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Ep.326: Dot Colagiovanni

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.326: Dot Colagiovanni

Ep.326: Dot Colagiovanni

Dot Colagiovanni joins us and shares that she’s got a PhD in toxicology which she put to use in the biotech industry for 20 years until she became disillusioned with the FDA working slowly but also hedge funds coming in to biotech and driving decision making as opposed to the science. She wanted to bring medicine to market sooner at the same time as her son had to have a liver transplant. During the wait to find a liver, Dot wanted to be present and so she and she alone self medicated with cannabis after her son went to bed. She had never utilized cannabis medically and she says, cannabis helped her cope. She put two and two together and realized the cannabis industry was where she needed to be.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Dot Giovanni joins us and shares that she's got a phd in toxicology, which you put to use in the biotech industry for 20 years until she became disillusioned with the FDA working slowly but also hedge funds coming into biotech and driving decision making as opposed to the science. She wanted to bring medicine to market sooner at the same time as their son had to have a liver transplant during the wait to find, deliver dot, want it to be present, and so she and she alone self medicated with cannabis after her son went to bed, she had never utilized cannabis medically and she says cannabis helped her cope. She put two and two together and realize that the cannabis industry was where she needed to be welcomed to cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word Economy Dot Giovanni

Speaker 1: collage. Giovanni, that's not true. Do it phonetically for you. Do that. Oh No, no, no, no. I thought you were going to verbally do it phonetically. Do it that way. Collagey Avanti. That's it and that's why I think we went short on the situation, right, because my real name's Dorothy, so why add to the whole thing? We don't need that. It's just too long. Exactly. Alright, so dot Khaled. Giovanni, Giovanni. Yes. I just love it. Nice Jewish girl is what you are, right? Exactly. Not so much. All right, so we've got next frontier, bio sciences. We've got vera. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. We've got next frontier. Bio Sciences. We've got. Vera, let's just make sure we understand what both of those things are. Okay. So next frontier. Bio Sciences is an IP company and brand management company based in Colorado. Vera wellness is our brand that we're launching this week.

Speaker 1: Oh, congratulation Colorado. Thank you. All right. You know you're in Vegas, right? Right now I'm in Vegas. Mj Biz con. That's how they say it was here in 2014 and it has grown so much. Substantial. Can't believe it was that. That was the first year in Vegas. Vegas at the Rio. The Rio. My goodness. What a, what? A, what? A place. What a place and tell her. You can see there I, yeah, there's no tales to be told. Oh No. Penn and teller, the magician that, yes, but the magic. But we have to, we have to find out what tells. You do have to tell. Right. So what are you doing in the cannabis industry? Is My first question to anybody that I haven't met before. Like why are you here? Why am I here? Well, good question. Um, I have a phd in toxicology that'll help.

Speaker 1: I worked in the biotech industry for 20 years and got a little disillusioned with what was happening as far as lack of FDA approval of drugs as well as uh, the hedge funds that were coming in and kind of driving the decision making rather than the science. Huh? Both ends kind of thing. Here's FDA kind of not doing it so great. And then from the top hedge funds being like, we want it done this way. And I decided I wanted to work on bringing medicines to market sooner and I had a personal, uh, I would say come to Jesus moment. Uh, in 2010 when my son had a liver transplant. How old was he at the time? He at the time was 10. Oh my goodness. And so little boy. There's something called the waiting period when you're waiting to get an organ and I can tell you as a mom, it was the most horrible three months of my life.

Speaker 2: Dot Giovanni joins us and shares that she's got a phd in toxicology, which you put to use in the biotech industry for 20 years until she became disillusioned with the FDA working slowly but also hedge funds coming into biotech and driving decision making as opposed to the science. She wanted to bring medicine to market sooner at the same time as their son had to have a liver transplant during the wait to find, deliver dot, want it to be present, and so she and she alone self medicated with cannabis after her son went to bed, she had never utilized cannabis medically and she says cannabis helped her cope. She put two and two together and realize that the cannabis industry was where she needed to be welcomed to cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word Economy Dot Giovanni

Speaker 1: collage. Giovanni, that's not true. Do it phonetically for you. Do that. Oh No, no, no, no. I thought you were going to verbally do it phonetically. Do it that way. Collagey Avanti. That's it and that's why I think we went short on the situation, right, because my real name's Dorothy, so why add to the whole thing? We don't need that. It's just too long. Exactly. Alright, so dot Khaled. Giovanni, Giovanni. Yes. I just love it. Nice Jewish girl is what you are, right? Exactly. Not so much. All right, so we've got next frontier, bio sciences. We've got vera. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. We've got next frontier. Bio Sciences. We've got. Vera, let's just make sure we understand what both of those things are. Okay. So next frontier. Bio Sciences is an IP company and brand management company based in Colorado. Vera wellness is our brand that we're launching this week.

