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Ep.313: Betty Aldworth, SSDP

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.313: Betty Aldworth, SSDP

Ep.313: Betty Aldworth, SSDP

Betty Aldworth returns and has a lot going on with the SSDP conference as well as ensuring that all the SSDPers are out there supporting ballot measures for cannabis legalization and all sensible drug policy for that matter. We discuss deschedling as potential focus for the cannabis community and while that dialogue should certainly occur, with the Rohrabacher Blumenaur Amendment holding on by a thread, 280E being no where near the tax bill, not to mention the proclivities of our attorney general, Betty’s thought is to continue to focus on moving the needle state by state. Oh and by the way, you can help by going to SSDP.org/match and donating now. And donate whenever at SSDP.org.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Betty Aldworth returns. Betty Aldworth returns and has a lot going on with the SSDP conferences as well as ensuring that all SSDP ears are out there supporting ballot measures for cannabis legalization and all sensible drug policy for that matter. We discussed dea scheduling is a potential focus for the cannabis community and while that dialogue should certainly occur with the war back or Blumenauer amendment, holding on by a thread to 80, being nowhere near the tax bill. Not to mention the proclivities of our attorney general that he started, is to continue to focus on moving the needle state-by-state. Oh, and by the way, you can help by going to SSDP.org/match and donating now and donate whenever it SSDP.org. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the Hana can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Betty Audra,

Speaker 3: she is almonds and Pecans.

Speaker 1: Okay, and is it your mixed nuts or these mixed by another party?

Speaker 3: The nuts are mixed by another party. I see. I get them at Costco. I mixed them with the dried unsweetened cherries and blueberries that you get to costco shoe.

Speaker 1: I see. Okay. So you add your drop your own dried fruit to. They're already mixed nuts. Yes. This is believable. It's true. It has the benefit of being true. Betty Aldworth, how are you?

Speaker 3: I'm great. We're getting ready for year end here and ramping up for an exciting 2018 and I'm looking forward to wrapping up a really successful year for us for

Speaker 1: so right off the bat. Um, you are skipping the line and we are putting this up before the end of the year because. Because why? Why are we putting this up before the end of the year?

Speaker 3: Well, I'm, I'm so excited. Yesterday we announced, we just got a few days ago and yesterday we announced a handful of generous donors approached us to say, hey listen, I'd like to kick in a little extra at the end of the year so that other people will also do the same. And we managed to put together a $50,000 match here at the end of the year for SSDP. An extra $50,000 that will help, you know, legalize a needle exchange and the lock zone access and if you stayed next year, an extra $60,000 that's going to help us, uh, you know, get out the vote in Michigan in 2018 another $50,000 that's going to help us bring so many more students to our next conference. And so if anybody would like to help us do those things and participate in this work, they can just go to [inaudible] dot org slash match and make a gift right there and make it possible for us to bring more students to conference and to do all of this amazing work.

Speaker 1: Betty Aldworth returns. Betty Aldworth returns and has a lot going on with the SSDP conferences as well as ensuring that all SSDP ears are out there supporting ballot measures for cannabis legalization and all sensible drug policy for that matter. We discussed dea scheduling is a potential focus for the cannabis community and while that dialogue should certainly occur with the war back or Blumenauer amendment, holding on by a thread to 80, being nowhere near the tax bill. Not to mention the proclivities of our attorney general that he started, is to continue to focus on moving the needle state-by-state. Oh, and by the way, you can help by going to SSDP.org/match and donating now and donate whenever it SSDP.org. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the Hana can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Betty Audra,

Speaker 3: she is almonds and Pecans.

Speaker 1: Okay, and is it your mixed nuts or these mixed by another party?

Speaker 3: The nuts are mixed by another party. I see. I get them at Costco. I mixed them with the dried unsweetened cherries and blueberries that you get to costco shoe.

Speaker 1: I see. Okay. So you add your drop your own dried fruit to. They're already mixed nuts. Yes. This is believable. It's true. It has the benefit of being true. Betty Aldworth, how are you?

Speaker 3: I'm great. We're getting ready for year end here and ramping up for an exciting 2018 and I'm looking forward to wrapping up a really successful year for us for

Speaker 1: so right off the bat. Um, you are skipping the line and we are putting this up before the end of the year because. Because why? Why are we putting this up before the end of the year?

