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Ep.325: The Lucas Brothers

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.325: The Lucas Brothers

Ep.325: The Lucas Brothers

Comedy duo…and twins, the Lucas Brothers join us and share that there was an easy transition from being quiet off stage to being quiet onstage. Kenny and Keith were on their way to being lawyers until they realized that they hated it. And of course stand-up comedy was the next best option. From Newark, NJ which they pronounce like Pork…from Newark they separated for the only time going to Duke and NYU respectively which precipitated them coming back together and staying that way. As it’s said, comedians are today’s philosophers so we find our way to discussing the relationship of women to men and vice versa. We discuss how economics and race have played into our current global geopolitical construct. And we do discuss thoughts on the proliferation, growth and acceptance of cannabis.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: The Lucas brothers

Speaker 2: comedy duo, end twins, the Lucas brothers join us and share that there was an easy transition from being quiet offstage to being quite onstage. Kenny and Keith were on their way to being lawyers until they realized that they hated it, and of course stand up comedy was the next best option from Newark, New Jersey, which they pronounced like pork from Newark. They separated for the only time going to duke and Nyu respectively, which precipitated them coming back together and staying that way. As it said, comedians are today's philosophers, so we find our way to discussing the relationship of women to men and vice versa. We discussed how economics and race have played into our current global geopolitical construct and we do discuss thoughts on the proliferation, growth, and acceptance of cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. The Lucas brothers. Yeah. Yep. Which

Speaker 1: nice. This is. I mean, there's love. There's true. There's familial. Yeah. We're close. All right, and so you can introduce [inaudible]. This is audio, so it's important to introduce both of you. Sure. Uh, well I'm Kenny. Oh yeah, you're right where? Lucas, bro. That's, that's for. That's true. Right. And so I guess we should start where we just were, which is, you guys have like Wallace for President Reagan and Goldwater and uh, these are interesting. Pins and Nixon of course. No. So, you know, it's, I got to ask again, what's the, what's the deal? We're just, we like to carry the timeline of republican thought on our chest. We like to remind someone needs to carry the tradition. Yeah, I see. So are we, and I don't mean to get via the whole thing is you guys are funny, but you know what your, is it that you're saying, hey, this whole thing that's happening now, isn't that necessarily much different than what we've experienced before?

Speaker 4: I think it's, it all evolved from something. So, I mean it's a little different because of the Internet, but in terms of the emotions behind the beliefs, I don't think it's that much different. Yeah. The emotions have been festering for years so that you don't want it to be, uh, an overreaction, but you certainly have to,

Speaker 1: you know, assess it properly. I guess that's what I'm gone it. So that's the policy. Then of course this is a person. We're not gonna. Spend any time on that? Not at all. Let's do this because if you're going to do this, we should plug something. So like what do we need to know? You guys are very funny and, but it's so dry. It's like Sinai, desert, dry eye. We know how to make it less dry. I don't drink before we go for a drink before drink water. Some words less dry. Yeah, no, no, but we can't make it more dry I guess is the point. So what is this? Can I ask about the parents and if it was like it was Kinda, you know, humor, uh, appreciated. And were they draw like it's a very specific brand of humor, right?

Speaker 4: Um, I mean we were always really, really quiet. So, I mean, I think that that's just, it was an accurate transmission of being on stage and being quiet. Don't we would never really. Loud. Family was very like bolster. It's like it's the complete opposite of the style of comedy that would generally come from a, you know? Yeah. I don't know why it's. I don't know why we're the way we are.

Speaker 1: But you all. Youtube specifically. If the family was loud, you guys were.

Speaker 4: No, we were not. We were always quiet and pensive. Family, certain members of our family.

Speaker 1: How big is it? Family? How many other brothers and sisters too?

Speaker 4: Two younger brothers. We have a bunch of aunts, cousins

Speaker 1: and so there was. There was place I guess for quiet and you took it needed to be some peer. Yeah, we have to represent the. The outcome. The opposite. Okay, fair enough. Have you always been twins? For the most part? For the most part. That's fair. That's a good answer to a stupid question came up. People who was first, I guess I was first 10 minutes and that matters because I know a triplet. He's one of my buddies and it's like the whole life is all about. I'm older. Really? Right, because you'd said it right away. There was no hesitation. No, I know, but for so long, I know. Is it 10 minutes or a minute? It might be a minute. It might be a minute. Yeah, no, yeah. My worldview was rocked because my mom told me it was a minute, 10 minutes, so everything just sort of changed.

