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Ep.328: Dr. Rachel Knox- MCBA Spotlight

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.328: Dr. Rachel Knox- MCBA Spotlight

Ep.328: Dr. Rachel Knox- MCBA Spotlight

Dr. Rachel Knox returns and as a commissioner on the Oregon Cannabis Commission. Medical Marijuana has been in existence since 1998 in Oregon and was originally overseen by the Health Authority. With the onset of Adult Use cannabis in the state, Oregon’s Governor Brown sought to ensure that the medical marijuana program was well structured and well run and at the forefront of cannabis research, so she developed the Commission to oversee it. She looked for capable and committed folks like Rachel and two other doctors, a patient representative, and regulators from both the Health Authority and from the OLCC who oversee adult use. The goal is to ensure that the program is robust, features patient advocacy and is focused on further research in Oregon.

Transcript:

Dr Rachel Knox returns. Dr Rachel Knox returns and as a commissioner on the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Speaker 1: Medical marijuana has been in existence since 1998 in Oregon and was originally overseen by the health authority with the onset of adult use cannabis in the state. Oregon's governor Brown sought to ensure that the medical marijuana program was well structured and well run and at the forefront of cannabis research, so she developed the commission to oversee it. She looked for capable and committed folks like Rachel and two other doctors, a patient representative and regulators from both the health authority and from the oil cc who oversee adult use. The goal is to ensure that the program is robust features, patient advocacy, and is focused on further research in Oregon. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hammer can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Dr Rachel Knox

Speaker 2: and a place to live and we're getting way too many transplants from other states that are congesting our highways. Oh, I see.

Speaker 1: Interesting. So what we're saying is that people have caught on to this whole thing.

Speaker 2: Portland really? He has the best of everything. It's not a big metropolis, but you know, it's big enough for most people's tastes, right? You have maybe the big city folks who want to downgrade. You have the country bumpkins you want to get a taste of the city life. Um, and so we have everybody moving here. Then what's really catching on is this sort of craft culture at Portland is known for. And so if you want to start your own anything, you know, Portland might be a good choice of relocation and yeah, once again, people are catching on to that because we are an hour and a half from the coast. We're an hour and a half from the mountains. We're at two hours from Seattle. We are an hour and 20 minute flight to the bay area, um, for pretty low fares. So it's a, it's the ideal place, I suppose

Speaker 3: and know now you're, you're, you don't even just live there anymore. You're kind of a part of what is happening. You are on Dr. Rachel Knox, thank you so much for uh, giving us a few more minutes of your time. Thanks for returning here to cannabis economy. You're on the cannabis commission for Oregon.

Speaker 2: Yes.

Speaker 3: Congratulations on that. Uh, I know that you had been seated a kind of a while back. You and I haven't spoken on microphone since it did occur, so just give us a sense of, um, what the commission is doing, what your role on the commission is and uh, you know, a sense of what's happening now here in early 2018.

Speaker 2: So the Oregon Cannabis Commission was created to oversee the Oregon medical marijuana program, which has been around since 1998. It was originally, um, facilitated through and overseen by the Oregon Health Authority. And as recreational cannabis has come onto the scene in Oregon, a lot of voters, patient, patient consumers, had been very concerned about what's happening to the medical marijuana program and to combat that. And that's only because the people who were, um, who, who had the medical program in their purview weren't the best executioners of, of the game plan. And you know, patients go by the wayside. Providers fell by the wayside. So because Governor Brown, um, and her, her folks and Salem believe in the maintenance and integrity of a well structured well run medical program, I mean Oregon wants to be in, in, in the forefront of researching cannabis. For example, they developed the commission to oversee the next iteration of the medical program here and they were very interested in having capable and committed people to the industry on that commission.

Speaker 2: Um, so we have three doctors who are committed to camp clinical cannabis medicine and cannabis research and public health. We have a representative from the patient population. We have, you know, authorities and the Oregon Health Authority and the OCC, the recreational regulators of cannabis all in one committee. And our goal is to just oversee really a more robust, more focused a medical program in Oregon, really pushing for advocacy for patients and their providers, but not only their cannabis providers, but there are medical providers supporting that crowd of folks right in their ability to provide good care for patients. But also further research in Oregon. We really want to collect the data and run the studies that show how effective cannabis can be. Particularly when we're amidst this opioid crisis, which is another one of our governors, um, areas of interest.

