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Ep.307: Tim McGraw

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.307: Tim McGraw

Ep.307: Tim McGraw

Returning from Episodes 26 & 155, Tim McGraw joins us from a cafe in California’s Bay Area. After securing cannabis licenses in Illinois and building up operations there, he’s returning to his real estate roots while taking advantage of his cannabis operator acumen.
We discuss facilitating an opportunity to create thousands of jobs through cannabis in local municipalities that absolutely need those jobs. Tim notes that no matter where you are, the cannabis economy is already in your home town whether you have legal cannabis or not. If it’s not locally legal, rather than money spent on cannabis going back into your community- it disappears. He’s seen the import of the direct impact of cannabis dollars on a community that needs it. And that impact is immediately quantifiable.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Tim Mcgraw returns

Speaker 2: returning from Episode Twenty Six and one slash 55. Tim Mcgraw joins us from the cafe in California's Bay area after securing cannabis licenses in Illinois and building up operations there is returning to his real estate briefs while taking advantage of his cannabis operator. Acumen. We discussed facilitating an opportunity to create thousands of jobs through cannabis in local municipalities that absolutely need those jobs. Tim notes that no matter where you are, the cannabis economy is already in your hometown, whether you have legal cannabis, we're not. If it's not locally legal, rather than money spent on cannabis going back into your community, it disappears. He seen the import of the direct impact of canvas dollars on a community that needs it, and that impact is immediately quantifiable. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Tim Mcgraw, Shannon laid on thicker or

Speaker 1: just be. I don't think you have a choice. There's no choice. There's no choice. It is what it is. So Tim Mcgraw, if you can believe it. We're here in California. Yes. Because you live here now. I do. I do. I'm a proud California now. Right? And again, you wouldn't know it by hearing you, but I have a flip flop tan line that's called. I mean, I'm now officially California. I told you the first thing I think about when I, when I hear Tim Mcgraw is California, I think you know, this is, this is a two peas in a pod. I'm the typical typical California, that's for sure. So how did this happen? I mean, you actually like a. we're doing something here. Yeah, I mean this is, this is the new chapter in a Tim Mcgraw Legacy.

Speaker 1: What will you, what, what I'm doing now is really what I've done for almost 20 back to real estate real estate. Um, it's obviously centered on cannabis, which is what I know and what I'm passionate about. Sure. I've always been a real estate developer. Uh, I've always planned on moving out west anyway, so now I'm, this is it. I mean we're, we're going full bore. We have two large scale sites under contract now and we've got zoning entitlements in place for both, uh, we're negotiating a third so the portfolio is growing very quickly. I mean, I'm doing a lot of running around and a lot of city council meetings and engineering meetings and architects and so on and so forth. But um, it's no longer an idea now. It's the real deal. All right, well let's get all this out of the way here. As far as zoning is concerned, what are we talking about?

Speaker 1: Well, that's just to let the listeners know what's going on, what's going to happen. You give them some context is, as you and I both know, starting next year in California, in order to even operate she cannabis operation of any kind, whether it's a dispensary cultivation, manufacturing, volatile, volatile, and nonvolatile, transportation, distribution, all those 20 plus licensed types to even apply for that license. You have to prove that you have local approval for that. And what goes with that is local zoning approval and entitlements. So what we've done is we've done all that hard work and what's, which has taken me months of time and lots of negotiations, but we've gotten the zoning entitlements out of the way for operators. So they're essentially buying or leasing a legally ready real estate for their operations. What locations so far? Uh, so far we have a location about 50 miles north of Sacramento, one about 12 miles outside of Fresno and we're negotiating right in middle of negotiations on another one.

Speaker 1: Not far from Bakersfield, but they're all very well from a logistical standpoint, you know, got three regions covered. The north, central and south. But again, they're zoned both sites. All of our sites are zoned for all of the licensed types except for outdoor grow and dispensary. Okay. And the, the, the biggest factor is our costs. The permitting costs that we've negotiated with the cities is, is the lowest in the state quite frankly. And it has to be. I mean, there's going to make it work in order to just wait for that federal excise tax once we get through. Yeah, that first 15 percent going into the state, so you know by the end of the day these guys are going to be struggling to survive paying 176 percent on the dollar. It's not. So there's not that. The margins aren't what people think they are in regulated cannabis to the way it is now in California it has been since 1996.

Speaker 1: Tim Mcgraw returns

Speaker 2: returning from Episode Twenty Six and one slash 55. Tim Mcgraw joins us from the cafe in California's Bay area after securing cannabis licenses in Illinois and building up operations there is returning to his real estate briefs while taking advantage of his cannabis operator. Acumen. We discussed facilitating an opportunity to create thousands of jobs through cannabis in local municipalities that absolutely need those jobs. Tim notes that no matter where you are, the cannabis economy is already in your hometown, whether you have legal cannabis, we're not. If it's not locally legal, rather than money spent on cannabis going back into your community, it disappears. He seen the import of the direct impact of canvas dollars on a community that needs it, and that impact is immediately quantifiable. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. Tim Mcgraw, Shannon laid on thicker or

Speaker 1: just be. I don't think you have a choice. There's no choice. There's no choice. It is what it is. So Tim Mcgraw, if you can believe it. We're here in California. Yes. Because you live here now. I do. I do. I'm a proud California now. Right? And again, you wouldn't know it by hearing you, but I have a flip flop tan line that's called. I mean, I'm now officially California. I told you the first thing I think about when I, when I hear Tim Mcgraw is California, I think you know, this is, this is a two peas in a pod. I'm the typical typical California, that's for sure. So how did this happen? I mean, you actually like a. we're doing something here. Yeah, I mean this is, this is the new chapter in a Tim Mcgraw Legacy.