Speaker 1: The Lucas brothers

Speaker 2: comedy duo, end twins, the Lucas brothers join us and share that there was an easy transition from being quiet offstage to being quite onstage. Kenny and Keith were on their way to being lawyers until they realized that they hated it, and of course stand up comedy was the next best option from Newark, New Jersey, which they pronounced like pork from Newark. They separated for the only time going to duke and Nyu respectively, which precipitated them coming back together and staying that way. As it said, comedians are today's philosophers, so we find our way to discussing the relationship of women to men and vice versa. We discussed how economics and race have played into our current global geopolitical construct and we do discuss thoughts on the proliferation, growth, and acceptance of cannabis. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. The Lucas brothers. Yeah. Yep. Which

Speaker 1: nice. This is. I mean, there's love. There's true. There's familial. Yeah. We're close. All right, and so you can introduce [inaudible]. This is audio, so it's important to introduce both of you. Sure. Uh, well I'm Kenny. Oh yeah, you're right where? Lucas, bro. That's, that's for. That's true. Right. And so I guess we should start where we just were, which is, you guys have like Wallace for President Reagan and Goldwater and uh, these are interesting. Pins and Nixon of course. No. So, you know, it's, I got to ask again, what's the, what's the deal? We're just, we like to carry the timeline of republican thought on our chest. We like to remind someone needs to carry the tradition. Yeah, I see. So are we, and I don't mean to get via the whole thing is you guys are funny, but you know what your, is it that you're saying, hey, this whole thing that's happening now, isn't that necessarily much different than what we've experienced before?

Speaker 4: I think it's, it all evolved from something. So, I mean it's a little different because of the Internet, but in terms of the emotions behind the beliefs, I don't think it's that much different. Yeah. The emotions have been festering for years so that you don't want it to be, uh, an overreaction, but you certainly have to,

Speaker 1: you know, assess it properly. I guess that's what I'm gone it. So that's the policy. Then of course this is a person. We're not gonna. Spend any time on that? Not at all. Let's do this because if you're going to do this, we should plug something. So like what do we need to know? You guys are very funny and, but it's so dry. It's like Sinai, desert, dry eye. We know how to make it less dry. I don't drink before we go for a drink before drink water. Some words less dry. Yeah, no, no, but we can't make it more dry I guess is the point. So what is this? Can I ask about the parents and if it was like it was Kinda, you know, humor, uh, appreciated. And were they draw like it's a very specific brand of humor, right?

Speaker 4: Um, I mean we were always really, really quiet. So, I mean, I think that that's just, it was an accurate transmission of being on stage and being quiet. Don't we would never really. Loud. Family was very like bolster. It's like it's the complete opposite of the style of comedy that would generally come from a, you know? Yeah. I don't know why it's. I don't know why we're the way we are.

Speaker 1: But you all. Youtube specifically. If the family was loud, you guys were.

Speaker 4: No, we were not. We were always quiet and pensive. Family, certain members of our family.

Speaker 1: How big is it? Family? How many other brothers and sisters too?

Speaker 4: Two younger brothers. We have a bunch of aunts, cousins

Speaker 1: and so there was. There was place I guess for quiet and you took it needed to be some peer. Yeah, we have to represent the. The outcome. The opposite. Okay, fair enough. Have you always been twins? For the most part? For the most part. That's fair. That's a good answer to a stupid question came up. People who was first, I guess I was first 10 minutes and that matters because I know a triplet. He's one of my buddies and it's like the whole life is all about. I'm older. Really? Right, because you'd said it right away. There was no hesitation. No, I know, but for so long, I know. Is it 10 minutes or a minute? It might be a minute. It might be a minute. Yeah, no, yeah. My worldview was rocked because my mom told me it was a minute, 10 minutes, so everything just sort of changed.

Speaker 1: She gave you 10 minutes and then like she's like, you know what, I got to tell you something. He took me aside and he said I have to. It's a fundamental difference. I do think though that that's a good. That's good parenting. Like she waited to be able to use it like you were probably just a terrible person for in your teenage years. And she's like, okay, here's what, when this happened, but I assume the burden of being an older lady that came with that. The psychology of a younger. Yeah. You really do have it even though it's like one minute. All right. So you mentioned that it was an easy transition from being quiet offstage to being quiet onstage, but being quite offstage is not an easy transition to being onstage usually. Sure. So where does the kind of entertainment bone come from? If we were quiet, we weren't necessarily shy.