Speaker 3: Well, I'm, I'm so excited. Yesterday we announced, we just got a few days ago and yesterday we announced a handful of generous donors approached us to say, hey listen, I'd like to kick in a little extra at the end of the year so that other people will also do the same. And we managed to put together a $50,000 match here at the end of the year for SSDP. An extra $50,000 that will help, you know, legalize a needle exchange and the lock zone access and if you stayed next year, an extra $60,000 that's going to help us, uh, you know, get out the vote in Michigan in 2018 another $50,000 that's going to help us bring so many more students to our next conference. And so if anybody would like to help us do those things and participate in this work, they can just go to [inaudible] dot org slash match and make a gift right there and make it possible for us to bring more students to conference and to do all of this amazing work.

Speaker 1: All right, so you, you don't get SSDP does not get the $50,000 match if we don't raise $50,000, is that right?

Speaker 3: That's the deal. Yeah. We've got to raise this. We've got to raise $50,000 from the rest of our network before the end of the year. Otherwise that matches locked up and we aren't able to access it. So we just have to make sure that that $50,000 comes in right away and then we're really proud to say that in the first few days we've already raised more than $8,000 towards that match. And I know for sure that we can do it by the end of the year, but we can't do it without people like your listener is kicking in.

Speaker 1: Perfect. Alright. So ssd p.org,

Speaker 3: could you ask match match? Yep. And we'll put it on the front page so that folks can find it really easily. And also I should point out that if people would like to make their gifts in either stock or in Bitcoin or other cryptocurrency, they can do that too. They would just want to contact us by emailing SSTP the SSTP.org and Wilson the long instructions for how to get it done that way as well. It can still count towards the matches.

Speaker 1: Okay. And do you have bitcoin? You know, are you in on either bitcoin or lite coin or a theory?

Speaker 3: Well, you know, our job as an organization is to and do drug prohibition. And, uh, you know, bringing human rights and compassion to our approach to drugs so we don't spend a lot of time worrying about bitcoin and uh, you know, the, the, the various ups and downs of that market

Speaker 1: having, having said that as a development director, you certainly, uh, will, we'll make that easier on your donors that they can, they can donate any way they want, you know.

Speaker 3: Yep. Absolutely. We do have a finance committee, it really told to folks that keeps an eye on that stuff for us. So we do have a, you know, a little bit of our reserves in Bitcoin and we were able to, uh, you know, enjoy the benefits of the most recent bumped. But really, you know, like what we're focused on is getting resources to students. That's the most important thing. Obviously a lot of our community is excited about the bitcoins situation. Sure,

Speaker 1: exactly. That's just how it is based on the fact that, uh, the first s stands for students. Um, so as far as a 2018 you, you kind of brushed over a few, you know, things that you're focused on doing, bring us through your view on what you're, you know, wanting to accomplish, know maybe let's just go by quarter by quarter because I know that SSDP conferences in in the first quarter, right? Right at the end of March, right?

Speaker 3: Right at the beginning of March. Actually this year, our conference is March, second through fifth in Baltimore and we are going to be laser focused on putting together the best student conference in the nation for the next handful of weeks. So I'm March 2nd. We'll get together for a handful of affinity group meetings and, and some other, you know, like conversations amongst people working on some very specific pieces. March, third and fourth are primary, the primary days of conference content. So there's lots and lots of stuff around understanding policy change. What's next for psychedelics therapeutics, you know, what's next for Canada's policy reform in 2018, where can we expect to see that work moving? Um, as we're looking at a different world now with that. And then we will also, of course included a ton of skill building content, so loads of information about how to actually change laws and they lift other people in doing that work and making it happen most effectively. Then on the fifth, I'm so excited we're going to bus everyone down from Baltimore into Washington dc and we are going to put hundreds of students on Capitol Hill that day talking to the officers of their elected officials, senators and representatives about the things that we're most excited about.

Speaker 1: So that's an SSDP lobby days essentially.