Dr Rachel Knox returns. Dr Rachel Knox returns and as a commissioner on the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Speaker 1: Medical marijuana has been in existence since 1998 in Oregon and was originally overseen by the health authority with the onset of adult use cannabis in the state. Oregon's governor Brown sought to ensure that the medical marijuana program was well structured and well run and at the forefront of cannabis research, so she developed the commission to oversee it. She looked for capable and committed folks like Rachel and two other doctors, a patient representative and regulators from both the health authority and from the oil cc who oversee adult use. The goal is to ensure that the program is robust features, patient advocacy, and is focused on further research in Oregon. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hammer can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Dr Rachel Knox

Speaker 2: and a place to live and we're getting way too many transplants from other states that are congesting our highways. Oh, I see.

Speaker 1: Interesting. So what we're saying is that people have caught on to this whole thing.

Speaker 2: Portland really? He has the best of everything. It's not a big metropolis, but you know, it's big enough for most people's tastes, right? You have maybe the big city folks who want to downgrade. You have the country bumpkins you want to get a taste of the city life. Um, and so we have everybody moving here. Then what's really catching on is this sort of craft culture at Portland is known for. And so if you want to start your own anything, you know, Portland might be a good choice of relocation and yeah, once again, people are catching on to that because we are an hour and a half from the coast. We're an hour and a half from the mountains. We're at two hours from Seattle. We are an hour and 20 minute flight to the bay area, um, for pretty low fares. So it's a, it's the ideal place, I suppose

Speaker 3: and know now you're, you're, you don't even just live there anymore. You're kind of a part of what is happening. You are on Dr. Rachel Knox, thank you so much for uh, giving us a few more minutes of your time. Thanks for returning here to cannabis economy. You're on the cannabis commission for Oregon.

Speaker 2: Yes.

Speaker 3: Congratulations on that. Uh, I know that you had been seated a kind of a while back. You and I haven't spoken on microphone since it did occur, so just give us a sense of, um, what the commission is doing, what your role on the commission is and uh, you know, a sense of what's happening now here in early 2018.

Speaker 2: So the Oregon Cannabis Commission was created to oversee the Oregon medical marijuana program, which has been around since 1998. It was originally, um, facilitated through and overseen by the Oregon Health Authority. And as recreational cannabis has come onto the scene in Oregon, a lot of voters, patient, patient consumers, had been very concerned about what's happening to the medical marijuana program and to combat that. And that's only because the people who were, um, who, who had the medical program in their purview weren't the best executioners of, of the game plan. And you know, patients go by the wayside. Providers fell by the wayside. So because Governor Brown, um, and her, her folks and Salem believe in the maintenance and integrity of a well structured well run medical program, I mean Oregon wants to be in, in, in the forefront of researching cannabis. For example, they developed the commission to oversee the next iteration of the medical program here and they were very interested in having capable and committed people to the industry on that commission.

Speaker 2: Um, so we have three doctors who are committed to camp clinical cannabis medicine and cannabis research and public health. We have a representative from the patient population. We have, you know, authorities and the Oregon Health Authority and the OCC, the recreational regulators of cannabis all in one committee. And our goal is to just oversee really a more robust, more focused a medical program in Oregon, really pushing for advocacy for patients and their providers, but not only their cannabis providers, but there are medical providers supporting that crowd of folks right in their ability to provide good care for patients. But also further research in Oregon. We really want to collect the data and run the studies that show how effective cannabis can be. Particularly when we're amidst this opioid crisis, which is another one of our governors, um, areas of interest.

Speaker 3: Excellent. So the governor, you know, uh, when, whenever I hear Governor Brown, of course, I think of California, which I'm sure drives a Oregonians insane because there's another governor Brown, uh, and that is in your statement and it's amazing to me, uh, the, you know, what is happening, what she's doing up there, uh, that's number one and two itself would be a wonderful. What is even more amazing is the stark contrast with which Oregon is approaching medical cannabis, a versus how Washington, you know, approached medical cannabis, which was to never regulated, uh, then pass adult use and then kind of also have medical cannabis to.