Speaker 1: Uh, probably, I don't know. Pure madness. I don't know. Where does it come from? How do we decide to get on stage? And I think you have to be a little bit like, it's just like we just wanted to do it. I don't think that's a terrible answer. I don't know. I can't, I can't like explain why we did it. I went to do something together. We want them to work together and stand up. Just felt like the right career choice and we always just, we love comedy and law was we were trying to become a lawyer then that to started to. We didn't really appreciate it or not even appreciate it. Hated it. Got It. Alright. Well let's lead up. So where, where'd you grow up? What geography? We grew up in north New Jersey. Oh really? You're like neighbors from long island. So it's the same thing.

Speaker 1: Oh Shit. It's the same thing. What? Morris town or something like go to Newark, New Jersey. This Essex. Oh, I thought you said North New Jersey. New Jersey, Newark, Newark, that I'm not hearing people from north pronounced it differently. It's like pork, pork. But people who were dealing with, they say anymore that strike even as far away as a Dli. Alright. So a newark big family. You know, some people are loud, some people are not good students. I guess if you were going to be lawyers, I was a great student, a better student than I was carrying his weight. I got Ya. And they didn't know the difference. So it was fine. Both good enough. Uh, and then you go to university immediately? Uh, yeah, we went straight to college after high school we went to the College of New Jersey. Both of you together together. Okay. Have you ever been apart? I got in law school.

Speaker 1: Okay. Where did you go to law school? I went to Duke. And where did he go to? Nyu. Okay. Yeah, I've, I'm rooting for Nyu there. Yeah, of course. With the purpose. And then how do you spell Shefsky? The answer is we get this knock on the door. I guess we should answer it even though we're in an interview. Hey, how are you? Do you mind if we did? Ten minutes. Alright. Alright. What's that? Oh, food food. Food is allowed in without question. That's fantastic. Perfect. Thank you so much. All right. I think that there's A. Right. Okay, great. Thank you. There were some, uh, I'll be honest with you guys. There were some watermelon radishes in the, in the past or d'oeuvres are good. I didn't have them, but they looked great. I always liked the way a watermelon radish looks. They look great. Yeah, it looks like a watermelon radish.

Speaker 1: All. Alright. So you spent some time apart. Duke coach. Ha Ha. Are you a big. Are you. So that remains still remains. And how did you meet coach k? I didn't meet him, but I saw him. I saw him a bunch of times. Okay. All right. But you still care about them? As far as the Myu basketball team, there is nothing. I mean there, there we have a team that really attacked. I didn't even know that it exists, but they don't matter. What's the name of the mascots? Some controversy here. Some people like to say is the violence, but more aggressive people don't.

Speaker 4: I think that that's a good nickname. He like to call it the bobcat.

Speaker 1: The bobcat, or could it, could it be the fight and violence? You know what I mean? That would be a split in the know the violence that is that, that you're a violent person or your bobcat first? Oh, I thought you said violent. Bobcat's Bob cast will be more aggressive. Violent. Alright. And so then how did that go with you guys not being in the same room together all the time?

Speaker 4: It's tough. It was a, it was more difficult than I anticipated it being. I don't think I really reflected on it when, when it happened, but yeah, it was, it was very difficult. You can, you lose your support system in law school is incredibly stressful so it's always good to have support and he wasn't there. So you. So you know, distress sort of was a little bit more impact. Same. Especially like I'd never lived in New York or a big city like that. So it was like, it was different, man. It's different.

Speaker 1: So it almost these separate environments metastasize the fact that he needs her. You guys were with the other one. I don't know if that a grammatically made sense. You, you, you, you, you followed me. I mean, my sister, I'm very close with her. She's three years younger, not the same thing. Can you, how would you explain the, the twin thing to someone that isn't a twin twins aren't created equally. Fair enough. Fair enough. Winter. Totally.

Speaker 4: In our relationship, we're really close and we worked together. We lived together. So, uh, I would imagine that even among twins, this is really somewhat abnormal.

