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Ep.290: Julie Dooley, Julie’s Natural Edibles

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.290: Julie Dooley, Julie's Natural Edibles

Ep.290: Julie Dooley, Julie’s Natural Edibles

Joining us from her mother’s house in Wisconsin, Julie Dooley returns and Chickie her mother does join us at a few points throughout the discussion. As a reminder, Julie was diagnosed with celiac disease and cannabis was suggested to her as a solution. She did take cannabis and it immediately helped her with diet as well as pain management. She also had a friend in need and they both then created a company producing healthy cannabis snacks. But that was nearly a decade ago. Eight years later Julie realizes that the past has served as R&D. She’s now set to expand into multiple states. But it’s not anywhere close to easy. Julie takes us through a true understanding of what it means to be in cannabis business for yourself in 2017.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Julie Dooley returns joining us from her mother's house in Wisconsin. Julie Dooley returns and shaky. Her mother does join us at a few points throughout the discussion. As a reminder, Giulia was diagnosed with celiac disease and cannabis was suggested to her as a solution. She did take cannabis and it immediately helped her with her diet as well as pain management. She also had a friend in need and they both then created a company producing healthy cannabis snacks, but that was nearly a decade ago. Eight years later, Julie realizes that the pastor served as r and d. she's now set to expand it to multiple states, but it's not anywhere close to easy. Julie takes us through a true understanding of what it means to be in cannabis business for yourself. In 2017, welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American Academy. That's two ends of the word economy. Julie Dooley,

Speaker 4: chicky made me eggs with potatoes and Zucchini. Okay, well that sounds fantastic. And chickie, who is chicky? Chicky is my mother. I want to see. I'll show you chicken. Okay. Because we're on facetime so we can say hello. How are you? You or your daughter is wonderful. I know that. I feel. I feel like she had to have celiac because she was too perfect. It made so much better, but we blamed my mother for them. Right.

Speaker 1: Of course. Mother mothers, of course, always wrong.

Speaker 4: Well, it's, it's hereditary. So let's, let's actually start there because you and I know each other for a long time and you were like episode. I don't know, but it's a single digit, I think. Number nine. There you go. So I, let's review and make sure that we understand, you know, how we have the pleasure of Julie Dooley and you, you, you like to say yours truly here in the cannabis industry. Right? So, you know what's, what's the old story?

Speaker 5: Yeah. God rest his soul mate. She's just shaming in that. My, my stepfather made coin that yours truly. Julie Dooley. Okay. What's going on?

Speaker 4: Well, what was the. Yeah, so you know, all the way back when, how, how did we get you here in the cannabis industry?

Speaker 5: So you're right. CELIAC was the, was the, my um, was the reason why I entered the doorway in the first place. Now going back before that though, sad to remember that I am a dad had and I got the privilege of following them around as a young girl and an older girl. And now I'm in love with John Mayor. Thank you for bringing some good dead tunes. But anyway, so the point being that cannabis was not scary to me, it was very much open to it and it wasn't like somebody told me, oh, try a try. You have Celiac, tried marijuana with that. It was just like I got diagnosed with Celiac. I was changing my diet, my entire lifestyle basically. And um, the kids, we're not babies anymore and a friend of mine grew it, so I was like, you know what, it's been so long.

Speaker 5: Let me just try it. And it was like, it was having the first hit and opposite. So when you, when you're undiagnosed CELIAC, it's really painful and egg. I always looked like I, um, I was nine months pregnant, always bloated and my house, we called me bloated Mary for years, but I, and I only weighed like 100 pounds by the time I was diagnosed. So now's a healthy. I'm adult. I'm 125. So that was really, I was really too thin. So the pain and the fact that I couldn't eat and marijuana, you know, of course it's a good for um, it's great for diet. Thank you. So, uh, first hit and all of a sudden it was like somebody had poked the balloon and it was instant and I felt wonderful and it was like, all right then add to the fact that there was a friend who also had a need.

