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Ep.296: Brian Beckley, Marijuana Venture Magazine

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.296: Brian Beckley, Marijuana Venture Magazine

Ep.296: Brian Beckley, Marijuana Venture Magazine

Brian Beckley joins us and shares his journalism background. His thinking is that most journalists are hired guns and back in the day due to his being in a punk band- he resisted. Brian started covering government writing for a print publication and then moved from upstate New York to Seattle and in a suburb of a suburb kept writing, eventually becoming an editor of a local weekly. After discussing his thoughts on the current and future news journalism landscape, Brian dives in on cannabis. His entry to the market was when he sat down with the publisher of Marijuana Venture and it was an instant match. Brian notes, his and the magazines focus is squarely on the business of cannabis.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: When you're very busy people to get a lot of events and a lot of communications, you need to be consistent. Get to that. No. His handle on any social channel pitch to Ben, Brian Beckley, Beckley joins us and shares his journalism background is thinking is that most journalists are hired guns and back in the day due to his being in a punk band, he resisted. Brian started covering government writing for a print publication and then moving from upstate New York to Seattle and in a suburb of a suburb. Kept writing eventually becoming an editor of a local weekly. After discussing his thoughts on the current and future news journalism landscape, Brian Dives in on how he got into cannabis. He sat down with the publisher of marijuana venture and it was an instant match. Brian notes that his and his magazines focus is squarely on the business of cannabis. Welcome to cannabis academy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Brian Beckley. I am originally from Philadelphia

Speaker 2: up in upstate New York and I went to college in Albany and now I live out in Seattle. This weirdness that when I get out there now people say, you talk so fast and I think, no, I don't. I'm just got things to say exactly and I my mind, you know, goes so I have to go with it. When you talk about Philadelphia, right? You didn't spend a lot of time there are. You did. I spent time there. I grew up there until I was about six, but I had family and I went back every summer and spend a couple of months every year there. So you know the difference between Philadelphia and downstate, right? The city of New York and of course the difference between downstate New York and upstate New York. Yes. Having said all that, as you get further and further away from the northeast, we all come the same thing.

Speaker 2: Don't. It's amazing when I tell people I'm from New York and they're like really? From Brooklyn or the city, right? Oh Man. It's a big state. There's, there's other places, lots of places. So let's start with the buffalo bills, what's not, and we'll take it from there. They're the only actual New York football team though. So that's the only ones that play in New York, not the New Jersey giants. What are the New Jersey jets? That's exactly. So you're proving your northeast and New York state bone. A fee days? Yes. So how long did you spend in upstate New York? I moved to upstate New York. Uh, my family and I moved there when I was six and I went all the way through school and I graduated from Albany, Suny Albany in 98. And I'm state. Oh Wow. Yeah. Okay. And then I moved to Seattle in 2002 when the girl I was with at a time got a job offer out there.

Speaker 2: We're going to get to that. You graduating Albany in 1998 means that you almost certainly know some of my friends which will do after this. Okay. But uh, what was your major? I was a history major with a minor in journalism. Well, so you did have journalism? I did. Alright. And history is also kind of writing and reading and kind of thinking very much so and very much in the research and the interviewing of people to get the facts that you need and going to the right places to look for it. Yeah. So that all is interlinked. Yes. When did you realize that something like that, that kind of composite thing, which by the way, my sister history major journalism minor. Same deal. Um, when did you see that pathway for yourself? Well, it's funny, I went to college, uh, I've always been something of an academic and intellectual.

Speaker 2: So I went to college to study history. Or You just wanted to learn? Yes, I went, I went for the learning experience. They say people change their major six times. Sure. I did. And it was once I changed what I was going to do with it six times. Got It. So I went originally prelaw and realized that that was not the track for me. And then I was in the education track for a while to be a teacher and I realized that was probably not for me either. And a journalism came up as I made a list of things I was good at and the only thing I've ever been good at his school and I thought to myself, what is that? What you go somewhere, you listen to what someone says, you take notes, you go home and you write a paper. A light bulb went off and I thought that's what a journalist does because you tried it with education and you're like, I'll just do school the whole time.