Speaker 1: What will you, what, what I'm doing now is really what I've done for almost 20 back to real estate real estate. Um, it's obviously centered on cannabis, which is what I know and what I'm passionate about. Sure. I've always been a real estate developer. Uh, I've always planned on moving out west anyway, so now I'm, this is it. I mean we're, we're going full bore. We have two large scale sites under contract now and we've got zoning entitlements in place for both, uh, we're negotiating a third so the portfolio is growing very quickly. I mean, I'm doing a lot of running around and a lot of city council meetings and engineering meetings and architects and so on and so forth. But um, it's no longer an idea now. It's the real deal. All right, well let's get all this out of the way here. As far as zoning is concerned, what are we talking about?

Speaker 1: Well, that's just to let the listeners know what's going on, what's going to happen. You give them some context is, as you and I both know, starting next year in California, in order to even operate she cannabis operation of any kind, whether it's a dispensary cultivation, manufacturing, volatile, volatile, and nonvolatile, transportation, distribution, all those 20 plus licensed types to even apply for that license. You have to prove that you have local approval for that. And what goes with that is local zoning approval and entitlements. So what we've done is we've done all that hard work and what's, which has taken me months of time and lots of negotiations, but we've gotten the zoning entitlements out of the way for operators. So they're essentially buying or leasing a legally ready real estate for their operations. What locations so far? Uh, so far we have a location about 50 miles north of Sacramento, one about 12 miles outside of Fresno and we're negotiating right in middle of negotiations on another one.

Speaker 1: Not far from Bakersfield, but they're all very well from a logistical standpoint, you know, got three regions covered. The north, central and south. But again, they're zoned both sites. All of our sites are zoned for all of the licensed types except for outdoor grow and dispensary. Okay. And the, the, the biggest factor is our costs. The permitting costs that we've negotiated with the cities is, is the lowest in the state quite frankly. And it has to be. I mean, there's going to make it work in order to just wait for that federal excise tax once we get through. Yeah, that first 15 percent going into the state, so you know by the end of the day these guys are going to be struggling to survive paying 176 percent on the dollar. It's not. So there's not that. The margins aren't what people think they are in regulated cannabis to the way it is now in California it has been since 1996.

Speaker 1: There's very little regulation so you can. It's the cost. The operates not nearly what it's going to be come next year when you have to worry about seed to sale tracking, you have to worry about passing third party testing for pesticides and residual solvents and mycotoxins and the list goes on and on. So this sea change that's happening next year is going to kind of legitimize what is the Mecca of cannabis. First off, I mean it is. The should be. Hold the crown as the Mecca. Denver took it for a little while. Now it's coming up. Back then you were saying it's not Illinois, no noise, nothing. Not Mecca. The Mecca. Not with 25,000 or 30,000 patients. Right. But let's go back there for a minute because you are bringing the experience, uh, that you have from Illinois out here and the experience that you have in Illinois is a tightly regulated market.

Speaker 1: I'm the most tightly, tightly regulated markets in New York. I would have argued with you there, but you know, New York, Minnesota are fighting for a few seconds, one, two, and three right there. But I guess what lessons learned are you bringing from that too, you know, from Illinois to here? Well, what operators need to need to be supplied to survive and that means, you know, sophisticated design and architecture, architecture and engineering for one. Uh, some of my biggest lessons learned through the building of these operations is, you know, how complicated and how insanely arduous engineering these facilities is. This is not something that you just take out of a means book or, or ask your local contractor about, is this something that you kind of need to have experience in with, you know, because the environment is so important. You know, the, the co two levels, the humidity, the humidity and temperature being that the two most important things also see ceo two and then being able to have, you know, essentially clean room style grows so you don't have any cross contamination, uh, and, or if you do happen to get some pests that you don't want the quarantine, they're not going to spread throughout your facility.

Speaker 1: A W we've even engineered our facilities down to the fact that there was no landscaping inside of our campuses. It's all hardscape because I don't want one of our operators to blame us because somebody walked through the grass and brought spider mites into their, their Russet mites or something that's really hard to get rid of a into the facility. So we've designed these facilities all the way down to the landscaping being optimal for a cannabis operation. So that's how you run your life too, right? It's like, let's not pay attention to the way Tim McGraw looks.

Speaker 1: I'd argue I'm a better looking in the country singer. I'd argue. I would argue, oh, there's no question about it. Why do you think you've. Where's that big hat? I got more hair for sure. So you know, we're, we're bringing up landscaping and you did mention the types of licenses, you know, no dispensary. Fine. I get that. That's a whole different thing. You did mention no outdoor grow. I would imagine. We're already talking about why right? Well, it's right from the get go. The way that I've always operated, the way I've operated in other states we have operated internationally even is to kind of bully our way into communities and going to say La county or San Diego and say, you know, we, we got to be here, we've got to be here and then we want to try and try to find a space and then deal with the way that they've written the ordinances.