Speaker 2: Yeah, yeah, it's true. And I know Oregon wants to show really the rest of the country, even the world, what a well structured adult use and medical program looks like that are run in parallel in the same state. Excellent. We really do believe we can do that in a good way and in a way that sets a standard for other states in the union.

Speaker 3: So what can you share as far as these commission meetings and your position on it, doc Knox as a I, and I've noticed others are starting to call you as well. Um, well, what, what can you tell us about your position and what has happened in the, in the meetings that you've already had? A in regards to medical cannabis in Oregon.

Speaker 2: So I was nominated for the attending physician seat on the commission and they felt very strongly that he didn't want to just have any doctor on the commission. They want to know doctors who had experience in certain areas. And so the, uh, the seat of the attending physician was slated for somebody who actively practice cannabis medicine or phenomenology, if you will. Um, but because I've had so much patient experience in overseeing medical management with cannabis as a therapy, and I think that's one of the, one of the sticking points when one of the reasons that I had so much support, um, in, in my nomination and am thrilled. I always thought one of the doctors in my group, it should be on that commission. It really didn't matter to us who we just wanted somebody with that year of experience, um, to, to be in that position of influence.

Speaker 3: Okay. Alright. So they only had one meeting today. Oh, good. When was that?

Speaker 2: It was, um, back in December and it was really just to meet. And these are public public meetings of course to meet, establish the chair and vice chair, um, go through the rules and regulations for the commission moving forward. We did have, um, a few, a few minutes at the end where we were able to hear public testimony and so it really was just giving us a flavor of what to expect over the next four years. Um, but yeah, we're all looking forward to getting started

Speaker 3: and, and understanding that it was just a couple of minutes. What was within that public testimony? You say it's a flavor. Give us a flavor of what, uh, of what you heard.

Speaker 2: So, you know, patients, patient, consumers, patient growers feel neglected, they feel neglected as um, and really, you know, thrown a bad deal as adult use has come to the scene in Oregon and it's made, made their medicine a lot less affordable. You know, people who used to grow for them little who now have to pay a rising fees to even remain viable. Really, people's growers are disappearing for that reason. People cannot sustain their goodwill anymore. And that's really unfortunate. And so a couple of patients that we've heard from, um, you know, we're talking about their personal stories and how their illness is being managed by cannabis and how the program as it stands, is making their access to cannabis that much more restricted in a lot of these people are coming from rural areas of Oregon where there's not a whole lot of dispensary's um, they may or may not be able to grow for themselves.

Speaker 2: But when we're talking about these areas and they already have, you know, a dearth of resources in the first place, access to medical care anyways, you know, having a medicine that they can grow in their backyard or that a community member can continue to grow for them is really important. Um, and so we heard from a woman who needed that cannabis medicine to treat her Alzheimer's disease. Her access to that has dwindled. We heard from another gentleman who, who spoke to the growers plight in that, you know, they cannot afford, if they're selling, if they're growing more than 12 plants, for example, you're in Oregon, you have to register into the tracking system and see what comes with that is a cost you have to get your product tested. And with that comes a cost. So these mountains mounting costs keep building up and it really is limiting the ability of these people to do good work.

Speaker 2: Now the other side of that coin is that Oregon is battling and overproduction problem, right? And so yeah, the, those who are overseeing these programs really want to curb this excess canvas going into the black market and so they're looking at both medical growers and adult use growers and wanting them, if they're going above a certain amount to report those, those amounts so that they can continue to track those and really make sure that they're not entering into the illegal market. So, you know, it's sort of a catch 22 that we need to do the best that we can for patients in their growers. Admits, trained, also cartel the black market industry.

Speaker 3: Right? So we just Kinda have to figure out the size of what the actual market is. It sounds like there's, you know, a push for a homegrown to make sure that a caregiver network is protected. It sounds like as far as mounting costs for, you know, a small to midsize farmers, we have to look at those from a legal standpoint and make sure that we're not killing good players. But as far as, uh, the elicit players, folks that are, you know, um, you know, providing cannabis to the black market, we want to pay attention to those folks and extinguish that.

Speaker 2: Oh yeah, sure. You know, and I always think of course I can, as a excess in production, I can actually show you a whole cup of patients who could benefit from that.

