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Ep.323: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.323: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

Ep.323: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

With the Capitol Corridor train in the background and a very personal point up front, Julianna Carella returns to discuss Auntie Dolores and Treatibles. In the wake of California’s new regulations, she’ll be shuttering Auntie Dolores edibles to focus on Treatibles exclusively. Julianna certainly understands and appreciates the two steps forward, one step back reality of legal cannabis, but at this moment in time she has evaluated other realities- slim margins on high-end edibles and the raid preparedness nature of California dispensaries. With those points, adding potency and serving size requirements in the new regulations make continuing with edibles untenable for her. That said, hempCBDbased Treatibles certainly lives on.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Julianna carella returns with the train in the background and a very personal point upfront. Julianna carella returns to discuss Auntie Dolores and treatibles in the wake of California's new regulations shall be shuttering Auntie Dolores edibles to focus on treatable exclusively. Juliana certainly understands and appreciates the two step forward, one step back reality of legal cannabis, but at this moment in time, she's evaluated other realities, slim margins on high end, edibles, and the rate compared to the nature of California dispensary. With those points, adding potency and serving size requirements in the new regulations make continuing with edibles untenable for her. That said, hemp cbd based treatibles certainly live on welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Julianna Carella,

Speaker 2: Julianna carella. Yeah, that's perfect. And I always never know if it's two ends and Juliana, I never know if it's two r's and I never know if it's two l's every time. Okay, here's the easy part. Yeah. My name is spelled Juliana, but it's pronounced Juliana. So there's two ends. Oh, Julie Hanna. And there's only one R and two l's in my last name. Just think care is the first four letters of my easy. These are both easy things to remember by. That's fantastic. You've thought about this before. That comes up a lot. It comes up often. Daily. Maybe so, but the whole thing is though we can't call you Juliana. I'd prefer if you didn't. Exactly. It's Juliana, Juliana, and uh, there's the train, the, you know, the kind of Jack London area train, but it goes all the way up and down. But specifically here the horn is a little obnoxious.

Speaker 2: Oh, a. and you have to be much closer and especially if you're with me because I'm very loud. Got It. Um, and I'll tell the sound man, no matter who he is, he happens to be me in this case, but usually if it's a sound man, I'm like, I'm the loudest person you've ever dealt with. And the guy's like, okay. And then he's like, yeah, you are. Every time it happens I don't. Well, do you think that that's like how much of that is based in me personally versus New York versus, I don't know, something else might have a heavy New York accent. No, I don't. I know. Well, I made that decision. I would imagine roughly around the same time you decided on Juliana, unless that was apparent. Was that apparent? That decided to mean if you really want to know. My real name is Julie Anne with an e at the end? No. What was it, the dancing that gave you the Juliana sort of? Yeah. One of my dance teachers in high school started calling me Juliana and that's when everybody else started calling me that. Okay, so how has that sort of. That's exactly right.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, and there's more details, more details and how much you want me to go into this, but let's do it. Why not? We're here. How many times have I spoken to you? Not on Mike. Usually we talk off Mike. Yeah. So my parents' first child was a girl and she was named Julianne and she passed away. You've told me this not on Mike is what you've done now as you when you just said that. I remembered that. Okay. Yeah, so when someone else like inadvertently changed my name, I kind of just went with it because I wanted my own name and you even saw the headstone, if I remember correctly, to go visit her grave site when I was a little girl and I'd see my name or I thought it was my name. Anyway. Crazy crazy thing of Catholic. Yeah, I mean I wouldn't know and that's a good thing. Most people don't take their infants to the grave site to view there

Speaker 2: dead sister's grave site. My father, yeah. My father once told me that his father, because his father, cause my dad told me that he didn't do great in school and it was when I was not doing great in school so he's trying to empathize with me and then I used that as an excuse and so he called his father and he, his father said, well you don't have to tell them everything so they didn't have to tell you. They didn't have to bring you to the thing there. So Juliana is just a little bit more welcomed in every way.

