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Ep.298: Alex Rogers

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.298: Alex Rogers

Ep.298: Alex Rogers

Alex Rogers returns from Episode 230 by phone this time to share his thoughts on among other things, the cannabis economy and changing laws in Germany. We discuss the fact that international import/export is happening and how the US is truly falling behind. Alex discusses his event that’s coming up in Hawaii and so he discusses the cannabis program which just opened up there. We discuss what’s happening in cannabis and otherwise in Spain in Madrid and Barcelona respectively. Finally we discuss what’s happening in Canada both federally and provincially. And on Hawaii, comedian Doug Benson will speak and Grammy winning reggae artists Morgan Heritage will play.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: We're on social at OPA ink. For more information, Alex Rogers returns. Alex Rogers returns from episode 2:30 by phone this time to share thoughts on among other things to cannabis economy and changing laws in Germany. We discussed the fact that international import export is happening and how the US is truly falling behind. Alex discusses his event that's coming up in Hawaii and so he discusses the cannabis program which just opened up there. We discussed what's happening in cannabis and otherwise in Spain, in Madrid and Barcelona respectively. Finally, we discussed what's happening in Canada, both federally and provincially and on Hawaii. Comedian Doug Benson will speak and grammy winning reggae artists, Morgan heritage will play. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Alex Rogers or something.

Speaker 1: So how you been man? I mean, I haven't spoken to you really since Germany. I guess you know, you, you, you kind of lucked out with timing plus a little bit of planning, right? As far as that event went?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I'd say it's about 50 slash 50. I took a big chance, but, uh, I definitely lucked out a also.

Speaker 1: And so, you know, what was your sense, you know, what month were you there and what was your sense on the ground of the cannabis economy, if you will, a over there?

Speaker 3: Uh, yeah. So, uh, you know, we, we, uh, the event was mid April and have two this year to 17 and uh, the, the laws changed, uh, in late March and uh, what the laws that changed where the medical marijuana of Germany and they changed, uh, in a way that was a, that really opened the system up in a few different regards. Um, one was, uh, before that time, it had been a difficult for someone to get their medical marijuana card. It's actually a actual prescription in Germany because it's fake federally regulated, but, uh, it was really difficult for a patient to get their medical marijuana prescription and if they did get, were lucky enough or a, or diligent enough to get their prescription and then it was, it was hard for them to procure medicine. They could, uh, before April first 2017, a wife, one guy, you're, you're, there are medical marijuana, prescription Germany, you had to pick a pharmacy that you were going to procure your medicine from. And uh, and so if you were, let's say that with some pharmacy in Berlin and you were traveling to Munich, you couldn't just stop in a pharmacy and get your, get your medicine. So two major things changed. It became a lot less prohibitive for a patient to get their prescription and all pharmacies were able to carry cannabis and any patient could get it from any pharmacy that, uh, that, that decided to carry a cannabis.

Speaker 1: I hadn't let the market decide is what, is what they said

Speaker 3: in that regard. Yes. Uh, exactly. And uh, uh, and made it less prohibitive for doctors to give the prescriptions out. Whereas before it was kind of like a lot of state, a lot of people in certain states in America had, had experienced this, where you back in the day you go to a doctor, they say, well, did you try percocet for pain? This, that, and you know, that kind of defeats the whole purpose anyway of why one might get their medical marijuana card and so they were making a go to that type of rig of a role in, uh, in Germany and now and now that's not the case at all anymore. It's, it's, it still has its little nuance problems and whatever, of course. But, uh, it was a huge step forward, um, and that, that helped make the, uh, the event a big success.

Speaker 3: And, and, and, and the third thing that was really an important change was up until that point. And still to this day, actually, the only the only place they Germany gets their medicine is, is the important. And from right now it's Holland in Canada. And that changed also in that they, they let uh, the, they're allowing for domestic license production in Germany and that won't be online for probably, I don't know, a year or so when the first foreign German pharmacies carry German cannabis. But, uh, but that was a good thing also, that vote was a little bit prohibitive. Uh, uh, and not so free market that prong because they basically forced anyone who wanted to be a German domestic producer to team up with a Canadian who had been doing it for some time and that was a, that was a funky little thing that, that we think is going to change, but, but, you know, it was really odd because Germany is all about Germany, uh, and, and the free market and self sufficiency and they really kind of, lot of people were excited to get into the proverbial game, if you will, and realized it was not going to happen and uh, or was going to be a lot harder to acquire a license because now they had to team up with someone who, a producer that I think they said hadn't been producing for since two, five years or something like that.