Speaker 5: And so, you know, it's like once you have a friend who's doing it with you, it's, it's awesome. And she, so you, I've told you about kate, my cocreator, she was um, had the brain tumor removed successfully and then left with nerve damage that was kind of painful at times. So, and she needed longterm was relief. So add the fact that I was just consuming canvas on occasion as needed for Celiac. And now I had my friend who actually she needed a daily at this point, that's where we decided to create the butter, the cannabutter because we wanted something to screen. We wanted something that a parent, um, you know, could consume and the kids didn't even know what just happened there. Medicine, right? Um, so what law now actually today or two days ago, we brewed the 500th brew in the kitchen.

Speaker 1: Julie Dooley returns joining us from her mother's house in Wisconsin. Julie Dooley returns and shaky. Her mother does join us at a few points throughout the discussion. As a reminder, Giulia was diagnosed with celiac disease and cannabis was suggested to her as a solution. She did take cannabis and it immediately helped her with her diet as well as pain management. She also had a friend in need and they both then created a company producing healthy cannabis snacks, but that was nearly a decade ago. Eight years later, Julie realizes that the pastor served as r and d. she's now set to expand it to multiple states, but it's not anywhere close to easy. Julie takes us through a true understanding of what it means to be in cannabis business for yourself. In 2017, welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American Academy. That's two ends of the word economy. Julie Dooley,

Speaker 4: chicky made me eggs with potatoes and Zucchini. Okay, well that sounds fantastic. And chickie, who is chicky? Chicky is my mother. I want to see. I'll show you chicken. Okay. Because we're on facetime so we can say hello. How are you? You or your daughter is wonderful. I know that. I feel. I feel like she had to have celiac because she was too perfect. It made so much better, but we blamed my mother for them. Right.

Speaker 1: Of course. Mother mothers, of course, always wrong.

Speaker 4: Well, it's, it's hereditary. So let's, let's actually start there because you and I know each other for a long time and you were like episode. I don't know, but it's a single digit, I think. Number nine. There you go. So I, let's review and make sure that we understand, you know, how we have the pleasure of Julie Dooley and you, you, you like to say yours truly here in the cannabis industry. Right? So, you know what's, what's the old story?

Speaker 5: Yeah. God rest his soul mate. She's just shaming in that. My, my stepfather made coin that yours truly. Julie Dooley. Okay. What's going on?

Speaker 4: Well, what was the. Yeah, so you know, all the way back when, how, how did we get you here in the cannabis industry?

Speaker 5: So you're right. CELIAC was the, was the, my um, was the reason why I entered the doorway in the first place. Now going back before that though, sad to remember that I am a dad had and I got the privilege of following them around as a young girl and an older girl. And now I'm in love with John Mayor. Thank you for bringing some good dead tunes. But anyway, so the point being that cannabis was not scary to me, it was very much open to it and it wasn't like somebody told me, oh, try a try. You have Celiac, tried marijuana with that. It was just like I got diagnosed with Celiac. I was changing my diet, my entire lifestyle basically. And um, the kids, we're not babies anymore and a friend of mine grew it, so I was like, you know what, it's been so long.

Speaker 5: Let me just try it. And it was like, it was having the first hit and opposite. So when you, when you're undiagnosed CELIAC, it's really painful and egg. I always looked like I, um, I was nine months pregnant, always bloated and my house, we called me bloated Mary for years, but I, and I only weighed like 100 pounds by the time I was diagnosed. So now's a healthy. I'm adult. I'm 125. So that was really, I was really too thin. So the pain and the fact that I couldn't eat and marijuana, you know, of course it's a good for um, it's great for diet. Thank you. So, uh, first hit and all of a sudden it was like somebody had poked the balloon and it was instant and I felt wonderful and it was like, all right then add to the fact that there was a friend who also had a need.