Speaker 1: Julianna carella returns with the train in the background and a very personal point upfront. Julianna carella returns to discuss Auntie Dolores and treatibles in the wake of California's new regulations shall be shuttering Auntie Dolores edibles to focus on treatable exclusively. Juliana certainly understands and appreciates the two step forward, one step back reality of legal cannabis, but at this moment in time, she's evaluated other realities, slim margins on high end, edibles, and the rate compared to the nature of California dispensary. With those points, adding potency and serving size requirements in the new regulations make continuing with edibles untenable for her. That said, hemp cbd based treatibles certainly live on welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Julianna Carella,

Speaker 2: Julianna carella. Yeah, that's perfect. And I always never know if it's two ends and Juliana, I never know if it's two r's and I never know if it's two l's every time. Okay, here's the easy part. Yeah. My name is spelled Juliana, but it's pronounced Juliana. So there's two ends. Oh, Julie Hanna. And there's only one R and two l's in my last name. Just think care is the first four letters of my easy. These are both easy things to remember by. That's fantastic. You've thought about this before. That comes up a lot. It comes up often. Daily. Maybe so, but the whole thing is though we can't call you Juliana. I'd prefer if you didn't. Exactly. It's Juliana, Juliana, and uh, there's the train, the, you know, the kind of Jack London area train, but it goes all the way up and down. But specifically here the horn is a little obnoxious.

Speaker 2: Oh, a. and you have to be much closer and especially if you're with me because I'm very loud. Got It. Um, and I'll tell the sound man, no matter who he is, he happens to be me in this case, but usually if it's a sound man, I'm like, I'm the loudest person you've ever dealt with. And the guy's like, okay. And then he's like, yeah, you are. Every time it happens I don't. Well, do you think that that's like how much of that is based in me personally versus New York versus, I don't know, something else might have a heavy New York accent. No, I don't. I know. Well, I made that decision. I would imagine roughly around the same time you decided on Juliana, unless that was apparent. Was that apparent? That decided to mean if you really want to know. My real name is Julie Anne with an e at the end? No. What was it, the dancing that gave you the Juliana sort of? Yeah. One of my dance teachers in high school started calling me Juliana and that's when everybody else started calling me that. Okay, so how has that sort of. That's exactly right.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, and there's more details, more details and how much you want me to go into this, but let's do it. Why not? We're here. How many times have I spoken to you? Not on Mike. Usually we talk off Mike. Yeah. So my parents' first child was a girl and she was named Julianne and she passed away. You've told me this not on Mike is what you've done now as you when you just said that. I remembered that. Okay. Yeah, so when someone else like inadvertently changed my name, I kind of just went with it because I wanted my own name and you even saw the headstone, if I remember correctly, to go visit her grave site when I was a little girl and I'd see my name or I thought it was my name. Anyway. Crazy crazy thing of Catholic. Yeah, I mean I wouldn't know and that's a good thing. Most people don't take their infants to the grave site to view there

Speaker 2: dead sister's grave site. My father, yeah. My father once told me that his father, because his father, cause my dad told me that he didn't do great in school and it was when I was not doing great in school so he's trying to empathize with me and then I used that as an excuse and so he called his father and he, his father said, well you don't have to tell them everything so they didn't have to tell you. They didn't have to bring you to the thing there. So Juliana is just a little bit more welcomed in every way.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And there's even more weird stuff. Be Quick, but so it turns out that my sister was

Speaker 2: born on 11 slash 11 and she also died on 1111 and that's a very auspicious date. So it's kind of strange.

Speaker 3: So at least celebrate the 1111

Speaker 2: to honor my sister that I never got to meet. And also because it's 1111 and that's awesome. That's a cool thing. Cool thing. And uh, when's your birthday? March twelfth. Okay, good. So we got out of that whole thing so we're far away from that. A suspicious about my birthday and I'm very close to the ides of March though, only three days prior. So there's that, there's that Shakespeare would have, you know. Good to know. Yeah. So. Alright, well we should probably talk about cannabis before we. Before we forget to do, we have to know. So I guess you, you know, have auntie dolores fame and of course of treatibles fame. Right? In other words, if people go back, they'll see auntie dolores first and then they'll see treatibles because I have interviewed you a few times, so I'm way back when like you are an industry veteran truly. And literally like, when did you start Auntie dolores to remind us? Two thousand eight. Okay. And so it has only been 10 years essentially, right? Basically 10 years dog years. Right. When you bring up dog years, when did you launch treatibles? Two thousand 13. So it's already been five years with that thing. Holy Wow. No, that I remember at the beginning of that. I know. That's weird. I know. It's crazy. We're still here. So January first a. okay, fantastic. Uh, if prop 64 and the whole thing, here's new regulations and your reaction is what?