Speaker 2: We're on social at OPA ink. For more information, Alex Rogers returns. Alex Rogers returns from episode 2:30 by phone this time to share thoughts on among other things to cannabis economy and changing laws in Germany. We discussed the fact that international import export is happening and how the US is truly falling behind. Alex discusses his event that's coming up in Hawaii and so he discusses the cannabis program which just opened up there. We discussed what's happening in cannabis and otherwise in Spain, in Madrid and Barcelona respectively. Finally, we discussed what's happening in Canada, both federally and provincially and on Hawaii. Comedian Doug Benson will speak and grammy winning reggae artists, Morgan heritage will play. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Alex Rogers or something.

Speaker 1: So how you been man? I mean, I haven't spoken to you really since Germany. I guess you know, you, you, you kind of lucked out with timing plus a little bit of planning, right? As far as that event went?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I'd say it's about 50 slash 50. I took a big chance, but, uh, I definitely lucked out a also.

Speaker 1: And so, you know, what was your sense, you know, what month were you there and what was your sense on the ground of the cannabis economy, if you will, a over there?

Speaker 3: Uh, yeah. So, uh, you know, we, we, uh, the event was mid April and have two this year to 17 and uh, the, the laws changed, uh, in late March and uh, what the laws that changed where the medical marijuana of Germany and they changed, uh, in a way that was a, that really opened the system up in a few different regards. Um, one was, uh, before that time, it had been a difficult for someone to get their medical marijuana card. It's actually a actual prescription in Germany because it's fake federally regulated, but, uh, it was really difficult for a patient to get their medical marijuana prescription and if they did get, were lucky enough or a, or diligent enough to get their prescription and then it was, it was hard for them to procure medicine. They could, uh, before April first 2017, a wife, one guy, you're, you're, there are medical marijuana, prescription Germany, you had to pick a pharmacy that you were going to procure your medicine from. And uh, and so if you were, let's say that with some pharmacy in Berlin and you were traveling to Munich, you couldn't just stop in a pharmacy and get your, get your medicine. So two major things changed. It became a lot less prohibitive for a patient to get their prescription and all pharmacies were able to carry cannabis and any patient could get it from any pharmacy that, uh, that, that decided to carry a cannabis.

Speaker 1: I hadn't let the market decide is what, is what they said

Speaker 3: in that regard. Yes. Uh, exactly. And uh, uh, and made it less prohibitive for doctors to give the prescriptions out. Whereas before it was kind of like a lot of state, a lot of people in certain states in America had, had experienced this, where you back in the day you go to a doctor, they say, well, did you try percocet for pain? This, that, and you know, that kind of defeats the whole purpose anyway of why one might get their medical marijuana card and so they were making a go to that type of rig of a role in, uh, in Germany and now and now that's not the case at all anymore. It's, it's, it still has its little nuance problems and whatever, of course. But, uh, it was a huge step forward, um, and that, that helped make the, uh, the event a big success.

Speaker 3: And, and, and, and the third thing that was really an important change was up until that point. And still to this day, actually, the only the only place they Germany gets their medicine is, is the important. And from right now it's Holland in Canada. And that changed also in that they, they let uh, the, they're allowing for domestic license production in Germany and that won't be online for probably, I don't know, a year or so when the first foreign German pharmacies carry German cannabis. But, uh, but that was a good thing also, that vote was a little bit prohibitive. Uh, uh, and not so free market that prong because they basically forced anyone who wanted to be a German domestic producer to team up with a Canadian who had been doing it for some time and that was a, that was a funky little thing that, that we think is going to change, but, but, you know, it was really odd because Germany is all about Germany, uh, and, and the free market and self sufficiency and they really kind of, lot of people were excited to get into the proverbial game, if you will, and realized it was not going to happen and uh, or was going to be a lot harder to acquire a license because now they had to team up with someone who, a producer that I think they said hadn't been producing for since two, five years or something like that.

Speaker 3: I don't know the exact date, but.

Speaker 1: So that will include the Netherlands, you know, anybody that was importing, not just candidate. Obviously Canada is the best case, a best example. But, uh, that'll include anybody that was importing or exporting to Germany. Right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's true. And the reason I focus on Canada is because it's just, there's so many more totally licensed producers. I think Holland is, it's pretty much bed, bedrock and

Speaker 1: bedroom.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And uh, uh, then that's, and they kind of have a monopoly in Holland as far as I know, so, uh, or, or close to it. And, and so, yeah. So that's. So that was a very interesting thing where they didn't allow the German people that kind of thrive when it within an of themselves and kind of a and basically mandated that they partner with a, with a foreign entity to become a domestic producer. A little bit ironic.