Speaker 1: Oh, congratulation Colorado. Thank you. All right. You know you're in Vegas, right? Right now I'm in Vegas. Mj Biz con. That's how they say it was here in 2014 and it has grown so much. Substantial. Can't believe it was that. That was the first year in Vegas. Vegas at the Rio. The Rio. My goodness. What a, what? A, what? A place. What a place and tell her. You can see there I, yeah, there's no tales to be told. Oh No. Penn and teller, the magician that, yes, but the magic. But we have to, we have to find out what tells. You do have to tell. Right. So what are you doing in the cannabis industry? Is My first question to anybody that I haven't met before. Like why are you here? Why am I here? Well, good question. Um, I have a phd in toxicology that'll help.

Speaker 1: I worked in the biotech industry for 20 years and got a little disillusioned with what was happening as far as lack of FDA approval of drugs as well as uh, the hedge funds that were coming in and kind of driving the decision making rather than the science. Huh? Both ends kind of thing. Here's FDA kind of not doing it so great. And then from the top hedge funds being like, we want it done this way. And I decided I wanted to work on bringing medicines to market sooner and I had a personal, uh, I would say come to Jesus moment. Uh, in 2010 when my son had a liver transplant. How old was he at the time? He at the time was 10. Oh my goodness. And so little boy. There's something called the waiting period when you're waiting to get an organ and I can tell you as a mom, it was the most horrible three months of my life.

Speaker 1: Right. And during that time I really was anxious as you might expect, and I really had a situational depression because I'm not a depressed person at all. I'm a pretty upbeat person. But when you think your kid is going to die, it's a pretty dark place. So I relied on cannabis, put him to bed at night. I would, you know, for me personally, that's what got me through that experience. Now had you had a relationship with cannabis before that? Not very much. You know, in college I was a little bit of a Dabbler, not a regular user. I occasionally used recreationally. I'd never used for medicinal purpose before though. Understood. And so at that time I was, you know, really, really sad about the whole thing and it was really the cannabis that helped me cope. How did you come to cannabis? If it was just like this thing that maybe I sometimes used to do, then yeah.

Speaker 1: How did it become part of your world? If I met add some good friends that continued to use throughout the year. Some moms. What state were you in? Colorado. In Colorado. Are you from Colorado? I'm from Rhode Island. Oh, I see. Yes. That's it. That's a trick that I have. I don't know why. So you were in Colorado, so this is the right state in 2010 or he was eight. What? Steve? When he was 10, what year was it? Twenty 12 went to when he actually had his transplant. So during that time, you know you have a waiting period and then you have your transplant and it really helped me realize that there is so much value to this medicine because of course the physicians want to give you whatever. You know, you're in this bad place. As the parent waiting for this, they would have given me Ambien to sleep.

Speaker 1: They would've given me Prozac, give me anything, but I wanted to be present and I knew if I use cannabis at night to kind of relax during the day, I can be present for my kids, so you have these lovely a friends, these ladies so that that cannabis in you need some weed. Dot is basically where we're going with that, but then you were able to evaluate it from western scientists and I realized it was so important to me and I realized that, you know, the concept today of polypharmacy with so many people taking multiple medications where you cannot be yourself, where you have drug drug interactions. I didn't want that and I didn't want that for other people. Polypharmacy. Is that where I take 10 pills because I have to take these two pills for that pill, those two pills for this pill. Exactly. That's exactly right.

Speaker 1: Yeah. Do you know if you're a person that has anxiety, depression, and sleep problems, you're probably taking three different meds and the interactions between those is really important and how you feel and act. So let's dive in on your education. Yeah. So Rhode Island. And then when did you know that you were a scientist? Well, I was like the five-year-old dissecting bugs under the microscope. So that was one of those kids. I was not one of those kids. But you saw that you were sold. So I went to University of Vermont Undergrad and got a degree in medical technology, medical technology. What is that? Uh, so that's understanding laboratory sciences so you can work in a clinical laboratory setting. So I worked in Boston and a clinical microbiology lab, which was really fun. And then I realized I wanted to go back to Grad school. So I went to University of Colorado, which was then the health sciences center, now known as the Anschutz campus and got a phd in molecular toxicology, molecular toxicology.

