trying to do. Um, in terms of the branding and the logo and the name. Yeah. Is that people can wear it proudly. It's an emblem, right? Um, and, and yeah.

Speaker 1: So you're one of these licensed producers. Yes. Correct. How many could there be? Not a lot. Now there's about 50 that have the right to cultivate. Okay. Well, what number were you? Do you remember? Yeah, we were number 15 eye a number 15.

Speaker 5: Right. Here's the thing though. You look like this normal guy. I'm a normal guy, right? I'm like, yeah, but you gotta have like a substantial amount of money to be number 15. I'm a no. I mean I've, I've invested a lot of money into this business and I'm not taking a dollar out. So, uh, that's not the case. I'm still working at it everyday. What I'm getting at Max is that early on, uh, you know, uh, they were handing out licenses and by that I mean Health Canada under your former prime minister, I believe his name was Howard. Stephen Harper. I mean, I believe his name was harper. And um, how did you set yourself up for this? Because you had to be in the know of what was going on to be number 15. Anybody in their brother could, you know, put themselves in for a license now, you know, it'd be number 51.

Speaker 5: Yeah, that's a good point. Early on I did find out through press release and they're setting some stuff up here. We're in Toronto at an undisclosed location and so, you know, we've got the people there setting up the stuff and we can't really tell you more than that. But that's the clicking, setting up the stuff. Yeah, exactly. Alright, so go on. I think the stuff's have been set up stuff. Maybe he's got a couple more. So, uh, back in 2012, I was just reading news releases that the government was beginning to, uh, consider changing the laws with respect to how medical marijuana was going to be produced and sold in the country. So it was going to evolve from a grow your own system that was abused and was proliferating at a, uh, at an exponential rate. Um, and uh, and there was no quality assurances on the product.

Speaker 5: There was no standards for potency, um, or other microbial pathogens and all that other good stuff. So that was. So that was the mma are all good intentioned, but a kind of took off like a runaway train is what happened exactly in. And then storefronts began to open up as well, people had dispensary's and there was, there wasn't any control, uh, with respect to the product, um, and taxation and all that kinda good stuff that the government wants to make sure that there, there is. Um, so yeah, I mean, you know, I out of the gate, as soon as I found, found out that the government was doing this npr, Npr, I, uh, started to look into the business and I'd met with someone that was preparing himself for the MMPR and he had an mma our facility. Unfortunately I couldn't do the deal with them. And as they say, sometimes the best deals are the ones that you don't make. And this was definitely the case, uh, with this individual. He did end up getting a license and he was one of the first good, but now he's no longer in the business, uh, so, uh, you know, and, and

Speaker 1: I, and I was able to found a licensed production facility as well. Um, so, you know, all came kind of serendipitously and, and, you know, having a meeting the right partners who share the same vision was important. Um, not to say that there wasn't challenges, there were many challenges, but, you know, here we are. I'm trying to, or executing on our plan, uh, with respect to what we promised shareholders. So early on you were paying attention to what was happening and that's literally how you put yourself in a position to be where you are now. In other words, not everybody was paying attention to what was happening and you were one of the people that was, I was paying attention and I was willing to, um, to put my money where my mouth was and, and I was investing early on in, in to the project or into projects and, and regarding your unrealized relationship.

Speaker 1: That also goes with interpersonal relationships. Some of the, uh, some of the interpersonal relationships that we don't pursue. Uh, there's, there's good reason for that, right? Correct. Yeah. I'm talking about love, of course. Talking about love. Yeah, you have to be really careful. That's a, uh, that's a partnership, uh, that, that can cost you a lot more than any kind of business brochure. Yeah. That can cost you the most. Are you married? Yes, I am. I see. Do you have children? I do. I see how many, uh, two boys. A four year old and a two and a half year old. And the, those were the ages of the boys that you mentioned. So it's not two boys and then a four and a half year old. No, no, you're absolutely right. Undisclosed to gender. Okay, fair enough. I mean, it's 21st century. Sure, exactly.