Speaker 3: Yes, precisely. So I would imagine that a lot of your listeners have done state or federal lobby days with their various industry associations or other groups would slit, which they're involved. We do the exact same thing, you know, obviously we're most excited right now about a senator booker's marijuana bill that really speaks to a lot of the concerns of the members of our network, these schedules, cannabis. But it also, um, you know, it takes a very strategic and targeted approach to the, the racist history of the war on drugs. And um, so we're very excited about that. We're also a, you're going to be advocating for, um, you know, some of the work that our partners at maps are doing around psychedelics and some broad criminal justice reform. You know, one of the really disappointing things about the 2000, 17, 2016 election is that it really did a halt. A lot of the extraordinary criminal justice reform that had been mounting for such a long time. We really had a lot of great energy around that and everyone's got to be so focused now on other priorities that, that, you know, we're finding that, you know, both among activists and in Congress, we aren't seeing the kind of movement on those issues that we had before. So we're trying to bring some attention back to that in some ways that are going to be powerful for the members.

Speaker 1: Okay. And what else can you give me there? What kind of level of detail can you provide as far as that's concerned?

Speaker 3: As far as criminal justice, right?

Speaker 1: Yeah. You're going to be providing a little bit more, you know, what could we expect, I guess?

Speaker 3: Yeah. I think that there's, there's still some movement around ending mandatory minimums or, or shifting mandatory minimums, you know, under the Obama administration, we saw some changes to that. Um, the sentencing commission is still an independent body that will make its own decisions about how mandatory minimums ought to be enforced even though the Department of Justice is likely to and has already in fact rolled back a number of the reforms that came under a new attorney general holder. There's, there's quite a lot that can still be done, especially with some pressure from Congress. And there are still some bills floating out there that we will, we will stand in supportive. Honestly though, you know, what we're really trying to do is make sure that people keep thinking about this so that under the next administration we can continue to see the clemency efforts that the President Obama started.

Speaker 3: We can continue to see some of those shifts in a prosecutions and the way that the doj is enforcing the laws that were happening under holder. And, you know, I think that one of the really exciting things right now is that we do have folks like, you know, former attorney general holder and others standing up and saying, you know, we did the best she could under the laws that were given to us, but here in the failings that we see and pointing that out from an inside voice, a credible voice, and really affirming a lot of the arguments that we're making around these criminal justice reform. So hopefully we'll be able to see these folks stand up even more strongly under the next administration really pushed hard for some change.

Speaker 1: Okay. So kind of keeping the conversation going as far as Michigan, what were you talking about there when you mentioned Michigan?

Speaker 3: Yep. So just last month, the campaign, Michigan to regulate marijuana, like alcohol submitted signatures to get on the ballot. We expect that the initial of those signatures are going to be valid and that, uh, marijuana for adult use will be on the ballot in Michigan next year. There are also about nine other states where folks are considering initiatives, whether more and less viable depending on the state and I don't want to go through them all. It's probably not with our times at the moment, but um, you know, as far as Michigan is concerned, we do know that it's a quality build, supportive by quality people. The campaign is fully viable and we do expect it to pass, but it's going to take a lot of work. So we'll be working on supporting that Michigan campaign with education and get out the vote efforts. But we also have a lot of citizen education to do though in the first chapter of the year when legislators come back into session. So we will be contacting voters or excuse me, contacting constituents in encouraging them to get in touch with their elected officials in all of the states where we expect to see reforms through the legislature. And there are many in particular in Connecticut and Rhode Island, Jersey, New Jersey, Vermont. Um, and, and several others where we have sst peers, SSEP alumni heading up those campaigns and being influential voices in the state. We want to stand behind them and make sure that, um, you know, those people who are tangentially connected to be SSDP network are aware of what's up and contacting their electives.

Speaker 1: And so, you know, that, that, uh, puts us to going state by state, by state and of course, you know, that work needs to be done and that work has been done in the past by SSDP and you personally. Um, and, and I, I just wonder though, as as far as, you know, a tipping the Scales and, and kind of changing the conversation. You know, you and I have talked about this offline before, you know, uh, we had these microphones on a couple of different times and uh, I, I really love the idea of you and you know, our most trusted voices who have been, you know, battling for a legalization and, and uh, reform, um, for the past decade or so to turn the focus to Decrim, you know, and of course to deschedule dea scheduling a federally as a banner headline, you know, where are we as far as, you know, guide kind of coalescing all of the voices and saying, okay, we're done here d schedule.