Speaker 1: And so what that lets you do basically toxicology is the study of poisons. You could either go and work for something like EPA or FDA or you could go into industries like pharmaceutical or the chemical industry. Why that jump? Why Boston to Colorado? Why did we do that whole thing? Now there was a guy, I figured I didn't want to come out. You didn't want to go there for a. That married a ski bum basically. I gotcha. Oh, so we're still with the guy 26 years later. Oh, this is great. Okay, fantastic. How did you meet them in Boston? I met him in Vermont and Vermont. I see. And then he went to Boston. He was on the five year plan, five year plan. I was on the four year plan. So why the toxicology piece of this? Okay. We get to Colorado. Why did you jump to that microbiology?

Speaker 1: I was very interested in environmental pollution and so there's a couple of other things you could do at that toxicology degree is I could've gone and worked for an NGO like Sierra club or Greenpeace or something like that because the skill set would help you do environmental work, but I also realized I wanted to have a good life and then I want to be able to afford the things we wanted to do and travel and so what I did was I hadn't spent a lot of time volunteering for Sierra Club and environmental organization so that I could do my good stuff and then have a good life having a career. Got It. Okay. I'm going to do this kind of during day hours, business hours and I'm going to do that when I. When I damn well please. Alright. So the toxicology thing happens to you or you happen to toxicology and then where was the job?

Speaker 1: What did you get? So I've been really lucky after I graduated, my entire career has been in Colorado. So I've gone to a number of companies you might be familiar with. I did a postdoc at Amgen. Sure, of course. Yeah. And then I worked at Giliad sciences course big. These are big, big, big names and then uh, Osi pharmaceuticals which developed Tarceva for lung cancer. So I've had a lot of experience doing antibiotic development and oncology work. And then before I came to cannabis I was working at a small company called Novalis working on cystic fibrosis, which was, which was a really interesting disease to work on. A, it's very complex. There aren't very good. Well there's no cure, you know, you have a lung transplant basically is what happens to those poor kids. It's extremely difficult to treat. So there's a lot of unmet medical need associated with that.

Speaker 1: And I like those challenges. So you like a challenge is what we're learning. Yes. And you had been with these giant companies, you went to a smaller company. Why did you choose to go to a smaller company? Was there. It's a good question. I like a startup environment. I feel like you can have more of an impact and do a lot of different things and I never saw myself in like a large Pharma where I'd be pigeonholed into being just a toxicologist. You were at large farmer, right? You were at. I was at Amgen in Colorado to Colorado is specifically working on inflammation research, so it was a smaller group, not the big conglomerate in California, so we were able to do some interesting work early on with their immunotherapies. But you did say earlier, if I remember correctly, that you became. What was the word that you used?

Speaker 1: Disillusioned. Disillusioned. How so? You know. What often happens, unfortunately is financial decisions take the place sometimes of what the science will show you. So what I mean by that, sometimes there's a product you're working on that has excellent activity in a particular indication, but the money isn't really there for that disease. So you go in another direction. This is very typical where they'll shelve a really good drug because, oh, the market's only 50 million or 100 million or $500 million depending on the company. You shelve it and that's where I got disillusioned. I wanted to be able to work on things that I felt we could have more impact.

Speaker 2: Can you dive in there because that is something that I worry about and I can't wait to talk about your products and cannabis, but I worry about that in, in cannabis where we have a plant here that doesn't have any side effects and we have money coming in that wants to make more money and I worry about the efficacy of the substance, if you will, that we have kind of being a prostituted.

Speaker 1: Yeah, it's, it's interesting existential conversation around that. Um, I think one of the things a lot of people came into this industry for was because cannabis is going to cure everything, right? That's, I've never really felt it's going to cure everything. Nothing. Nothing really has that capability. And I am science driven so I want proof when something works. We've got some great anecdotal evidence right now about a lot of different things and we're starting to get the scientific data to back it up. So for example, we know now, you know, cannabis works in chronic pain, there's good studies that have been done to prove that we know cbd works in Epilepsy, we've got good data to prove that. I feel like you've got sort of, you know, our tagline is derived from truth and we say that because we want to be able to be straightforward, honest, transparent, and do the, the good science to back up what we say. We don't want to be the people that are just out there making money. I mean that's, you know, that's not who we are derived from truth. Yes.

