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Ep.331: Ryan Jennimann

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.331: Ryan Jennimann

Ep.331: Ryan Jennimann

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Ryan Jenneman, Ryan Jenneman joins us and shares his unique background with the plant from Tulsa, Oklahoma. He wanted to be called a caregiver as opposed to a criminal, so he moved to California once up and running. He noted the product that he was cultivating was making it's way south, and so he moved to Los Angeles to ensure that in his words, he was well positioned in the biggest cannabis marketplace. Cannabis cultivation is not an easy job. You have to work hard and the industry landscape is extremely competitive. Ryan is us focused on finding dependable, hardworking people, and so he's got a military veteran internship program and a military veteran employment program. Brian's also focused on sustainability chairs, examples of how he's reducing his carbon footprint. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. It's two ends of the word economy.

Speaker 1: Ryan. Gentlemen, Gentlemen, Brian, gentlemen, you got it. So many ends. So many ends. You could ask for ends. Yes sir. Oh, and every time you just. Every time you write your last name, you'll have to do this. Oh, it's a hassle. Yeah, it is. I just, yeah. A lot of times I tell people it's just Ryan j better. How do you spell? I'll be like Jj, why? It's just easier to. It's very simple. Why? What were you wearing the world? Is this from a actually on the gentleman side, uh, my, I was adopted but my family is German. My adopt my father's side. Yeah, the German, they moved over here in the 18 eighties in the German immigration and everybody was named Hyndman at the time because they didn't want to be lumped in. And I guess German immigrants in 18, eighties were like typecasted as like bad short. Any immigrant edit any time. Exactly. So, um, so for that they didn't want to be lumped

Speaker 2: in with all the cinnamon. So they made the name gentleman. So apparently you have the last name spelled the same way. I do it. You got to be somewhat related because that name has only been around for about 130 years. Scott. Interesting. All right. So let's start there. Adopted though, right? Well, I say adopted. I don't want to. My mother is my blood mother. My father, who I never met, my blood father and my father adopted me when I was a couple of years old. Oh, so that means. Come on Zach. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, exactly. We Love Dad. Is that I love. Oh yeah, exactly. He's my dad. I love him to death and my dad and I just always. But I'm weighing the bloodlines. But my dad, the reason I bring that up as my dad or the adopted father who actually wasn't my blood is the one that I feel the most close to and the family in regards to who I was thinking that I'm the most like.

Speaker 2: And my dad are adoptive father. He's the one who, he's passed away now. But um, he died in his mid forties so he died young. Uh, and, but he was a huge cannabis advocate. He and bringing up the adoptive side, I look completely different because I'm a more clean cut looking. My Dad had a huge beard and long flowing hair, you know, hippie style. And um, so, uh, my dad was huge. Cannabis, his, his father grew, my dad grew, passed onto me. So, um, so multigenerational grower. There we go. So that's, take that Emerald Triangle. Exactly. Fine. But what else about this person's philosophy? Values, mores. Why do you think you identified with him? So, uh, well my dad, uh, I'm in, him and I were really close. I mean from a young age. My Dad, he's the one, he was head of the boy scouts.

Speaker 2: He all, my dad did. Again, he was a hippie so he didn't work. He only did volunteer work who is head of the hippies, head of a boy scout or I, I mean, I'm sorry, not head of it. So heaven in the boy scouts of America for our school. He was head of the Little League, coached my baseball team, coach my football team, coach my basketball team, so he might not have worked, but he was just full time, uh, you know, working with his kids and doing volunteer. He might not have worked, but he was always working. Yeah, exactly. Um, and then on the side of that, my dad in the evening growing up, the sounds bad, but it's more we all, we lived in Oklahoma and not that we live are, we live in Tulsa, which is a large city. Sure. But at the same time there's large yards there.

Speaker 2: So we had a yard that's at least an acre. It's like one and a quarter acres. We always had a little bit of a, um, a garden in the back few hundred foot garden and mixed in that garden was always cannabis plants my entire life. So always was around growing cannabis plants at a young age. You know, my dad really pressed me. Hey Ryan, I don't want you doing any drugs at all. None of them are good, but I'm going to tell you right now, alcohol is one of the worst drugs as just happens to be socially accepted. It's accepted because it's one of the worst and that's the hardest one to get away from. And he got in. My Dad was like, what I truly, truly believe to be the worst drug is synthetic drugs. By that he was meeting pills. Um, apparently my mom, when she was in college, she had um, an issue with barbiturates.