Speaker 1: Oh, this is even closer than close to close to look at how we're sitting literally in the same chair. That is my lack of production ability and I should mention that we also have some friends here. If you're hearing other kinds of laughter, that's not our ids. I guess that's actual other people. Okay. So then when who gave up on which one or did you just drop out of law school altogether? I think we were both sort

Speaker 4: of coming to the realization that we didn't want to be lawyers and we were, you know, we started considering other career path. I was thinking heavily about comedy. I was literally right across, across the street from the comedy cellar. Oh sure. I would just go there and watch a bunch of comedians do it. And before, before you get into comedy, you have this perception that the only way to do it is you have to be Richard Pryor or you have to be, you know, you know, one of the big Eddie Murphy. But then you see like regular work and comedians and I'm like, okay, it can be done. So this can be a pathway.

Speaker 1: If this could be a job that doesn't, you don't have to be the biggest comedian of all time. I can actually work, have a kind of a living and do it that way. So who did you see at the comedy store, which is essentially Mecca, right? Who did you see where you're like, oh, okay, I get it. This guy, this girl. So Marina Franklin saw Franklin and gi. I saw just a lot of the road warriors. Um, but then even some good ones over there. Great. Those comedians are great. You, you may mean that we know is your name. Well, we know. Uh, I saw. Uh, I see, I saw Louis. Okay. So we're not allowed to talk about that anymore. Fuck man. Pee p.

Speaker 4: yeah. We saw everyone who visited the salary. So Keith, Keith Robertson and yeah, they were just, they were just prefacing free. They seem happy,

Speaker 1: right? This is what I want to do for us. My, he's Robinson. I've seen kids Robinson in at the seller like a million times because that's where I live. I live in new, so he's amazing. He's amazing. I said no, we're not allowed to talk about Louis ck anymore. And I guess that means in terms of the comedy, what do you do though? You guys are in the community, right? You're funny guys. You also are thinkers, obviously. We mentioned the pins. What do you do with this? What happens? What do you

Speaker 4: are you go ahead. I think, you know, there has to be repercussions for the, for the behavior because you want that behavior weeded out. Can't happen. It can't happen. I mean, I don't think we should excommunicate them forever. I mean, I feel like he's, he's been punished gravely and he's going to have to live with that shame for the rest of his life on top of losing all of his deals and you know, having to explain that to his daughters. So I just feel like eventually that needs to be a period of healing. I don't know when that is. Certainly not now or forgive him even depending on the year. Yeah. And especially if it's not, like if he didn't violate laws, but um, I mean I'm talking about Louise specifically.

Speaker 1: We all got the other guy. It's crazy. Crazy. It's a, it's a watershed moment

Speaker 4: in power.

Speaker 1: I've been saying I'm used to being, you know, dumb as a guy. Right. And I'm used to seeing other fellow men and saying, Oh yeah, we're done. We're really stupid because really just a, what do they call it? A affirmation. My point is this is a whole different, like I know we're dumb, we're scary, stupid women are complex and to us that means sometimes crazy, but it's because they're complex and we're literally stupid. Like we're just sitting there on the couch literally thinking about nothing. We can do that, but this is like a different thing. I didn't know that this was out there and I turned to my female friends and they're like, we knew this because there's this huge machine, a that's

Speaker 4: supported by the media where they sort of create this image of the guy as his fun loving but goofy guy and they kind of minimize the, you know, the criminal element of it all. They don't talk about it. And I think what's happening now is that we're finally, like, the veil is being lifted now. There's no mythology anymore. You know, it's not boys being boys. It's like some guys are doing really vicious thing and it needs to be addressed and hopefully it's not even. Hopefully it will lead to change. So yeah, that's, that's a good thing. Ultimately.

Speaker 1: Totally. We were talking before we turned on the microphones about there's two ways to go with our current reality. Just generally, you know, even even bigger picture over. We're just talking about, which is like how everybody hates each other specifically from, you know, take a country. Those people hate each other, you know, so like, we all, we hate each other, you know, German day, hate each other and it doesn't matter. Yeah. So if you have a world war who's a versus who's, you know what, no one can fight anybody.

Speaker 4: I mean, it's the war to there's going to be the war to end all wars, I think. Uh, yeah.

Speaker 1: Oh, to be actually, I thought you were trying to sell it.

Speaker 4: Humanity. If it's going to be tribal, it's going to be ugly. It's not gonna. It's not gonna come down to your nationalistic pride is going to be, you know, different groups fighting against different groups across the world.

Speaker 1: Or we could make it out and be like [inaudible] just, here's the thing. What I'm doing now is I'm, I read a spectrum. What'd you say?