Speaker 3: So, you know, I think that that's a really important part of the conversation that we need to be sure to keep having. But there are a couple of considerations here. The first is that's not going to happen with the current congress. Right? And, and, which is not to say that we shouldn't be talking about it with the current congress moving any piece of legislation through Congress takes many sessions, many years and it takes a lot of work, roebuck or far, which is a, you know, an amendment that we all rely on incredibly heavily in the cannabis space and middle. So terrifically important isn't even locked in a line in appropriations and we need to make sure that that's protected. But we thought for years for that without having, having it move forward until it did. And I think that there's. So there are a couple of things to consider. First is that, you know, getting anything through Congress takes a really long time. So we should be talking about it now. They have realistic expectations about when we can see these scheduling.

Speaker 1: Yeah,

Speaker 3: well I can, yeah, that states are uh, you know, there's, the states in the meantime are places where we can get things done more quickly. Um, you know, anybody who's been involved in policy change can, can attest to the fact that the larger the body with the larger number of constituents, the harder it is to move, you know, you can move some that use through city council pretty quickly and it takes maternity at the UN. And so being able to continue to move the fates, continue to make the difference for those people in those states who are suffering under cannabis prohibition is a, is work worth doing. And lastly, when we do see cannabis legalization, you at the earliest in, let's say 20 slash 20, but probably, um, you know, a bit longer than that, the seats are still going to be in charge of managing their own markets, right?

Speaker 3: We, that's what we saw without the hall. I'm sure that's what we see with pharmacy boards being largely in charge of how pharmaceuticals are handled. I think that it makes a lot of states a lot of sense for states to handle drugs of any kind, cannabis or alcohol or pharmaceuticals in the way that they best see fit in a ways that work best in their communities. And that's how we get, you know, real buy in across the board, there are going to be dry counties and dry states for a really long time when it comes to cannabis, just as there are still dry states or excuse me, dry counties anyway for alcohol today and we need to give communities the opportunity to figure out what's best for them. So you know, whether or not we're cannabis is dea scheduled at a federal level, states are still going to have to figure out how to deal with it. So why not continue to push the issue and build support at that state level when it's worked. It's gonna need to get done anyway.

Speaker 1: No, I'm with you it. And it's kind of, um, you know, a little bit too depressing I guess because it, it feels like a, we could have been having that dea scheduling conversation now if we weren't having to, you know, battle for Rebecca. I think it's raw racker blumenauer now, um, to, to just kind of get reaffirmed. Uh, you know, we, we have this big old tax bill that they, you know, that they're shoving through and you know, you and I don't have to get into our thoughts on that here, but what's not in there is to 88, you know, there's nothing about to add that, you know, so I, I, you know, I, I take your point that this unfortunately isn't the right time to kind of go loud and proud with dea schedule.

Speaker 3: Certainly, let's keep talking about it. Let's make sure that our supporters know that we care and the, we're behind them. Let's make sure that people who are posting these scheduling are still getting the arguments. Um, and, and, you know, but let's have realistic expectations about where our energy should be spent. Right? And you're right, you know, she really isn't included in this tax bill. No surprise. Um, you know, in the $5 million price tag that comes with according to the joint committee on taxation is a, it is certainly not a good sign that it might get passed anytime before cannabis itself is dea scheduled. And we're able to actually, you know, he used that as a trading point for excise taxes, but you know, until then I think that we should have realistic expectations. Should we talk about how unfair it is, should we talk, as you know, is a conversation worth having? Totally. Is it something that we should be, you know, writing into our budgets just yet? Nope, sure isn't, that's a real shame. But it's, you know, unfortunately the way the congress works.

Speaker 1: Well, you know, it's funny is that you say no surprise on 80 not being in this bill. And I remember right after election day and kind of leading up to inauguration and following that, you know, my libertarian and then you know, all the way right friends were. And some of those are your same friends were very excited about the prospect of really going ahead and pushing to 83 to 88 through, you know, as part of this thing, you know that that's what we were talking about back then in November, December, January. I was like, oh, well, you know, these, these friends of business and, you know, obviously this will be part of what they want to do. And um, so I think that while you and I, you know, um, are, are maybe not as surprised. I think that this entire, you know, our community, which includes everybody all the way left out everybody all the way, right is a little bit more disappointed and a little bit more surprised than we thought we would be about the fact that cannabis is, is getting a, a bit of a stiff arm. And I mean, besides, you know, our attorney general as far as just like we said, you know, getting back or Blumenauer reaffirmed. What was rebecca far now Rebecca Blumenauer reaffirmed it. It's like pulling teeth.

