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Ep.322: Etienne Fontan, Berkeley Patients Group

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.322: Etienne Fontan, Berkeley Patients Group

Ep.322: Etienne Fontan, Berkeley Patients Group

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Etienne Fontanne returns to share what's happening on the ground in California since January first. He notes at Berkeley patients group has been testing for more than a decade and otherwise self regulating for 18 years, as has always been the case in the interim period between temporary regulations rolled out one, one and full regulations rolling out seven, one at 10 and bpg or focused on what they've always been focused on staying as compliant as possible. He notes that there's been a bit of sticker shock for the patient consumer in that city, county and state tax have been added to product prices which have gone up, and so he's hopeful that at least at the city level, there's an easing of taxes for consumers. Something echoed by Aaron Justis and Steve de Angelo in the two episodes which precede this one. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American economy. That's two ends of the word economy at 10. Fontanne Roger will know at 10 Fontana.

Speaker 2: That's my name. Yeah, we are here. We have so many things to talk about at 10. One is you and how you're doing and make. We want to make sure to to know about that. The other is January first happened and so we are in a different reality here in California and then just a few days later, jeff sessions rescinded the coal memos in the Ogden memo before. It's. So we're gonna want to talk about that? How does that line up as far as things to talk about? So much fun. I cannot wait to tackle it all. Well, let's do, you know, California here we are adult use, you know, a whole new world. Brave new world of cannabis here in California of course, looking to what Colorado and Washington and Oregon and Alaska have done have allowed a bureau

Speaker 3: of cannabis control to a. They came through with emergency provisions, I would say about a month before. Right? And so, um, everybody was tasked with a steep learning curve. So from my legal team to I'm government relations people, everyone across the board, we actually spoke to Sabrina. I saw that. And so it's a absorbing, you know, um, because what we have been doing and self-regulating here at Berkeley patients group, um, you know, from being pioneers and testing back in 2006, 2007, I'm coming online with that type of testing to where the city decided that the other dispensary, he's had to hold up to the same standards. Now the state is holding everybody to the same standards that we've been self holding ourselves up to. And it's nice to see everybody else come along for the ride because unfortunately those things that have failed in testing my competition is taking them around or to absorb them because they don't have the same testing standards that Berkeley has enacted.

Speaker 3: A Berkeley was the most strict in enacting a testing. And in fact, to my knowledge is the only one initially that has a testing still on the books for all of its dispensary. So we've been forced into going into the realm of having all of our cannabis tested, storing that and dealing with the, um, the realities that come with holding cannabis for an extended period of time. Right now it is, the onus has changed, the dynamic has completely changed, whereas in the fat in the past, I dealt directly with the farmer, now I'm dealing with the distributor, whereas the farmer and I had to negotiate. Now it is completely, the onus is on the grower to do the testing to make sure that it is packaged properly. Uh, and uh, coming in July first, they will actually have to be in a childproof packaging.

Speaker 1: Etienne Fontanne returns to share what's happening on the ground in California since January first. He notes at Berkeley patients group has been testing for more than a decade and otherwise self regulating for 18 years, as has always been the case in the interim period between temporary regulations rolled out one, one and full regulations rolling out seven, one at 10 and bpg or focused on what they've always been focused on staying as compliant as possible. He notes that there's been a bit of sticker shock for the patient consumer in that city, county and state tax have been added to product prices which have gone up, and so he's hopeful that at least at the city level, there's an easing of taxes for consumers. Something echoed by Aaron Justis and Steve de Angelo in the two episodes which precede this one. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American economy. That's two ends of the word economy at 10. Fontanne Roger will know at 10 Fontana.