Speaker 1: Totally. But what, what they would argue, I would imagine is, hey, listen, these guys have been doing this for quite some time. We're talking about medicine. Thankfully we're talking about medicine. And so if we, you know, if you want to start from a standing stop, you've got to go ahead and partner with somebody that's been in the game for awhile. You know, you and I can agree or disagree on the merits. But, uh, I would imagine that's the thinking. Which brings me to the interesting situation that the United States finds itself in, which is not first, not second, not third, and uh, you know, really making a, an argument for being last in the world as far as, uh, you know, federally regulated and legislated cannabis.

Speaker 3: Well, that's the interesting thing. That's, that's, that's another way I got lucky. I'm the, I'm the, I'm the first person to, to, to go out internationally from America and do conferences around the world. Um, and I, I didn't really know that it was, it's actually when, when trump got elected, um, or I should say when he put sessions in, there you go for attorney general. There was a lot of thinking of, wow, are we gonna, you know, you know, fall back in America. We going to take some setback. So of all the progress from all progress we've made. And it made me think a lot. I'm glad I've made inroads in Canada and Europe because those might be, those are the up and coming spots. Uh, uh, you know, I think we get kind of complacent in our own respective states. Like, I live in Oregon and it's, uh, it's, it's, it's awesome.

Speaker 1: Sure.

Speaker 3: Yeah. But we, you know, we, I think we lose track that, hey, this ain't federally legal yet and you know, uh, you know, I don't get complacent. Of course I have been incarcerated before, so I know the horrors of losing your freedom. And so that's why I'm an ancillary business person. I don't deal in the actual product and wouldn't until it is federally illegal in the states, but I think a lot of people get complacent and think, oh, the feds aren't going to boss me. And if you look statistically, the feds really aren't busting people in, in these, in these states with clear laws. However, uh, you know, if, if, if what's past is prologue that could change at any time.

Speaker 1: Yeah. It doesn't even need to be passed. I mean, you know, there is ample reporting on the fact that, uh, the Department of Justice is absolutely looking into whatever they can do even in legal states, uh, to, to kind of disrupt what's happening.

Speaker 3: Right. And trying to roll, roll back, roll record for Blumenauer amendment.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I mean, he wrote a letter to the state saying, hey, hey, excuse me. He wrote a letter to the, uh, to, to Congress saying, hey, please don't please don't pass this and we only got to pass through December. So, you know, your friend, your friends in mind, uh, Dana and earl have to have to get, uh, get their buddies to, uh, to push back on this. Right.

Speaker 3: It's a real. It's really messed up. It's convoluted. And the point is, is we could, uh, we could go back to the stone ages at, at, at, at just the flick of a switch. And so it's so, and so, I just had on a, not on an activist or political perspective, like, wow, which of course I have, but from a business perspective I was like, Oh wow, I'm glad I have, you know, we'll just go to Australia and Canada and Germany and Croatia in Spain and wherever else starts to, uh, legalize federally and then, and they surpass a America and America all of a sudden becomes a last because the, you know, whatever happens, we're until we federally, if we crack on or not until we federally legalized, we're missing out on, um, unless there's some special provision, unimportant export opportunities, also a part of a primarily exporting and uh, it's a big deal. And so all the pup coast public corporations from, uh, from the Toronto exchange or just going.com, crazy, you know, and we don't have anything like that. We kind of have these shady penny stocks fitting in in the states. And so we're, yeah, it's as progressive as one state a respective state might be. Uh, it's, it, it doesn't translate federally for the, for the state.

Speaker 1: I just want to make sure that folks know that you did, you know, kind of reveal your age there by saying that the folks on the Canadian Stock Exchange, the stocks are acting like dotcom stocks from the, you know, kind of 1999, 2000 so that, you know, that lets us know he, he got, he got a couple of years on you, right?

Speaker 3: Well I'm getting closer to 50 40 so.

Speaker 1: Well you're, you're even older than me. That's how old you are.