Speaker 3: Bye.

Speaker 2: So treatable stays at cbd based product, right? It's hemp cbd. Yeah. So, and then what are we doing with, with Auntie Dolores?

Speaker 3: Well, we're regrouping and we're assessing what's a good plan for us. And unfortunately producing edibles is no longer a good plan.

Speaker 2: Let's go ahead and slow walk all the way through that. So we understand exactly why because everyone's very excited about legal cannabis. But here's a story of what happens when legal cannabis occurs, you know, for some companies right now we bought right before we started, you'd launched treatibles and you kind of let you kind of coasted with Auntie Dolores if that's fair and maybe you would have made different decisions. But yeah, where we are now is taxation, et Cetera, et cetera. Makes it so that it just doesn't make sense. Right?

Speaker 3: At the end of the day, it's um, you don't hear stories in the news about dogs dying from our product or jumping out of windows because they got too high and this kind of thing. And I mean, frankly, we just kinda got tired of the stories in the news about kids showing up to grade school with pot brownies in their pockets and sharing them with their friends and all the liabilities involved there. You don't want that to be your product. Well, if we're going to be an unregulated market and we have certain protections, then perhaps yes, but given the current environment and all the other reasons why we needed to close down production of our edibles, there's just, it's just another reason to discontinue it.

Speaker 2: I gotcha. So like with the rescinding of the Cole memo is and Jeff sessions being the attorney general, if I was going to continue before that, well then, you know, let that be the nail in the coffin.

Speaker 3: Yeah. But at the same time, you know, I mean we have been around a long time and we've seen so many steps backwards. It's always been two steps forward. One step back. I mean since day one. And so when we have these steps backwards, I don't, I don't get my panties in a bunch about it because it usually just passes, right? Um, and it gets worked out and if you look at the progress that the industry has had in the last 10 years, there's been a ton of it. So I don't want to, I don't want to just sound super negative about everything.

Speaker 2: So that doesn't scare you away. You know, this whole, uh, you know, here's a new sessions memo that doesn't scare you away in and of itself.

Speaker 3: It's just always going to be a fight, but I just, I find it really hard to believe that they're going to try to end, succeed at rolling back these state laws. I mean, come on this, it's kind of silly. Okay. So then what does it mean? We don't have to put up a fight. I got you. Let me be clear. We don't have to. We still have to fight the good fight and protect our rights. Right? But I don't see how they could possibly roll it back at this point. I mean, that's just come on.

Speaker 2: Where were the toothpaste is too far out of the tube, etc. So, uh, then, uh, you know, if it's not that, then just, you know, a reason number one, two and three for, you know, here's, this is where we were with the edibles and mrs. Why we Said, you know, hey, here's reason number one, reason number two years.

Speaker 3: Well, reason number one happened before these new regs were released and really reason number one is that there's incredibly slim margins on these products and for a product line like ours, which is a superior quality, high end, not easy and cheap to produce, therefore it's got a higher ticket price. And um, unfortunately we just don't really think that California dispensary's know how to merchandise and sell and market these types of products and make a luxury. Yeah, I mean it might happen in the future, but if you look at other states, especially in the rec shops, I mean the way that they display edibles and market them and merchandise them as is phenomenal. The way that we do it here in California is like don't put anything up on the wall because we might have a raid. So be ready to grab everything real quick. Like we've got this.