Speaker 4: I said, I don't think history is not on the side of that position.

Speaker 1: Oh, you are not. I see you guys are not silver lining type fellows. I say I'm a real politic guy. I think, uh, I think it's so we're going to have to fight this out now before we get to the right.

Speaker 4: We're already, I mean, was already.

Speaker 1: Oh, it's a cold war. Oh, certainly. Oh yeah. Oh No. We hate each other. You're literally can't talk to each other. You know, like when you find out, oh, you voted for shuts down. Forget it. That's what I'm saying. I, I read a spectrum of news. I read all the way left. I read all the way, right. And no one's. Everyone's screaming. Everybody's screaming at each other. Everybody else is, as we said, a moron. But what's interesting is that I do feel like I'm not the only one that's reading everything. You know what I mean? There's some people that are reading nothing. And I actually, that's helpful. I think so. I think unplugging and plugging in

Speaker 4: bit is really some, some people who are apathetic and just like, fuck it. It's just too much a woman. I'm just going to play video games,

Speaker 1: but that's the. I can't, I think we can't have that anymore. Like the 50 percent of people that don't vote and I get it. We didn't have good choices here this last time, but we got to get involved. Like if you're not going to vote, at least run for officer.

Speaker 4: Yeah. But one choice was at least more sane than the other and the fact that shorter, less sane one. Terrifying. But

Speaker 1: you guys, I mean I can understand it from a, from a, a specific one of those voters is I've been, you know, coming out of world war two, we were told to we're all going to be rich. Everybody cross a warm and that got less true as I went on. Right? And so then everybody told me great thing called politicians kept on promising, promising, promising everything was going to be great. It really, it got worse. I bought into the whole hope change thing. I gotta be honest with you. That didn't work out for me. Then this guy tells me I'm going to get my coal job back. At least he's talking to me and I'm poor.

Speaker 4: Yeah, no, I mean I, I think you can certainly use a rational explanation, but he's just so terrible. Get. Even if you might be able to get a job, if you vote this guy in the chances of world war three happening or who cares about the job? What, what's, what's, what, what good is a job if you don't have any. Like if you're a war with another country town. I like, it just doesn't make any sense. It's like, what do you prioritize?

Speaker 1: Yeah. I guess the argument goes is like if I'm hurting real bad, I can't worry about. I got to worry about, you know what I mean? Like where's the bread on the table type of thing.

Speaker 4: There are so many problems on every front. So it really depends on how a person decides to prioritize and enough people put trump, uh, or put their own stuff. But I think the economic argument is there, but I think that the more stable and yeah, I still think race played a huge role in that. Uh, I think that certain, I think white men are terrified of the power being usurped. And I think that you're painting with a broad brush. Let's just say that something. Yeah. And I think that there was a reaction to Obama. I think there was a reaction to a potential following of a black man with a woman, like, you know what I mean, that's just too much for it. It was like, no, we can't do that. Yeah, it was a reaction, I think. I think that it's a part of the capital is very complex. It wasn't, I mean you can put, if you tie into the economics and then the ratio component, sex, political. Some people who didn't vote for Hillary simply because she was a woman, you know what I mean? So the sexism, racism, yet classism and only Hillary was very flawed, but trump was much more.

Speaker 1: No, but yes, it was like flawed versus flawed certainly. But you do have to give somebody to vote for like that.

Speaker 4: Yeah, I mean those were the candidates that, that was it. Those were the options in.

Speaker 1: Alright, well I'm going, I'm going Lucas brothers 20 slash 20. I'm looking for. That would be added to country better. Can we do that? Can we do like a vise versa? You know, I think I'm leaving the country. So like is that imminent or. I feel like we're in Canada. I should say that we're at the. I think I might just say, I don't know man will walk out of here and we'll just be like, okay, here's the good news. You got three more guys guys. We're going to bring some comedy, some laughter. That's it. Alright. So I, you know, I could talk all night but we actually do have to go on a little bit. So I've got three final questions. I'll tell you what they are, I'll ask you them in order and I would love for both of you to answer each of these. What has most surprised you in cannabis? We haven't talked about that at all. So I'd love for you to share what's most surprised you in life and then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. I can't wait for that one, but each of you, what has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 4: I mean just uh, the, the acceleration and how people are accepting it because as of last decade, I mean people were still very apprehensive about embracing a, the cannabis industry and I think that they collectivized and, and uh, put forth a good effort to change the narrative behind marijuana and people were starting to see the medicinal aspects of it. And Yeah, I think that that's been the surprise and just how it, how much we were collected by the proliferation and the Grove, how big of an industry it is. Like I always knew it was a huge industry, but just to see the numbers finally and I, yeah, it's been amazing. I know people have this idea about stoner that lazy and can't, you know, you can't get work done. But the industry has shown that people who are just who's just as a active and just as an energetic and just as responsible and doing great things.