Speaker 2: I love that. You have me. Right. So I guess let's, let's talk more about some of the products. Like for instance, the spray, right? Not a lot of sprays out there. You have one of them. Talk about that in following the conversation. We were just happening. Absolutely.

Speaker 1: So the reason we developed the company in the first place was because we felt the products that were out there were not the best ways to deliver cannabis from the standpoint of if you don't want to smoke because you're worried about lung issues, you don't want to vape because you don't want to be using peg in your products. You don't want to do an edible because you're unsure about when is this going to act. It's inconsistent and not reliable. The group of scientists that came together to form this company have over 100 years of Pharma experience. So ours doesn't mean anything. If it's like 30 people though, there's. There's nine of us. There's six scientists in total, right? I'm our chief scientific officer is a guy by the name of Paul Johnson and he came from an extensive background in nasal drug development. Okay. So he and our CEO, mark re boys who you've interviewed before, came together and said, you know, we want to be able to create products that will work through transmucosal delivery. And what that means is you're going to go into areas such as buckle delivery, under the tongue, up the nose, because we know those are rapid and they will get into the bloodstream and avoid first pass metabolism through the liver that can degrade the thc and cbd and other canabinoids. Okay. What else are you

Speaker 2: you doing to the cannabis that I need to know so that I can so that I'm certainly not a frightened of, you know, the product here,

Speaker 1: what are we doing to question so were scientifically formulating them in ways to improve that delivery. What does that mean? So for example, with our nasal spray, we've added excipients which are compounds that will help with permeation and delivery so that it can rapidly get taken up in the bloodstream without unwanted effects. And I don't mean to get too far into the weeds here, but I do mean to get too far into the weeds, no pun intended, offshore excipients. Can you tell me more about or components in any formulation you would take, whether it's currently a flonase that you would use or lotion you would use. It's things that help improve the delivery, delivery and formulation of the product. So is it w? What is the substance? Is that a plant? Is that a. So our systems for both the nasal and the sublingual are a liquid formulation.

Speaker 1: Understood. But the excipient itself, I'm literally asking you as a layperson, like a bunch of ingredients you put together, what are those ingredients? So the ingredients, and you know, again, this is where our intellectual property is derived from. Can you tell us? Of course, I can tell you that they're liquid formulations that are complex in the sense that they are derived from mostly natural products. Mostly natural. Yeah. But we've got things like, for example, in the nasal spray, there's a preservative in there and that's for your safety because we don't want bacteria growing in there and going up your nose.

Speaker 2: Totally. Thank you so much for doing that. And again, we're at Mj Biz con and it's getting a little wacky. So if you can hear other voices, that's the kind of thing that happens here now because you're a scientist, right? And because you know what you're talking about, I'm asking you these questions and I appreciate these answers. Sure. When do we start to, from your amgen days, from your. When do we start to crossover to the commercials

Speaker 1: that I see where, oh, and then by the way, this is what's going to happen to your blood and this is what's going to happen to your thing. And then there's also, this might happen fatally. And so if you take this, you may have an increased risk of a heart attack. You might die, you might die. So the disclaimer is, I think the Pharma Industry has been so sued and they're so risk adverse and as part of what the FDA requires, they have to list all the side effects that can happen. Fine. So, you know, I don't want to be doing an ad say you may have somnolence, you may have, you know, whatever it is, what somnolence sleepiness, you know, like when you smoke weed, well, you might have some, some cyclists, somnolence. Sure. That might happen to you. And maybe that's not a bad thing.

Speaker 1: Maybe that's an effect you might want to have or not depending on the circumstance, but I can rest assured that the rest of the ingredients in this Mary Taj of incipient excipients, excipients, yeah, in that formulation are not anything that's going to be toxic or harmful to you. They're just going to help deliver the products more readily to you. Got It. So just again, I really very much appreciate scientists who have worked in Pharma coming into the industry. So these questions are because of that. Absolutely. When you said that they've been sued so much and this is just to, you know. Okay, fine. But we also talked about what was the other word that you used with the multiple pills? What was that called? Polypharmacy. Polypharmacy. When I see the commercial about the opioid induced constipation, right? That I'm going to. So now I have to buy that pill because of the pill.