Speaker 1: We go in the reverse. I find locations or sites, cities that want to work with us and needs some economic stimulus a and see that the benefits of having a can of hub, a facility or campus in their community, because you know, this is an example, one site we're going to create over 1300 jobs now. It's kind of those are gonna be operators that are hiring, hiring people, but at the end of the hub, the argument goes, yeah, they're not there. Right. You know, these small towns have five, 8,000 people are going to see a couple, two, $3,000,000 a year in additional revenue when that's their yearly budget in some cases. Right. So, um, why would we say no to Tim? Now it's. Well, I think part of it is that quite frankly is that, you know, they know that I'm not some guy that, you know, they just fall off the turnip truck.

Speaker 1: I have a track record. I know what I'm doing. I think that I come across as knowing, you know, I think that comes across in my, in our meetings, we're not the first guy that pitched. I'm not the first guy has gone in there and pitch these guys expect to the sites. They had a, a, a ban in place, a ban against all cannabis operations and that actually remains in one case and they're just doing an overlay of the zoning ordinance where you can have hubs. A sites are, are zoned specifically for this purpose. What do you think it was that kind of turned them around on what they had in place? You know, I was able to stand up to scrutiny and questions and uh, tell them what they would, you know, what we were doing this in. Describe it very well. And then also I think the, the economic impact was probably the biggest influence on the decision.

Speaker 1: Yeah. You know, again, 1300 jobs you can't sneeze at, you know, a town that's, that's, that's struggling and needs jobs and I think that one of our, one of the towns has close to 40 percent unemployment in the off season, you know, because their agricultural towns. So a lot of these towns are struggling. A lot of agricultural communities are struggling because in California there's not many crops that are doing very well right now outside of almonds and in a couple of other things, there's not very many crops that are doing well and a cannabis obviously is doing well. What I've, I still want to kind of continue to talk about outdoor grow because I feel like I didn't get what I wanted there, but also back to the outdoor girl. Well, let's just do that quick I guess. Right. So I guess the biggest issue with outdoor grows the smell.

Speaker 1: Sure. Uh, as far as the, the locals go and they're going to notice it, they're going to notice it and they're not. We're building, you know, labs style, very, very sophisticated, very technologically advanced facilities as opposed to just outdoor outdoor grows with hoop houses and you know, you've got runoff going into the streams, you've got pesticides potentially getting in the soil. All of those issues are things that, that towns don't want. And, and quite frankly, indoor grow is really going to be the future of California, you know, high quality grow up. But let's not say that, let's say greenhouse, right? The benefit of Sun. Yes. Well, greenhouse was allowed. Going to build ingredient. Exactly. Ours are fully enclosed and they are environmentally controlled. So there's no smell. And we mitigate smell with a carbon filter, ring, uv light, and also ionization. So anything that leaves our greenhouse girls, which again are loud, was mixed, light is loud in all of our sites.

Speaker 1: We're not pumping out, you know, it's not gonna smell like you hit a skunk a mile away from the place you were three or three. So yeah, we have very specific covenance as far as our operators go as far as smell mitigation. Yeah. So I mean you're not gonna be able to smaller facilities from, you know, maybe in the parking lot but not, not much further than that. So let's talk about this 40 percent unemployment thing and these 1500, 1300 jobs that you're going to bring it. You've done it in Illinois, now you're kind of bringing it into various communities here in California when we, when you take a step back and just look at the United States, forget about, because I know you've worked globally, but forget about that for a second. How big is the potential do you think, for the cannabis industry to actually hit a re have a real dent in unemployment in communities that need it?

Speaker 1: So when I talk, when I watch vice news and see, you know, a report on West Virginia, coal miners and I think to myself, well, what could they do? There you go. I mean, that's, that's, that's a great example. We believe that, uh, right now in California, the market's already here. It's already a multibillion dollar market, but unfortunately because of the lack of regulation, it just kind of goes into the ether. It's a cash business. Uh, you know, employees aren't being the payroll, their w two for the most part, a lot of them paid in cash or at the best 10 99. Our money doesn't benefit us. One, he's not adding back, going back into the economy with as much impact as it could. Now it's providing jobs and there's a, especially northern California and then we will triangle and whatnot. There's a lot of seasonal jobs, but most of those guys are not paid the way that a typical corporation pays their employees.

Speaker 1: So with what the new regulation, uh, and the fact that you're going to be state law, state licensing, that's going to mean that this money is going to actually get pumped back into the academy. Holy Yeah, but legally it's going to have to be one hundred cents on the dollar. Well, it should, if you're going to follow the irs rules with two 80, if you file your taxes correctly and do everything you need to be needed to do to be legit or to not run sideways at the law that, that money's going to end. End Up back in California. Crawford is first off, I mean the 15 percent tax. It's all going towards regulation. So the money that we pumped into these local economies, I've always said from the beginning is that I like working with these smaller towns because you have, you see a much more direct impact.

Speaker 1: Absolutely. Instead of getting eaten up in bureaucracy and in larger counties and in, in larger cities, the impact that we have in these small towns is immediately quantifiable. You can immediately see what it does, even during construction, before we see any of the operators have hire anybody that just the development costs and the in the, in the contractors going out for lunch every day. Dave, Jim and Nancy didn't have a job before we got here. Now they do. Bottom line. That is going to be that simple and there's not just low paying jobs, not just tremors or you know, this is, these are jobs are all across the spectrum. This is up to, you know, phd chemists and you know, geneticists and that this is not just low income jobs were created that these operators are creating. Um, these are, these are jobs that people can support a family on.