Speaker 1: When you're very busy people to get a lot of events and a lot of communications, you need to be consistent. Get to that. No. His handle on any social channel pitch to Ben, Brian Beckley, Beckley joins us and shares his journalism background is thinking is that most journalists are hired guns and back in the day due to his being in a punk band, he resisted. Brian started covering government writing for a print publication and then moving from upstate New York to Seattle and in a suburb of a suburb. Kept writing eventually becoming an editor of a local weekly. After discussing his thoughts on the current and future news journalism landscape, Brian Dives in on how he got into cannabis. He sat down with the publisher of marijuana venture and it was an instant match. Brian notes that his and his magazines focus is squarely on the business of cannabis. Welcome to cannabis academy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Brian Beckley. I am originally from Philadelphia

Speaker 2: up in upstate New York and I went to college in Albany and now I live out in Seattle. This weirdness that when I get out there now people say, you talk so fast and I think, no, I don't. I'm just got things to say exactly and I my mind, you know, goes so I have to go with it. When you talk about Philadelphia, right? You didn't spend a lot of time there are. You did. I spent time there. I grew up there until I was about six, but I had family and I went back every summer and spend a couple of months every year there. So you know the difference between Philadelphia and downstate, right? The city of New York and of course the difference between downstate New York and upstate New York. Yes. Having said all that, as you get further and further away from the northeast, we all come the same thing.

Speaker 2: Don't. It's amazing when I tell people I'm from New York and they're like really? From Brooklyn or the city, right? Oh Man. It's a big state. There's, there's other places, lots of places. So let's start with the buffalo bills, what's not, and we'll take it from there. They're the only actual New York football team though. So that's the only ones that play in New York, not the New Jersey giants. What are the New Jersey jets? That's exactly. So you're proving your northeast and New York state bone. A fee days? Yes. So how long did you spend in upstate New York? I moved to upstate New York. Uh, my family and I moved there when I was six and I went all the way through school and I graduated from Albany, Suny Albany in 98. And I'm state. Oh Wow. Yeah. Okay. And then I moved to Seattle in 2002 when the girl I was with at a time got a job offer out there.

Speaker 2: We're going to get to that. You graduating Albany in 1998 means that you almost certainly know some of my friends which will do after this. Okay. But uh, what was your major? I was a history major with a minor in journalism. Well, so you did have journalism? I did. Alright. And history is also kind of writing and reading and kind of thinking very much so and very much in the research and the interviewing of people to get the facts that you need and going to the right places to look for it. Yeah. So that all is interlinked. Yes. When did you realize that something like that, that kind of composite thing, which by the way, my sister history major journalism minor. Same deal. Um, when did you see that pathway for yourself? Well, it's funny, I went to college, uh, I've always been something of an academic and intellectual.

Speaker 2: So I went to college to study history. Or You just wanted to learn? Yes, I went, I went for the learning experience. They say people change their major six times. Sure. I did. And it was once I changed what I was going to do with it six times. Got It. So I went originally prelaw and realized that that was not the track for me. And then I was in the education track for a while to be a teacher and I realized that was probably not for me either. And a journalism came up as I made a list of things I was good at and the only thing I've ever been good at his school and I thought to myself, what is that? What you go somewhere, you listen to what someone says, you take notes, you go home and you write a paper. A light bulb went off and I thought that's what a journalist does because you tried it with education and you're like, I'll just do school the whole time.

Speaker 2: And you're like, no, that's the wrong application as exactly wrong. Not only that, but I don't want to do the same thing every year. I don't want to do that over and over. Let me tell you about Christopher Columbus was start at the beginning. One more time. Alright. So all that kind of adds up. All that kind of makes sense. I was good at school. I wanted to keep doing school. Uh, when you kinda came out. Now let me ask you this. Sure. Were your folks in the space also because kind of an academic mind usually springs from other academic minds. My mother was a teacher. She, there you go, she's an elementary school teacher and she was the first in our family to graduate college and it was one of those that from the time I was born, Brian was going to college. It was just that simple.

