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Ep.314: Jmichaele Keller, Steep Hill

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.314: Jmichaele Keller, Steep Hill

Ep.314: Jmichaele Keller, Steep Hill

Jmichaele Keller returns to tell his personal cannabis story. Going back, he had cut out carbohydrates from his diet completely. But substantially increased travel had those carbs wade their way back into his daily plan. Which led to him finding himself in the emergency room. Over the past couple of years he’s been to the hospital four times. The reason for these visits was due to a GI “adventure” as he calls it which has him living in a constant state of inflammation. He had found that CBD solves this problem. He found a product that worked for him, but he didn’t have that product on the road which leads to what he calls an attack where his stomach becomes distended. On top of that attack, his body rejected CBD product which it turns out was not well tested.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Michele Keller returns to tell his personal cannabis story going back, you'd cut out carbohydrates from his die completely, but substantially increased travel. Had those carbs wade their way back into his daily plan which lead them to finding himself in the emergency room over the past couple of years. He's been to the hospital four times. Reason for these visits was due to Agi adventure as he calls it, which has him living in constant state of inflammation. He is found that CBD solves this problem. He found that a product work for him, but he didn't have that product on the road, which leads to what he calls an attack where stomach becomes distended. On top of that attack, his body rejected CBD product, which it turns out was not well tested. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Jeremy Keller

Speaker 1: do without. Well, we could probably go further. I see. Fair enough. But I feel like we don't have that kind of time is the only issue set. Let's go, right? Yeah. So Michelle, so here we are in Las Vegas, Los Vegas. Los Vegas. Would he has lost vague last vegas. Las Vegas? Yes. I thought you were like wanting me to do more New York, like Las Vegas. No, we're here in Las Vegas. Yeah, I would imagine that a favorite city of yours isn't a, it's just a little on the plastic side. Yeah, a little. Yeah, definitely not my place. Well, I wake up with a hangover every morning even when I don't drink. So that kind of doesn't work out so well. You can, you have a conceptual hangover. Oh No, it's a real hang. It's a true hangover hangover. Not aided by alcohol, aided by the consciousness of everyone who's been consuming alcoholic.

Speaker 1: It's kind of fun. It's a, they're harshing. Your mellow is what's going on yet. Yeah. So, uh, we are sitting here for the third time, uh, because you know, you're a fun person to talk to. Hey, thanks. And also, thank you, I enjoy it. I look forward to these. I appreciate that. You, uh, you keep doing stuff right? Isn't that what it was supposed to be doing? Yeah, like do stuff. Yeah, you're supposed to do stuff. Um, but, uh, I guess what I want to do is make sure that we understand where you're going with this whole thing. And then, you know, uh, you and I saw each other in London where you told your story, but I don't know if we have it here. So if we can get a little snip in the video there in the video, we something out and put it in the video.

Speaker 1: I see much like your, your guts now. Well let's start there actually. Okay. Right, right. Your, your cannabis story goes a little bit like this, which is you need it, right? Yeah. Yeah. So how, and why does CBD help you? Well, um, so let me give you the feedback. I have to go back. I can't give you this without going back and giving you some context. Yeah, I mean I almost have to go forward and then go backwards. So like, prior to joining Steep Hill, which was, you know, in the fall of 2015 at which um, yeah, um, fall of 2015, I had eaten very, very little carbohydrate, so very, very controlled amount of carbohydrates like for the last 10 years for that. And I'm like, and I felt great. Um, and then I started getting involved with Steep Hill and then I had like travel a lot and I travel far, far from Amsterdam over to Berkeley, generally speaking or dealt for that matter.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Well answer on. I kept a flight from to delft. Okay. Ends up flagship shipple. Yes. Very good. So I'm like, ah, I feel okay. Whatever. It's like, all right, so I'm going to start eating carbohydrates, which by Mj Biz two years ago did not work out so well. So at Mj Biz two years ago, I was in the emergency room. Okay. Um, so that's when it all started in my, my life over the last two years has been four trips to the hospital. It's just been kind of fun, right. Um, and like in the process, while I made an investment into a coffee and tea company in mid 2015 in my very first tape, two days in the industry and they gave me a sample of high cbd or it was 20 to one cbd to thc hot chocolate and I drank that hot chocolate and I'm like, it changed my life because I wasn't, I didn't even think about cbd being anything that would help me and that I like at that point in time, it's like I haven't felt this way.