Speaker 1: So when you look at West Virginia, how big do you think that this can possibly be? You know how I, I'm asking you as like a business guy that sees markets, right? You know, so if I said to you, hey listen, we can get you in West Virginia, what would you. Obviously you got to do some research. I'm just throwing it at you, but you know, what does that make you think as far as unemployment as far as effecting that economy? I think that I've, based on what we've seen to date in other states like Colorado and Washington, um, and other regulated states like Illinois, as you see a lot of economic stimulus and not a lot of downside. You know, cannabis is, I think the only non criminalistic drug where if you're a patient or a, even a recreational user, you're less likely to commit a crime who are holding up banks to supply their, their, their cannabis habit.

Speaker 1: Uh, it just doesn't happen. But then look at it from medicinally. I mean, what it does, I've seen it save people's lives. The number of veterans that I've met with ptsd that, that this has completely changed their life. They've come back from Iraq or from Afghanistan and around the, what they called it, the, what they called the combat cocktail. I think that's what they call it. It's basically an antidepressants opiates, and then it's washed it down with some booze. And that's what. And that's how we treat people. You've got to take these pills, then take these pills, take these pills to solve those pills, those pills, and then you know, because you're so distraught because all the pills you got to go get a drink at the bar. Exactly. So, but that's just, I mean that's just one condition. Forget about pain and the opiate opioid epidemic that we have nationwide, I think West Virginia is probably ranks up there as far as opioid addiction goes.

Speaker 1: The number of people that get off of opiates because of cannabis is. I don't know the exact numbers, but it's, it's huge. Every state that has regulated cannabis sees a decrease in opioid abuse and overdose. It turns out the cannabis as an exit drug. Oh, absolutely. A calling. It's not a gateway drug. If anything is a gateway. It's alcohol or opiate itself. Yeah. Most of the dumb things I've done in my life were not because of cannabis put kind of a different gateway, which would be alcohol. Exactly. You might have said some silly things on a couch somewhere. You know, I would disagree with cannabis. I'd probably say it's a very enlightening thing to couch somewhere, have it some of my best, the Bains and the conversations I had medicated so well that, you know, we, we've spoken before about the fact that, you know, you're not originally really kind of a cannabis activist, you know?

Speaker 1: I mean, I would disagree with that a little bit. I mean, I've been going on six years now and now you're a veteran, which is, which is interesting, right? You know, certainly. But on your way until annoy, you know, you were, you were a new kid on the block six years ago, right? Yeah. Everybody starts somewhere. But um, because initially I was going to do something at Michigan. That was my initial plan because Michigan pastoral offers, but after looking at Michigan's law just wasn't very commercially viable and we've seen that that has absolutely come true. Correct. They're working out the kinks mean it's coming along. But the reason I came out to California come out to California is because first, firstly, it's the largest market there is the cannabis cannabis. The California cannabis market is larger than all the other states put together. And that's before recreational or adult use.

Speaker 1: So it's only going to grow. I mean, this is, this is a six, eight, $10,000,000,000 industry out here. So this is before we even start, we're saying that, yeah, it's already projected to be, I think six, 6 billion by 20, 20. And I think that's probably not a number's probably a little bit short, but imagine all the jobs that a, that a industry that big, it's already surpassed manufacturing, I believe in California. So it's, that's a lot of money that's going to be now in the system and benefiting the local municipalities like we are. And just the state in general. What advice do you have for folks? Let's do it this way. You've spoken with your fair share of regulators at the state, local municipal level. What, what advice do you have for folks? Learnings from Illinois? Learnings from California. If I'm sitting in, um, the, uh, the, uh, town magistrate in Arkansas.

Speaker 1: You know, what, what did, what would you tell me? What would you share with me? Share with you is that there is no boogeyman, uh, a lot of. I met with a lot of local officials, I mean, and then federally, but with a Dana Rohrabacher, a rand Paul, cory booker, a lot of the federal level, a lot of supporters and um, but a lot of them going in initially think that they're going to be helped guys picketing outside the office the next day if they ordered, if they cosponsor a bill or they get, they get behind or, or just just letting some support or, or, or say anything positive about cannabis, right? Seventy five percent of the country wants to see it legalized. So you're actually making an error in judgment the other way you're going to get more votes and more support by supporting cannabis than going the acting against it.

Speaker 1: There's only one guy that's against it. He happens to be the attorney general of the United States of America. But, you know, you would think I'd be more worried about that, but I'm not, you know, I've, I think that trump. Well there's definitely issues. He's a populist and I believe the industry is, you know, the banks are too big to fail. I think that the cannabis market at this point, especially California, is too big the mess with it. You'd be poking a bear. That is a very popular bear and you know, it does a lot of goods. There were reports that he's poking in Colorado as we speak. Jeff sessions. Yeah. He wrote a bill. He wrote a letter to Congress. Hey, don't pass the record you'd mentioned, and Rebecca don't pass the Rebecca Blumenauer amendment so that I can go after medical care. Medical Cannabis. That's ridiculous in every aspect. I think that if you.

Speaker 1: I think the guy stuck in 1950 quite frankly, certainly. And um, he's, he's definitely an issue, a potential issue, but I'm not worried about dollars. A dollar speaks volumes. There's too much money and too much in too little negative pointed point. I'd love for Mr. Sessions to point out all the what has happened on the negative side with cannabis, what bad things have happened. I will. Good people don't smoke marijuana is what was thinking any humans ever ordered. We gotta tell everybody now that we're in a public place. Yeah, we're in California. We're looking at the hills here. We're northern California. Is that the bay bridge or is that the, uh, I don't know. It must be the bay. That's the bay bridge that we're looking at and uh, it's just, uh, it's a beautiful day, but, um, we were in, you know, kind of this outdoor place with nobody and you can hear that people are here now.