Speaker 1: Ryan Jenneman, Ryan Jenneman joins us and shares his unique background with the plant from Tulsa, Oklahoma. He wanted to be called a caregiver as opposed to a criminal, so he moved to California once up and running. He noted the product that he was cultivating was making it's way south, and so he moved to Los Angeles to ensure that in his words, he was well positioned in the biggest cannabis marketplace. Cannabis cultivation is not an easy job. You have to work hard and the industry landscape is extremely competitive. Ryan is us focused on finding dependable, hardworking people, and so he's got a military veteran internship program and a military veteran employment program. Brian's also focused on sustainability chairs, examples of how he's reducing his carbon footprint. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the hand mechanic economy. It's two ends of the word economy.

Speaker 1: Ryan. Gentlemen, Gentlemen, Brian, gentlemen, you got it. So many ends. So many ends. You could ask for ends. Yes sir. Oh, and every time you just. Every time you write your last name, you'll have to do this. Oh, it's a hassle. Yeah, it is. I just, yeah. A lot of times I tell people it's just Ryan j better. How do you spell? I'll be like Jj, why? It's just easier to. It's very simple. Why? What were you wearing the world? Is this from a actually on the gentleman side, uh, my, I was adopted but my family is German. My adopt my father's side. Yeah, the German, they moved over here in the 18 eighties in the German immigration and everybody was named Hyndman at the time because they didn't want to be lumped in. And I guess German immigrants in 18, eighties were like typecasted as like bad short. Any immigrant edit any time. Exactly. So, um, so for that they didn't want to be lumped

Speaker 2: in with all the cinnamon. So they made the name gentleman. So apparently you have the last name spelled the same way. I do it. You got to be somewhat related because that name has only been around for about 130 years. Scott. Interesting. All right. So let's start there. Adopted though, right? Well, I say adopted. I don't want to. My mother is my blood mother. My father, who I never met, my blood father and my father adopted me when I was a couple of years old. Oh, so that means. Come on Zach. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, exactly. We Love Dad. Is that I love. Oh yeah, exactly. He's my dad. I love him to death and my dad and I just always. But I'm weighing the bloodlines. But my dad, the reason I bring that up as my dad or the adopted father who actually wasn't my blood is the one that I feel the most close to and the family in regards to who I was thinking that I'm the most like.

Speaker 2: And my dad are adoptive father. He's the one who, he's passed away now. But um, he died in his mid forties so he died young. Uh, and, but he was a huge cannabis advocate. He and bringing up the adoptive side, I look completely different because I'm a more clean cut looking. My Dad had a huge beard and long flowing hair, you know, hippie style. And um, so, uh, my dad was huge. Cannabis, his, his father grew, my dad grew, passed onto me. So, um, so multigenerational grower. There we go. So that's, take that Emerald Triangle. Exactly. Fine. But what else about this person's philosophy? Values, mores. Why do you think you identified with him? So, uh, well my dad, uh, I'm in, him and I were really close. I mean from a young age. My Dad, he's the one, he was head of the boy scouts.

Speaker 2: He all, my dad did. Again, he was a hippie so he didn't work. He only did volunteer work who is head of the hippies, head of a boy scout or I, I mean, I'm sorry, not head of it. So heaven in the boy scouts of America for our school. He was head of the Little League, coached my baseball team, coach my football team, coach my basketball team, so he might not have worked, but he was just full time, uh, you know, working with his kids and doing volunteer. He might not have worked, but he was always working. Yeah, exactly. Um, and then on the side of that, my dad in the evening growing up, the sounds bad, but it's more we all, we lived in Oklahoma and not that we live are, we live in Tulsa, which is a large city. Sure. But at the same time there's large yards there.

Speaker 2: So we had a yard that's at least an acre. It's like one and a quarter acres. We always had a little bit of a, um, a garden in the back few hundred foot garden and mixed in that garden was always cannabis plants my entire life. So always was around growing cannabis plants at a young age. You know, my dad really pressed me. Hey Ryan, I don't want you doing any drugs at all. None of them are good, but I'm going to tell you right now, alcohol is one of the worst drugs as just happens to be socially accepted. It's accepted because it's one of the worst and that's the hardest one to get away from. And he got in. My Dad was like, what I truly, truly believe to be the worst drug is synthetic drugs. By that he was meeting pills. Um, apparently my mom, when she was in college, she had um, an issue with barbiturates.

Speaker 2: My Dad because of chronic migraines, he had an issue, not that he was addicted to it, but he had an issue with a opioids because he was always prescribed opioids for decades. Now you fast forward about 15 years after my dad had given me the drug talk, he died from opioids. So really ties into that. So my spiel is that was at a young age. My family just really impressed on me. We don't want you doing any drugs, but if there's one drug you're going to do cannabis as the one we prefer you to do, but we really don't want you to do any of them. So that's one reason I as someone under 18, I think just exactly as someone under 18. Exactly. Fair enough. Very. That's, I mean, so there was openmindedness but also like so open minded as to say keep your mind open until you can actually evaluate things for yourself.