Speaker 1: I'm here to support you. That's all I care about. So, and I said you by the way. Thank you. Did you say you, um, do you ever see my cousin vinny course? Yeah, one of my favorite movies. Really Great. Really Great. Classic. So how though Max, where you and I'm going to try to get this answer without kind of getting too uncomfortable. How'd you have enough money? Right. So that's the question that I, I'm not gonna ask you right now. Where are you from? Toronto. Okay. So four, one, six, you got it. All right. Or the six? Thus six. It's called thus six. Called the six. Now why? Well, because there's a 400, six in her area code and uh, there's a, a rapper by the name of drake. You might've heard of him. Yeah. Yeah. He coined the term and apparently he's the god of the six and enough I see.

Speaker 1: I, yeah, you can. Now I've, I've, I've showed my cards. I'm not a drake fan. No, sadly. So some people will see that as a weakness and that's fine. They may kick you out of Toronto. Just warning you. I love and respect him. I mean he's kind of a Jew. Yes. Yeah. So like I'm on board with that as a minor. So Zahav it. So. Alright. Actually Rabinovich probably that's the greatest answer that I've ever heard. All right. So you're from Toronto, you grow up in a nice Jewish community of course. Right. So what were you into as a kid though? Um, as a kid I loved sports, loved baseball. Did you play? Yeah, I played baseball recreationally, but with some, uh, with some, uh, select and a rep in there, but for the most part very recreational position. Did you play like to play the infield first base or second base or you left handle guy?

Speaker 1: No. Oh, just because you're tall. First base. Yeah, it helped with the stretch. Got It. And then second base catcher as well. Somewhat now some backup catcher. What, what are you calling it? Catcher. Yeah. Why are you saying the extra thing? That's the Canadian way of saying. Are you serious? Yeah. Okay. So like, um, so like a Gary Carter when he was on the Montreal Expos would have been a what? A bad catcher. Broad Osmosis was on the Toronto Blue Jays, I believe at some point. I'm not sure who was the Blue Jay's catcher when you were growing up? Um, it was pat borders. There you go. He was a bad catcher back catcher. That's crazy. Is it t? Bat Catcher, ck Catcher, catcher. That's ridiculous. No need. There's no reason for that. All right, so you did a little bit of back catcher because you're a smart guy. You can kind of be a field general.

Speaker 1: Sure. Alright. So, but what in terms of your mind worked like as you got into high school, when, what started started to turn itself onto you as far as subject matter and. Yeah, I mean in high school as you know, as a kid that was kind of lost. The I didn't really belong to with, with the cool kids. Are The jocks or uh, any subculture that you usually find in. In high school. Huh? No label, no emblem to speak of. No, that's a great point. Thank you. And uh, and, you know, uh, but um, but I hung in there and I did what I had to do to get through in university. I matured for sure and kind of came into it, came into it, um, and, you know, experience lots of travel and um, lots of partying and lots of having fun. And I liked it.

Speaker 1: Some people went to um, you know, higher learning and really studied a subject and came away with a degree. I on the other hand, went to college. Yeah. So I came away with an understanding of life and that's what you're talking about, kind of. Yeah. But I did end up in law school. Uh Huh. Interesting. And then did you follow that through or not? I did. Oh you did? Yeah. You are a lawyer. I am a non practicing lawyer. So it's like you have to pass the bar up here. It's always different. You don't have to pass the bar. And is it provincial? So you're a. yes. Okay. So you passed it in Ontario? Correct. Okay. Uh, yeah, I actually found that a law firm called Lavie Savin let me give it a plug. Loads that at is still operational. Still operational. How's Levy? A Levy is amazing partner. Yeah, definitely. Um, okay, good. So he's still working. Is he in cannabis in any way? Uh, no he's not. All right. When did this. All right. So now you've, you're smart guy. Lawyer. Right now we're starting to understand where the money's coming from. And Are you wincing because I'm calling you a smart guy?