Speaker 5: And so, you know, it's like once you have a friend who's doing it with you, it's, it's awesome. And she, so you, I've told you about kate, my cocreator, she was um, had the brain tumor removed successfully and then left with nerve damage that was kind of painful at times. So, and she needed longterm was relief. So add the fact that I was just consuming canvas on occasion as needed for Celiac. And now I had my friend who actually she needed a daily at this point, that's where we decided to create the butter, the cannabutter because we wanted something to screen. We wanted something that a parent, um, you know, could consume and the kids didn't even know what just happened there. Medicine, right? Um, so what law now actually today or two days ago, we brewed the 500th brew in the kitchen.

Speaker 4: There you go. Alright, 500. So congratulations on that big deal. And that brings us, that brings us to today and the reason that you and I are talking is because we spoke the other day and I'm like, how's things going? And you know, you're one of these, you're one of these cannabis people that's just raking in a tremendous amount of money. The euro, you're participating in the green rush and you're like, uh, this rich person now because you've been doing cannabis for a ton of years, right?

Speaker 5: I'm dripping in gold and diamonds right now. Absolutely weighed down with it.

Speaker 4: So just share with folks, you know, the over the past few years, just share with share with folks you know, where you are now, and what your business actually is so that we can actually get a true, a real understanding of what a cannabis businesses in Colorado in the middle of 2017.

Speaker 5: I'm so glad you asked that question set because that is the perception that I am raking it in and I have, you know, we're vacationing and we're doing all this wonderful things. The reality is I'm at 75 to 80 hours a week. Um, I haven't had a paycheck in over eight months right now because I'm reinvesting everything into the business. So, um, we're doing a scale up for production and requires new equipment, requires extra hands on deck. So I've gone through a ton of transitions in the kitchen, kind of experimenting with a large team. Okay. So the mistakes I made were I should have hired one expert for sales, not my friend who wanted to help me sell and learn like I, I love them and they're women like myself. And so that's what I thought would work because, you know, this is a product for women like me also for men like you.

Speaker 5: I mean, for anybody who really cares about cannabis for that matter, but I didn't know that back then. So I, I feel like 2000, 11, 2012 were really my years to um, create a product to master the art of an edible and whatever that means. So it was consistent, potent. Every time I made it, it was identical. That's what like 2000, 10, 11, 12 really were about 13 was, um, my year to kind of just like throw up and put anything out, everything out, you know, we were just throwing stuff out, meaning products meaning skews like let's try this, let's try that. Let's try the different marketing techniques, different ways to talk to people about it. And my problem was, is that because of my history and genetics, I went, added really scientifically and from way back when I was yelling at people that they needed to.

Speaker 5: It should be strain specific. You should never be combining strains and you should always, um, you shouldn't have sugar with it. You know, here I am like this is a 2010 people are like, I just want to get high now. Fast forward to 2017 off somewhere. People are like, well, I really don't want that because it has sugar. Great, and now you're, you're on the right path. And now, oh, Julie's has strain specific. Holy Moly. That's like genius. So Pe, so I'm enjoying right now. People are finally starting to catch on with the reality that you shouldn't be mixing a cannabis was sugar and you should be able to have it straight specific. But so dialing back just a second, like in I said in 2014. So we go rack and I hire my friends to sell disaster. People would tell him no and that cry or they're not.

Speaker 5: Salespeople know tufts skin, you know? And then I didn't know what to say because my expertise is not in sales at all, right. My expertise is finance and genetics and I know how to formulate. So it was like, I'm great amount of lessons. I, you know, I'd love to rewind now knowing what I know to avoid all those mistakes. Having a huge kitchen staff was another nightmare because all you had were people stepping on toes. I mean the classic too many cooks in the kitchen now literally. But the thing about it is, so I have one cook in the kitchen, one had shop, Angie corwin while Angie called now, um, because she got married, but that's it. And then you have a sous chef, but, and then you'd have these packagers that I bring in, you know, and just say stand here and wrap this for eight hours every day for five days a week and within two weeks all of a sudden they're like, well I have an idea, I want to make this and I, I have cooking skills and I want to do this.