Speaker 1: We're not going to be able to get away with the fact that no one's around us. So let's, uh, let's bring this thing in for a landing, I guess. Um, if we've been to Illinois and we're in California now I know that you're 100 percent focused on California, but, uh, where, where might your eyes be next? Eat. Well, I guess then the question is where am I trying be next in California? Before we go outside of California, I'd say that I want to build a portfolio. I want to finish the portfolio. So it's got logistically we have all the bases covered. So we have our northern, we have our central. I'm definitely going to lock up a southern California spots are almost done, is over. It's not biggest fear was near Bakersfield. It's, it's in the works. There's some issues with the, the local zoning rules that I want to get fixed before we pull the trigger on it, but we're still looking for looking for other sites down there, but we'll have eventually we'll have all, you know, all three.

Speaker 1: How does, I guess so to speak. We'll have three can hubs that cover the, the logistically cover, the entire state. Good. But beyond that, um, we only are really looking at states or we're not really looking outside California at all right now, but if we were, it would be only regulated states that have what we, what we think is a fair and equitable type rules where there's enough operators to support our business models. And that's why we're really in California is because there's, you know, I think 50,000 growers is an estimate of how many are in California. And I think that number's probably low and we're never going to worry about patient count here either. No, that's the last thing we were worried about. That's only going to grow A. I mean, it's pretty easy to get a car here in California already, but as you know next year with the you that goes out the window, you don't need to know anything, so I think I'm fighting the last battle there when I bring that up with you in Illinois, patient count was always the issue remains the issue until the until politically until governor rounder.

Speaker 1: Stop starting to squash the program there. But once he up for reelection, I think he's only got another year or 18 months at the most then. Okay. All right. We'll see how that goes. I've got to get somebody that we can vote for against him, you know? Yeah. He's a, he's something special. But I think it's the point that now there though, that was pretty much super majorities that are in support. So we'll see in the state's broke, Illinois is broke and turning away revenues is dumb. Well what, so now let's, let's get in here, right? Because what I say is I come from the left. I tried to be in the middle and when I talked to a guy like you, who really doesn't care for a politician, no matter what his stripes are.

Speaker 1: Politicians listening to this, and I love you all. I shouldn't say politics is politics. You don't care for politics. I don't love it. Yeah, no, I've. I've unfortunately or not. However you wanna phrase it and I've. I've been forced into that, into those battles. I've learned a lot about it at a local level. I like it. I love dealing with cities. I love the village managers and mangers because they got to do stuff. Although they're actually running something, they're actually doing something. They're entrenched in what they're doing and like I said before, there's a. with what we do, there was a whole lot more direct impact and quantifiable impact and immediate impact. You, the politician, me, the businessman, we are both effecting the community directly in a positive way and it's in a historic way quite. These are towns that have never gotten, that may never see this type of boom out of anything else ever again.

Speaker 1: Right. You know, there's, there's no tomato processors and almond process. None of those guys are pumping in $3,000,000 a year into the local economy, you know, they might be hiring the, hiring a few people. Sure. But we're directly into the local municipalities coffers, pumping money into them. So, you know, politics on a local level I actually enjoy because it's a relationship based and you get right in front of the people. Uh, on a state level. It's, I've been disgusted to a certain degree with a lot of, with a lot of what I've seen in some of the wrong turns. So in other words, if you are open minded to the governor of Illinois, a political mindset, if you're open mind to that, I'm not saying you are. Where did he take wrong turns, you know, besides all of them, uh, what, what were the big ones do you think?

Speaker 1: The biggest ones is that, you know, there's obviously reasons for the, for his stance and I think those are not well known, but, um, you know, he's, he's invested in some pharmaceutical companies and he's had some family issues with the opioid abuse. And whatnot that he blames on cannabis. So it's got jeff sessions type of mindset a little bit. He's just, again, yeah, stuck in 1952. This is, if you're, if you have any, if you're willing to look at the facts at all, then you would be on our side of the fence. That's simple. But these are guys that are dogmatic and for whatever reason, who knows, you know, dogmatic about anything. Nothing. I'm willing to be proven wrong on everything, every single thing that. I mean, that's, that's, that's how you, that's, you know, that's what a true international in my, my mind is, is somebody that's willing to. That's a scientist mind. I guess I'm not a scientist, begins with a question, is your point of view if you're not willing to be proven wrong or where you believe something based on just belief.

Speaker 1: Everything that the. From a business standpoint and everything. I do personally and I try to use as much logic and reasoning and skepticism as possible. If we agree that, um, you know, this is an interesting moment in time in terms of politics where this morning I read that, uh, we declared war against, uh, before I got a car today, I saw that, that they took that they took trump's last statement as a secretary snore. And it's funny too that these declarations of war come from twitter. So if that's where we are, you know, just speaking nothing of policy simply of rhetoric, what do you think about 20 slash 20? What kind of person could we turn to, you know, as an alternative, what might be good I think, or I hope that the Democrats and I'm, I'm a libertarian really. I've been trying to get you to say it, but fair enough.