Speaker 2: And uh, that was, it just went in. Incidentally, I realized that a, I didn't start with the fact that you are Brian back land. Brian Beckley. Yes. I'm the managing editor of marijuana. Venture magazine. Should've touched on that earlier, but at least we got to it now and we'll get to marijuana venture because I know that you, you are new and it is not type of thing. A little bit of both. Yeah. Um, but you were definitely going to college, so that's what it was. Absolutely. You're a mama's boy and I am. And there was no question that I was, I was going to college and that my dad never graduated from college, but he was an it. He was an ibm or it was a zipper head. Sure. He fixed computers. Um, so I went off to school to study as an academic mainly and I, I went prelaw was what it was going to be that early and I, I realized that it just, it was not for me.

Speaker 2: I. What was it, do you think that repelled you repulsed you? Exactly. In my freshman year, I took a class called constitutional us history 3:13, which sounded super exciting from a historical standpoint. Absolutely. What we did is we studied supreme court cases and how they applied. Yeah, that's the pre law stuff, right? That bored the hell out of me. And I thought law schools another six years of this, I don't want any part of it. You want it to discuss and debate the constitution as it was written. Correct. And they were like, no, no, no, no. These cases, here's how it apply. Yeah. No, I don't want to. Being a lawyer would be fun, but law school just didn't appeal to me. No. Good. And it's good that you made that decision before you got to law school, which, uh, not many folks, uh, in law school understand until after the first year or during the first year, they look at that debt that they've got.

Speaker 2: That's exactly, that's a, that'll hurt you. That cuts deep. So, uh, you then graduate? Yes. And you had just decided I'm going to change the application changing application, change your application when you got out there in the late nineties. Uh, what was the job that you looked for? What was the job that you got? Well, obviously I was looking to get into a daily paper if I could, and any anywhere in there. And Albany is the papers, The Times Union and there's a paper in Schenectady as well. Most journalists are like hired guns. We, uh, we run around from small market to bigger market to bigger market. And I didn't want to do that. And on top of that, I was in a punk band in Albany and we were making records and touring and I was like, I can't leave this to go and work in Louisville or Paducah or Kadoka or anywhere like that.

Speaker 2: I got to stay here. I'm going to have to stop you there because we're going to have to talk about the punk band. Okay. So what position did you play? I was the bass player. Okay. Yeah. Which usually in a punk band is almost worse than the drummer. Yes, it's true. Can you explain to non musicians what I just said? Yeah. Normally the drummer is the one that is the butt of all jokes. But in a punk band, the drummer has got to be in shape. That guy has got to be able to play and play hard and fast. Yeah. So the bass player stands in the back in the shadows and the drummer gets all the girls. It's, it's just not fair. So pure punk. What, who were the influences? Uh, we were uh, uh, Ramon style for, for straightforward punk band at first, you know, a bunch of kids.

Speaker 2: Just picking up instruments and yelling about things that upset us. Sure. Our songs might be three minutes long, but definitely not. Right. Yeah. And then by the second record we had evolved a little bit. We're better at what our instruments. They got more interesting but it was still very much, you know, like a punch in the face, so very Ramon z earlier, ramones the. And then later we got into more of like a hot water music if you know who they are. It was a dual vocal, complicated, you know, doing different things as opposed to everybody just play in the street for four. So two guitars, two guitars, bass player, drummer in the band was called the disenchanted. And you were touring, you had some success? Yes. We had some minor success, especially in Albany. Now this is pre social media, so it was, you know, selling out of the trunk of a van and driving around, you know, stopping at payphones to see if we could get a gig in the next city kind of thing. But lugging around the CDS. Yes. Boxes of CDS.