Speaker 5: Yeah, because I don't consider myself a, a, maybe a smart and in the traditional sense, but yeah, I am smart in streets,

Speaker 1: smart streets market, absolutely. Sure. Also, I think as far as smarts are concerned, um, it's a lot like the asshole theory. Are you familiar with the asshole theory? Not really. If you are familiar with, Lupita is kind of familiar with the asshole theory, if you, do you think that you are at least in some way an asshole that's. I'm asking you that question directly. I've been told that I'm an asshole. Can you see that point of view? Yes. Yeah. This means that you're not truly an asshole. Only true assholes don't think that they're assholes. And so in terms of intellect, you know, if you've got a little bit of a, you know, differential, yes. If you're humble about your intellect, it probably means that you're smarter than the guy that's like yield. Never believe how smart I am. That's flattering. Thank you. You're welcome. And that was all from a wince is where that came from, whence that came. Uh, so, so. All right, so we got the law firm and then you turned to levy and your like body.

Speaker 5: I said, buddy, there's a, there's a wave coming and I grab your surfboard. Sure. And, um, because the, the, the, uh, by the way, the waves in Toronto, amazing surfing, huge, terrible. Uh, not to get stuck in the undertow, but sure. No, um, yeah. I said, you know, grab your surfboard. This is going to be, you know, this is going to be big, this is going to be huge. And I believed in cannabis. I used cannabis medically for some degenerative disc disease that I have, so I have a lot of stiffness and, you know, it was hard for me to exercise and a quality of life was definitely affected. So that's why I was using cannabis for medical purposes. Um, and uh, you know, at the time Levy didn't see the same opportunity but still agreed that there was an opportunity, uh, in it. Um, so he supported me, um, and you know, I supported him and uh, and I went off and started this project initially was still from the office, but I quickly. Isn't it a project? Pardon? Isn't a project a project? It's a project. The project. Are you sure? Yes. All right, fair enough. Go on. No, that's you are. And I was just interrupted

Speaker 1: for no reason. I was just trying to make you sound like you're Canadian. I am. Right. But I mean people say project here. Yeah. You say projects a project. Yeah. You, you're like a fake. You know, you're, you're, you see the American in front of you and you're like, I'm going to make this easy on you. A what? What do you say? I say projects the. I thought that the Canadian project kit like the heavy. Oh, what's new? New New. That's little bits of saying that Max says no boots. You don't know. Sometimes she's checking human. She's checking your all right. So, so, and that's how you have money and that's how you have this and that's where we are right now. More or less. In other words, not every single person can get an LP license, even if you're number 15 is all I'm saying.

Speaker 1: It was extremely tough. Uh, you, you did work. Yeah. The course was tough and I had to raise the cash that's in. I didn't raise all the cash myself. I had to find partners and my partners have to find partners, uh, or at least the fine people that were interested in investing in marijuana startup with a lot of uncertainty. You have to be in certain circles is my point Max, right? Well, I think I got my credibility for sure by being a lawyer. I think that went along way. So when I was in the boardroom with potential partners or talking to people about business, I already came with some credibility. So yeah, I think that was, that was pretty important. So here we are, it is the, let's call it third quarter of 2017 when we're talking, even though podcast land knows no time, right? We are trying to make our way into a full federally mandated adult use program, which still from my American lips sounds fascinating and amazing to me.