Speaker 3: Well, with that, let's get a, let's then take that opportunity and get into your, you know, your day job really. So the American cannabinoid clinic, uh, is, you know, you and you know, the, the others doctors knocks, isn't it?

Speaker 2: That's right.

Speaker 3: How many doctors knocks, do we have?

Speaker 2: Only four.

Speaker 3: Your sister, your mother and your father, right?

Speaker 2: Mother, father, sister. Right.

Speaker 3: So, you know, we, you and I spoke a while back and you know, we, we talked about your personal background and a little bit about the uh, clinic, but, but give us an up to date, kind of a representation of what's going on.

Speaker 2: Yeah. So the American can have an eye clinics or, or founded on the premise that health, wellness depends on healthy endocannabinoid system. And so our focus with working with patients is bringing the endocannabinoid system into balance and the queen of all tools that work on that system if cannabis. So we do have a special focus in cannabis therapeutics and cannabinoid medical management, um, but we really are trying to help people restore their health from the inside out by addressing that endocannabinoid system cannabinoids and come from plants. They're made in our own bodies. Um, they can be developed in a lab. So just honing in on the word cannabinoid gives us really a broader range in the ways and the methods and modalities that we use to help address people's concerns about their health and disease and healing. Um, and we named it the American can have in my clinic because our mission really is a global one, but I'm more in the short term, we want to focus on getting the type of care that we provide into all of our states right here in these United States. And in collectively, we are licensed in 19 states to see patients. I'm already represent quite a few of our states and desire to branch into more. But that being said, we can do our telemedicine platform, can see people world wide, I think to date, uh, farthest patient has been some France. Yeah. And so it's great that we have that telemedicine option so that people can see us for consultation worldwide already in. We love it. We love it

Speaker 3: for folks new to cannabis. And if I go ahead and dial up, any of the doctors knocks that I, uh, that I can, but specifically, you know, let's talk to, uh, to Rachel while we have her. If I dial you up and I am new to cannabis, what can I expect from, from that telemedicine visit?

Speaker 2: Well, it depends on what you want. So typically a telemedicine visit is a, is an hour long consultation is typically coming from somebody who has a disease or few and it's turning to cannabis as an alternative because they want to stay away from conventional solutions or, um, as a last resort because they're fed up with the conventional solution. Right? And, and so we spend a lot of time going through their medical history, talking about the reasons why they might have developed these diseases in the first place because you have to get to the root of the problem to help address it. But then we go into how cannabis can be a tool to either bridge that process or to treat that condition directly. And so we do go into a cannabis one on one of sorts. We have to typically educate people for the first time on the endocannabinoid system inside of their body and talk about how the dysregulation of that system, um, met most likely lead to the disease that they are burdened with now. And then we talk about how and in what way and um, what type of cannabis to use that may be of benefit to them and we're helping them heal.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And if I'm in New York, will you kind of, do you have a network of doctors that you know in, in certain states that you can then say, Hey, your next step is to get a medical card in your state for maybe, you know, try Dr Smith for instance.

Speaker 2: Well, we haven't built that network yet. We do have a position of my students in New York and what we're talking about getting other doctors on the ground, but we have to train those doctors. So in New York, New York is one of the few states, if it's not the only that is requiring any doctor who writes medical authorizations for the use of cannabis to, um, take for, I think it's four hours of certification and certification training and also puts your malpractice for cannabis authorization writing specifically. So some minor barriers to entry, but it does certainly make the process less appealing than the average physician.

Speaker 3: But in other states you could provide that recommendation which will lead to my medical card.

Speaker 2: Sure. Well, yes, ideally, but the issue is we still have to train you, right? So why I'm in New York, for example, the barriers to get into that position, I'm sort of a new thing, however, you still need to understand the foundational principles of cannabinoid medicine.

Speaker 3: Oh, I'm sorry. I switched back to being a patient. So what I'm saying, so my question is as far as, uh, in other states, you know, if I'm a patient you can recommend, um, you know, you can give me a recommendation which I can take forward to getting my medical card from one of those other 19 states. Is that right?