Speaker 2: I just need to know just one more shirt influences for you as a bassist. Oh, my favorite bass players are, um, Matt Freeman of rancid. Oh, okay. And uh, Carl Alvarez of the descendants that sort of melodic, busy baseline. I just, I just love right. But up here. Yeah, exactly. Okay. And we'll maybe come back to the music at the end, but I think that's enough for right now. So now. But the deal is I love the music. I care about the music. I got to stick with the music. I was in the band, you know, we were, we had just put out a record. We had done some tours so it didn't make sense for me to move to a small market in Iowa or western Pennsylvania or somewhere like that. So I stayed in the Albany area looking for a Gig. I ended up getting a job at a data processor for awhile, like a cube farm or it was a nine to five when the band ended, when that finally stopped what it was doing, I started looking for newspaper gigs and I got a job at a weekly paper in Saratoga County, uh, and Clifton Park and half moon, uh, just north of, of, of Albany, and I was there for about a year, maybe a little bit more.

Speaker 2: And then the girl that I was with at the time got the job offer in Seattle and as a kid growing up in the nineties when someone says, do you want to move to Seattle? I said yes. And then asked what the job was. Right. Because what you're talking about is grunge. Yes. The coolest place on the planet as the movie is single. I quoted it to the guy we were with yesterday and also as a musician and by the way rip Chris Cornell tech yet it was at yesterday or tonight. We got the news this morning. Terrible. Terrible News. So that's a ridiculously and weirdly timely for this conversation. Yeah, it's odd. I have to say, the only upside is that Roger ailes also went. So, I mean, if you're gonna you're gonna take one of them too. It is a spoonful of sugar to even it up.

Speaker 2: So, uh, all right. So then you were covering what though? In state government I was covering two small towns. They are a, well, there were large towns but small populations, um, and I covered local government planning boards, a local business schools, things like that. Like the real actual stuff. Honest to God knows. Yeah. All right. So then a lot of time at city hall. Right. So when you went to Seattle, did you have enough in the portfolio where someone said, oh, you could do that for us? Eventually when I got to Seattle I was unemployed for about a year and I did some temp work and I got some other jobs that way. I put my resume out on the local job sites and things like that. And I eventually heard back from one of the companies they, uh, they called me and said, listen, we saw your resume, we saw your work.

Speaker 2: What'd you come in for? An interview, right. So I ended up in a small paper in Pierce County, which is where Tacoma is, south of Seattle. So those who have traveled to the Seattle Tacoma airport. Yes. It, which is in the terribly, a unimaginatively named town of Seatac, halfway between Seattle and Tacoma, but west of east of Tacoma. I've been out there 15 years and I can't get it straight. Mountains are mountains or to the east out their oceans to the west if backwards. Well, lotion is definitely going to be to the west, but it is backwards for an east coast to the east coast. It doesn't make any sense. So, uh, it was east of Tacoma was a small town called Pula and uh, I got a job at a paper out there covering it, even smaller town that was a suburb of New Orleans called Bonney Lake.

Speaker 2: And uh, I worked at that paper for awhile and then I got a Gig at a paper that covered Bonney Lake specifically and just a whole bunch of trades and you know, moves and in the area and in the companies. I ended up as editor of a newspaper called the Renton reporter, which was a weekly paper of a town of about a hundred, a hundred and 15,000 outside of Seattle. So this was a, a real estate and journalism, a paper rent and reward. It's the town is renting there, which I actually knew when I got to rent and I had heard of it before because of a court case, a supreme court case take that, that I had to write about for anything that came up in Clifton Park. So it was this weird like, wait a minute, this is renting as in renton versus playtime. And the lawyer was like, yeah, I argued that in front of the Supreme Court.

Speaker 2: I was like, I know you guys are there you go. So you were covering before you got the editor job, you recovering government or just everything and just covering news, just news, general, general assignment, uh, anything that came up. I wrote some features again, I spent a lot of time at city hall, did a Lotta Lotta government stories. So when they said you're the editor yet you knew that to mean what, and then what did it? Actually, I thought I would get a larger staff. Uh, it turned out that I meant that I did most of the work myself. Um, it also meant that they no longer paid me overtime because they salaried me and that was, that was the key for them. I think, yeah, we can get this. Plus this guy got this. So when you say you thought you would have a staff and you had to kind of do all of it, just give us a sense of like, I don't know if we've, uh, if I've spoken to an editor on the show, what is the job?