Speaker 2: That's my name. Yeah, we are here. We have so many things to talk about at 10. One is you and how you're doing and make. We want to make sure to to know about that. The other is January first happened and so we are in a different reality here in California and then just a few days later, jeff sessions rescinded the coal memos in the Ogden memo before. It's. So we're gonna want to talk about that? How does that line up as far as things to talk about? So much fun. I cannot wait to tackle it all. Well, let's do, you know, California here we are adult use, you know, a whole new world. Brave new world of cannabis here in California of course, looking to what Colorado and Washington and Oregon and Alaska have done have allowed a bureau

Speaker 3: of cannabis control to a. They came through with emergency provisions, I would say about a month before. Right? And so, um, everybody was tasked with a steep learning curve. So from my legal team to I'm government relations people, everyone across the board, we actually spoke to Sabrina. I saw that. And so it's a absorbing, you know, um, because what we have been doing and self-regulating here at Berkeley patients group, um, you know, from being pioneers and testing back in 2006, 2007, I'm coming online with that type of testing to where the city decided that the other dispensary, he's had to hold up to the same standards. Now the state is holding everybody to the same standards that we've been self holding ourselves up to. And it's nice to see everybody else come along for the ride because unfortunately those things that have failed in testing my competition is taking them around or to absorb them because they don't have the same testing standards that Berkeley has enacted.

Speaker 3: A Berkeley was the most strict in enacting a testing. And in fact, to my knowledge is the only one initially that has a testing still on the books for all of its dispensary. So we've been forced into going into the realm of having all of our cannabis tested, storing that and dealing with the, um, the realities that come with holding cannabis for an extended period of time. Right now it is, the onus has changed, the dynamic has completely changed, whereas in the fat in the past, I dealt directly with the farmer, now I'm dealing with the distributor, whereas the farmer and I had to negotiate. Now it is completely, the onus is on the grower to do the testing to make sure that it is packaged properly. Uh, and uh, coming in July first, they will actually have to be in a childproof packaging. Right.

Speaker 3: We've got six months to kind of work that out. Yep. And, um, but we're trying to stay as compliant as possible. Right now I'm, I've spent the past six days stickering, um, because, uh, there's compliance, uh, stickers and warnings that come with and because of the lack of time, there's no way I could have gotten the bags printed and all these types of things. So in time that I'm in, even, how much is it really worth my time because within six months it's all coming to me in prepackaged forum. I will no longer be taking bulk and breaking it down into eighth ounces and grams that I have for 18 plus years. Uh, I know unfortunately I'm going to be laying off, you know, that department and shutting down my weight room, you know, there are jobs that are being lost because of the distributor kind of setup here.

Speaker 3: It's inevitable, however, there'll be absorbed into other areas of the business. But um, I will no be hiring in the future for that specific department and then we'll close down because I won't have the state coming in calibrating my scales because that's something that we do and we have actual stickers. Will that save you money in the long run? So in other words, you've got some people, which it sounds like you're going to give them different jobs you won't hire, you know, that same department again. But will that save you money in the long run because you don't have to do those things. I have to weigh those out. I mean, one would think so. But with these other taxes, uh, realities that we're dealing with, which is 15 percent a local tax here in Berkeley as 10 percent hopefully will be lowered to two point five percent, but currently is at 10 percent.

Speaker 3: Then you've got the over the counter tax, which is nine point. Oh, for Alameda County. So those Qa, cumulation of taxes has led to a sticker shock for the patient as well as the individual consumer. How does you say sticker shock? Just give us a sense of December 31st January first. What's the difference is roughly have, you know, kind of taxation on product. What was it and where did it, you know, you just mentioned what it is now. Well, if you were a patient, you didn't have to with the state card, you didn't have to pay the taxes period. So of course they were just a local tax and the over the counter tax. Uh, now I'm a patient with an actual county card and that changed for me as far as I know, I now pay a 15 percent tax, which you did not, did not pay before.

Speaker 3: I also pay a, uh, the over the counter countertack's currently and I'm supposedly a do not pay the local tax. So there's still some confusion around the taxation. A local municipalities like Oakland, Berkeley, and San Francisco, which decided to regulate or setting their own taxation. I anticipate La, we'll do the same Santa Cruz and other places because they're seeing the amount of cannabis and people coming in and out the doors for us. It definitely started with lines to January first as opposed to before on December 31st. Um, it was just a patients as usual, so to open up to the adult use markets, uh, groups of people showing up because they were coming with their family. I see fathers and sons coming together. Mothers, daughters, you know, cousins, nephews all coming together because it's something they want to experience together. They've either been doing it in a hiding and they now want to come out and celebrate in the new air.