Speaker 5: And it's like, I love that but I don't need you for that. So I kept having more and more and more employees that would do that to me. Like they'd start at the bottom wrong and they've looked at Angie and be like, well, how soon can I ever job? And that it is never, never like, so now I learned my lesson. You hire somebody. And first I went through literally and fired everybody that was not at Angie's level. Her work ethic is like mine, 75, 80 hours a week. She wouldn't even blink. She do it in my paid for that, which I felt like overtime. So

Speaker 5: I make, you know, I really keep her at 40 hours and she needs it because being a head chef, managing that level that she's doing right now, I really take it seriously that she takes her brakes. I forced her to go on vacation. I literally had to pay her to go on a vacation because she refused to leave for her honeymoon. Even. Forgot I had to like force her to leave. So that's the work ethic that I'm dealing with and she's leading the team. So anybody who was a slacker we got rid of. Yeah, forget about it. And, and now we have a core team of five and that literally is all I'm probably ever going to need because now we're at the level where instead of an employee, we get a machine and, and maybe someday we have so many machines, I need somebody to help run the machines.

Speaker 5: But right now I have a girl that's actually very mechanically inclined. Um, I love how I found these people. Like Ashley, just for instance, here's a high school graduate, she came to me with just the packaging skills. So she thought, okay, that's all this girl thought she was ever where she comes from a meatpacking, the Greeley, which is the meat packing land of Colorado. That's all her family's ever done. She's Hispanic. They came from that high school. Graduation is all they did. Well, meanwhile, this girl's genius in math, like genius level, just never recognized until she sat down with us time and time again. And I'd be like, well, how did you just figure that out? And she was like, well, I don't know. I just did this and this and this. And I recognized her talent. So as her boss, it's been a true joy to watch her go up in the ranks and now she is mechanical.

Speaker 5: Uh, she, she, I mean if she went to college, she could easily be a mechanical engineer. She's that brilliant. But I'd keep her, she's not doing any school anymore. He's just a genius. So at that thing, like there's a packager, she didn't come to me and want to make anything. She just kept coming to me with ideas. Like I figured out how to do it faster. I figured out how to tweak the machine so it cut it better, you know, this is, this is helpful to Julie's job here. Here's how I can do my current job better. Hell yeah. And now she's gotten race after race. He just had a baby, had maternity leave, like love, love this girl and she will not. Now she's also, um, I trained her. I wanted her to become an expert with metrics, you know, the seed to sale tracking of course.

Speaker 5: So now I'm teaching her to have this, this asset on her resume. I mean, she could literally go to any state right now. She is an expert with veterans tracking, knows the program in and out, can foresee things that are needed and, um, and can tweak that program better. So this is the perfect type of person. And, and, and so I, I love it because God forbid Julie's goes under, I feel like my core team right now has such a level of expertise. They're all gonna go be manageable level in this industry wherever they want for that.

Speaker 4: So let's just make sure we understand how, uh, you know, the, the, the kind of, the size and scope of what you've got going on now. You mentioned how many folks are working for you? Are you just in Colorado? Are you looking outside of Colorado?

Speaker 5: So, yes, that's where we are now. So I finally pared down. I have a core team. I have a real sales manager who has real sales. It's night and day. I mean literally learned how I'm, I'm getting sidetracked again, but just like, you know, if somebody says no, he was like, oh no, no, I don't accept that as an know and told me how to get past that. No. Now he's trained me actually to be a much better salesman, so it's really just the two of us. I kept it with just Patrick and myself. Well, sales, we have our skews down. We know how to scale up as orders come in, we know how to prepare for that. So the idea was to make this model in California in Colorado that I can literally take the box now and I can go to California, which is our venture 2018.