Speaker 2: Michele Keller returns to tell his personal cannabis story going back, you'd cut out carbohydrates from his die completely, but substantially increased travel. Had those carbs wade their way back into his daily plan which lead them to finding himself in the emergency room over the past couple of years. He's been to the hospital four times. Reason for these visits was due to Agi adventure as he calls it, which has him living in constant state of inflammation. He is found that CBD solves this problem. He found that a product work for him, but he didn't have that product on the road, which leads to what he calls an attack where stomach becomes distended. On top of that attack, his body rejected CBD product, which it turns out was not well tested. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Jeremy Keller

Speaker 1: do without. Well, we could probably go further. I see. Fair enough. But I feel like we don't have that kind of time is the only issue set. Let's go, right? Yeah. So Michelle, so here we are in Las Vegas, Los Vegas. Los Vegas. Would he has lost vague last vegas. Las Vegas? Yes. I thought you were like wanting me to do more New York, like Las Vegas. No, we're here in Las Vegas. Yeah, I would imagine that a favorite city of yours isn't a, it's just a little on the plastic side. Yeah, a little. Yeah, definitely not my place. Well, I wake up with a hangover every morning even when I don't drink. So that kind of doesn't work out so well. You can, you have a conceptual hangover. Oh No, it's a real hang. It's a true hangover hangover. Not aided by alcohol, aided by the consciousness of everyone who's been consuming alcoholic.

Speaker 1: It's kind of fun. It's a, they're harshing. Your mellow is what's going on yet. Yeah. So, uh, we are sitting here for the third time, uh, because you know, you're a fun person to talk to. Hey, thanks. And also, thank you, I enjoy it. I look forward to these. I appreciate that. You, uh, you keep doing stuff right? Isn't that what it was supposed to be doing? Yeah, like do stuff. Yeah, you're supposed to do stuff. Um, but, uh, I guess what I want to do is make sure that we understand where you're going with this whole thing. And then, you know, uh, you and I saw each other in London where you told your story, but I don't know if we have it here. So if we can get a little snip in the video there in the video, we something out and put it in the video.

Speaker 1: I see much like your, your guts now. Well let's start there actually. Okay. Right, right. Your, your cannabis story goes a little bit like this, which is you need it, right? Yeah. Yeah. So how, and why does CBD help you? Well, um, so let me give you the feedback. I have to go back. I can't give you this without going back and giving you some context. Yeah, I mean I almost have to go forward and then go backwards. So like, prior to joining Steep Hill, which was, you know, in the fall of 2015 at which um, yeah, um, fall of 2015, I had eaten very, very little carbohydrate, so very, very controlled amount of carbohydrates like for the last 10 years for that. And I'm like, and I felt great. Um, and then I started getting involved with Steep Hill and then I had like travel a lot and I travel far, far from Amsterdam over to Berkeley, generally speaking or dealt for that matter.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Well answer on. I kept a flight from to delft. Okay. Ends up flagship shipple. Yes. Very good. So I'm like, ah, I feel okay. Whatever. It's like, all right, so I'm going to start eating carbohydrates, which by Mj Biz two years ago did not work out so well. So at Mj Biz two years ago, I was in the emergency room. Okay. Um, so that's when it all started in my, my life over the last two years has been four trips to the hospital. It's just been kind of fun, right. Um, and like in the process, while I made an investment into a coffee and tea company in mid 2015 in my very first tape, two days in the industry and they gave me a sample of high cbd or it was 20 to one cbd to thc hot chocolate and I drank that hot chocolate and I'm like, it changed my life because I wasn't, I didn't even think about cbd being anything that would help me and that I like at that point in time, it's like I haven't felt this way.

Speaker 1: I could not remember what exactly. How did you feel different? What, what exactly did it do? You know, with my adventure, my gi adventure, my gastrointestinal adventure that started when I was in third grade, that was my first trip to the hospital when I was in third grade. Um, it's like I live in a state of constant inflammation, which is pretty debilitating, you know, like nothing works. I mean, really nothing work. You can't just get on with it. No, no, no. There's none of that. Yeah, okay. You have to become inert. Um, so like, and how he described it in my early days and it was a really, like I started to kind of move on in my discovery of cbd because I kind of like, you know, I'm like a science experiment, you know, inside of a body, right? Yeah. And Reggie made this chief scientist.

Speaker 1: Yeah, he made it. He kind of made a statement saying we should just hook you up to an inch to an instrument because you detect all contaminants almost instantly. So I said, yeah, it's probably actually a true statement. Um, um, so you found cbd, you, it worked for you, you brought down the inflammation, but then you went to vegas, I would imagine without the hot chocolate. Well here's, you know, here's the thing, it's like I'm kind of like not into breaking the law. Sure. Okay. You like me too. I'm also like, and I would take the risk analysis, I would take a personal risk to take cbd. Sure. Across state lines, but I have a responsibility to a lot of people. So it's not good if I land in jail and then I can't run steep hill. Not a good plan if it was just Jamie, Jamie, sheldon out every once me in jail, whatever.

Speaker 1: I've always, he's the head of Steep Hill. We have other things to worry about how I'm busy can be thrown in jail and I'm busy right now so I don't take my cbd so I don't take it. And this is a repetitively happened to me when I travel and I'm at. Then I ended up in the hospital or the same thing happened to me at um, at Kenetech in Israel this last time. Oh, did I know that because of course I'm flying to Israel from Amsterdam probably on the radar, you know, yet maybe things come from answer damn to Israel. So they would tell you that they do and you know, I really don't want to like be in that position etc. So I like within a matter of days I'm like, all right, I'm having what I would call an attack and that's when it gets really bad.