Speaker 3: But when they do see the taxes, you know, it's definitely a reality check for them. But, uh, the majority of them are like, well, this is what, uh, we voted for and this is what the state wants. So this is what will move forward with. And Berkeley seems to be pretty open minded as far as listening to taxation concerns from, you know, from, from Sabrina, from you, from others. Well that's because we've been lobbying and working with our city for 18 plus years, 20 years. Exactly. By doing so, people seem to forget that they're just in business, but they have to social responsibilities. And due to that in the era of activism that we came from, it's one of those realities we've had to confront head on, you know, we put on the suits and ties and we have to go down and we have to play the suit and tie game, be proper, be prim beyond time, do the things we have to do a lobby, go down and help them.

Speaker 3: Uh, when they're running for office, be there for the phone banks, make donations, know when their birthdays are, you know, these very monotonous realities that really build over time so that you can have a consensus so that you can reach out to the mayor and they respond and they actually saw red tape on a cut. The, what was it, not red tape, what do you call it? The, uh, the ribbon. The ribbon? Yes. The official ribbon for opening up. Yes. We were very honored to have the mayor of Berkeley come out as well as the state senator and that was a humbling to say the least because, uh, it's, it's one thing when we've been working so hard for us, it's, we're, we're neck deep in it all the time so we don't necessarily get to come out and rebel so much and this was one that we wanted to celebrate with our peers and we were very fortunate to have our own cities constituency actually come out and where it was the mayor himself.

Speaker 3: So, uh, we will also wanted to honor a longtime activists because we are activists. Um, I started way back in the, uh, in 92 93 and section network totally with the fathers and the sons and the mothers and the daughters coming together online here January first. You know, if, if Jack were still around, Jack Herrera, uh, were to see the line, what do you think he, his response would be? Because that's the activist roots you're talking about from, from your own self, told you, so told you everybody wanted this. We'd, Jack would be happy and he'd be mad at the same time. Why would he be mad? Taxes. Okay, well, sure. But Jack came to my university in 1989 along with Debbie goldsberry. And for me that was when I cut my teeth and got the emperor wears no clothes. So um, to honor Chris and Mickey, Chris Conrad who wrote the hemp lifeline to the future, which was the, uh, more of a understood book as opposed to Jack's book was more of a compendium of information.

Speaker 3: Hemp lifeline to the future was more of the narrative. Got It. And uh, to have Chris and Mickey who have been such long time activists, uh, we wanted to honor our activist roots and they have been toeing the line, in fact, for 64, they took a lot of heat for it. So. So I wanted to make sure that they were honored fully and we had them be the first purchase. And what brought a tear to my Isa purchased three Jack Rare joints of course. So, uh, he was, he was involved somehow. It poetically, yes. Uh, even though he wasn't there, he was there in spirit and uh, we wanted to honor that. Yeah, because it's just where we came from and it's just a nod and not, not enough honoring of those people who have been in the trenches and need to be recognized for who they are and the sacrifices that they have been through and have done for the better of all.

Speaker 3: And many of us have given up our blood, sweat and tears. And this was just a nod in the right direction out of respect for our activist roots. And then it just turned into lines after lines after lines. And so fortunately we have a very well educated staff as well as we, uh, have a, a vending machine inside that, uh, you saw when you came in and that is a new state of the art technology. So trying to incorporate the new with the old as well as some convenience. However, the majority of people that come in, they just want to see it and feel it. Yeah. This is their first time to a dispensary. Well, the patients are frustrated because, well, the medical paid sure course because they've seen, and I have to explain it is like you have to realize you have seen all of these products come in and out of the door and the 18 plus years that we've been open, so you've seen them come and change and evolve and become what they are and you completely normalized to it.