Speaker 1: You did, you know, I hate to even admit it, but as a entrepreneur and on the lifetime, you know, I've been self employed since I was 18, so I voted with my checkbook unfortunately with a lot when I was younger. But now I'm older and wiser and it usually goes the other way. By the way, you usually get more conservative as you go. I've become far more liberal because I was raised in a pretty, in a pretty conservative household, so, and it took me a while to, to get rid of that. But um, I think that no dad, what about you? That type of thing.

Speaker 1: I grew up in a very patriotic and you know, a military family, so it tended to be more conservative but I still have. So just do your thing. I mean like I'm not going to sit here and listen to you whine like that wasn't part of your, like my mother was happy to listen to me why my father wasn't. But I feel like in your house, no, whining, whining is now out. Get to work, make some money, go whack. Whack weeds with a sickle and the ditch. There you go. That's it. You need something to do. Go ahead. That's it. My father gave me my working papers is my birthday present for a when I was 15, right. Same type of I would imagine thing. My 18 year old son. I'm trying to figure out how to instill that work ethic and until now you too much of a softie.

Speaker 1: I just worked through it, so I try to be nice to add that they wanted, you know, trying to get his hands bloody with calluses on the weekends, but it definitely taught, saw me, my work ethic, which I. I mean, I appreciate that, right? You got to know how to work. You got to know how to kind of pull yourself up from your own bootstraps. No matter how you know, socially liberal he want to be or whatever. A fiscally liberal you want to be. You still gotta get to work every single day. You still got to do the thing. I mean, I've never in my life taken any kind of government handout. I mean, I don't think I've ever been filed for unemployment in my life, but that's because my dad taught me to, you know, very young age. It says to be independent and fend for myself.

Speaker 1: You know, I think one of the lessons he taught me was whether you're working for somebody or somebody or yourself, what are you doing today that's going to make you money 30 days from now and a year from now? And if you're working for somebody, make yourself so damn valuable that they can't imagine not having you there. So I tried, I tried to take that into what I do not business wise and it's a bit of a curse because I guess I'm a workaholic, but could be worse. It could be worse. I could be something like the alcoholic. I guess given the choice. I think you've made the right one. What do you think? We all, we, the people need as far as you know, somebody at the, at the top there. I think I haven't met him personally. I think I will soon actually.

Speaker 1: I think Gavin newsome the lieutenant governor of. So you're talking about the gay marriage guy, right? Yeah. Okay. All right. Um, I, I think that he, he would be, he kind of fits the mold for what the Democrats. They need to move away from the old, the old school, the old house. He not old school is my question. Well he's young. He's already, he's already be a little older, right? It was like 40 or something like that. I could go and book a pdf and check it out, but if he's 50, he's just 15, right? I don't think it's 50, you know, that they need to understand that they need to get past the old guard and they need to. I think everybody that's essentially your, my age, my age or is essentially libertarians at heart just wants to be left alone. Yeah, let me do what I do. And you do what you do and who cares what I, you know, gen x, no one paid attention to us anyway. Right? You always heard about the boomers. You always heard about millennials.

Speaker 1: Gen X was raised themselves. We just did the whole thing ourselves. That's it. Going to figure it out. I'll see what I get back from a two week vacation. So, so what you're saying is, uh, the Democrats as far as the, the, the national stage. We've seen a lot of people that are 70, right? Schumer. Pelosi, I hate to be an agent, but we need to, we need to get. I think the probably the biggest issue we have, the, the, the biggest change that we could make in America or Americans, Americans would be term limits. Sure. Period. Yeah. Get all these guys that are dogmatic and stuck in their ways and have been there and politicians. What I've learned is they're only there to keep their jobs. So that's it. How do I get elected again? How do I stay in office and what do I do with the office, which is what I was elected for.

Speaker 1: It's how do I stay here? The opposite of the whole thing needs to be more change. We're constantly evolving and I think politics needs to constantly evolve and it's not. There's guys had been in an office for 40, 50 years that needs to end. I think knew, I think one of the few things that the UK or has right politically is I liked the parliamentary system of government where there's constantly changing who's, who, who's what party's in charge. And it keeps the debate going and nobody entrenched in power like we have now where we have a majority of both houses, the House and Senate. So, um, yeah, I think that that gets to the, the, you know, we're not gonna do this now, but that gets to the gerrymandering and, and all that as far as, you know, how people get in and then stay and beyond the politics beyond, you know, I'm getting in and staying alive.

Speaker 1: It's the gerrymandering thing, which really changed dramatically in kind of 2010, 2011 that both sides are guilty of it. Big Time. Yes. It's sadly, um, the, the, the Democrats have been very poor and if they've done it, they're just good at it. I think the Republicans have really taken the cake as far as that's concerned, but more successful at it. But the, uh, if, if the Democrats have done gerrymandering, they are the Washington generals of gerrymandered to the Republicans. Harlem Globe trotters shorter. They're both playing the game, but you know, there's not a huge amount of difference. They're both in the big thing. They both know they want to justify their existence. It's like they're judged on how many laws we passing. What about taking some off the books, you know, how about, well that gets to regulations, right? You know, and I believe me, I fully support smart regulation of cannabis, but I also support homegirl.