Speaker 1: And I kind of looked like, you know, my laSt trip to the hospItal high described it was like I'm nine months pregnant. Okay. That would be the perfect visual. Okay. Because it's all consolidated and um, I'm looking like I'm ready to pop puffy. No, puffy would. I'm serious. Nine months pregnant. Oh. So for real. Oh, for real. Okay. Okay. I'm not joking. alright. So that's pretty much what I look like a that happened in vegas. That happened in a couple of times or a couple of other times. Yeah. So where does the fear come in? I wonder if the ear comes in where like, so I'd finally found a product. Okay. I don't want to give any, I don't want to give any plugs k, but I do feel the need to because in my evolution it's like in the cbd world, like I tried hemp derived cbd. Okay.

Speaker 1: That doesn't work very well by the way. That doesn't work very well. it's surely did not work the same for me because it's like, oh, hemp derived cbd, maybe I can take that and that can transport it around. So I ended up at harbor side and I met the ceo of a company that produces a product called prana, which is like a gel cap. Okay. And, and, and he happened to be there. Okay. I came in and I was in the middle of that at harborside. Steve has the people in, you know, they may know, but, but lIke the champ, I spent two hours with him. Oh, okay. Two hours. Um, and it was after I didn't have a medical card at that point. I just called steve and said I need to go see a cannabis doctor. Like right now the recommendatIon, this is pretty serious.

Speaker 1: And he referred me. I can't remember who we referred me to, but like within, within our, I was in harbor side and talking to tony and he said, here, try this. Okay. So I described my symptoms and he gave me a 20 milligram, um, three to one. So three parts cbd to one part, thc, nonactivated, right. Um, and how I could best describe it was I felt an immediate hit within minutes. And how can I best describe it to people is like, you know what it feels like when you suck your gut in. Yeah, sure. You feel like, boy, I tell you, you'll feel it kind of macho. Well, I do it at the gym. I was going to say, let's pretend thing. You have to pretend like we're in shape while I'm trying to engage my core and I'm just not good at it.

Speaker 1: So I would imagine doing that without sucking your gut in. That's exactly what it felt like to me. God was like, oh my god. And then I'm like, all right, this is having some effect on me. So he like, but we're not there. So he gave me another 20 milligrams and it was, oh my god, there's, there's hope. OkAy. And If I look, some of this is paired with my decision to start eating carbohydrates again because I'm allergic to carbohydrates as we've deduced right now. Deduced. Okay. So it's like the cbd kind of kept me out of the hospital, right. Did not solve the problem that I'm allergic to carbohydrates, so that's like something that I have to really deal with god, but it does have this huge effect on, on inflammation and kept me out of the hospital on and off for two years.

Speaker 1: So, you know, I would not have made it without it. But then the year, right? Uh, and then the year, so of course I don't want to like transport from California to amsterdam right now. I don't feel totally comfortable with that. So I'm going to go like, I'm going to go find some, some cbd, right. Let's see. I need a cbd tincture and I already know about the contaminants in holland, which are just mind blowing. Right? Okay. So anything from ground headlight, glass to simulate tricombs and you're talking about things that you can get into coffee shops, which is unregulated, unregulated to test it and not safe ever. I mean like, seriously safe, right? Um, because the level of pesticides there is enough to make you feel like you're having a heart attack. So it probably also not something that you should seek out. So already know this shit, right?

Speaker 1: So it's like, all right, let me find somebody who's growing something that I would feel moderately safe. I'm putting in my body. Right? Because there's no reports. Okay. So I find that my biggest concern is pesticides because at the time, at the time I was, we were, we were starting to look at pesticides in the California cannabis stream and we're like, we're kInd of freaking out. Yeah. This is what we're seeing. So I'm like, and we've talked about that. Yeah. So like, I like search out organic. Um, uh, uh, what do you call the people a sustainable? No. Um, um, the yoga yogis I find, I find, I find organic yogi cannabis grower and it's like, all right, if they're like, they're really careful about what they put in their bodies. So that seemed like a pretty safe spot for me. Absolutely. Um, so I get the tincture.

Speaker 1: Okay. Um, and, you know, I'm ready to go. I'm in my bathrOom, I'm, I just got another tub, I'm ready to go to bed. It's like, all right, I'm not feeling so good. So I'm going to take this cbd tincture. Right. Okay. So, you know, I puT like probably about half a dropper under my tongue. Okay. And um, uh, in the process I pass out with no advanced notice at all. So I just, one second, I'm standing next second, I'm on the floor and I wake up and there's a, there's blood all over the place and I stand up and I look at my ear and I'm like, all right, this is serious. I've just cut my ear in half. Right? Yeah. And what happened is, what I passed out, I fell against my stone tub. She had a real sharp edge to it and I cut my ear in half.