Speaker 3: Ain't shit. Yeah. I was the guy on Haight Ashbury and 93 94 signed saying legalize weed and everyone was laughing at me with my dreadlocks but nobody's laughing now. So

Speaker 1: that's exactly right. And, and uh, you know, kind of as you laugh your way to Australia, you know, you're, you're kind of taking a halfway measure and hidden Hawaii first, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's right. Yeah. Cool. Why is coming up December first through third? We've got a big golf tournament at the ocean side. Robert Trent Jones a course on the fourth and we will be delving into some, uh, some Australian stuff. There will be doing some Hawaiian stuff and then we'll be doing, some will be doing some international stuff as, as, as well, it's, it's the first ICBC that is a, a true destination event. So we're calling it the cannabis island retreat and it's kind of like a, a meeting point for, um, for a lot of heavy hitters in the industry and a lot of investment finance stuff will be going overall. So,

Speaker 1: and if I'm listening a who you know, who you're looking for to attend, who would be good to be in the room?

Speaker 3: Yeah. So basically investment in finance guys, we're going to earn gals. We're going to have a lot of investment finance people there. No doubt. It's going to be some real fierce intimate networking, uh, you know, big deals and ain't, it ain't no consumer show, that's for sure. And uh, uh, and then you know, anyone that's interested in, um, uh, you know, what's going on in Hawaii, we will have a couple panels on, on what's going on and why. So if anyone has any interest in the Hawaiian market, that's a, it's, it's an, it's an important venue for that. We'll have most of the major players in Hawaii and uh,

Speaker 1: and they're, they're in the news now too. I mean they just opened up basically for business, right?

Speaker 3: Yup. They, they opened up, it's, it's funky. But

Speaker 1: as he usually is in the early days.

Speaker 3: Yeah, exactly. But it's, but it's going and that's great. And, and, uh, they just need to, you know, basically they need a few more labs for certification right now because the supply chain is bogging down because the one lab that is certified just can't do it all. And so like, um, my guides on choir waiting to a waiting to open until they know they can stay open and don't run into a law and are a glut and a half to have to close down. So it's really fucking Hawaii. It's just a funky. The politics in Hawaii are just really funky as maybe a lot of people might know. A real old school, uh, uh, stuff, you know, I think you needed a million dollars to, you know, even woody Harrelson couldn't get a license on Hawaii. Right. So, uh,

Speaker 1: it might be because he said he stopped, you know, using cannabis. Yeah. Why do people live? And he should not hit you. Just not so thing. Did he really say he? And then he took it back. So. Okay, good. That's great.

Speaker 3: The other reason people might come to Hawaii is it is a destination event. It's at the Grand Hyatt, this gorgeous five star hotel right on, like, I dunno, it's like 100 acres right on the ocean and uh, it's stellar and normally wounds or 500 bucks a night. And uh, I got the room block starting at 180 bucks a night with the resort. Yeah. So it's, it's anybody that wants to come and mix business and pleasure. It is the destination event of the year. I don't know how anyone could argue anything else, but that.

Speaker 1: There you go. All right. So, so that's the one coming up in December and you did kind of foreshadow, um, you know, international destinations come 2018, what's the first one out of the gate? You know, not on American soil, I guess

Speaker 3: American. So that'd be Berlin in April. All right. Yeah, we'll run in Berlin and then. And that should be, would that be a sold out event because it was almost sold out a last year and we were at the same venue. So it should be a bursting at the seams, you know, that's a great destination event to a uh, you know, the hotel, the venue I have in Berlin, this is really sweet. It's right in the heart of midtown on Friedrich Strauss, uh, right next to the Friedrichs Josef von Hoff, which is a famous, a train station that connected east and West Berlin back in the back of the day. So the location is just absolutely amazing. And then we'll, and then, and we're going to delve into what's going on in Germany more and what's going on in greater Europe because now Spain is about to invasively Spain as a very interesting, uh, animal right now, isn't that we all think that it's going off of because of all the social clubs, right? But really what's the big, the big business play in Spain is they're about to go uniformly, federally, medical, right? And so that's where then you'll have actual real parameters to work around and within

Speaker 1: most likely be out of Madrid, not Barcelona or Barcelona, as they might say, which means that whatever's going on in Catalonia right now might not have as great an effect on legal cannabis as you might think.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, that's that. That's also, uh, uh, the truth. However, the opposite is not if in Barcelona Madrid legalized Federally Medical Marijuana, Catalonia will get on board with, with, with that. However, the reverse is obviously not true, is that Madrid, Madrid won't follow the Catalonians. Um, in fact, that might their openness with the social clubs. That puts the emphasis on Madrid almost even more until we leave to make a robust and clear medical.