Speaker 5: Hopefully by January will be there. It'll be small in the beginning. I don't know that all my skews will make it and that's fine. We, I, I'm also weary about all the regulations that are conduct come in afterwards. So I, that's being rezoned like there's most likely just going to be two Sku's entering California in the beginning. Let's get our feet wet. Totally. The territory that I'm a, the group that I'm working with is in palm desert, so they're doing their full build out with their full mip, full grow, you know, the whole nine yards and they just been licensed so they anticipate that facilities ready. I'm in January and with that though I brought in, I was just telling my mom about this. So Julie's now white labels, so I have actually three labels in the kitchen and a one skew is called happy too. And it is a Taffy, you know, about high chew, the Candy High Chew.

Speaker 4: No. Oh yeah, I've seen it in a convenience store. Sure.

Speaker 5: Do it. Yeah. It's Kinda like a starburst. Um, so I let these guys come in. I loved, um, um, they let me add some fat to their recipes so we added some coconut oil and bumped it up in potency and all of a sudden you have a really effective candy on the market and because Julie touched it, there's sugar in that. I still don't love a product like that, but I love these guys. I love what they're doing and they're promoting the product demo themselves. Then I have a third, um, skew, um, team. It's called K J l compounds. Now that is an awesome, awesome product line. It's tincture capsule, a gel cap, which is a new technology. Julie's is going to be the first in Colorado. Did launch that and then um, we invented, I'm a candy for them and uh, we are co branding a new item that I can't talk about yet, but the NFL, we hope the NFL is going to be one of the promoters of this product.

Speaker 5: It has to do with exercise. It's very much a julie product when you see like hell yeah, that was Julie. No sugar, high protein, you know, the full gamut that will be available that the reason why I love kgl compound is it's going to, every product will have three skews, 30 to one, 15 to one and a one to one ratio of CBD. And I'm very medicinal. He has a back story with this son, the Kingsley, who's this extraordinary child that's defeated every odd, like he should be dead, but he's nine years old. And so he, you know, I just loved everything about what these guys were bringing to me and I needed. I wanted more skews in the kitchen, but I didn't. I was done promoting. I'm done spending money on it. I'm just done. So let these new guys come in and spend all the money right and improvements, any new employees, it's all on their dime.

Speaker 5: So I love this model now taking all three of us to California. I'm the first box like that. We're going to try out and then, um, the gel capsule technology actually comes from Canada. So the candidate Canadians, um, we'll do a reverse. We're bringing it to Colorado for them and they're going to reverse and bring Julie Suite of products to Canada. Look at that. Yeah, we'll, we'll, you know, Canada is going to be awesome because you only need one kitchen and you got the entire country. So it's extraordinary and we're really looking forward to that. But first let's test it out in California and see how that, how hard it is. It's a massive state and now I'm finally competing with people that are actually in my niche. I mean, you can find your granola and California, right? It's hard to find because they're all sold like random places. But you know, we want to bring the level up. Like, you know, Julie's has a name, has a reputation behind it. It's solid, you can count on it. It's potent, you know what I mean? So that'll translate to caleb.

Speaker 4: Yeah. You've got that natural place in Colorado. If you think of Colorado, Julie's natural, that's her. And you know, maybe there are other folks, but you own that. And so when you talk about California and uh, Canada, I wonder, size of market. So in Colorado, how many dispensaries are, are you in?

Speaker 5: Great Point. Yeah, 145 right now I, I'm, I'm not a fan of every single dispensary. You know, mine's a niche product. It's all right. Are certain dispensary's that just cannot, I mean their demographic is they go in and buy one gram or one joint and you know, those kinds of areas that like, it's the one beer liquor store went in and so there's several dispensaries in the state, like probably over a hundred that ended up being in just an area that's just doesn't work for Julie's. So what's happened was I stuck with 145 and I've cultivated this relationship for a very long time. It makes it a lot easier for me, like native roots for instance, you, once you're on native roots, you're on every shelf. You deal with one manager for 17 stores right now I have an entire suite of products. I just call them and say, hey guys, Julie's got some more products I want you to put on the shelf and I get an automatic test for as a new company.