Speaker 3: Whereas you're caught up absolutely right. Whereas these people have never seen this beyond high times or on a TV show or on a cheech and Chong show. I mean, they've actually had access. Don't, don't get me wrong. People have been buying cannabis illegally throughout the United States for generations and that's what I'm saying, that even with legalization a third of the market is still going to stay illegal. Well, and then and depends on that actual percentage really does come down to where we wind up with taxation, doesn't it? Well, it's not only were we wind up with taxation, it's where do we do a way, where do we finally do away with these prohibition prices? Remember the, the price of cannabis has been a subjectively high because of these risks that we were supposedly taking over our freedoms to get this to you in your hands. Whereas that's no longer the case.

Speaker 3: It becomes an agricultural crop. And as you know, with every agricultural crop, it's a race to the bottom. It's no longer a race to the top. Colorado can tell you as Colorado has shown the way and we've seen with their five year experiment and seeing nothing but we expect to happen here in California, which is with large scale production. We will see the prices come down. You'll see the prices come down of oil and concentrates because we see that a flower starts to wane in the air of the newer markets. Uh, older patients and consumers tend to enjoy edibles much more than necessarily a combustible flower. And we see the younger generation going more toward the dads and the concentrates. And then you more of the urban people tend to like the pens because the simple convenience and access, um, so the patients have had full run of the store for years and now the regular patron over 21 can come through the door and that has led to lots of questions, lots of curiosity and we want to be as helpful and as educational as we can be regarding the, uh, you know, they just have questions and they see you, they've heard of Hash you now here's 50 different types of, you know, they go to their or had access to a cannabis dealer, then they have only had access or one or maybe two different varieties here.

Speaker 3: Forty to 60 different varieties of flowers for me to choose from. And then then the edibles. Okay. So we saw edibles go from, you know, a thousand, you know, milligrams too, you know, it's now gone down, right. You know, I'm right. Products have changed completely and now a products have had to change their packaging because, uh, things like Corova of went from there very large high concentration bars to know going into 100 milligram cookies into, you know, a 10 pack. So you then meet that thousand milligram limit. So the learning of what those limits are, depending on if it's a concentrate such as we found out the other day that I'm, uh, pills such as goal drops are a concentrate. They're not an edible really. They're suspended in oil. Interesting. Yeah. So again, clarification being sought for these little intricacies that weren't known and aren't known and what we thought was an addable because it is as such, he stated now deems it as such.

Speaker 3: So, and that's that six months, right? Isn't that January, first, July, first six months, let's all figure this out together type of. That's what we're trying to do. And you know, we're seeking an erring on the cautious side whenever we're uncertain about things because, um, we just want to do things proper. We understand that there's a lot of challenges with the new rules and regulations, but, uh, we've immersed ourselves in them to make sure that we're serving all of our customers, both patients and adult users legally. How are the bud tenders don't cause a lot of this falls on their shoulders, right? Uh, there reenergized um, good things have slowed down a bit because in the last year, uh, with, um, legalization being anticipated, a lot of people have let their doctor's notes a subside. Uh, Ha, uh, ha. Interesting. And in doing so it challenges, um, uh, well they basically, it's not really much of a challenge as much as it was a realization that, you know, things started to taper down a little bit so it slowed down for the bud tenders because people weren't renewing.

Speaker 3: Their notes are coming by because there were anticipating on legalization to happen. So we wanted to be ready on January first, so we had to go through, you have to be locally, locally licensed. So we had to work with our city there and get everything on proper and prim. And then, uh, then we applied for the state permit and we were the fifth one for that. Good. We were very proud to have passed the sniff test, needless to say. But, um, we knew that we would, we just had to get our affairs in order. Right. And we know that we will into the future because we've always been about following the rules. Remember Berkeley patients group was formed in anticipation of getting busted. So we wrote everything down. We acknowledged everything. We did everything within everything that we thought was proper with within the law.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And once we arrived there, um, we always felt a defense was possible because I'm an affirmative defense. Again, that's why we had Berkeley patients group because patients was in the name because you couldn't use medical marijuana is an affirmative defense at the federal level. So it was a well thought out strategy through and through, which did help by the way, along the way, it did help along the way, but we've never had to have cases is my point. We want a case. So as we went last year against the federal government or when they tried to evict us from this location and a, which is your second location, which is our second location, because they successfully evicted us from our previous location after threatening the, a bank that had the loan for the property as well as the landlord. They threatened to take away the entire bank if they didn't kick us out because we were within 980 some odd feet from a French school as opposed to a thousand.