Speaker 2: The job of editor at this paper, which was relatively small. I covered news, I did some sports and then I as a reporter, as a reporter, and then I also had to edit all of the copy that came in. I had a reporter on staff and some contributors and photographers and things and I would edit their copy and work with them because in a weekly newspaper it doesn't pay a whole lot, so a lot of the reporters that you get are very green. There are a lot of out of college, so it was a lot of training of young reporters, a lot of editing of copy and then layout work. I designed the paper every week. Say this picture is going to go here. This story is going to go here, so that. That sounds creative and fun. Yeah. The editing though. Yeah. You can't be talking about ellipsis and antecedents, right.

Speaker 2: At times you are okay, but what is, you know when you say I'm editing this story, what are we really getting at? What are we trying to make sure is in? What are we trying to make sure isn't in that? Depends on the story itself. My job as an editor is to read the story and if I have any questions, no matter what they are. So does the reader, our reader will too. So I go back to the writer and I say, what about this? What about this, what about this? It's also my job to make sure that the copy is legible, you know, like, it makes sense when you read it. The commas are in the right place. There's no, uh, no dangling participles and things like that. Which also would be, by the way, a great punk punk name. Yeah. The dangling participles I tried, they wouldn't go for it.

Speaker 2: We start with the disenchanted, but I'm a make sure the copies clean as clean as I can make it. My job is also to fact check. So in a reporter comes in and I look at something and I go, I don't know about that. Where'd you get this? I called the cop and I go, you will. Did you say this? Is this real? The editor will have the cop. Yep. Okay. So we could use a ton of editors everywhere. Everywhere. Yeah. It's another profession that's dying at the moment, obviously. Yeah. Well what, let's take that tangent, you know, and [inaudible], right. The next step is, is where you are now. Um, but before that you are in this news business, you always have been as somebody that is an editor. How do you see what this kind of new reality has been like? It's amazing to me as a, as a reader.

Speaker 2: What about as an editor? What's interesting is that the current state of media is sort of fractured, you know, like there's print media which is what I was in. And then there's television and those of us in print media always have sort of a squinty one eyebrow up look at television, like always have, we're not quite sure. And the old joke used to be that a newspaper reporter gets up everyday and goes to look for a story. A television reporter gets up, reads the paper and decides what they're going to cover. Exactly. It's half true on both sides. Um, but, uh, so in the current state, I'm actually really encouraged right now to watch. I really love watching the Washington Post and the New York Times chase down the trump stories. It is so exciting to see newspapers breaking big stories day after day, trying to one up the other ones that are enough for the big papers in the country right now.

Speaker 2: It's a good time for the weeklies. It's a little difficult because the consolidation of media has really been the problem. It's been the way to make it look like you're profitable is to buy another paper even if you're not, and since the recession, the advertising marketing has really dropped and since Craig's list, the classifieds, which is what used to really carry newspapers monetarily has virtually disappeared. So budget wise, that's really been the big thing that lay down. Yeah. Yeah. There's no money right now in newspapers. It's a very difficult time to try and be in newspapers. I think the future is nonprofits. How so? Well, I think there's going to be nonprofit newspapers that can get money from foundations, get can get donations in order because journalism is such an important factor in democracy. It's supposed to be the fourth estate. Yes. Well, it's. It's the only job in the country enshrined in the constitution to be protected.

Speaker 2: Every country has teachers, every country has lawyers and every country has an army, but only a country with a free press is truly free and the consolidation of media has really sort of crunch that down so it's, we need it more than ever and I think, I think nonprofits when they can get money from foundations because I think there's going to be rich people like we've got to save this newspaper, they can't do it if it's a for profit industry, so I think you're going to see a switch in journalism to become more of the public service and less of the profit driven business. Interesting. So kinda the Jeff bezos buying the Washington Post instead of him doing that kind of setting up a nonprofit and. Right. The bezos foundation buys the post kind of thing. I like it. I like where you're going with this now the post and the times, they're still profitable.