Speaker 1: Okay. And there I am no clothes on, like it was like 1:00 in the morning. I'm like, all right, I don't, I know this is serious. Okay. But here's the thing. All right. So I didn't discover until after the fact. All right, what was actually in this cannabis? So I ran tests on it because you can do that because I can do that. I'm like, yOu know, I have the labs all over the place. So like, so, um, well first let's talk about potency. No cBd. Okay. Not a single milligrams of thc in it. Not a big percentage. Right. But it did have thc, which is of course not what I'm looking for. So it was just a bunch of junk. Um, so it didn't have any pesticides. So it's like an objective number one that was matched. Yeah, I mean it was clean. Well, objective number one was cbd that failed, that rejected number two, at least I'm not, you know, I'm not going to have a heart attack as a result of consuming this tincture.

Speaker 1: Right. So that's a plus. But it did have a level of iso propanol. Um, I'm at a level high enough to cause me to pass out. So what is that? I said propanol. Um, it's a solvent, so like this is in that residual solvent world, right? So people can extract cannabinoids out of flour. I'm utilizing an extraction method. They chose to use iso propanol, um, to extract, to extract. Okay. WhIch they were pretty much unsuccessful. Extracting much of anything. Maybe there was some cbd in there and they didn't wait, but you know, uh, I forget the number of milliliters of isoc propanol that will kill you. Yeah, I think it's just 15 milliliters will kill you. Okay, so here I am and I adjusted it fault, whatever. It's like I, when I woke up I'm like, I felt completely stoned beyond belief beyond belief, but it wasn't even thc.

Speaker 1: There was very little thc in it. Right. But to me it felt like, oh my, I'm on a trip that was really strong. Something's thc is right. But it really wasn't that. It was the iso propanol and it had just completely messed with my mind. And so I'm there, like, all right, I'm a, how do I go to the emergency room? So I called a friend and said, okay, come get me. So here I am, right. So I need to get dressed. Okay. Yeah. Um, and there's blood all over the place. It's like, all right, I'm really not into going to the hospital with blood all over me. So I like taking a shower, holding one ear, my ear together. Right. And then like after that, it's like I couldn't drop it hair because that would, that wasn't gonna work out. So I like, all right, let me get dressed one hand at a time.

Speaker 1: Alright. So when the rescue squad, the emergency people dmts or whatever came that I have clothes on. Yeah, you're present kinda good and I need to walk downstairs. So, so yeah. Um, and that, that's resulted in like, oh, I'm still holding my ear. Like literally right now, right now I'm holding my ears. So I went to the hospital and they put my ear back together. It's kind of back together. It okay. Right. Well you can sit there, you can definitely. So yeah, absolutely. To actually have it put together iN a more presentable format. So I don't look like elephant man. You do have to look though to see it, you know what I mean? Okay. So then this makes all the sense in the world and then it became the alright.

Speaker 1: You still affect you. Oh absolutely. Yeah. Well this, what effects me is taking care of people. So like I have so much empathy that anytime anyone does anything good for anyone, I am overwhelmed by that. Okay. So like when I think of myself trying to help patients that need it is your point that could die. whatever has a huge biological effect on me. It's a flood of oxytocin, you know, I'm a, a neuroscientific neuro, scientific geek and, and, and so you get flooded. So I get flooded with oxytocin and then also my vegas nerve fires. Right? And that's like all of you have this experience, so if you like, if you go out and you see a fireman rescue someone and you're going to be overwhelmed by some emotions, that's the vegas nerve in your body firing and you're going to get a dose of oxytocin's.

Speaker 1: We're desigNed as humans to do this, to come to the aid of each other. Is that really called the vegas? It's called a vegas nerve. We're in vegas. Vegas. It's just ironic because we probably should do a press release. There's not a lot of empathy here. I'm going to take that. I'm going to take that because you just said press release and you've got about eight of them, right? So let's run them down as we go. Let's do Canada first because that was the one that I thought to myself. Oh, well that makes sense. Right? So what are you doing in Canada? There's a little bit of a partnership there. Yeah. Well, you know, we actually signed it quite some time ago. Okay. But we were, we didn't announce because we wanted to pull together something that was really altering in the space. Right. And we're cOmpletely collaborative so we want to create relationships around the planet.

Speaker 1: Right. That are win, win, win, win. Actually I like, I like to get up to seven, that's my goal. Seven. All right. Seven people or entities or whatever when out of anything that I would be involved in. So I'm kind of always looking for that right now. So I'm not a big fan of losers. I gotcha. Any equation? Okay. So I'd like to meaning in a deal with you. Yeah, there shOuld be. No. Everybody should feel good, right? It's like, yeah, this is perfect for me. Right. So for everybody works for everybody. Like all right, check, shamed. Michelle, yOu did your thing right? The world. Right. So in Canada, I'm the path that we're going is really aligning with the indigenous people of Canada. Great. And here you go again. Right? You really, so how I'm going to, while you well up here and you, you're this a running this big company doing these big deals and you're complete softies yet I usually have to have somebody around me to protect me.