Speaker 2: The. Correct. Correct. And then because my dad was way in the farming, always growing cannabis, even though it was against the law, but he truly, truly believed in it. I mean, you fast forward to our cannabis company. I've been, it was very, very gray at best, you know, 10 years ago when we moved out to California. Um, so, uh, you know, my dad's sort of beliefs of pressing the envelope and doing what he believed in, it has a lot to do with what we do. And I said take that Emerald Triangle because your southern California orange, you. Yes. Exam moved from Oklahoma to Tulsa to Santa Cruz and we lived in Santa Cruz in the bay for a couple years. You did. And as we saw all the product from the, not all, the majority of the product that we made would find its way down to la. Uh, we moved down to La a couple of years after moving to the bay because we are positioning ourselves to be in the largest market for legalization.

Speaker 2: And there was that. I moved in 2014. Oh, okay. So this is now someone much. Yeah. So we were up in the, we moved to the bay in 2009 and then I say a couple of years we were there for five years and then an about a foreign or late 2013. Early 2014 is when we started transitioning everything to la. You keep saying we and I think that you are including your father went. When did he. I'm sorry, we. I'm sorry, when did he pass away? My father passed away in 2008. That's what led to me moving to California was I had my mid twenties crisis with my dad dying and being like A. I had a small sporting goods company in Oklahoma that was doing decent and it was start getting ready to take off so to speak. And I was like, well this is about to take off.

Speaker 2: And in Oklahoma this is a city I, you know, I basically, I didn't think I fit in there and I sure was a criminal for cannabis. I wanted to move in California in 2009. You are a caregiver, not a criminal. So learn to definitely move where I was labeled as a caregiver, not a criminal. So after my dad passed away, add my late twenties, crisis had me get rid of the little sporting goods company had created and moved to California. He just let it go, just let it go because we. I sold out my interest in it, but although it started to do a decent amount in gross sales, it wasn't making an income yet. So there wasn't much of a budget of an asset base or a capital value there. So who's the we that we is my still my girlfriend to this. Her and I knew known each other since we were in high school.

Speaker 2: We've only been together for a little over 10 years. But when I moved out from Oklahoma to California, everybody in Oklahoma is like, Ryan, you might be able to grow weed in Oklahoma but you're not going to cut it in California. So we weren't sure if I would cut it. So when we moved out here, my girlfriend stayed back in Oklahoma and continued to work and send out money each week just for me to, for food and gas and we were just scraping by after we had, after I had my first harvest here and it went well and I went up to harbor side. This is now January 2010. They paid a crazy amount of money and we're like, we want you to become an exclusive grower. Uh, not that I took that opportunity because I wasn't to get my product in multiple stores, but I was like, we can make it.

Speaker 2: So my girlfriend then moved out there. So the company that we have the desired my girlfriend and I founded it. So the whole week that I keep referring to his chariot and I because everything was her and I that did it. Why did we decide on the design the design too? I was going after a clean two things. We started this name, you know, eight, nine years ago and cannabis has such a negative stigma, still has a little bit of a negative stigma, but it's changing over, you know, marijuana had the negative stigma of cannabis has the positive stigma, so, you know, things are slowly changing over, but there's all these different companies out there that are more marketing and going after an exploiting the what I consider the negative aspects of cannabis and those aren't the names, the brand or the image that we want to go to and that.

Speaker 2: Sure, not presenting a positive image for cannabis and in regards to your future brand, um, mainstream doesn't want to see stuff like that. That's not what they endorse or what they see. Yes. So the design is a very digestible, I think name. And it also lets you, you know, you're involved with cannabis, but at the same time it's a little vague. You're not sure exactly what they do. And the longterm, I truly, truly believe in cannabis. And so our longterm goal is, is genetics, nursery, um, and basically creating a world seed bank, so to speak, for cannabis and thc design. The name, the logo really fits into what we're trying to do on, on that side. Why do away with CBD Cbns, you know, any other kind of aspect of the cannabis plant by focusing on thc. I wonder. Yeah. So I mean we're still looking at other, at other aspects, you know, I mean, we're not turning a blind light to CBD, CBN. I mean those are all very, very important chemical compounds that play a light in canvas. But the design I'm in, the name we went with was more. I mean, granted now every society has heard cbd, but you just go back just literally a few years ago when you called yourself cbd design. It'd be like that. I have no idea what that to be direct. But you didn't want people to know what you're exactly right. Exactly. Okay, fair enough. Alright. So a growing

Speaker 3: obviously. Yup. Right. You have two things that you're interested in that I'm interested in. Right. So let's do a veterans first. Okay. I mean, when we spoke, I guess it was a few weeks ago now, and you just told me what you were doing with these folks. I love this. I mean, it is so obvious and it seems so easy. So let's back up and tell people what I'm talking, talking