Speaker 1: We are, are we, as far as Canadian cannabis is concerned, how well is the medical program going and what still needs to be done before adult use Kinda hits? Yeah, that's a great question. Um, the program's growing at, uh, at, uh, also at a really high rate. I believe it's somewhere around 10 percent per month as far as patients as far as patients. Excellent. Um, so that's really promising and I believe today there's about a hundred and 50 or 160,000 patients in the system. Um, I think the, uh, the, there is obviously a big challenges with respect to recreational or adult use is I like to call it cannabis, which our prime minister is slated for July, first of 2018. Um, I right now the industry, I just, I put my finger up and you're so polite. You're Canadian. You stopped. Is that still a realistic date? Uh, I believe it is. The big problem is going to be the supply of, uh, of cannabis. Sure. You heard about what happened in Las Vegas and now imagine

Speaker 5: that times are a country tons of country. Exactly. So, uh, yeah, I'm fearful that, that that's going to happen and we're not, we're not ready for that. I'm the Canadian government is trying to license more licensed producers and that's why you've had such an uptake in the last couple of years, but it's still going to take a licensed producer a couple of years before they're running on all cylinders and producing the kind of cannabis, uh, that's a salable to our market. Yeah. So what about the governmental machinations of what has to happen? So I've heard about the House of Lords, uh, who are, by the way, unelected, which I guess is the way they do it in England as well, whether the senators, I guess, I guess they would have the final stamp of approval, but it's a relatively, just a, uh, a formality. They don't actually have any because the way it was told to me, it wasn't just a formality like we have to worry about.

Speaker 5: This is what I was told. It's got to pass through the House of Commons. But is that the bigger piece? Right. But the liberals are, the liberals are the majority, but they've been disbanded. No. As far as the House of Lords is concerned, there are no. Right. What was I just fed a line of nonsense. You might be adding the UK a confused with Canada. Right? I got you. You guys already did the brexit thing I guess for a long time ago, back in the forties. Now I eat. Well, I guess I'll do that. Yeah. I, I'll have to do more homework on what I'm talking about as far as the House of Lords in the House of Commons Commons. Just just quickly take us through exactly what needs to happen. Well, they came out with a draft, a bill, the cannabis act, I forget the name of the bill at this exact moment, but it's called bill see 45.

Speaker 5: Lupita. There's always a, there's always a letter and a number attached to these bills. Sure. To keep track. So, um, they've, they've put that forth. It's making its way through the House of Commons also for final. It's not in its final form. So they're still working out a lot of the details. It's the legislation can pass in time, that's not what the issue is. The issue is going to be the fact that the provinces like Ontario, British, Columbia, Alberta, they're left with a task to figure out how distribution is going to work, doing everything you are doing, the heavy lift more or less health Canada saying, you know, we have these rules and we're going to make some changes and have a federal, um, federal framework in place. But Hey, provinces with respect to how people are actually going to get it, that's up to you. And then it's also up to the provinces whether they want to change the age limit and whether or not they want to do plain packaging and then figure out public consumption as well. Details, details, details. Let's just quickly though, as far as your prime minister is concerned, there's the House of Commons. What else is involved? Just to make sure. So are there any other houses? There's, there's the Senate, have those are senators. Are they elected?

Speaker 1: No. Uh, oh. So that your center is called the House of Lords in England. Probably. I'm not sure. Who knows. Stopped talking about the House of Lords, it doesn't happen here, but we have a senate and it is not elected. You got it. And those folks are not necessarily, uh, you know, heavily liberal. Well, not necessarily, but they also don't typically oppose any legislation. It's just kind of rubber stamped. So we got to worry about the house comments, then we got to worry about the provincial level. So now let's talk about Ontario versus BC. I know that there are other provinces, but systematically it's traditionally, this is the way BBC is thinking, this is the way Ontario's thinking everybody else's kind of, somewhere in between, right? Or on one. Whatever. East Coast, west coast. Hell yeah. So as far as Ontario is concerned, since we're sitting here, what are you getting as far as how the province is looking at what will be coming to them?