Speaker 1: It's like, all right, please don't give away the world, right? Yeah, it's okay. Ifc pill winds to. Yeah, right, exactly. Now, but you're really, I mean there are tiered literally just my daily thing. So anytime. Any. Yeah. It's, cause you're, you're very intouch, right? You are very present. Yes. Have your emotions and, and everyone else's emotions also. So what are we getting out with the indigenous people here in Canada? So really, you know, the path that we're going down there is, you know, how can include the indigenous people in what we're doing in Canada. Um, and also how can we support them? And here's the. All right, so this is kind of be a little side look, we'll go off the side here. We'll it back to the carbohydrates thing. Okay. So, um, as I already checked out of the hospital in and went to Canada tech london.

Speaker 1: Okay. So that morning I had an ultrasound and then I got on a boat because I couldn't fly, took the boat to london. Okay. Um, I'm just earlier, like the day before that I finally figured out what it is that I have and it was a recommendation from a gi doctor and I had this extremely rare disease called genetic. Um, I have to, like, this is like really hard to say. It's an extremely rare genetic, um, sucrase, iso multays deficiency. OkAy. Okay. What are you deficient in? Really in human speak, right? I'm deficient of the enzymes that break down sugars and starches into something that your body can deal with. And So that is why your body's doesn't understand carbohydrates that does not understand because they, they go through my body and my body was like, wait a second. Yeah. This should not be here. Right? Right. So, um, um, sucrose, sugar, okay.

Speaker 1: That breaks down into fruit toast via this enzyme. Right. And the same thing happens with starches. So I'm starches as a result of icl multays breakdown into something. Okay. Okay. Does it feel like you got far enough there that you can go and he'll ask richard about the rest and here's the, here's the real tie in. It's like this is a disease that is a big problem in northern indigenous people in Canada. Uh huh. Interesting. And in Alaska. So eskimos one, because you basically, you're right, they don't have a lot of carbohydrates, you know, you're not going to go around to die. No. If you look historically forever, right? Um, so fIsh bread, not so much fat meat, whatever, which is pretty much, I'm like live on fat and meat and nuts and whatever. And. okay. All right. So I'm a, I'm allergic to all sugars, all grains, all flowers, rice.

Speaker 1: I'm a all starches, most fruits and some vegetables oddly enough, like carrots can do carrots, potatoes either. Right? So I can eat those green beans, right? Yeah. Okay. God, I'm so amazing. But then you have this kind of business was like I told, I told our, um, our um, our, uh, his name is scott cathcart and he like, he's the chief of global for steep hill. It's like all these titles, whatever I have to their tongue twisted, love it. But do you do that scott though? You know exactly what he does. You can't, you're not going to get busy with the words here, but I'm told so I said, you know, I'm going to become the champion of the indigenous people surely in Canada. Okay. Perfect. And I think genetically speaking of where it's coming from in my bloodline is actually siberia. Okay. So my, my great, great grandfather, you know, liVed in Russia during the bolshevik revolution kind of days.

Speaker 1: RighT? So if you look at almost exactly 100 years ago, when you look at the diet of the people in siberia, it's probably pretty close to eskimos I think because it's pretty cool. Sure. Right up there in the arctic rim or whatever they call it, you know, you're not eating a lot of mangoes up there. So what are we. So what is the partnership? What are we actually accomplishing? Um, so the partnership really is a global partnership to empower indigenous people all around the world. Great. And utilizing they, you know, they believe in cannabis, right? And depending on the indigenous people of where, you know, what we look at, we could go to jump to Jamaica in that. And what about native americans? Native americans also, right? So, you know, one, they've used it as a medicine in many tribes around the world and it is part of their indigenous medicine.

Speaker 1: Totally along with other things. It's not like, you know, a bunch of indigenous people like, okay, let's. Cannabis is the only thing that's been integrated into everything that they do medicinally. Right. And they don't view it as anything different than, you know, harvesting any route door, plant or some other substance that they may turn into medicine. It's part of the culture that's part of the culture. It's almost part of the part of the uh, I want to saY it's part of the zeitgeists surely, but it's part of the, uh, the sole. Oh yeS, of the people. So we, we like, so we're moving like, so we took our contacts from the first nations. Alright. So that is really the, the, the political or the organizational. It's probably not, will they aren't, have a lot of political power. But that's not really their total quest is it's all of the tribes, indian tribes in Canada all become part of this, this organization called first nation.

Speaker 1: Love it, love it. and you can do this around the world. Yeah, there. You know what, there are indigenous people everywhere generally has been abused. That's worked out well for them. That's exactly right. So, and the same thing goes with Jamaica. So we immediately came out of the, when we established the canadian relationship, we took representatives from the pontiac group and they're really pushing forward how can we empower indigenous people in Canada as a result of the cannabis movement that's unfolding there and how can we give them a stake at the table. Okay. We just dropped them like on one day's notice is like, all right, can you guys come to Jamaica? We're goIng to bake it. And we're meeting with chief grizzle of the maroons in Jamaica who are also in indigenous people. And they were um, they when, um, england colonized Jamaica and they of course had slaves.