Speaker 1: I mean, that's what bar Barcelona has been waiting for that, you know, for the past few years, the smoking clubs or you know, a, a burgeoning still even, even after, um, you know, many were, were shut down. But uh, well that's an interesting. That's an interesting thing. None that is a, how should I, how can I put this in, there is no question about it. That, that is an interesting place for legal cannabis and otherwise. Right?

Speaker 3: That's right. And the ICBC, will it be. It's true. It's amazing what's going on down there. And the ICBC, we will, we will be in Spain. I don't have a date set quite yet, but we will be announcing that soon when we're, when we will be in Spain and we have some really, uh, great partners that everyone knows about. I won't mention them by name yet, but, uh, that we're working with over there. So it's, uh, it's really exciting. And then we'll be in Canada, in Vancouver, uh, for our second visit in June, late June of one week before legalization. And I expect that to be a madhouse. And uh, yeah, it's, it's, it's, it's, it's great. Um, we'll be at the will will be downtown Vancouver Twenty fourth, 25th of June and that is, that is going to be a big event. I'm already getting that's already on our website actually. And I'm, I'm getting a lot of feedback on that also,

Speaker 1: uh, Vancouver being the Barcelona of Canada with no with no succession vote on the roles and anytime soon.

Speaker 3: Not yet at least a, yeah, that's a great analogy that they are the Barcelona of Canada and that they're, they just pushed the envelope and you know, it is the Republican Vancouver and no matter what the feds do and how they try to uniformly control the, the, the, the recreational supply system will probably always be dispensary's in Vancouver that, that run without a license, you know,

Speaker 1: now licensed by the city and uh, you know, as well as the, uh, the province. So, you know, we're getting there.

Speaker 3: That's. No, that's that, that's true, but that Nicole might get you a cup of coffee where the old federal want to.

Speaker 1: Exactly. Especially when a cup of coffee costs to 25.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well I at least that in Vancouver. Uh, yeah. So and so and so and so we, yeah, we have a lot of great places. We're looking, going to Spain, we're looking at going to Australia and um, and I really want to do an event in Croatia just because I like it there a lot of times I'll do an event just because I think it's a great, a great place that everybody that I want to share how awesome it is, wherever. Yeah,

Speaker 1: I haven't been there. I've heard it's amazing. I just got back from Budapest, which is, uh, which is pretty awesome itself.

Speaker 3: Yeah, Budapest is amazing. Uh, uh, hungry is amazing. I lived on the Hungarian border for a couple of years in Slovenia. Um, you know, that area of the world I'm, I'm extremely fond of. My wife's from Slovenia and I lived in Slovenia for two and a half years. So, uh, here you go. I visit Croatia, a lot, can't say enough about that country and it still actually cheap, relatively speaking,

Speaker 1: and if you want to hear more about Slovenia, go back and listen to the Alex Rogers Bio podcast, which, uh, I'll go ahead and include the number in the session copy after this thing, which we're getting to the end of. So I'll go ahead and ask the three final questions, Alex, for returning guests. You ready for these? I'll tell you what they are. I'll ask you them in order. What would you change about yourself? If anything? It might be something you're already working on. What would you change about anything else, if anything? And then the final is always the same on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there, but uh, what would you change about yourself if anything? It might be something you're already working on.

Speaker 3: Oh my God, what would I change about myself? Man, you really want me to pick.

Speaker 1: You're aware that you're not perfect. Is that what I'm hearing?

Speaker 3: Chewing gum aisle at the grocery store. Well, I'll tell you what. I'll tell you what I've changed about myself is that last year I worked my butt off to, to expand the ICPC internationally. I almost killed myself doing so and uh, uh, uh, I, I'm not working as much now and when I do work I try to really manage my time well and work efficiently. You know, I'm, I'm from Minneapolis, Minnesota, you know, I didn't, I didn't grow up religious per se, but a or I didn't grow up religious brought. I'm still, I feel that if I don't work like 10 hours a week or 10 hours a day that might Lutheran, God's will smoke me on the spot. And so it's almost like the Jewish thing. Right. But a Catholic thing, right? Anybody Different in Catholic Jew or a Jewish guy going diligent campus? Jews, Jews. Catholics are afraid of God. Jews are afraid of their parents. So yeah, I'm probably on the more of the friend of my parents. I think so. Uh, but uh, what was the second?