Speaker 3: We still have this bullet proof window mentality for a good reason and ready to grab it real quick because if, if the rain comes, you know, you don't want to be as out with all your products on the wall. Well with, I mean with the cole memo is under the obama administration, there were raids in California, there were more grades during obama's administration, then bush's administration, and that's news to a lot of people. I mean, this is not just a republican issue, it's not just a democrat. I mean this is, this is an issue that crosses all barriers and there's a lot of it is not making any sense at all. Sure. No matter what perspective you look at it from, right? Yeah. no, it definitely doesn't make sense if you're a guy that believes in states rights and also is a big fan of capitalism.

Speaker 3: You might think you wouldn't, um, you know, go after, uh, businesses in a that are legal in their states. Uh, but then again, you'd be wrong because nothing makes sense. All right? So that's not forget that trump said that he wanted to leave this to the states and he says a lot of things. So. Right. I mean, he does like, let's be, I think we should go with medical. We should keep medical short. He said that. okay. I know what you're telling me this because I mean, look what does the attorney general just did and that's a whole different. I mean, I try not to speak about him as a person because it doesn't do any good, um, in terms of keeping the conversation going in a productive way, what I'd rather talk about is policy and, and the issues at hand and what is actually happening, which is, you know, this is, this is what just happened.

Speaker 3: All right, so number one, margins very thin to begin with. Thin margins. The reason, number two, reason number two is the potency and serving size requirements are pretty impossible for us to work with given our product line. Just having to section off our products into a 10 milligram dose. Having a cap it out at 100 milligrams. Um, having the cause of the product. Just describe the product for instance. So for instance, our caramel corn, which has just naturally irregularly shaped it, snack food. It's meant for, you know, folks that can handle their consumption or not, you know, and if they can't handle it, they know they should only eat a couple pieces, but we couldn't possibly quantify a 10 milligram does like with our karma corn because it's the nature of the product is can't do it. It's not happening because popcorn pieces are snowflakes.

Speaker 3: The funny thing about all this is that we. We created these snack foods that have multiple pieces in the package so that the consumer could be more mindful about how they're consuming. Right. You already thought about this. All right, and then they made rules that made your thinking about this. The irony is that all the products that are the easiest to comply with now are like chocolate. Do we really need more cannabis? Chocolate? I mean it's like $80 million frigging cannabis is chocolate bars. Very easy to say. well, it's really easy. It's really easy to infused chocolate. It's liquid that turns into a solid perfume. You dispersed the medicine throughout the batch. You mix it up really well. You lay it out, squared off it, you know, it hardens. It's like, it's kind of the best Medium for, for cannabis oil and candies are too, and even though there's all these restrictions around gummies and this and that actually producing the candies, you know, you can titrate that dosage pretty successfully just in the production process.

Speaker 3: So there's, there are certain things that just have become easier to comply With. So as far as product assortment, as part of those, as far as health and wellness, it limits those choices unfortunately. Yeah, well they've ruled out some really interesting products as well, you know, well like cheeses and dairy products or beef jerky, I mean they basically disallowed all products that are perishable in nature. No more ice cream, basically. All the interesting stuff that like we would love. It's gone. It's gone for now, you know, I don't know. We'll see. You know, I guess we'll see. We will see. all right, so that's reason number two, tough to kind of comply. If I've got popcorn, essentially I'm not really interested in making another chocolate bar. Reason number three, reason number three. I'll have to wrap. Reason number three through 50 into reason number three.

Speaker 3: I guess, um, I guess reason number three would be it's tough to grow a brand that is limited to one state. You have to license the brand and other states in order to groW the brand nationally. Um, we talked about that, that you were looking into that. Now this is a while back. Well, we do. I mean we are licensing auntie dolores in Arizona right now, so you can actually find our edibles in Arizona. There you go. And when we, you know, obviously that's not going to change, but we're not looking into other states at all because again, the only states that we would be interested in would be where the regulations are reasonable and unfortunately the unfortunate. No, not for edibles, no way. Not for edibles. Exactly. Yeah. And unfortunately right now I called her. I can't even think that colorado's, our market is just as saturated as California is.