Speaker 1: If you're growing it for yourself and it's your own medicine and you're not selling with the people and it needs to be tightly regulated though because that's where, that's what goes cross border is that homegrown. Those big home girls go cross border. We need that from Colorado and quite frankly those are the guys that however you look at it. Fortunately, unfortunately I don't like seeing anybody go to jail for any reason, especially if it's a victim. Victimless crime of growing for yourself will specifically a victimless crime is what I'll agree with you on it. Continue. I think somebody murders somebody sure that you know, we should probably do something about that. Specifically victimless crime. Fair enough. But you know, victim was growing cannabis for yourself and using pesticides and that's fine because it's for you, you're only damage, but I do believe that if what's sold commercially, it needs to be pure.

Speaker 1: It needs. You need to know what's in it, you know, and quite frankly, these standards that are put in place by most of them regularly, the states for cannabis are far more strict than FDA guidelines for any other effort or aspirin. You know, that the FDA, um, all the testing that the FDA requires is self testing and you don't even have to report it. You just have to, you just can't let it out the door if there's a problem. So is that true? That's 100 percent true. If you're a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer, you, the FDA rules are that you set self tests. There's not a third party testing every single batch. How do I not know this? That's remarkable. Yeah. That is literally remarkable. It is. But in cannabis and most regulated states, every single batch, a one gram for every pound, whatever it is, whether the ratio is every single batch is third party tested.

Speaker 1: And that's what's going to happen here in California too. So the testing in another good example would be residual solvents and levels of acceptable pesticides were in cannabis. We've gone, I don't want to call it overboard, but we've gone really, really far in the right direction of having really pure cannabis in regulated states. You can't say the same about pharmaceutical drugs, so it's, I think the maximum maximum allowable residual solvents for the FDA for most is 800 parts per million for residual solvents, uh, in cannabis in Illinois. It's 10 parts per million. Right? Which is like, I mean crazy, but, uh, it's over the top is the points over the top of. We've gone the other way because of the dirty word of cannabis, you know, but you know, if it's an opiate or an antidepressant that makes you more likely to kill yourself than that.

Speaker 1: Let's look into this again. Yeah. We'll have lower standards for that than we do for a drug or a medicine or a plant, a plant based medicine we should say that's never killed anybody ever. History of man, just since the beginning of time, 4,000 years documented use and not a single single death attributed to cannabis. So that underlying container. Let me quantify with that. So far it's only so far, right, exactly. It's always happening. Can always happen. All right, so I'm going to do. Here's what I'm going to do. This is a new three final questions. Oh boy. Returning guests. You're very good. You're definitely a good to putting you guys on the spot. No, of course. That's what I got to do. So you've answered the three final questions before, but now we need you to answer the, uh, the new three final questions for returning guests.

Speaker 1: Hopefully you'll be able to edit this later as I sit here in the last. Yeah. And the thing is I'm going to try to edit the wind out, but there's no way. There's no way to heavy breathing. Yeah. No you can't. You can't edit God. Uh, the, the third question will always be the same no matter if you're a returning guests or not. And that is oh, on the soundtrack of your life to bring up that. This is my third podcast. Told me earlier that the five is the record of five. Yeah, I think John Davis from Washington does have the records here. You know, you're making 30 days. You want to get up there. Alright. So the three final questions for returning guests are, if you could change one thing about yourself, what would you change? Second question is, if you could change one thing about anything else, what would you change? And then the third final question as we've said on the soundtrack of your life. One Song on track that's got to be on there. So. Wow, okay. Change anything about myself. What would you change? Oh cool. What are you working on? In other words, you might already be aware of this and you're working on it. What I'm saying like this question, she probably several answers will bring in spouses of other podcasts as the spouse. That question she'll have know about myself. I should mention by the way. Um, I said you can't edit God I should mention I don't necessarily believe in God. I was going to say something, but it stopped myself short. But anyway, we're both on the same side of that. But I guess about myself, um,

Speaker 1: is to get better work life balance. I see. So you've got the work down this know how to do. Yeah, there's, there's nothing I don't need to like I don't even have an alarm clock. I don't know if you know this, but there's not an alarm clock in my bedroom. I also do not have an alarm clock. I need. The only time I need an alarm clock is if I am waking up in the fives. I needed assistance. Oh, you don't need assistance with that. It's like you ever seen the Seinfeld episode where Kramer can set is. Oh sure. Yeah. I can do my. I have a 7:00 AM flight tomorrow. I got you. I won't set an alarm. You don't need to know. I'll be up in my brain. Just knows. So work life balance. That's the other way. More life. More life. More time with my kids than about the world.

Speaker 1: Yeah. If you could change about it. Anything else? Specific goopy, general. I would just go back to using logic, reason and skepticism as your basis for how you look, how you view the world and how you make decisions. If I could change anything about the world, it would be that it would be the appeal to take a scientific methodology or approach to life and that they're not dogmatic and that stuck in, in the bronze age with the way that they think about things because of certain books that tells them to think a certain way. So if there's anything that I could change about the world that was be that, you know, a more humanist approach to everything in the whole thing. And now I don't mean to be morbid, but are we getting at maybe what might or should be on the tombstone? You know, Tim Mcgraw used logic, reason and skepticism.

Speaker 1: It's funny thing is I was actually, it was a couple of our right here from up north and I listen to spotify and, and uh, the song question, and actually I could, I think I can answer it. Is it white rabbit logic in proportion? No, it's funny, I was listening this a Bob Seger. I was really happy to see that Bob Seger finally signed off on being, being on spotify. And the silver bullet band was in Katmandu. No, it was against the wind. Oh, okay. Which is what this is, but this podcast has been battling by the West, but you know, speak in metaphors and I think that going against the wind you need when you take off the aircraft carrier or even at the airport, you take off into the wind, you can let, you know, fighting against the wind, either lift you up or knock it out.