Speaker 2: So those will be okay. Totally understood. Small towns know where I'm from. Macomb 10 is in trouble there. Paper might have that kind of thing. Yeah. Binghampton once a, a, a great, uh, university. Still a great university. Once a great industrial area and then the cold war ended so well, that's a whole different thing. That'll be in our second interview. How about that? Call me back. We'll get that. Exactly. So marijuana venture calls you or you call them? They called me. Actually it wasn't. It was actually A. I knew a guy who had just gotten a job that I didn't get. He didn't know that I didn't get that job, but he had just gotten this job. The publisher of marijuana venture was looking to expand his staff and went to this guy and said, are you happy where you are? Right? And he said, I just got this.

Speaker 2: I'm very happy, but I might know someone. So I got in touch with our publisher, Greg James. He's the publisher of Marijuana Venture magazine and he and I had lunch and we have similar backgrounds and I have a similar background to his editor at the magazine. How so? In what way? We just went through your background. Yes. Well, he's also the former editor of a weekly newspaper on the eastern part of Washington to speak the same language, speak the same language, and Greg had had success with Garrett and knew that this was a background that I could trust when he and I hit it off personally as well. He offered me the job to come into the magazine and he said, he said, what do you need to leave your current job? I said, two weeks. Right. So that was, that. Was it also this much money?

Speaker 2: I hope it was. I would have done it laterally. I got a little more, but I was just like, I gotta get out. So, uh, as far as coming in now it's been recent, right? Yes. I started in January, so we're in May of 2017 because it's podcast land. So you never really know, but it's been about five months ish. Right. What did you come into? What did you realize you had to do and what have you done? Well, when I came into it, they had already built a very successful magazine. How so? Garrett, the editor of the magazine, Garrett, had done an excellent job maintaining an editorial focus for the magazine. Marijuana Venture magazine is the largest business to business magazine in the cannabis space. We focused on what a circulation sales. We have a circulation of $27,000. Um, we have, we maintain a mailing list of anybody with a license.

Speaker 2: We get them a copy. We have deals were distributed in Barnes and nobles all across the country. We just worked out a deal with trophies in Canada. So we're going to be in the trophy stores through there and we're going to be in Hudson, new stores in, uh, in airports that's starting with our next issue. You as a business traveler that is now you've used. Exactly right. Now you're everywhere, but our focus is solely on the business of cannabis. We are not a culture magazine. We are not a lifestyle magazine. We like to say no bongs, no thongs. Okay, so if you're looking, if you're looking for that, you're not going to get it into us. So we are all industry. We're like the Forbes of the marijuana industry. We're aiming for the business. Gotcha. And Garrett had kept an iron fist focus on that.

Speaker 2: He just laser on that as the editor. Uh, so they had built this magazine. Our third anniversary was in March. The first issue in March of 2014 was an eight page black and white folded stapled magazine. Right. Sounds like the old rolling stone. And in March we were 164 pages color glossy full of ads. So sounds like the new rawlings. Yes. And we actually won an award. I say we, I wasn't there. Sure. Well you were, but you're right. I, I'm there now, uh, they want award for a festival or a magazine in the country. So we've had an out of all magazine magazine's not cannabis. Oh Wow. We have had a rocket ship. So when I got there they had already built a successful magazine and I wasn't exactly sure what my role was going to be accepted. I was going to be writing and dealing with helping other writers and doing a lot of editing.

Speaker 2: I do a lot of editing now. Um, so I realized when I got there, the thing that I had to learn the most about was the cannabis business. I mean, I'm not gonna lie to Ya, I'm bit of a pothead for college and going through what we say is that you, you came in already as a cannabis enthusiasts, correct? I, I understood the marketplace and was a fan. Right? And from a user perspective, correct. But the business side of it is very complicated. There's a lot going on between the regulations and how they work in different states. Um, for example, when I first got it, I took an, a story back to Garrett and I was like, do we need to explain what the, what the Emerald Triangle is? And he was like, nope, no, we do not, not tell our readers. I was like, okay, the next door.