Speaker 3: Yeah, I think it does. I mean, Rebecca can certainly have a shot in, you know, if, if a budget bill can be passed, but that's such a big f. and honestly you said, you know, right after the election, I was one of those people. You said, well, if there's one good thing about thinking about it, um, it is that, you know, these people have friends invested in cannabis. Um, they are, um, you know, pro business, pro, capital, capital development, pro, all of this stuff. Um, intro text, you know, fairness and um, you know, at the time I think that we, you know, reasonable people could agree that maybe we might be able to see some shifts, uh, you know, toward more fair and fairness under the tax code or, you know, um, you know, more explicit protections for states rights and a variety of things that aligned to the ideological Lee, um, you know, pro business, uh, conservatives and Republicans and I, you know, I think that a lot has shifted since then in terms of what we understand to be the priorities of both the administration and Congress right now around those Christians.

Speaker 3: I just, I, you know, I think that with all of the chaos and, and all of the trouble that they're having in coalition amongst the Republican Party, which hadn't been a governing party for such a long time, it's really hard to expect to be able to get something like that accomplished. I mean, among other things, we just don't have the political power in Washington, you know, we're spending. We spent so far this year about $900,000 in lobbying, which is nothing to sneeze at, but it's, you know, more than twice as twice what we spent the year before, if I remember correctly. And that, that was more than twice what he spent the year before that. And so, you know, as we're growing political power on the hill, we will start to be able to see some, you know, some of these, you know, various benefits slide into places like the tax bill. But you know, healthcare spend 400 million or something like this on the hill every year and lobbying and we can't expect to see. I don't think those sorts of major changes coming. I'm just yet just enough, just enough, but not just yet.

Speaker 1: Well, I guess betty, what we're going to have to do is drain the swamp

Speaker 3: about did he said we build up great leaders and support are amazing. Uh, you know, nonprofit organizations who are working to bring fairness and justice to the world.

Speaker 1: So what's you're saying is the solution is not just three words, just saying three words over and over again. You actually have to do work. Wake up every morning and actually work hard to accomplish something. Is that what we're saying?

Speaker 3: Uh Huh.

Speaker 1: See? Yeah, exactly. That's, you, you, you are always continually turning me wise, I guess, you know, um, there's more to talk about but we'll leave it there as far as SSDP.org/match. Go there now, you know, check out the conference in the beginning of March. And I guess before we end, I, I should ask you, you know, we've got a little bit of a shift here, a little bit more Colorado, a little bit less Washington, D, C for you personally. How are you enjoying that?

Speaker 3: I love it. I love it. It's really wonderful to be in Denver. I love DC too and such an incredible place to be, but I do get to eat home with my cats and my honey and little more often here in Denver and that's been a real treat and I'm very excited to start tearing, literally tearing down some walls in my house now that I have time to focus on some of the things at home a little bit more. So it's been, it's been delightful.

Speaker 1: Excellent. And I just want to, you know, I had the pleasure of meeting your honey, which is a person we should point out and so, you know, please send him my best I guess while we're on the subject. Uh, so let me ask you. Yeah. So, so let me ask you the, the three final questions for returning guests, which I've not had the opportunity to ask you yet. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What would you change about yourself? If anything? It might be something you're already working on. And what I'm really asking you this is for this question, what would you change about anything else, if anything, and this is, you know, you being omniscient and uh, you know, all powerful and uh, able to bend the space time continuum. What would you change if anything, if you could. And then the last question is always the same, which is on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first, what would you change about yourself, if anything could be something you're already working on?

Speaker 3: Um, I would meditate more. I feel like I don't have the mindfulness practice that I would like to and I think that there is that it provides extraordinary value in making a person more calm and thoughtful for most people. For some people it can be different, but I would definitely spend more time in mindfulness practice and, and you know, I just get so excited about everything else that's happening around me and charge me to remember that. Like sit down and focus on that.

Speaker 1: Yeah, I, I've, I've been hearing that more lately and I think 2018 is my year for, for maybe doing that too. So I'm going to share that with you if you don't mind.

Speaker 3: Oh yeah, absolutely. We can help each other stay accountable to that a little bit.