Speaker 1: Right? So then the, how are we making sure that that doesn't happen here? Well, one of the things we're hoping you're going to do is you're gonna. Look at whatever medications you're on and you might decide with your physician, hey, maybe I don't need to be on that anxiety met anymore. I don't need to be on that sleep med anymore. I don't need to be on the antidepressant, or I can drop my ancestor press and dos and use just a cannabis derived product so that we hope and really want to see a shift away from over prescribed medications. I mean, I think this is why the Pharma industry is so afraid of the cannabis industry. They know this is their competition and as you've probably seen, the data opiate use goes down dramatically when cannabis is legalized in a state, which is a positive thing, but it's a huge opioid crisis.

Speaker 1: We know that the receptors in the brain and how opiates work are very similar in the brain and how cannabis works. Now we're talking about the cannabinoid system, the endocannabinoid system, and you're telling me that the receptors are similar. To break that down for me, where my endoccanabinoid system versus Pharma is essentially what I'm asking and it's a great question. So let me just tell you, when I went to graduate school in the nineties, we were not taught about the endocannabinoid system, right? I didn't even know it was a system that had the most density of receptors in the brain and I was in a school of pharmacy. Right. I find it shocking that I did not learn about this system until I entered the cannabis industry. And I've asked many physicians that I know w, what do you know about the endocannabinoid system? And honestly, it's a travesty because we're not taught it in graduate school or medical school yet.

Speaker 1: So I've spoken to now to a number of doctors in my personal life. For instance, my aunt was just in a situation where I was talking to a doctor and I said, well, how about cannabis as a solution here? And his response was, oh, well you're gonna have to talk to your other doctor about that. Meaning I'm literally not going to talk about this, but there's a risk and a liability for them with their licensing. Sure. Because right now the AMA is threatening that and has done that in some cases with physicians in Colorado, so I get it why they're tentative to prescribe, but any good scientist, any good physician would want to know about a biological system that controls homeostasis in the body. Just from the standpoint of knowledge. Even if you're not willing to prescribe it, you would at least want to understand that system, so when you work with your patient, you have a better understanding of what is going on with that individual. So how do we speak to the Ama to kind of say, hey, you can. You can clearly see what's happening here. Yes. I have to imagine those conversations are ongoing because you cannot be living in the dark at this point. You have to know if you're the attorney general. Well, there's that. What are your thoughts on that?

Speaker 1: I wouldn't have voted for jeff sessions if I lived in Alabama. Let's just say that's where I would go with that. And just because it's in the news, you know, I just have to ask you, are you pro or anti pedophilia? Usually I'm anti. I'm funny that way, you know, being a woman and having been a 14 year old girl myself, I have a hard time reconciling a 32 year old hitting on me and how I would've reacted to them. Fourteen year old is young. That's pretty young. Pretty Young. I'm anti just so we get that. It's newer on the same page. I wanted to backtrack. We didn't finish the piece about the interplay between the cannabinoid system and the um, opioids. Oh yeah, please let me just connect those dots. So the cannabinoids do not just act on the CB one and CB two receptors. They can also act on other receptors in the brain, including the opiate receptors such as.

Speaker 1: Well. So what would that be? Correct them you receptor. It's an opiate receptors and so that receptor is where things like oxycontin. So there is a lot of interplay between those systems. Look at that. And so especially with the spray, with a nose spray that goes direct, that's gonna be. Yeah, rapidly acts. It's, it's a very nice, clean high and it's a short product so it can last one to two hours. So if you're looking for relief, it's, you can have a short effect there, which is nice if you have to drive in the near future, it's hitting my receptor, it's hitting him you, but it's also acting on your cannabinoid receptors to or. So of course I'm just gearing up for my next conversation with a doctor. Yeah, I know we're hitting the, uh, the immune receptor with the, with the pills that you're given, doc, did you know that we could also do this with Vera for instance?

Speaker 1: Exactly right. Alright. So you're only in Colorado are now. Currently we launched in Colorado this week, but we have a multistate expansion strategy, so we're looking at expanding into other states very soon that have legalized recreational and medical and then we will also, because our products lend themselves to manage us. You're saying California and you're saying not just California, but those could be on our shortlist. And then we're also looking at large medical states as well. So Illinois such as Illinois, potentially Michigan, Massachusetts. We've got a, we've got a good network back east. So we've got a lot of friends. But here's what's so depressing for me, you're not talking about New York and the reason you're not talking about New York is because of the patients only. Well, patient counts and what we could do if you can't have infused products there, that's a problem for us.