Speaker 3: Correct. But that was, as the crow flies, we were over a thousand if you actually walked around the corner. So that brings us to a few days after January, first a later in the week, uh, jeff sessions rescinded the coal memos and the Ogden memo before it and put out his own three paragraphs, which I guess is now known as the session to Malmo, which doesn't tell us much, but what it does do is it puts, puts the power back into the, uh, you know, uh, US attorney's hands a new, by the way, us attorney for your jurisdiction. I'm, I'm sitting here talking to, we just talked about it, a grizzled vet. Right. So I'm expecting you to say this is more of the same. I'm not really bothered by it because I've been rated before. I'll be rated again. Who Cares? That's what I expect you to say.

Speaker 3: Um, no, I don't expect to actually be rated again. Uh, we have seen enough pushback and we'll see. You continue to see pushback because you also still have the word backer amendment, which is still only for medical, correct? It is for medical and you guys are selling adult use. Yes we are. But our state has defended and will continue to defend as well as other states with recreational have come out and said that they will defend their individual 10th amendment. Right. And we will. Until then, we're just continuing on. It's today is Wednesday, so. Right. But I have no time to sit there and waste or think about those types of. It's minutia. It, it, it, it's, it's, it's hearsay and conjecture until, you know, until it happened. The tank start rolling or

Speaker 2: totally. But. And you guys show up. What I'm getting at is that if you were to be rated your, you've done your raid preparedness, you're ready for that. That is something that you've been through before or do you just not expected at all?

Speaker 3: We have not felt the paranoia to go into the, um, the old rate status, the what we have back in the early two thousands anticipating I've seen people go in directions.

Speaker 4: Um, but

Speaker 3: right now we are just concerned about what's before us,

Speaker 2: what's going to happen nationally is going to happen nationally. And there's nothing I can really do about that. But if you've got a sessions appointed us attorney in, you know, overseeing a, you know, Berkeley,

Speaker 3: that's just whatever. Yeah. And We survived the Bush administration and it was Obama who came after us. So in here we are in the trump administration. So, um, it's um, again, Wednesday.

Speaker 2: That's uh, so, so that, that is essentially, uh, what I expected. So I appreciate that. Um, having said that, would, do you have any advice for folks that have not been in it as long as you have, you know, for, for a new operator? As of the past year, two years, three years, um, who only does no Cole memo is reality and you know, a kind of. Yes, okay, fine. Obama administration in California came after you, but not nationally. And that wasn't really, uh, the, the um, that wasn't the feeling from a Washington under the Obama administration. It seems like there's a different feeling in Washington now. Do you have any thoughts for your, uh, uh, you know, closer to neo fight status as far as cannabis operations.

Speaker 3: Welcome to the game. Hi. This is the reality we signed up for. This is why we're activists. This is why we're willing to sacrifice our freedoms for many years. This is again, Wednesday. I'm unfortunately for them it's a whole new set of nerves and anxieties and fears, but I'm tempered. I've been through the fire. I've been through the flame, I've come, I've dealt with a grand juries, I've dealt with. I'm trying to incarcerate. My friends have gone up in federal court and declared my fifth and 10th amendment. I have also fought the government for five years and if that's what it takes to have to go through again, we will do so. However, I don't anticipate it going there. I see much pushback. I see also momentum that we have gained at the national level and pushing back against this type of a 19 eighties drug war.

Speaker 3: Um, you, you know, we're having an opioid crisis that we need to be focusing on. And here we are off on a tangent on the left because I myself got off of morphine by using medical cannabis through the Va. Right. Okay. The va did not allow me to use cannabis, don't get me wRong, but they allowed me to use all the morphine I could, you know, could stand and, uh, out of that I found my medical cannabis and it saved my life. And which we've talked about. Correct. Again, for your service, by the way. No problem. Uh, I just, uh, continue to serve every single day in this drug war, you know, that's the reality. And I have nO problem accepting that responsibility. And if the worst case scenario were ever to happen, we're prepared for it and I'm ready for it and I don't think the government is.