Speaker 2: No. Currently we are only writing for Oregon, Washington and California. Got It. Those three most only those three as far as cards go. Okay. And then as far as that doctor network, we're working on it type of thing. We're, we're both. I mean we have, you have interest from many states and it's funny because with the docs that come and approach us, they're interested in being trained first. They want to see patients, they want to be able to write authorizations, but they don't want to just match condition to a patient on the qualifying condition list and tell the patient, see you later. They want to be able to have meaningful exchange with patients and help oversee their care. Um, and that requires training and if there is no training that exists, where do they get that training?

Speaker 3: Right. And so, uh, there we go with the American canabinoids clinic. We can give you that training. Fantastic. We certainly can, can nab analogy. I feel like that's the first time I've heard that word. I love it.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Yeah. Well, yeah, we have endocrinology, cardiology, I think it's time that we, we, we, we coined a similar term study and practice of the cannabinoid medical practice can have analogy.

Speaker 3: Yeah. I mean it's not like we don't have the endocannabinoid system already built into the human body. Right? That's right. Alright. So a couple of other things to touch on. Um, you know, obviously you are in Oregon and uh, I am in New York, so, uh, we want to keep this shorter than longer, but you know, the rescission of the coal and Ogden memos did happen and you know, I wonder from your position on the commission, your position just in the industry for, for quite some time, uh, what were your initial thoughts and what do you think now?

Speaker 2: My, my, my initial thoughts were this is why you should focus on legalizing the medical use of cannabis. That has always been my position. I really fundamentally do not understand why we have created two, two silos really when the adult use market and the other at the medical market. My position is that cannabis in its natural state is medicinal. It is a, a wellness tool. Um, it is food is medicine and therefore we should be honoring it as such, in, in how we regulate it and how we use it, et cetera. That's not to say that a person can enjoy it in a quote unquote recreational way, but it's still a wellness product. So why don't you just make really robust medical programs offering an over the counter variety behind the counter variety that requires a medical authorization and medical oversight, but regulate it as, as, as when system. Um, that was my initial thought.

Speaker 3: I gotcha. Now how do you square the circle though of making sure that what happened in Washington doesn't happen across the country if we kind of bunch it all together, meaning the type of medicine that medical patients, true medical patients, you know, uh, uh, with the epilepsy, with um, you know, uh, crones, uh, the type of a cannabis medicine that those folks need different dosages and, and, uh, you know, uh, different types of products then what I need for a hike.

Speaker 2: Yeah. How do you, should've been easy in states like California and Oregon and Washington, Alaska, right. That started out in medical. You already have our therapeutic or pharmaceutical grade cannabis in circulation, but keep that, keep that, expand the, the, you know, the breadth of product offerings to people who don't need those doses or don't need those. I'm a application methods, right? We expand it that way. You want to, what happened in Washington state was that they created their adult use market that, that I'm really boxed out the medical market and sort of through medical under it. That's right. Adult use is still the overarching canopy. I think that was a mistake. And you do it the other way around. Do it the other way around. Right, right, right. So expand your services to, to appeal to the adult use market. Okay.

Speaker 3: So, so there's cannabis, there's a Dr Rachel Knox on the commission at the clinic and just generally as far as thoughts and your opinions for, for all of us on cannabis. What about you as a smart person who I know and love from various meetings along throughout the year? Uh, you know, you and I get to be in the same room at least a couple times a year. What are you thinking about as far as you being a human being? Um, and you being a citizen of the United States of America at this point in time.

Speaker 2: Oh man, you know, as, as they grow and mature. And why is. And I learned that I made the biggest impact by learning and knowing myself and in sharing the benefits of that growth that the people around me and sharing in their positivity and their growth. So at a very local level, right? And so, you know, I, as I travel and sit with people and have conversations with people I know well and with strangers, you know, people want to talk about the politics of the day and the trump administration, etc. And I think that's too much of a macro view. I do. Um, I think we All need to focus on what we can do In our immediate surroundings to make positive impacts, period. And I think if we all did that, we all took the time at our very local level and I'm talking even assets in your house.