Speaker 1: Sure. Okay. And, um, over over the years, and this is hundreds and hundreds of years back, right back to the constitution days, you know, when we, when the us was formed, ran away and they lived in the jungle because to escape slavery in Jamaica. And eventually that became identified as the maroons in Jamaica. So, you know, we have been supportive of them since 2014. We've been testing in Jamaica many, many years ago. Right, right. So we went out to, you already had that relationship. We already had that bring in another relationship. I see synergies here because they have no money. No, they don't have running water or electricity, right? So how do we empower these people who have been growing cannabis for as long as memory, as long as you can remember in Jamaica and have learned amazing things such as just for, you know, um, well let me rather than do that, it's like they took us Into the jungle or whatever you would call that.

Speaker 1: Um, um, and, and as you walk through their, their environment of growing cannabis, okay. I'm not even before you even get to the cannabis, you, the terpenes are so thick in the air you can taste up. Oh wow. It was like, oh my god. Yeah. You know, it's like I want to sample the air route because it's going to show up turpines and blow your mind. Right. So that is a, you know, that is a, a growing condition that cannot be replicated. No. Right. Um, and one of the paths that we want to go in the r and d that we're doing in Jamaica is appalachian control. Right. So because if you have unique genetics like on the islands of Jamaica. Sure. okay. um, you want to keep those or, or in the northern part of Canada and Alaska. Absolutely. As you were saying. Well no genetics of the plant.

Speaker 1: right. So the same people of the same thing would applied to emerald triangle. It's like, oh, you want to know whether that was actually grown a lot. Tell yOu. We can tell you it's called appalachian control. Oh, okay. It was very much like wine. So we can determine. Was that going back to Jamaica? So sorry. Obviously is this australian available in Jamaica, but we can tell through testing whether it was actually grown in Jamaica and where to the point where we can differentiate cannabis grown by the maroons versus the rastafarians on the same island. Really? Yeah. Now that's the research. This is all we need to prove out the test. They're shorter, but I don't really have any doubts that we can pull this off. We can do it anywhere. Huh? Because you know, if you look at Jamaica, you have a brand that you have to protect us the country.

Speaker 1: Right. So you want to oppose or go after anyone who is saying, yes, this is, you know, the best jamaican weed in the world and they're growing it in a Mississippi. Okay. Probably that possible. Have you met a mowgli holmes? I mean, it seems like there's a synergy there. He's mapping the cannabis genome we pitched, dIssipating together good in a project to it to be able to basically secure cannabis genetics and, and put a flag in the ground that says when the big boys enter this space and you could use an m word. Okay. And you could fill in the rest of the letters. Okay. But I'm not going to say that name. Okay. But it begins with an m in there into the genetics. Um, and when people like that enter this space and we want to be able to say it's like, no, these, this cannabis genetics existed long, long ago and no, you cannot rape and pillage the poor gets the last word of the last letter of.

Speaker 1: You'll just going to have to figure it out. I can't now. I'm not saying it. Maybe it's like if I had my very big company, very big company, and if my gc was standing here next to me, she'd probably say, you should not have said the first daughter. Don't even don't even talk about this. Well, that gets us into, you have a nice sizeable company in the cannabis space here. You're talking about big, big giant companies. It sounds kind of becoming one of those bIg giant. Well that's what I'm saying. Yeah. No, I mean how. Well, how many people do you have now? Right? Um, we will be at 100 before the end of the year. We started the year like, I dunno, 30 something, right? Um, we'll be at 250 by the end of next year. Excellent. And you, it seems like you have the resources available to you and the reason I say it seems like it's because you put out a press release that now we're going to have steep hill ventures.

Speaker 1: You have the resources to kind of bring others along with you type of thing is how I read. Yes, absolutely. What else do we know? This is kind of something that happens to us like this on a constant basis, like usually not more than every once a week or so, but like in the last three days, I think four times. Um, and it really is someone usually a scientist who has some discovery, right? Um, and like that will be something game changing that in the world of cannabis and, but you know, they're, they're, they're scientists, right? They don't know, first of all, they're going to get eaten alive by the market right now, especially on the money guys. Okay. So they need somebody who, you know and love. By the way, I, I love them, but they have to be good. All right? So they have to be good actors.

Speaker 1: Okay. In my world and those that have dealt, made me understand, it's like, all right, there are rules. Essentially you're kind of putting in a business casing around the scientist. Is that. well, you could call it really like incubating and accelerating and accelerating incubator. Okay, sure. Which is funny because the first, the first company that we officially brought into the program is actually I'm a bio reacting company, but let's whatever, let's another, another call because we can't get into any details. Another story for another call this a call. We, you realize we're sitting right here with each other, right? This isn't a phone call. Yeah. What's your point? I just wanted to poke fun. Okay, good. I like that. Um, so, um, so really what I want to do is empower people with that. Have something that'll change the world scientifically. Take care of them.

Speaker 1: So, you know, bring them into what we call the halo because when you, when, what is the halo? The halo is like when somebody uses our name and many people do it, like kind of without our permission because that gives them some credibility, right? Sure. Tested by steep hill and then we would like looking like, yeah, maybe back in 2014 once. Yeah. Once. Okay. but you're not regularly testing with us, so please don't say that. Okay. BuT we don't beat up on a lot of people for that. But um, so you get instant credibility, especially scientifically know to use our name because we have a reputation for leading the science of cannabis globally. Right? Right. And, and we've earned that and we've earned it by true scientific rigor and also having integrity and telling the truth. We can't be bought. Right? So we're going to tell the truth, right?