Speaker 1: Exactly. As opposed to just being nuts as soon as we wake up every day. Um, all right. So what would you change about anything else?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I, you know, I spent a lot of hunting event that's like, what is the thing that I think is missing in, um, in how we relate to each other, right? Because so much of the work that I do is about how we relate to each other, how we think about each other and I think that the piece that's really missing in our world is greater empathy. And if it were, if it were up to me, um, we would have more capacity to understand what it is that other people are feeling. Um, you know, whether that's, you know, looking a great big picture of know refugee situations or places where people are, um, you know, starving or brutally oppressed by their governments or any of it, um, to interpersonal relations where we're having conversations with each other and trying to understand each other and, you know, one of the first things that I tried to do and one of the, you know, thing that we always talk about it Ssep when we're in conflict.

Speaker 3: I think, um, you know, assume positive intent, assume the best first and rather than assume that someone is, you know, out there to hurt you in some way or is doing this thing to irritate you. Really just choosing to assume that they are, that are coming from, you know, a more benevolent motivation that just happens to conflict with yours. Um, and that's been attached slips and really useful. For me, it's, it's, it's certainly been a much more helpful than assuming otherwise. But like growing empathy across humanity I think would be like the most game changing things that we could do. I'm really interested in the ways that, that, that work is progressing amongst brain scientists. So I, you know, hopefully that's something we'll see.

Speaker 1: Oh, you're, you're getting all scientific with it. I am simply just trying to understand what my fellow Americans are thinking. And so I'm reading everything from the left, everything also from the right and everything in between. Just so when I get into a conversation about anything I can say, I can understand where that person, if that person mentioned something that I, you know. Oh wait, I did read about that. I know what you're talking. Have you considered that it's this thing and then if we're able to have a reasonable dialogue and you know, some, some sort of discourse, fantastic. And if there's no interest on the other end, oh, okay. Well at least I tried. Right,

Speaker 3: absolutely. That's a great way to do it in your own life for sure.

Speaker 1: Yeah, exactly. All right, so we're, we're here at the final question, betty on sheet.

Speaker 3: I have recently been introduced to this album. That is not by any means like defining my life at the moment and you'll understand why I say that now, but it is delightful and ridiculous and so Raunchy expects me up. Um, I think it's called squeeze my lemon and it's raw and Raunchy, uh, early blues tune from like the 19, 27, 19 thirties and it is scandalous. I love it.

Speaker 1: Yeah. The old blues guys and, and most folks who are listening will know, squeeze my lemon from the, uh, from led Zeppelin and in their lyrics. But absolutely it's those old blues guys that just are really remarkable with when you actually read the lyrics and then, or just listen to the lyrics and then think about them. It's like it is, it's, it's out of hand. What they were saying on recorded your unrecorded whack

Speaker 3: and not. And not just the guys, the way that I was introduced to his album, um, uh, was by a song by a woman named Hattie heart called um, I'll let my daddy do that. Which, uh, I, I got my first listened through. I went from thinking that it was like, Oh, a nice song for her father to like, Whoa, this is a really interesting celebration of polyamory. Polyamory was even a term, so, uh, it's awesome. It's like, it's like, you know, a bit of a, um, a, you know, a bit of a, like an uplifting, like, shocking album to listen to the Moma. So again, not deciding my moment, but I love it and I'm just trying to get it out into the world. It's just like, it's just a lot of it.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I appreciate that. And it also, it feels like it's kind of relieving stress for you too, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, totally. I mean, laughter always does, right? Like, what's better than laughter and hugs for um, you know, getting yourself grounded and releasing the right endorphins and making you feel like you're, um, you've got some access to joy in your life. I think it's really important.

Speaker 1: There you go. Hey listen, anybody in the cannabis industry, you know, or anybody with a relationship with the plant will tell you that it's basic, it's laughter and hugs. That's, those are the two main byproducts. Okay. Betty Aldworth, I will be

Speaker 3: fondness for, uh, for treats, but you know.

Speaker 1: Oh, sure. I will be coming to a Denver sometime soon, so I want to make sure to have a cup of coffee with you. But in the meantime, folks are going to SSDP.org/match. Correct? That's the one. Betty, thank you so much. I'll talk to you soon. And there you have betty Aldworth. I love the focus on empathy. I mean we've been yelling and screaming at each other for two years. I'm certainly tired of it. I hope you are too. Thanks to betty, of course, as always for her time. Thanks to you for your stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.