Speaker 2: Got to think about the most, the most local circumference around you, really up to you. But that building positivity from your, your core, from your most, um, local environment and spread that good news and cheer and, um, you know, gratitude. And I'm compassionate. Empathy out from your center. We will be living in paradise. I'm sure, and so that's what I focus on. I really do focus on me being the best version of myself pouring into the work that I'm doing. Um, you know, locally In all of our clinics, I'm thinking about the good work I can do here in Oregon and in thinking about the impact of what I'm doing throughout the country and even world wide. Um, so I focused on what I'm doing to be a good steward of the tools that god has given me and that's what I challenge everybody to do, right? Get to work as usual, make meaningful work that can inspire meaningful change. And let's take a stab at this. Really, this global chaos, global chaos that way.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Just, uh, start with positivity. Don't let negativity enter into it and do something about what you are, you know, about, uh, what you offer her, you know, offer something. Yeah, that's right. I like it. I like it a lot. All right, so

Speaker 2: distract you out there. Exactly.

Speaker 3: I love it. All right, so, uh, I've got the three final questions for returning guests. doc knocks, I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order. What would you, and it's kind of to the point of that we just made, what would you change about yourself? And it might be something that you're already working on a that's question number one. Question number two is what would you change about anything else if you could? And then finally on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, that's always the last question, but what would you change about yourself, if anything? And it might be something that you're already working on?

Speaker 2: Oh gosh. everything. The desert of the things that I'm working on on a regular basis, um, you know, both personally and professionally, but I will say, you know, in, in 2013, it became strikingly apparent to me that I had to focus on one thing at a time. Um, yeah, I've sort of had my, my fingers, my hands, my ears, my feet and you know, in, in different buckets of, for the past couple of years. And it really has been a challenge too, for me to progress in the fashion that I've, I've wanted to, you know, from the outside looking in, it might look like, um, I've been very successful on, but I am, like I said, trying to advance a cause and, and so really focusing. And so rIght now my main focus is on clinical development and expansion and the training program that we're building.

Speaker 3: So, so yes. So yes, multitask, but only within a couple of tasks type of thing.

Speaker 2: well, yeah, so, you know, me being one of four, I have to continue to participate in our clinical expansion. But really right now my focus, my, my drive is to build this training program for health professionals, um, you know, and we really are pushing the to create the first organized and comprehensive clinical weight training program for health professionals who not only want to learn about cannabis and cannabinoids energy, but once you integrate it into their medical practices,

Speaker 3: that could be huge. I really, I want to keep in touch with you on that because that is, that's just a wonderful goal. Um, what would you change about anything else if you could?

Speaker 2: Oh my goodness, I, I would want tesla to come back and show us how to harness free energy.

Speaker 3: That's nicholi tesla. Who word has it? Did have that idea. Uh, but, uh, I don't, I supposedly fights with edison and uh, you have to go look that up and read about it. Not you but others. All right, so the, that's a great answer. Uh, but as far as, uh, you know, the, the last question on the soundtrack of your life, one track one song that's got to be on there.

Speaker 2: Yeah. I think I answered this question before, but you said yes, of course it was. I would die for you, right?

Speaker 3: Oh yeah. So that you see how you, my voice all levels out right away. You mentioned prInce because prince, I mean that's a different level of, of music right there, right. You know what I mean?

Speaker 2: It is. But what's interesting about that song, and you know, I, I've always really liked that far, but it wasn't with like within the last year and a half or I really sat down and listened to the lyrics and he's talking about the love of god, the love of jesus. I mean, he's saying that I would die for you, you know, like I'm your messiah, like I choose you and I would sacrifice myself for you. And I had no idea it was sort of an iteration of a gospel gone.

Speaker 3: Oh wow. I did not, uh, that had not occurred to me.

Speaker 2: yeah. So very interesting. But I think um, I mean I like print artist. Um, I like the way that song sounds, but now that, that strong even resonates at a higher vibration for me of course, because it is speaking positivity into my life and those around me when I'm listening to that song. So yeah, I'm stickinG with it.

Speaker 3: I got iT. I love it. And I will now go back and listen to it one more time with a new understanding, a always educating me and others. Dr. Knox, rachel, I really appreciate your time. Keep going and we'll keep checking in with you. I think I'm going to see in a couple weeks anyway.

Speaker 1: Right, and there you have doc knocks, Dr. Rachel Knox. What a great goal to focus on being at the forefront of cannabis research. So love that from the governor of Oregon and very happy that uh, dr notes is a part of it, so appreciate her time. Appreciate yours. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.