Speaker 1: So please don't come to us and say, you know, you know, how much will it, how much can I pay you to falsify my test results? Right? That's not happening right now. You could ask, have been asked. That's not, we're not going to be doing that. Okay. Yeah. No. And we've talked about that before because what's the point of that? What are we doing? What, what does that even mean? It's whenever you get into the flawed thought process, because I don't think it's, it's in the interest of growers and producers either, but they're just not thinking clearly. Really. There's really two aspects of venture, right? So I just want to solve all their problems so that they can just go kick out and to go do their thing, right? Because I now understand scientists. Sure They want to play and they need toys, right? So I want to play mind kindness.

Speaker 1: Similar. You need to make sure they've got toys and their toys are always, you're always talking about hundreds of thousands of dollars for their toys because I like really nice toys. So it's like a one to like. All right. So when we look at a relationship where it's like, we were like, well, what are, what do we need to do to take them over the goal line? Do they need continued r and d? Do they need access to sample flow? Did they need validation or whatever? Um, um, and the first company that we did this for, this is, this is where my idea was born was a company called pathogen dex and they have or at that when we first started, because I'm kind of doing r and d for them, um, it is a mic, a dna based microbial testing, so either living or dead. Okay.

Speaker 1: We can detect whether there was any mIcrobial contamination there ever, ever. Right. So normally in microbial testing and everything that everyone else does in the test, in the testing world, you, you know, you put it in a petri dish, he puts his gel stuff right and you spread it on and wait for it to grow. You put it in your easy bake oven and let it grow for three days. Okay. I'm pretty antiquated technology and, and, and dna based microbial one can be done in six hours. So it's a really a game changer as far as your turnaround time, but it's 100 percent accurate down to one cfu and one cfu carbon or colony forming unit is unbelievably accurate. Right? Unbelievably, what is a kind of a standard that we're okay with now as far as cfos are concerned, you know, just so we can, if you're getting down to one, what, what, what is, uh, you know, generally acceptable, at least at this moment in time.

Speaker 1: I don't know. The answer is well, ask reggie, can you guys at reggie that question? I will ask you that question. You know, it's, it's in the magnitude of thousands, I'm sure. Right? Okay. But, um, and so the other aspect of ventures, I know you said that there's one that's one all the scientific side and, and blah blah, blah. How do you turn yourself into a business? Okay, that's one side money. They need money, right? They need, you know, seed funds, they need, you know, the ramp up to actually becoming a real force in the market and I want to solve that problem for that. um, so because you have, that means you have the. Yeah. I have a pretty good network of people who understand science and here's, it's like super vetted opportunities to invest in science because even when I look back at pathogen dx, it's like, all right, so we're doing the r and d, we're like pretty heavy commitment, right?

Speaker 1: The lab as far as the resources that we're throwing at that. And then they weren't there a startup. So they need funding and like I'm like, oh wait a second. If they don't get funding, I lose all my investment on the r and d side. I'm like, I got to make sure they're fun, let's get them funded, let's get them funded. So I called one of our investors and said, please go put some money in that. Okay. Um, and then I'm like, wait a sec. And then I kind of realize it's like, all right, we're super curating things, right? So on the scientific side, if we say invest money in this company, okay, one, we have a personal stake in it, you're going to lose money if they fail, right? So you can pretty much trust that it's a good investment, at least everything we know.

Speaker 1: And that's not available out there in the world because there's lots of people hawking, scientific, blah, blah, that may not really be based on scIence or may theoretically not even be possible. So this is a vote of confidence, um, that it's, you know, it's a smart thing to invest in something that we would take into venture. Got it. Sure. Steep hill ventures. There we go. We're done talking about it. You know, if seth would move faster, this is a, a, a public service announcement to all of sets customers. Okay. If seth would turn around his, his interview's a little faster. They would actually be about steep hill and not about the steep hill of yesteryear six months ago. Well, you know, the thing is you have to include that. Of course I will. And it's, you know, that's why I really do very much appreciate the sponsors that we do have.

Speaker 1: And it'S saying that you want money out of me. DefInitely. I'm saying that. And the reason is. Okay, fine. Yeah, it was because we have only so much means to get going. And you know, baby needs new shoes. Well, so that's why I have five other podcasts, right, is because I can only do the some of the time, which is why you have a little bit of a lack of. Does that make sense? Does that make sense? The person that's sitting on the other table talk and talk. You can talk about that. Please give me the steep hill. right. Alright. Collaborative and I appreciate that public service announcement and the opportunity to pitch you live, uh, on, on a recorded line. All right, so, so you guys are obviously making your way into 2018. You've got the ventures, you've got the kind of the Canada partnershIp which makes its way to Jamaica as well as kind of the rest of the world's indigenous people.