Speaker 3: They don't want to tangle with people who are willing to go through the fire and I've been through it before and those of you who are listening that are just done when it be prepared, you could possibly take the same path and have to actually, you know, make sure that you have good counsel, make sure that you have educated but tenders and people at the front in anticipation of a rate strategy because those realities could come forth and I'm sick and tired of worrying about it and being afraid and so are my patients and so are my constituency. And so we're going To continue to do what we do. And we will continue to use our voice nationally with voices like the national cannabis industry association in California with the cci, the California cannabis industries association, and through the bureau of cannabis control. We're seeing them also steadfastly want to defend and move forward. So we saw when we went against the government, our city backed us up and so if the government were to come after us, you would not only see our city, you would see our state back us up as well. So I don't think the government really wants to go in that direction. They may want to try it, but uh, where they're going to find, you know, 12 of our peers in our state to actually go again, take this, you know, um, and

Speaker 2: the, I think that it might be a good time to really take the listener through what did happen in that case. Obviously it took years. So if you could give us the cliff's notes version so that we understand what you had to deal with, you know, how you won and how we are here on the other side.

Speaker 3: Well, we were served in 2012. We were basically told to evict the property that we're at, which is 27, 47 san pablo avenue. We had received a kind of a letter back in 2007 telling us to stop what we were doing. But it was really, really had no teeth. It wasn't until they actually went after the bank, uh, and threatened the bank, which was a new tactic and that a forced us to be evicted in may of, uh, we've, we went into negotiation with the attorney if the federal attorney at the time and decided to close our doors. I'm officially. But then we did you make that decision? Uh, because you couldn't win. Okay. You know, we were going to be rated. Okay. And there's a. This was pre raid we never had to read. Yeah. And, uh, that's because we decided that we could close our doors, go to delivery, reopening a new location because the federal attorney had given us the, kind of our attorney of the understanding that if we had moved and were then away from a k through 12, that that would change.

Speaker 3: So, um, we went that route and we're able to find a location which is two, three, six, six san pablo avenue. But unfortunately it had been abandoned for 25 years. And so we had to, while doing delivery, build a whole new location, right a while fighting the government of which fortunately the government, uh, uh, was unsuccessful in. I'm not closing us down, so we were allowed to stay open the courts, let it stay open the whole time we fought it, took five years before finally the federal attorney due to the previous memos and due to the inability to use a money In California to prosecute eventually, uh, decided to, um, settle with us previous memos being the cole memo memo that was being the previous memos because now their history exactly didn't have any money, right? They talk about resources all the time essentially to, to prosecute.

Speaker 3: Saw the cole memo said, okay, let's settle and you have to understand the government was coming after us on the auspices of a daycare center, not a k through 12 daycare center. So we know them like big problem that we all have a preschooler's hanging out outside our doors. Just gang rushing as far pot all the time. It's absolutely a horrible, terrible thing that happens when these children that are unsupervised just overrun our marijuana stores. It's just terrible. And I think the government for making sure that, that type of problem doesn't happen for everybody. So that's sarcasm for, for anybody that's listening, just want to make sure that's a thick layer of sarcasm in that last comment, but we bit. Yeah. Yeah. Um, and so, uh, we, we also realized that we do not, they could not also find 12 people of our peers and actually try to convict us.

Speaker 3: So it's just one of those things where we settled, uh, and uh, we were able to exIst. And so when a prop 64 happened, uh, we saw the opportunity to, uh, since we have been serving our community for cannabis for 18 plus years, uh, we welcomed the opportunity to now service the public that had seen and heard of all the various things that we have done over the years to stay open and stay around. They could now come in and experience and they are, and they're coming in droves to experience a legal cannabis, uh, all around the bay area now because san francisco, it started on sunday and we've got it going in oakland and up in vallejo and in santa cruz and san jose and more cities are coming online and it's only going to be beneficial to the individual California consumer who is sick and tired of draconian drug war that has done nothing but impede a or, you know, ruin lives.