Speaker 2: So I was uh, coming in learning about the space itself and learning the industry. That was a bit of a learning curve for me. So I would go home every day after work and I would do homework. I would read, you know, Jorge's avant days and I would read the Horticultural Bible and I read Bruce Bruce Barcodes book on a, we, the people of course, as much as I could learn about the industry, about the plant, not the growing. Uh, so I was doing homework for past couple of months. There you go. And, uh, and now you kind of know, I know a little bit more. I don't like, I don't pretend I'm an expert, I still, I still go to Garrett every chance I get. And the key is that we have this guy who knows how to edit, right. And those had an editor publication and get it out, get the information.

Speaker 2: I'm on the journalism side and uh, so I don't come in through the business side at all and I think that helps the team as well because I can work with other reporters and I can take something off Garrett's table to help do some editing, you know, to make sure it gets in. So you have a 40 under 40. That's our newest issue. Yes. Issue coming out. Yep. Um, you know, kind of take us through that one and then I want to make sure I understand where we're going here with this publication. Our 40 under 40 issue, it's our second one, uh, as a journalist, I can't call it annual yet, but it's our second issue. It'd be annual next year, right? According to the APA style. So it's our second 40 under 40, and what we do is in our context throughout the business, this is a very young business and it's a very diverse business and so we set out to highlight some of the up and comers every year.

Speaker 2: So we have, we have profiles of 40 different people in the business under the age of 40, whether they own a grow operation on a retail store, lawyers, scientists, a stoner mom, doctors. Our cover is actually a pair of doctors out of California, Rachel Knox, go back and listen to it now. They are a, Oh, that's, you did a podcast on them. Of course they are wonderful. They're just Rachel. But Rachel Jessica of course is lovely as well. Yeah. Great. I'll tell you what, that's a great story. And uh, I did not get to do that profile, but I enjoyed reading it. I edited that one and enjoyed it greatly. Totally, totally. So we went out and we got our profiles of the 40 people for the magazine. Uh, everybody on the staff took a couple and we wrote them up and we got them in the magazine and uh, tried to get the hardest part is getting good, high res pictures of people for a glossy magazine.

Speaker 2: It, you'd be surprised at how many people don't realize how big a photo has to be to get that in. Well, I emailed with these people so I understand how difficult it would be. Um, and then now we're, we going. So if you have a vision or if we have a mission, you know, besides in addition to no bongs, no thumb is you say, right, we're going, well, we are continuing to look at the industry and as the industry expands throughout the country, we are trying to make sure that we're profiling all of those new markets. We want to talk about the up and coming markets. We want to talk about growers that are doing well as well as growers that necessarily aren't, so we can highlight to our readers are things that work, things that don't work. We get tips from experts in our magazine.

Speaker 2: We have legal pages. We every month we get lawyers to write for us about issues that are facing these businesses and I like to say cannabis loves lawyers by the boy. They need them. Yeah, exactly, and we've got. We've talked to marketing experts and branding experts and we're just trying to get all of the information or that guy likes to tell people that if you're looking for a magazine to help get into business or stay in the business, our magazine has the information that you're looking for in it. There you go. We will continue to try and do that. We're making a big push, of course, like everybody else in the space for California when that comes online in 2018, we're trying to be active down there and make sure we know all the players and the stories out of there. Same with Canada when they come online.

Speaker 2: We're gonna be all through there, but we're also following the markets like Vermont and Maryland and Maine and Michigan and all of the West Virginia just passed a bill, so all of those that are starting to come on with the magazine. We're also trying to make sure that we're staying out in front and innovating and trying to do new things with it. For example, in our newest issue in the 40, under 40, we also just launched what we call the green pages, which is focused on the organic side of cannabis growing in the industry. Ah, because organic cannabis cannot be certified organic because it is illegal federally and that term means something to the Usta. So what you find is a lot of people in the cannabis space saying all natural, so you don't use any fertilizer. Well, no, we use chemical fertilizers then you're not organic, so we're trying to stay in front of that and words matter.