Speaker 1: What's crazy though, just getting back to the United States of America, we're sitting here in Canada, you've got big deals out there, you got the constellation brands and corona beer with a canopy growth. You've got guys opening up the Stock Exchange and in Canada you've got federally regulated medical cannabis, now you've got federally regulated adult use cannabis coming in July first. And I'm reading news about Jeff sessions and wants to rescind the Cole memo. It's like crazy

Speaker 4: backwards man in our culture, you know, we have this, this idea that were for freedom and for, but it's, it's growth for growth opportunities. And we're literally like turning our back on an industry that's growing right now.

Speaker 1: Solve a lot of problems, jobs, jobs, the medicinal component. I mean, like there are a lot of it. Yeah. All right, well that's good. That's all very surprised me back end. But what's most surprised you guys about life? I wonder,

Speaker 4: uh, the biggest surprise I think is a, there's just no, like there's no stability in ideology anymore. I think like, I can't say for what confidence that I'm happy to be a liberal or I'm happy to be a conservative, like with all the shit happening. Like I feel like the veil has been lifted and like every belief that I once held, it's just been thrown away.

Speaker 1: Oh, don't let them do that. I don't think if I may, I'm a over here of one. I was never in any party, but I definitely come from the left. I try to be in the middle just so I can try to get along with as many people as possible. I think the long island accent came out there. Um, but you know, party one that I do believe what I believe I will not. And you may not take that away from me. Whoever I think I was affiliated with or whoever I don't want to be affiliated with. I believe what I believe.

Speaker 4: Yeah. But that's the fact. That might be the problem. People can't believe whatever they want to believe, sort of renders belief sort of meaningless. Right?

Speaker 1: Oh, I see. What you're saying is we're moral relativism, nihilism and then who wants to live in a nihilist? I gotcha. Cause I'm busy here paying attention to facts as you're. And you're like, yeah, sure. That's great for you if you're putting yourself at a disadvantage because some people don't give a shit about fat. Literally evidence

Speaker 4: that it's just. Yeah. The, the eradication of the belief structure is certainly one of those things that I don't know. I don't know if I'm surprised by it, but it's definitely. I didn't think it what happened during my time. Yeah,

Speaker 1: like the whole 1984 thing turns out 2016. Yeah. Okay. Fair enough. You guys. I get why you guys get booked all the time. Your ball last things coming and I believe that was not me. Jesus. I just arrived at this point tonight, right? Alright. Soundtrack the soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there. Both of you got an answer. I go faith by Fred Dearth and limp biscuit. I'm serious, man. He's going to get me through this time. I believe that George. I'm sorry man. That's okay. That's good. Did you got to give us another song though? Although that's a pretty good one, is what I'm supposed to say. That's the first limp biscuit mentioned. We've had over 300 episodes of the Nazis in the confederates can come back. I think biscuit hits. Can you give us a minute please?

Speaker 4: What do I listen to? All that that you're going to have to listen to you. I'll just stop.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Yeah. So it doesn't matter. Right? This is like the perfect song doesn't have to be like most appropriate, but if we are asking about the soundtrack of your life, this song definitely on there.

Speaker 4: A third. A blonde. No, no. Stevie wonder. That's better.

Speaker 1: You wonder.

Speaker 4: I'll go with was super stingy. I'm going to go super. No, no, no. Uh, what's the one? Superwoman. Superwoman will. Yeah. He, he has two different songs on one track. Oh really? I don't even know if I know what you got me through law school or something from the beach boys.

Speaker 1: Really off of pet. Sounds, I would imagine we'll just take all the lucas brothers. Amazing. Fantastic. Thanks so much.

Speaker 2: And there you have the Lucas brothers. The problem is that people can believe whatever they want to believe, so it's sort of renders belief, sort of meaningless. Truly. Comedians are. Today's philosophers, very much appreciate the Lucas brothers time very much. Appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.