Speaker 3: Right. When we started in 2008, there were less than five edibles companies. Okay. I think there's like $5,000 when we started. You started because you, I think, right? You went in and you were like, there's nothing on the shelf that was you, right. That problem anyway. Right. Exactly. We don't have anything on the shop because they don't know how to display it. It's not that they don't have product available. I mean, some of these dispensaries are carrying a lot of edibles, you know, as there were no edibles in the shop. I should, I shouldn't. Yes. Lucky you're not on display words. exactly. Alright. Alright. So that's reasons three through 50, but then that brings us back to treatibles, which thank you very much. Going strong. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Yeah. What's going on here? well, we're first to market with that product line as well. That's helpful to be first movers.

Speaker 3: We like being first movers. That's kind of our thing, you know? Um, yeah, it's been fantastic. I couldn't ask for more success and I mean waking up everyday and reading five star reviews that come in like literally every day and reading these emails that come in from pet owners and thank us all day long for bringing harmony to their families and some happiness to their animals is phenomenally satisfying. People love their pets. Yeah. You see that in the letters, don't you? Oh yeah. Well, and also let's not forget this is a product that we can sell internationally. It's a lot easier to grow a brand when you don't have the limitations of, oh, I can only sell in one state, you know, I can only sell in the state I'm in and yeah, I mean, you, you tap out. I mean we got, we were in over 600 dispensary's at one point in California.

Speaker 3: I mean, that's pretty awesome customer testing, you know, and when your margins are like as low as they are, that's a great way to go out of business. You know? So yeah. I mean, until consumers are used to pain what they're going to have to pay. And unfortunately, you know, the cannabis industry, let's not forget this industry is the oldest in the country, right? And we're the first born in California and California was the first to legalize medical cannabis. It was the first place to have shops that carried cannabis. So the owners of those shops were incentivized to offer the price to the patients that they're used to pain on the black market. Absolutely. So just let's take a step back and look at that from an economic perspective. If the retailer is selling the product to the customer, in this case, the patient, the product at the price that they can get it on in the black market, that's a great deal for the customer and that's awesome and no one wants to say we don't want to help patients and give them affordable products but math to be done.

Speaker 3: And I mean that, those economics, they wouldn't work anymore. Like they don't work in the cannabis industry. They wouldn't work in any other industry. You know when, when you're producing products, when you're developing products, you're looking at all the costs involved in producing that product. If you don't have a decent margin at the distributor price level, meaning that's the lowest price you're going to sell your product at. If you haven't captured a good margin at that level, you can expect to have a really hard time growing your brand and you may not make it so that means that the price that is going to the end customer has to be high enough to support the manufacturers to support the industry. And what I see has happened in the 10 years we've been involved is there's been this push for the dispensary is to continue to offer these amazing prices.

Speaker 3: Well, who's felt the squeeze the most, not the dispensary's? Well, it would be the operator in the middle there maybe the manufacturer, the manufacturer, and the cultivators. The cultivators have been grinded down. I mean cannabis in California used to sell for upwards of six to 8,000 a pound. Cultivators in California now are lucky to get a thousand dollars a pound and some are selling for 500 to 800 pounds. I mean, how do we expect to keep this industry a lot? How do we expect to keep California as the leader in quality cannabis when the sun grown? Cultivators can't even make ends meet. So it's just from an economic perspective, it was kind of tough, it was a tough, tough go and here we are trying to squash the black market and it's going to be tough. These regulations, if you look at it from that perspective, there's no way for California to fully rid itself of the black market.

Speaker 3: It's not going to happen this way because there's no incentive. There's literally no incentive for consumers that can get their product on the black market to go into a pot shop. Now to get it, everybody's talking about going back to the black market to get their products price because the prices are going up so high. It's almost like, you know, there's a, it's a shock. It's a shock because of taxation, taxation level. I mean we've got a whole new layer of compliance costs money, man. I mean we looked at the cost of lab testing, we looked at the cost of oil or just oil alone. For instance, our costs on oil, we're expected to go up 100 percent. okay. That alone drives up the cost of our product substantially. So you know, it's just, it's a tough, it's a tough go. So we'll see which brands make it work and, and sadly they're gonna have to fight like hell to make it work because they're all going to be itching for shelf space.