Speaker 3: YeAh. That's obviously well said because you've said all these things before, haven't you? Right. Well, you know, I'm, I'm not going to say this is my first time saying these things, but I also know that this is not my last. Exactly. Exactly. Wonderful at 10. I appreciate it. Thanks for everything that you've done to get us here and, you know, keep on pushing forward. I think it's fine. I also would love to know what jack might say about watching you put stickers on things, uh, because that's how to do what you gotta do. Yeah, exactly. Alright, so, so then that brings us to the three final questions for returning guests. Uh, I'll tell you what, they are all asking them in order. Uh, what would you change about yourself? If anything might be something you're already working on, what would you change about anything else if you could, and on the soundtrack of your life. One track, one song that's got to be on their third question is always the same. So what would you change about yourself, if anything might be something you're already working on?

Speaker 3: A thing of always striving to be better humility, keeping it humble, uh, always remember, you know, we still are serving patients and if today's somebody's first day or their last day and never forget that type of humility when dealing with people at the same time I'm making the adult customer aware of, you know, what their realities are. Just said it's still a ever Changing and it's going to change in six months. Yup, yup. At will without question on, on July 1st. Yeah, correct. So, I meAn there's going to be a, you know, a paradigm shift. There's already one and we're experiencing it now and there's going to finally be that permanent one and we look forward to arriving there, but we were also enjoying the journey getting there. Yeah, absolutely. And it seems like you're, you're also educating that new customer that, hey, you know, that's what we're telling you now, but July 1st it's going to change again.

Speaker 3: So, you know, come on back. What would you change about anything else if you could? Now this means you can bend the space time continuum. You're, you're, you're, uh, omniscient, you know, use any tools that you, uh, that you can to a change. Anything at abolish ignorance, willful ignorance, willful, willfully. Thank you for that clarification, right? Yes, it has to. Ignorance is one thing, but willful ignorance is something unfortunately we're all soaking in currently. And uh, we, all we want is to reality to turn to normal. I think everybody is sick and tired of being a, allowing themselves to be traumatized by what's happening in the body politic and stop being afraid. Pick up your pants and get out there and lobby locally. Get active. You know, there's still so much that has to be done all over the United States, you know, there's only eight of us that are currently legal in those 42 other states are going, come on, so stop saying, come on, stop asking us to come help you.

Speaker 3: We helped ourselves so you actually have to pick up your paNts. You start building your constituency and get out there and actually take your lumps just like we have. It's not going to magically happen. It's gonna be hard work. but if we could get past the willful ignorance than I think people would all be more actively involved as opposed to apathetically watching things go down, you know, you, you kind of ended as a cannabis message, but you started as a much kind of wider message and what I was going to kind of tag onto that is stop yelling at each other and think for yourself, please. Right? WoUldn't that help? Yes. Last time I checked it with all adults here and it's adult use here, so we have to act and be responsIble. Even though we have other forces that are not being responsible. It is our responsibility to lead, follow, or get out of the way. Now we're leading. There we go. Alright. On the soundtrack of your life at the end. One track, one song that's got to be on there. Now you're a music guy. I think if I remember correctly, you, you know how to play the bass. Yes I do. And ukulele is my uh, but on your new love. The ukulele, right? I've been playing for about five to 10 years, so it's been, it's just more of what I've been more concentrated around. George harrison, a big ukulele, ukulele fan. Um.

Speaker 3: Oh, maybe the pot by tool. Okay. That kind of makes sense. At 10. Fontana. Thank you so much seth. Thank you so much. And we look forward to seeing you again in the future. And congratulations on 2018 and we wish nothing but success with cannabis economy in the new year.

Speaker 1: And there you have that 10 fontanne. Make sure that you have good counsel. Make sure that you have good bud tenders. Make sure that you have a raid strategy because those realities could come forth. He's also quite confident in we the people as far as jurors, but uh, before we get there, do that. Thanks to him. Thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.