Speaker 2: Words matter. That's exactly right. Words have meanings and we're trying to stay in front of that as well because that's another big emerging market. One of the interesting things about the cannabis market place is that people are looking for more than just the flower they want to. They want to make sure it's being done right, especially in states like Oregon, Washington and Colorado. These are, these are hippie states. I mean, the people who are buying these products want to make sure it's reliable source, that there's no pesticides, that there's a free market, you know, that kind of thing. And so we're trying to make sure that we're covering that aspect of the business and staying up. We also keep our eye on any new products that come out be they know how to do new extractions, how to do, uh, you know, are you the distal, it's things like that that are, uh, are in stores and we do have a market watch every month to say what are the prices are and all of that kind of stuff.

Speaker 2: Excellent. So it's really all angles. If you want to get in, if you want to stay, that's exactly it. If you want to get into business or stay in the business. We got your tips. I'm going to ask you the final three questions. I'll tell you what they are and asking them in order. What has most surprised you in cannabis? Okay. What has most surprised you in life and then on the soundtrack of your life? I can't wait for this one. Oh Man. One track. One song that's got to be on there. But first things first and last one is going to. Exactly. I'm going to give you an answer and I'm going to stew on that for days. For a musician. It's tough. Yeah. So a cannabis enthusiast. Sure. Yeah. Not necessarily someone that's been in the industry forever. Now, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 2: What surprised me most about the cannabis industry, I guess is the sheer diversity of it. It's really interesting to see the products. You know, like as a, as an enthusiast, it's flour, you get it in a baggy, you know it up and it's. Sometimes it's Brown, sometimes it's green, you know? Well that's east coast. Yes, that's exactly right. And the west coast, it's all green. So seeing it out there and seeing the different innovations that people have, waxes, shatters, waters, the honeycombs, just the different ways that they're coming up with. It's the science behind it is amazing. Denis leary had a joke in the nineties where he said, cat, the marijuana doesn't lead to other drugs at least to construction because kids big bongs, it's very easy. He's right. The amount of innovation in the cannabis space is really staggering. I had not heard that.

Speaker 2: That's good. Dennis leary with only one end. Yes. No cure for cancer is best one. What has most surprised you in life? Um, I think what's most surprised me in life is that as I've gotten older I've really realized that it's true what you put out, you get back and as a young punk you're sort of angry and a little aggressive. And there's art. And it's funny how much the world gives that back to you. As I've gotten older I realized that when I walk into a room smiling, people respond that way to me as well as opposed to me walking in. You Walk in happy and people respond to that. So what surprised me in life is that Karma is actually a thing like who knew is actually a thing. Also, it turns out the love you make is equal to the love you j, which is a nice segue, which is a nice segue.

Speaker 2: Certainly something that not only a Paul Mccartney, but Chris Farley, uh, my house. Yeah. I'm on the soundtrack of your life. This is a tough one. I understand. Feel free to mention at least you know what I gotta give you gotTa. Give me a couple or a few. That's fine. You know, one of my favorite songs of all time and I don't know if it applies to my life, but it would definitely be, at least not in my life at this point. Gotcha. I love the song faded by the Afghan whigs on their black love record. It's the last song. This would be college music for you very much and I love it. That is just one of my favorites on the soundtrack of my life.

Speaker 2: But if I had to pick one, it might. It would have to be the Ramones, I would think. I might get. It might be Blitzkrieg Bop, um, oh, I'll tell you what it is. I realized this last year, I was trying to find a mantra, you know, like I was trying to center myself and get it in and I don't want to sit around his own and I don't want to say something that doesn't, but I realized what a mantra should be, is something that you can repeat that's kind of meaningless, that helps you focus and clean. Yeah. Being a young punk, the one I settled, hundreds, Gaba, Gaba. Hey. So perhaps I should pick a pin head as, as, uh, as the song of my life because my Gaba, Gaba. Hey, Gaba, Gaba. Hey somebody. I'd be that one. That is perfect. Brian Basically said, I'll see you in Seattle. Thank you. Come and check us out when you get out.

Speaker 1: There you go. And there you have Brian Beckley. Most journalists are hired guns and, uh, certainly considers himself in that group. I'll be it with his punk band background. Very much appreciated. Speaking with Brian, very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.