Speaker 3: You know, the, I guess the one a benefit would be, well the two benefits would be product assortment, specific product assortment versus the black market. And then the other thing is tested cannabis, which the black market does not have, which you know what I am all for testing cannabis. And that's one thing that is good about regulations. One thing that has been really awesome about California though is when we didn't have any regulations, we still self regulated and everybody started lab testing years ago and that was not an obligation, but it was the right thing to do and that's why everybody did it. Um, unfortunately now though, the regulators came in and they don't understand the science of cannabis, they don't understand the science of infusing canabinoids into foods. They don't understand about testing the end products and how there's variables there that are just natural.

Speaker 3: It happens when you're producing any foods, so there's a lot of um, but there seems to also be a little bit of give and take from the land. I've spoken with laurie a jackson. There's that jill January 1st, which happened July 1st, which is coming up. HAve that six month grace period of let's just, let's do this and learn from how we're doing it when we're doing. Yeah, I mean honestly, I think the state's been really great. The problem has been with certain counties and cities lag of course, get their ordinance in place in la, specifically la, I mean oakland, san francisco. And the final hour was saying, no, we want to go back and look at this equity thing and make sure it's equitable. No, san francisco did this as well as well at the very last minute. Yeah. I mean I just want to go on record by saying we're a women owned and women and minority operated exclusively business and we just got squeezed out.

Speaker 3: So if they're trying to protect minorities and women in this equation and you have no white men working for you. So what you're saying, there's one, oh, so it's not exclusively, I mean we are 95 percent women and about 30 to 40 percent minority. I mean it's, we got kick ass team and squeezed out really well. I mean they're, they're talking about this being an equitable process. How come nobody ever came and talked to us like nobody ever asked, you know, this company that's been around for 10 years that's owned by a woman and run by women and people of Color, like how can we help keep you guys around? Like what can we do to, to make sure you're still at the table. I mean nobody, you know, which, which is fine essentially if you are not also talking about, uh, being equitable at the same time.

Speaker 3: Yeah. If you're not talking about being, you know, if that's not on the table. Okay, fine. You know, the capitalism ease you guys go away. But if we're talking about being equitable, it would seem to me that maybe we should pay attention to these folks. Yeah. And, and maybe we should like align our efforts with the states so that on January 1st there's no lapse in business. I mean, essentially what's happened is a lot of the state hasn't been able to go live because the local haven't, haven't figured out their local ordinance and that is going to mean that a lot of companies can't work with each other because they're not permitted yet. A dispensary that's permitted can't work with any manufacturers or cultivators that aren't permitted yet. Um, there's so many parts of it that are just incredibly cumbersome and pockets of the supply chain or a kind of itching to catch up type of thing.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Yeah. So there's a possibility that will, you know, come back and produce edibles in the future. But at this point we want to kind of wait and see what happens. So then just going back to treatable, let's go back what you. So hemp cbd. So where can I ask you where you get your hemp? It's from Colorado. It is. Okay. Well then that's good. Hemp. What about this hemp that comes from China or that the has heavy metal, heavy metals in it? Anything grown in China is going to have heavy metals in it. It's, it's the soil is just loaded with cadmium and nickel and arsenic and all kinds of toxic stuff. What about the eastern europe? Uh, the eastern european, I don't honestly, there's no reason to, to purchase hemp outside the us anymore. It's legal to get it here. And you know, frankly, most pet owners want products that are 100 percent us made.

Speaker 3: So why do you think people still do is adjust price and we've been lab testing all the competing products and we see all kinds of interesting stuff including prices on products that are so low. The only explanation would be that it's chinese happened, then we'd test further and we find heavy metals where we find that the cannabinoid content is half what the package states that we have to that can't continue. Oh, it's continuing because there's no regulation. So here we are. It's, it's a tough, tough balance because we want regulations, but we need sensible ones. And when it comes to the lab testing and the science behind cannabinoids and products, there's a lot of, there's a lot of misinformation for. I just don't think that the regulators totally understand. This is not alcohol. You can't put a cannabis edible in a bottle like you can with liquor and store it on the shelf for years of end.