Speaker 5: It's a lot harder now, California. I mean I, but I'm pretty sure we're going to be in the thousands as far as dispensary is by the time they're set in DM distribution, we're going to really count on that distribution network and these guys are coming in already. You, you probably talked to some people that are just going to be in distribution. They won't even. They're not even creating the product. All they're gonna do is distribute Julie's and whatever they charge. You know, we'll start. We'll try and figure that out. I imagined because Julie unfortunately has a name, a person behind it, like I have be the brand ambassador, right? So I'm going to keep it very specific, like we're going to do the San Francisco area, but again, kind of the high level ones, I'm not gonna waste my time with the ones that you know, may have this great cat customer base and could potentially be awesome for me. But in the beginning we're going to just focus on the, you know, the five big ones in San Francisco, the five huge ones in La and illegal if they could ever get their act together, but they have a delivery service. So again, just getting them with those one guy's prime. Uh, I think it's prime organics or something and they deliver to the entire city of San Diego. So that's a great, that's a great opportunity for jewelry. So I

Speaker 4: want to kind of make sure that we, uh, investigate the dishes that your mother is cleaning. Uh, no, no, I'm kidding. Okay.

Speaker 5: Can you turn it on? Let me do the dishes after. Okay.

Speaker 4: I would love to investigate how we're going to go from 145 stores to a thousand stores and I feel like you already gave us the answer, which is kind of automation essentially.

Speaker 5: Absolutely. Um, and you know, Julie's originally was hand wrapped. I'm very lovingly. It still is today because I haven't actually brought the automation in yet, but that's coming. This it within the next 25 days. We anticipate getting this. It's called a flow wrapper. And uh, so we're going to switch how old the nutty biting Granola bar looks.

Speaker 6: Oh my God, that's a, that staying in, by the way, Julie. So.

Speaker 5: Well anyway. Um, that's exactly how we'll do it. Seth is taking a core team at knowing who that core team has to be. So you, you're always gonna need a headshot that she's going to be the executive level formulator or he runs on whatever it is, but then it's a matter of mastering all those slps and then teaching, you know, you need one sous chef that is physically making too. If we keep getting orders bigger and bigger and then it's a matter of having a, a really tight packaging team, I don't believe in minimum wage these people, mother to stop. I don't believe in minimum wage. I, I believe that, you know, the people that are going to start for Julie. Like I again, I, I looked for that talent and now that I've been operating for almost eight years, I feel like I'm good at, at recognizing that talent.

Speaker 5: And um, I feel like that's the key been the key to my success is and having today, right now I'm in Wisconsin, but I, all these products that have been made perfectly. I don't even have to think about it. It's, oh, perfect. Better than I could ever do. And I feel like that was the key for Julie, was to recognize the brilliance and the other people. And, and, and definitely admit faults. I mean it's like classic good boss, you know, one on one and it really is so true. So when I do my interviewing California, you know, don't come in and think like, oh I just love pot and I want to work, you know, I'm not even going to listen to the rest of the interview here about what are you good at and those kinds of things and why do you like doing things?

Speaker 5: And I'm good at. I'm good at like within the first few days I can recognize people's talents. So what I do now is I hire people temporarily. Like nobody gets a job with Julie's. You have to work with me for about a week and then we regroup after that week and I decided your Yay or nay and you and you can tell it doesn't even take that long, like three days. You've complain you're Outta here, you know, three days, you have an idea for me, I'm interested in still, you know, so I feel like that's how Julie's is going to be successful in California. We're going to have a team that's going to be exceptional. And then the brand ambassador in parts like, I don't know how that's gonna work. Like I said, we'll figure it out and I can't even imagine what we're going to do for yet.

Speaker 4: Right. But you're getting, you have figured out how to get the product to the shelf in a way which celebrates the product being fantastic. You have figured out how to organize your team in a way that doesn't make you a crazy person. Right?