Speaker 1: Yeah, we're involved in the provinces consultation process. So we're getting an inside look. I'm, I am encouraged by the fact that the provinces actually having consultation process. You're a well in advance of next year's date. Well about a year before next year's date. Um, and uh, but, but you know, uh, I can see that the province has just basically scratching the surface in terms of understanding the issues are understanding what Health Canada is proposed with their draft legislation. Um, especially when it comes to retail and distribution. Talk about it. What can you say about what is happening? So I think I'm a popular notion is that the cannabis would be sold the same way liquor is sold in the province, which is through a control board. The control board not only facilitates all the purchase of alcohol and the province but also runs all the retail in the province. Right? And where are we as far as actually putting the cannabis in the liquor stores?

Speaker 1: Yeah. So I don't think that's a good idea. And uh, I'm sure there's some people in government that might think that's an all right idea, but you know, the risk profile for both alcohol and cannabis goes way up when they're consumed together. So I think that's terrible. I take on it. Here's my take on it. What's going to happen, especially in theU , s, is that cannabis is going to get blamed for alcohol. In other words, I get my cannabis in my alcohol at the same shop, right? And I have a drink and I have whatever else. However I take my cannabis, I have that. And then something bad happens. And what was in his system? Cannabis. Whoa. Of course, that was cannabis as fault. Well, no, no, that was alcohol. His fault. Right? So, uh, the blurring of the lines here. I think if we're speaking to adults, you should be able to do this. Um, however, I feel like we need to help people. Yeah. Separate these things. Exactly, exactly. And I, and I think

Speaker 5: a lot of people that choose cannabis are, are, are choosing it as an alternative to alcohol. Um, and they may have a problem with alcohol. So there's that too, you know, you don't want to bring them back to the alcohol, right? Come get your solution to your alcoholism. Yeah, exactly. At the liquor store, the liquor store. So, uh, with that, I totally, uh, don't, don't get. It doesn't make any sense. And the other thing is, you know, there's so many varieties of cannabis, uh, different forms of cannabis, the people have to be knowledgeable that are selling it, um, and that are having conversation with customers that are coming to buy it could different potency ranges, different cannabinoids, different smells and experiences. So you know, these things are important. And, and uh, these are the things that a current, even the illegal operators are providing. So you, you brought it up.

Speaker 5: So I'll continue. There was of course project Claudia here in Toronto. I was here the day after that happened and folks were, let's say up in arms on every side of the whatever, however they think about that issue. Moving over to BC though, we do have operators that are licensed by the province, licensed by the city of Vancouver, licensed by the city of Victoria. And it's just a different setup as far as retail is concerned. What have you heard from across the country? It's interesting. First off, I think there are probably more operators that aren't licensed in the vein talking about what I want to talk about. Yeah, sure. But I'm fair enough. They have their own issue with licensing process and it's not a, let me not, let me make sure that I'm sorry for interrupting, but let me make sure that I do not make light of that.

Speaker 5: I am for safe patient access. Right? And so if folks are playing by the rules, I'm into it. If folks are not playing by the rules, I'm not into it. If you, if you don't mind, if we could talk about those licensed operators. The retail establishment is where we, as far as, you know, having those folks be a part of this whole thing. I'm in favor of those folks being part of it. I think if as long as everybody plays by the rules and the regulations and then they should be given an opportunity to get a license. I'm with Vancouver. It's interesting. If you look at the numbers, the lowest participation in the MMPR program is coming from British Columbia. You could arguably say they're probably the heavier consumers, uh, or, or consumed the most, at least anecdotally or historically, and the, according to a lot of the, the um, uh, the, the consumer reports, they're probably the least likely to participate in a legalized market. No, not obviously it's still participating in cannabis, just not illegalized market. So, um, when you go to a store in Vancouver, uh, even a licensed one by the municipality for business license, sure. Um, you know,