Speaker 3: We're talking about a shelf life. So if you have to produce a product and then your distributor is the first party to ab test your product because that's how the regulations are written. And then if that, if that product doesn't test exactly how it's supposed to do and there's this very slim margin of error, the distributor has to toss that whole batch. And is there a time, you know, limit on how long the distributor can hold your product or. No, I'm not really sure. And that'll change things. And there was some talk about letting producers repurpose it somehow. I actually don't know where things stand with that because once I heard that I had already given up and I was like later. I mean we lab test all the time. We do it, it's part of the process of like maintaining consistency. So the minute you pass that to another party to manage for you because you're forced to do it that way, how can you possibly correct the problem and you know, frankly, a lot of products that don't test out properly could be repurposed. For instance, chocolate. I mean if you, if you test chocolate and it's not proper, you could melt that chocolate down and fix it. It's not hard to do, but it's just, yeah, it's just another one of those unreasonable. you're going to get letters from the, you know what I love, I love chocolate. I just, I've been saYing this for years, like please no more fucking cannabis chocolate, lIke, and we're all done like we don't need, we don't need 1800 chocolate choices. Just like, you know, it's silly.

Speaker 2: It is silly. Uh, what's not silly is the three final questions for returning guests, juliana, and so I'm going to ask you, I'm going to tell you what they are and then I'm going to ask you the middle on him. Jesus, you did this last time. Did I do the returning guest one with you know. All right, here we go. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What would you change about yourself if anything? And it might be something you're already working on. What would you change about anything else if you could? So you can bend the space time continuum, be omniscient, anything. Uh, and then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. That's always the last question. So first things first, what would you change about yourself? If anything? It might be something you're already working on.

Speaker 3: Well, the first thing that came to mind is I wish I was a little more patient.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Actually I couldn't wait for you to finish. Can answering that question. Like why is she going to be done? Yeah. I need to do that too. That's like would be my one. I've, I just need to be more patient. How do we go about doing this? What do we do? How do you

Speaker 3: take some cannabis and chill the fuck out? I don't know. That's part of why I use candidate

Speaker 2: to chew. So ct. Wait, no, no. Yeah. See t, f, o I do ctsd. Which is. Yeah, exactly right. Yeah, curse on here. I guess. I guess it's a little late. Das don't do that. Well you six or seven? No, I know. Did I? Oh my god. I'm not to be trusted with the microphone. What would you change about it? Anything else? If you could?

Speaker 3: I'd put like 10 more hours in a day. Oh, because then I could really get shitters though. Why? Because it's amazing.

Speaker 2: I. But then like how do you do with human energy? I don't have a problem with that. Wait a second. How many hours? I'm not even kidding now. How many hours a night do you sleep for? And so you could just add 10 more hours. I'd take a nap, but I'd still have like nine hours to get a whole bunch of stuff dot. I gotcha. So you would do the four hours work a bunch, nap for an hour and then get nine more hours then? All right. Because I am also never sleep, but I feel like I'm not maybe as efficient as you are because I need like four hours is about right, but six hours is better if I get six hours, but sometimes it's too. And that's just ugly. Does that happen to you that. Yeah. It's not a good thing. No. No. On the soundtrack of your life, juliana?

Speaker 2: Yeah. Or juliana should say one track, one song, one song last time. That would make sense to me. I mean, you did spend time. You have to pick one in the east village at the right time. I mean, you were a lIttle late on the remotes, but they would have been there when you were there on the back end. Know how come? I don't remember what song I chose though. Um, who's, who's a rock of my life, who had half groggy. Who's a punk rocker from the remotes so much. She's a sheila. Sheena is a punk rocker. Of course she is. Okay. We'll go with that. Or do you want to do it? You get gaba, gaba, whatever. Sheena. Sheena is a punk rocker. If it means I'm done, that's what I'll go with this. Don't make me sing the song. Julianna carella. Oh my god. Welcome back. Good returns to edibles until maybe a time in the near future. Gun back,

Speaker 1: bacon at home, and there you have julianna carella really is a always fun to sit down and chat with her for the mics are on or off. California was the first to legalize medical cannabis. Who was the first place to have shops that carried cannabis. This industry is the oldest in the country, says juliana. Thanks to her, thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.