Speaker 1: Yeah, no, sure. Your point being, listen, work hard, but work smart is your point.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Yeah, no doubt. And I think every time everyone has that point in business where the iron is hot and they have to strike and they have to just, uh, just kick ass and go for it. But that's, you know, for me, I, I did that for eight months. I mean I'm always working 40, 50, 60 hours, but I would talk in 90 to 100 hours, 110 hour work weeks. And I did that for about eight months and you know, know, and, and, and working smart is another thing, you know, also my midwest ethic is just, Hey, you do it all yourself and blah blah blah. No, just let it go and be smart and uh, and, and work smart and efficiently and manage your time.

Speaker 1: There you go. All right. So what would you change about it? Anything else? Anything else? If you could,

Speaker 3: what would I change about anything else? Man, that is a big. I mean, is this like the Miss America world peace.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Miss America type questions certainly. And so try not to a blast theme or a large groups of people here.

Speaker 3: Right? Well, I'll try. I'm good at that, but uh, uh, uh, let's see here. What would I, you know, uh, yeah, this, this is slightly corny, but I really want to see cannabis a decriminalized, uh, around the world. I think it's really important for. Didn't know or about me at least, is that I don't, I don't make, I don't look at the cannabis industry from a business perspective. I look at it from a recreational users or patients perspective. So I always, I always favor public policy that's good for the record. Recreational user or the or the patient. A good example would be in Oregon when we legalized medical going really guys, recreation island, one of the biggest medical marijuana clinics in Oregon and, and I knew that my business would, would falter once it was a, once cannabis was legal and it did, and medical marijuana took a big hit and it was wild wild west and they were some golden years for sure, but they will only golden years because it was still illegal and people are still going to jail for it.

Speaker 3: It was still probable cause for cops to search your whole house car whatever. And so now if you look at the, uh, if you look at the, um, uh, the statistics, you know, the medical marijuana has taken a big hit, a lot of people crying over that, but if you look at the criminal statistics in the state, arrest for cannabis are down and not just down there way down against what, and guess what else? The legislate Oregon legislator has worked proactively to actually reduce criminal penalties for cannabis. I'm even further than our original measure. Ninety one, uh, had had stated so, so I can sell you a pound and a half of weed on the street, seth in, in my little town in Ashland here, and it's a misdemeanor. So, uh, so that's great. I think the, the, the crime in, in, in, in pop dealing should always be tax evasion and money laundering, those are always going to be crimes, right?

Speaker 3: But the actual criminality of the, um, the, the substance itself, cannabis itself should be decriminalized a completely. Sure. You're just talking about as far as tax evasion, all that, you're talking about unregulated. Uh, you know, uh, distributors, so to speak, if you're in a regulated market, pound and a half on the street and I make 400 bucks and I don't pay the tax or whatever, there in lies the crime. And the same is true for any commodity. So that's the real kind of libertarian, straightforward, very common law, a philosophy and a truly important. The other thing that coincides is that is that everyone should be able to grow in their house a certain amount of plants. This, what this means is if, if, you know, as the industry gets convoluted as it gets usurped by this kind of big, big business, capitalistic model where everyone can still grow their little patch. So if you don't want to go by your, your, your, your marble, Acapulco, gold, you know, then you still have the option to, to trade among family, friends or grow your, grow yourself. And I think those are, those are really important, uh, precepts, the, that kind of, you know, that's kind of my mantra for the whole, for the whole movement.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I'm with you on home grow as long as it's more like six plants and less like a 100, you know, if it's actually for you and yours, that's fine, but if you're saying the 300 plants as a home grow and I'm not with you.

Speaker 3: No, it's basically six to 15 plants would be where it would lie for me.

Speaker 1: Sure. That shows you the difference between you and me. Six 15. Right. You know, that's, that's what the, that's what that is.

Speaker 3: Yeah. I'm a little more renegade for sure.

Speaker 1: Alright. Soundtrack time. You gave us Curtis Mayfield last time on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 3: What are we going to do here? Let's see, I got it. I'm a black Uhuru. Guess who's coming to dinner?

Speaker 1: Fantastic man. Alex Rogers. Keep on keeping on and keep working at least 50, 60 hours a week. Would you? Would you think now is kind of half time, you know, half, half, half days

Speaker 3: pension right there.

Speaker 2: Good talking to you, man. I'll talk to you down the line and there you have Alex. Roger's doing his best to, uh, work as hard as possible it sounds like while staying sane. So very much appreciate Alex and his time very much appreciate you and your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.