Speaker 1: Yeah. What are you most exCitEd abOut as we kind of make our way into 2018? This is going to be a transformative year. I almost said it before, uh, you know, California is coming online. They're going to be new standards as far as testing in that big great state. Yes. Which is going to inform the rest of the industry worldwide, you know? Yes. Okay, fine. We've got that as you look to 2018, you know, what, what are you most excited about? I guess this'll probably come out in the first quarter of 2018. We will have already seen this shit show and the, and the laboratory space in, well in California specifically coming online stories. And then now, what do you mean by that? Um, there's not enough capacity to test, to do the testing that is mandatory. It's near [inaudible]. That will be the bottleneck in the industry.

Speaker 1: Now we'll see when, you know, we don't know the regs come out this morning, theoretically, right? We're here. Nobody like, all right, when does testing begin and you know, like, I don't see that being passed July 1st, but you know, if you're creating a product, um, and testing becomes mandatory July 1st, and I see that as the kind of the latest window. Well, you're going to want to test it. Are we going to do Pull it off the shelf July 1st? So surely if you're a manufacturer you're going to be doing that. So there's going to be significant capacity issues early on, um, testing itself, sting. And that'll be the kid. Imagine like, oh, you can't sell your product. Um, you grow because congratulations on the shelf. Right. Okay. Yeah. Because the lab turnaround time is 30 days. Well, why aren't we opening up more steep hill labs in California that we're building?

Speaker 1: Okay. Okay. But it's not more labs is one that building out on that. Yeah. Uh, when will that be ready, do you think? Um, first quarter for sure. Oh yeah, definitely. Okay. So we will solve that. Bottleneck will be a bottleneck. We will like, all right. If you're smart enough to get on the island. Yeah. Which is what we call it. You should get on the island now, the island of [inaudible] island. A steep hill because if you're not on the island, you know. Well, whO knows? Life is not good and you don't even have the opportunity to be voted off if you're not on. YeAh, that's good. Yeah. It's like you didn't even know you did not pass the whatever to get on the show. You can even be voted on and you know, um, and we believe in loyalty. Yeah. Right. You know. And so what's happening in Oregon then speaking to loyalty in Oregon?

Speaker 1: We're at this morning, we're announcing steep hill Oregon. Yeah. Um, and it is with a pain management doctor kay who's done a ton of research on opiates. Okay. And, and, and cannabis is effect in replacement of that for his patients. And unfortunately in the world of labs, you know, there aren't that many credible labs that actually really know what they're doing, especially when you're on, when you really want to talk about medicine. Okay. ThIs, you know, you need to go a lot farther than anyone else has gone. It's like, all right, so let's just talk about cannabinoids. Like, so I'm currently the market all labs around the world contest 11 cannabinoids. That's it. We can test for 25. We report on 17 currently and we're on quest. We're on the quest of unlockIng all a 140. He was going to say there's minor cannabinoids more than 100.

Speaker 1: Right. And we will be the first on the planet to be offering that as a test to. Interesting. When is that? Do you have a timeframe on it's r and d? Okay. This is not easy, right? Yeah. So it's like I can't give you, we just don't have those answers to be expensive tests. Right? Because it's like when you're talking you testing for 140 things once we're going to have to jump through a few hoops to make this happen, but we, you know, I think we're on the right path with that. Perfect. All right, So that's 2018 steep hill. So we're, we're moving, we're running. Move in, we're running. Is that fast enough? Is it fast enough? What's. What's faster than running pole vaulting. okay. Just pole vault.

Speaker 1: What happened to the last whatever, four miles and we'd just pull bolted over. Yeah, exactly. Well this is always a, a fascinating time for us to sit down. I very much appreciate it. Oh, we're going to talk in la a when's la? There's the arcview thing there. Maybe. Well, I don't know. I, you know, I only bump into you at conferences, so it's true. Well, I've got to make my way to delft, right? Yeah. Well, if you want to pronounce it like you were born there, you got hit on l so it's developed. Oh, deadlift. Very good. Okay. You can tell somebody from amsterdam that says delft. Yeah. Okay. This is like, oh, you're a foreigner. Delft. Telephone. All right. So that's what we had to be born there. Okay. But how many, how many days out of a month or you actually endowed enough? Right?

Speaker 1: I've had enough. What are you doing? Three or uh, how many weeks out of the month you're traveling on this trip? I will be gone a total of a month floating around. total for the month is gone a month. So four weeks out of four weeks on the west, right. I'll be home for six days and then I come back. Okay. To the United States of America, unfortunately. And we were all the reasons you would not want to be in the United States. Right? So we shouldn't talk about that. Talk about politics. We should not talk about politics because that would be swearing on, you know, in a public forum. Yeah. and we don't want to do this is for the kids. Yes. Jamie. Michelle, always a pleasure. Thank you. I will see you

Speaker 2: down the line is okay. Awesome. And there you have shame. Michelle keller, who In fact has come on as a sponsor. Steep hill is going to be with us in q one, 2018, so very much appreciate that jamie shell and the entire team over there. Guess while we're on the subject, engage@canneseconomy.com. If you'd like to do so to hey, happy winter solstice. happy new year. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.