Speaker 1: Exactly. So it limits what you can do. Now, interestingly, I don't know if you were at the keynote speaker this morning talking about New Jersey potentially with the removal of the Christie administration and then with the Murphy Murphy Administration that could change that up. So if they legalize a New Jersey, the market potential there is very large in Massachusetts is right up north. And then we got New Jersey down here. You know what that starts to feel like, that starts to feel like the United States of America with Canada up there in Mexico down there with their decrim. So, uh, you know, America is either first or last. Well, I, I do feel like we might be behind Canada a little bit where kind of a little bit. They have federally mandated medical. They have it any minute now is federally adult use. Don't be interesting though, is that a lot of the provinces are going with government run dispensary's and now having grown up back east near New Hampshire, next state over where they only had legal liquor stores that were state owned.

Speaker 1: It's a different kind of model. So that's a different kind of model, but it's still legal cannabis. Absolutely. I mean, it's ridiculous. It's enough throughout the country. I mean that we can't ship to Wyoming, you know, says a lot. We can go anywhere out of the state. Well, whatever. I'm now all of a sudden I have come to the 10th amendment. I'm all about states' rights. Uh, all of a sudden I didn't use to be, it used to be a problem with slavery, but I guess we're beyond that. We're supporting state rights on that issue and new world. Absolutely. Dot, before we get really too far off, I'm going to ask you three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and I'll ask you them in order. I'm feeling pressured. Oh, don't feel pressure. Okay. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 1: And on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what has most surprised me in cannabis has been, you know, coming into a new industry, the welcoming nature of most people when you come in, you're totally naive about what it's like on so many levels. People have been so willing to help other people out. And that's very different from other industries I worked in previously. How so? I'm particularly, if you look at academia where it is very cut throat in the sense of our lab is doing this research and we're not sharing with you because I'm in this ivory tower over here, you're over there. And if I share a lot of that information, I might not get the first publication on that. Right? So it changes the dynamic and even in. I mean forget it. In Pharma, it's all about competition and you hang onto information. Even though it scientific meetings, there's an exchange between scientists. It's a different business model. Whereas in cannabis I feel like it's really collegial and people want to help other people succeed. Do you think that ends if and when we do schedule or. I hope not because that's one of the things I find so refreshing. Yeah. Well, I'm. I'm right there with you. What has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 1: In Life? I would say when things go really bad, who steps up and who doesn't step up? Oh, you find out who your friends are. You truly find out who your friends are. When things go bad, not when they go well. Correct. By mom passed away about 12 years ago now and I know who my friends are. I know who my dad's friends are. Absolutely surprising. Very surprising, right? Exactly, and sometimes you get surprised to the upside, so I didn't think that that person was, oh, that's one of my best friends now. Exactly. It's been. It changed who my friend dynamic is after our particular situation. How are we doing with that particular situation? That boy is doing well.

Speaker 1: He's now 15 and five. 10 and a ski racer. There we go. So he's doing okay, go ski racer, go ski racer, go ski racer, go. Yeah. I think that that's an adaptation. I think that was speed racer, but I remember that. You're exactly right. So now we're onto songs already on the soundtrack of your life. On the soundtrack of my life. I'm gonna. I'm gonna. Pull in Eric Clapton. Oh Wow. Wonderful. Tonight would be the song I would have to go with. You look wonderful tonight. That's fantastic. Our Song, we got married too. Slow hand. Okay. So I have seen Clapton in the front row, right? He's spittle was actually coming out of his mouth and it was pretty awesome. That was a positive thing for you. Positive for me because I think he's amazing. I had terrible seats in Madison Square Garden for cream when they reunited you in your age.

Speaker 1: Okay. Oh No, no. Oh yeah. I couldn't have done it. No, no, no, no. There was like a minute before Jack Bruce Dot and uh, they, I got onstage 70 years old. Never cooking. Clapton is not lost a thing. No Dot. You've not lost the thing either. And now we're friends. This is fantastic. Awesome. Keep going and we'll keep checking in. How about that? That's great. And there you have.college. Giovanni of note the fact that, and we've heard it before, she did not learn about the endocannabinoid system in school and later was disenchanted to find out that it was the most receptive rich system in the entire human body. Thanks to dot, thanks to you. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.