Speaker 5: Know

Speaker 4: you're right. Yeah, sure. The good, good, crazy versus bad. Crazy. But, um, it, it sounds like you've been for the past few years literally figuring this out as, as opposed to, you know, doing the scrooge mcduck diving into gold coins. Right.

Speaker 5: Thank you for saying that. That's all that this eight years has been his learning. And so the fact that at first I used to be really upset about that because you look at a traditional business model and you're like, seven years, I should be. Well in the black, I should be driven by now in both. And, and then it's like, okay, well add the fact that it was a brand new industry. What I was doing has never been done before. Nobody's made an addable. Nobody's made an edible thousand times, you know, and, and then of course the science in me, it's like I had to make sure it was perfect. So I don't know how to finish that thought, but.

Speaker 4: Well, no, I feel like you do. You've been through a lot and you know, I called you because you, my father literally cut out an article, uh, in a physical magazine, like a woman's journal of some kind. And I'm like, this has been a journey, a life journey for you. You've had to kind of figure out how to do this. You were not, you know, a, um, you know, high while you do have science and finance in your history and folks will go back and listen to the other episode, um, you, you, you had a, a thing that you were trying to solve, you know, celiac. And then another friend who had, um, you know, uh, uh, well, what did she have?

Speaker 5: She was a, I can't remember the name of the cancer, but it was a brain tumor the size of a soft.

Speaker 4: Right. And so you're just, you're just, they're solving problems and you think, oh, I can solve it with cannabis, which is this brand new thing here in Colorado, and then eight years later you're actually still in business and now expanding to other geographies. Like that's the, when, you know what I mean as opposed to being disappointed or frustrated that a eight do, you know, eight years and you're not a millionaire. It's like, no, you, you're doing product correctly, you know, you're servicing people the right way. Uh, you know, and trying to educate the rest of us.

Speaker 5: And that's really, really it. And I hope that people, your listeners, we'll let that come home. I mean, there are some of my, you know, my, I'm a petition, you know, like incredibles and wanna. I mean, these brands are, they, they did it much faster than I do. Yeah, sure.

Speaker 4: And we know and love them both, of course.

Speaker 5: Exactly. I love them. I mean, we're all paving the way, but what I was doing was a lot of was different and I've accepted that, you know, I couldn't do a candy. I couldn't do a gummy or a chocolate, I just, no matter how many people came in my kitchen and said, your problem will be solved with the gummy bear. It was like, no, that's just so not Julie. I cannot get behind that. This product line is something that I really believe in and with that I'm going to, I'm going to keep at it and I mean as long as I can, you know, and a lot of my success I attribute to the relationships I've cultivated like with my landlord for instance, you know, if that is so key to my success because there were months that I didn't have rent and um, you know, and I needed to, I needed more space, but I couldn't pay for it.

Speaker 5: Well, that's where an awesome landlord has really made the day. He's still my landlord and I, I love him to death. He's never wanted to invest. I've offered him 100 times, can be a part of this. And he's like, no, no, you know, I don't need it. He just wants to see me succeed. Now aligning myself with people like that and it has really made it so that I'm still willing to do 75, 80 hours mean like my kids, you know, if he wasn't in college and like, like he never sees me except on the weekends, you know, I'm religious so I do take Sabbath off. I always take Saturday off and so that's when I get to spend time with the kids and that's enough for them right now. I mean they don't, they don't need me right now. So it was a good time in our life. They need me more than they frigging will admit

Speaker 4: if you've got late teens, early twenties type of things going on. It's like a alright ma, I get it. Right, you know.

Speaker 5: Exactly. Exactly. So I really appreciate that you recognize that it's almost impossible to have that path of incredibles and Ilana what they did it in today's market. I would challenge anybody to be able to come in and, and hit it like that. Just because it's been done now. And you also have these brand names. I mean incredibles is in California. Yeah. And like, I don't know why, but people just, they're there four or five different chocolate bars. There's still room on the market for that, but what I was saying in the beginning, what I am enjoying now is people finally on my page and they finally like know why I kept it sugar free and a lot of people understand that now. It's not just because Julia doesn't eat sugar. It's because cannabis and sugar really inhibit each other and, and people now I can tell that to people and they finally hear me. Whereas in 2010 they're like, eh. Like I said, can I get a high, am I going to get high? But with mine, yeah, I'm going to get you high. Or then you might want to be.