Speaker 1: uh, the, the public sees those outlets as selling out as well and not being true to the British Columbia culture, which is to have a grow operation than in the Okanogan valley and to get straight from, from the dealer, right? Or, or the growers are well and then there is home grow. There's, you know, there is a place for that. Definitely. Um, I can, I can tell you home grow is not as easy as people think it is. Good luck is what I always say. Enjoy yourself. Yeah, it's a hobby and much like home brewing and home, a home, a winery, a make it or home wine making isn't a, a large stretch that those industries, we don't think home growing would be a threat to the candidate, to our cannabis industry. Here's the thing, and that's exactly what it should not be and that's why we're talking about it that way as opposed to I'm a home grow and I have, you know, 700 plants. No, you're not a homegrown. So, um, here's the thing that I would say to my friends who think that, uh, you know, not being licensed or you know, having some 700 plants is a homegrown stopped driving your car because there are all sorts of regulations that are around you and the car, right? So if you don't want to follow any of those regulations, you can't drive your car.

Speaker 1: So let's talk about safe patient access in a well regulated market so that everybody gets the medicine or wellness that they need and quit kind of, you know,

Speaker 1: talking about selling out, right? Let's actually just create an industry and do this as it's supposed to be done. Agreed. Okay. I'm glad I got one guy on board going across the nation. Um, and a bachelor for Prime Minister of Canada. I'll never win against this guy. He's so dreamy. It's ridiculous. No, it's seriously like he's too good looking. And then he's got the, the quantum computing thing. Did you see the clip of the quantum computing where he explains quantum computing? Of course Labeija saw it. It's ridiculous. You can't be also smart if you're going to be that good looking. I think these are the basic rules that should be in place. Maybe Seth Adler for Lord of the House. That's whatever one I don't have to get elected to is the one that I should be at. It's exactly right. Uh, or the, as the Groucho Marx theory goes, I would never be part of a club that would have me as a member.

Speaker 1: Which is true. So I have three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of your life? Max [inaudible] or Max Rabinowitz. One track, one song that's got to be on there. So first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? You said that you came to the plant as a patient, which I love what's most surprised you in cannabis along the way here? You know, I thought I knew a lot about cannabis when I started, you know, I knew all there was the no, uh, and,

Speaker 5: and the amount there is to know and actually understand from the medical side to the growing side, the cultivation, uh, the process, um, to, uh, to, to the consumers, right? And uh, and the consumers who use it recreationally and the consumers they use a medically. Um, I mean it's just a fascinating world and everyday I'm surprised I'm a to see new and encouraging studies on cannabis, new information, um, and to discover people, uh, using cannabis from all walks of life for very different reasons. Um, and people that, you know are not what cannabis users are traditionally I'm a purported to, to look like or be so, you know, I'm, I'm encouraged by that and encouraged that I'm not the only cannabis user who's a high functioning family, a guy who's a, also a nonpracticing Jew and non practicing lawyer at the same time. I'm a whole lot of things that I don't practice being exactly.

Speaker 5: But uh, but I do practice being a great person and, and, uh, and wanting to execute my vision and dream of having a great company. I love it. You also said, I thought I knew that result to know, um, that is never true no matter who you are. Yeah. I'm, I'm, I, I, I know all there is to know about x. no, you don't. Well, I think one of my strength is definitely the, I know that I know nothing. Exactly. Again, back to the intellect. What's most surprised you in life? I'm most surprised me. Um, uh, I think, yeah, having children is sorta the, the, the biggest life changer that that can happen. Um, and it affects obviously all parts of your life, your social life especially short, but as well as your professional life, um, and as well as your priorities, um, you know, that all fundamentally shifts quickly. Um, and you don't see that coming until, uh, until they're born until they get here. So on the soundtrack of your life, Max, one track, one song that's got to be on there, a move, bitch, get out the way by ludicrous. Oh my God. So, uh, my goodness, this is a, this is a wonderful kind of exploration of continuous improvement by Max says avid. How about that? You got it. Thanks so much man. Appreciate it.

Speaker 2: And there you have Max Zap it and you're punchy host, clearly felt pretty comfortable around Max sand. Uh, it might have also been at the end of a long day, but he was an excellent sport, a very, very good sport and we covered a lot there. So very much appreciate his time. Loop time, your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.