Speaker 1: And uh, so I think that's a good song to a, demonstrating their kind of how I feel, but the interesting, it's like a lean in philosophy which, which means that Sheryl Sandberg facebook, because we're here in northern California, that whole theory and concept actually comes from Bob Seger. I think she'd be surprised to hear that obviously you're going to teach a lesson, but that would also be a pearl jam song somewhere in that mix too. But what are your thoughts on versus versus 10? You see what I'm saying? The second album versus the first album, I think 10 is an album that almost anybody that's has like Pearl Jam at any way you can listen to the whole album over and over again and not get bored with it and they have is the point. I mean if you were alive in 1990, whatever it was that I just. The whole thing was on a loop. Yeah, there's a very good. And there's, there's another song instance recently made my playlist that wha. What's the woman? The old woman behind the counter of a thing. Crazy. Mary. Is that what the song is crazy Mary of the curve in the road. That song? I don't know. I think it's a very long title for the song.

Speaker 1: I thought you were talking about crazy miracle. Maybe I might know. Anyway, and then are you going to give us three, uh, three options here against the, against the wind, right? A Pearl Jam Song of your choosing, choosing. Congratulations on the hall of fame. We're talking about this other day. It's have definitely one of the first things, one of the things that changed about people getting asked to sing them a song. Actually there's a regulator in the state and we made a bet that when I got the license that I had this call and seeing the entire department a don't take the girl, so I think I only made it through a few lines before. But you did do it. They didn't do it, but I think there ears blood in the end. Everyone lost is your point. Yes. This is not going to be good for anybody.

Speaker 1: Especially me. We can't record it, but I'm not a singer. He's got the other. Tim Mcgraw has that in mind. Oh, we have to talk about search results. What's the idea here? Oh yeah. We had an idea of sort of piggybacking somehow off at timber grove search results and. Well, here's the thing, right? Tim Mcgraw in cannabis, you know you've got some articles. You know you've got some podcasts, you've got press up there. It's funny too because if you look at. Not that I grew up on myself, but when I do somebody else works, you'll find that almost every article at the bottom it would have had suggested reading or whatever it you'll find something about tim mcgraw, the country singer, so I'm still waiting for a call from his legal team asking me to use my full name, timothy or whatever. But my idea of course is to have a debate between the two of you to blow the blow the whole thing out of the water.

Speaker 1: I would smoke a joint with it. Quite frankly. Forget why even record it or do both. It seems like a decent guy, but I'm pretty conservative. He's older than me. I don't know. He's probably got 50 something. Right? Sure. I wonder though what, uh, what his point of view would be, you know that because if we're talking about 70 percent, whatever, you know, short, maybe he's not going to do it, but you know, maybe he's got a, an aunt nancy or a nice for that matter. I just saw the today show, um, a couple of days ago, um, from, uh, from Greece, from Greece, the woman, the, the, the, we'll edit this. We'll figure it out. The Acropolis from the movie grease. John Travolta, Olivia Newton. John. Yes. She lives in Capitola and she's a cannabis patient. That's it. She just, she has breast cancer and it actually came back and she was just on the today show a couple of days ago espousing the benefits of medical cannabis.

Speaker 1: So anybody that's educated on the topic gets it. You can't, you can't argue with the facts, man. So what was the oldest that I answer? All of it did. We were going to think about maybe another song for no reason, which we don't need to do. Okay. But there was, there was last changed myself. Change the world changes as everybody else. Use the song. We got the song and you kind of said, I don't want people to ask me to sing songs anymore. You know, every time I called the bank, I called the airline. Anybody. Oh, is this the real go? Yes. I'm the real tim. He's the imposter. No, much cooler one. You've been the. Here's the thing, as far as you're concerned, you've been tim mcgraw since day one. He's the one that came in later when I was named Tim Mcgraw. He didn't even know who his dad was.

Speaker 1: Still a lot of people might not know that he's talking about girl baseball player, his son, but he didn't even know that until he was like 18 or so. And being a mets fan, I'm a big tug mcgraw fan. Of course. That was my nickname growing up. Actually, you know what his, um, it was a tug really. His, uh, his phrase for the mets in 1973, which got them to the world series, but they did not win. It was, you got to believe and I feel like, uh, that serves us well here. You've got to believe that this is going to get going to continue to progress the way it is and that, uh, you know, the people's voices will be heard. I mean, again, look at any poll you want to any poll, I don't care how, how slanted in the other direction it is. The support nationally, locally, state by state, however you want to hack it, is fully behind cannabis legalization of medicinally or otherwise, and hopefully our governor, our government, our president or our attorney general, whoever understand that that's a populist thing to do. It's the right thing to do and it's the best thing to do for our economy and look at that. Tim Mcgraw. Twenty 20. Great to be here to see. Again, I hope to be back at the top of that list. Of course. Yeah, we gotta we gotta get back here soon enough, right?

Speaker 2: Oh, it's good to see. And there you have tim mcgraw. Incidentally, the name of that song, as some of you I'm sure already know, elderly woman behind the counter in a small town, which I understand true pearl jam fans refer to as simply small town. So that fits very nicely. A song that I'll put on the soundtrack of my life. Thanks to him, thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.