Speaker 4: But anyway. But that's a whole different story for a whole different times. I feel like I feel like you were early enough on that. I might not have had the three final questions. And so I'm going to ask you the three final questions. Even if we've done it before. I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life? And then on the soundtrack of Julie Julie's life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 5: Most surprising in cannabis is how effective it was at, um, reducing the inflammation and the swelling. And um, I really, you know, you heard about it and when you smoke it, but when you eat it and you get that 11 hydroxy from the liver, it's a, that surprised me the most out of cannabis, you know, just the plant itself. Like I couldn't believe that I actually, I mean, you can get it to the point where you feel like you're tripping. I, I, I had no idea that I could push it that far and eight years into it I've definitely experimented and pushed it.

Speaker 4: Holy Moses. It works,

Speaker 5: it works. And it can get you to places that you really wanted to be. Um, you know, that, that somebody like myself really want it to be. So I, that was kind of surprising because I had only smoked it and uh, and, and like, you know, story after story, I'm as patients, epileptic patients, you know, psychiatric God, there, you know, with her hip upstairs, you know, I mean, it just, it's helpful for everybody. The smile on your face, we could just put smile on people's faces.

Speaker 4: What's most surprised you in life?

Speaker 5: She is. God, that's a tricky one. Surprising

Speaker 5: that I, that I'm a business owner. I think that was never planned. Um, I, I mean, I know it was never planned and, and the fact that I get to be at one of these pioneers I guess surprised me because it was all just, you know, um, serendipitous moments that brought me here. So, you know, that's kind of shocking that I'm still here and um, yeah. And I get to own a, I get to be with these women every morning, you know, and, and, um, it, that was surprising. Like I just didn't think I had it in me.

Speaker 4: And you do, apparently I do. What A. Okay. So here it is on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there,

Speaker 5: I mean, that's so hard, but right now, right now you don't have that changes. Of course you could ask me that question in a year and it'll be totally different, but right now I'd have to say ripple from the grateful dead it. Yeah. In stillwater it really, it just, it just, um, it's, it, it's, it encompasses pretty much everything that I'm going through and every time I hear it, it just puts me in that right spot that I can keep doing this. And like, Jerry, you know, just that whole motivation from that band. I mean, Jerry's gone, their leader's gone and they're still here.

Speaker 4: They just keep going. Yeah. Well, yes. I would say life's a journey, not a destination. Right Julie? So true. And I'm just, just quickly on ripple I. There is a cover album that came out when we were in college, which has Jane's addiction doing ripple. I wonder if you've ever heard that version.

Speaker 5: No, I haven't. Is it good? Oh my God. Go listen to it right now. I do like Jane's Addiction. I'll pull that up. Absolutely. Go do that. So I'm trying to get John Mayer to come to the kitchen. Good luck. I know, I know, but he's in calibra is, he's in Colorado like all the time. Well, you know, talk to pr people.

Speaker 4: No, no. Talk to Andy and Sally just uh, they, they have a go, go talk to them.

Speaker 5: Really get the start there. Okay.

Speaker 4: Julie, thank you so much. Thank you for returning as a guest here at cannabis economy, right

Speaker 5: Scott and I'm signing off for one for. Yeah, exactly. The floor. One floor. Alright, take care of seth. I'll see you soon.

Speaker 4: There you have Julie Dooley,

Speaker 1: and as you can hear, certainly part of the old guard who jumped into cannabis right at the beginning. She had an issue that cannabis solved and then she wanted to solve issues for others. So the industry is changing and Julie is certainly part of the loved old guard, so thanks to her. Thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.