Speaker 2: about. Okay. Yeah. Great. Uh, what we started last summer, so it's only been about six months now, uh, is a veteran internship program and veteran employment program. Uh, this lead into the fact that it was less that's doing or it was nothing to do with us doing community outreach and community work. It was all about us basically trying to find value add for our company. We were having a very hard time finding dependable, hardworking people. We'd taken, as I mentioned, 16 people, including myself and my girlfriend out from Oklahoma. We basically used up our Oklahoma resources. We are having a hard time finding hardworking, dependable people. Cannabis cultivation is farming. It is hard work seven days a week round the clock. Many people that we were hiring, they would think of cannabis as an easy job. They didn't realize how hard you have to work, how competitive it is, so because of that we had a couple veterans in our company that were basically friends of mine from growing up that were veterans and the few interactions I'd had with other veterans that are around us.

Speaker 2: This is a hard working group of people, a group of people that are very punctual. Big issue that we're having in La is because of traffic is the excuse. We have workers that show up 30 minutes plus late to work. They have an attitude about being late and then they blame traffic. If you live in La and you choose to live there, you can't blame traffic that's part of living there. You just plan accordingly. So we're having a lot of downfalls for that and when it's a team of people working on a farm and you're waiting on people to show up, and seven people can't move forward with their job because one person is late. This really throws off a supply chain and nobody that's in a production side can operate like this. Right now you go to the military. A lot of these guys, you can't stereotype everybody for good or bad, but most of them, um, you know, one thing about him, they're punctual, they do what they say.

Speaker 2: Every single veteran that I've spoken to, it's showing up on time, is one of the first things that they say about the lessons that they've learned in the military. Exactly. Kind of making the bed is the first thing. Once I make the bed, I know that that is done and that is done correctly. I continue with the rest of my day and I will never be late because you have a mission, I have a mission and if I'm late for you, the mission can't go on. So those are just, obviously I'm not a veteran, but those are some of the reasons why they're punctual. And so I love that you need it on tests. So. Yeah. So yeah, you brought up exact points. I mean everything that you just said from being punctual, making the bed, basically that ties into the work. Cleaning up after yourselves, being time, being punctual, do what you say.

Speaker 2: Say what you do. These are issues that, as I think everybody that's listening to this or would that knows, it's very hard to find people that do this of cannabis exactly inside and outside of cannabis. So that's what led into the veterans were like, okay, hardworking people that need that we can depend on that, work their ass off and they know they're not coming into this thinking this is a cakewalk. They're coming into it working really hard and so they know what comes out of it per. Also, farming is a very stressful. I always give the analogy that, um, you know, any movie where you see them go to a farm, there's always something broken. There's always, they're working through the night, stressed out hard life. That's what farming is. It's not easy. So you'd go over to him, just call the it guy to fix x, whatever.

Speaker 2: Exactly. And so, and it's stressful. So, but then you go over to the military. I mean their version of stress is bullets and people dying, right? So our version of stress with the pumps going out and having to work late into the night, we can deal with completely different level of stress compared to people dying and being shot at. Right? So they're stress, you know, what they can handle on stress as much higher than what a standard standard worker can handle. So we saw those were real big strengths then were icing on the cake that we were hoping for as a lot of us people in the cannabis industry are, whether we're anti mainstream anti society or just have a hard time dealing with large amounts of people. I'm definitely one of those people that likes to be secluded in the warehouse with the plants and not have to be around thousands of people.

Speaker 2: Got You. I'd rather be with the plants. Thanks. Yeah, exactly. It's very peaceful. Creating life, growing plants. You get just such a rewarding feeling from creating life and watching your hard work. I'm in. Marijuana grows so fast. You literally can watch your hard work in front of your eyes. You get an incredible sense of accomplishment just like mowing a yard. Um, you know, you do it for an hour and after you mow your yard, you look back over your yard and you get a great sense of accomplishment. You can bust your butt on your computer all day for 10 hours, you may make your company a bunch of money, but at the end of the day you just feel more behind it. You don't have any sense of accomplishment. So that's where cannabis just makes me feel so good working in with it, being with it, it's rewarding. I get a sense of accomplishment and not that I'm a veteran, but just hearing things about veterans having a hard time fitting in with society, lack of direction, lack of goals, having to be around the civilian life, all these different things they say.

Speaker 2: I was like, well I'm not a veteran. I don't have ptsd. But a lot of problems they seem to have with coming to the civilian life problems a lot of us donors already have. And I mean stone is in a positive way. The venn diagram overlaps in just the right way. Exactly. So I was hoping that this would tie over to the veterans as well. Um, and lastly, you know, veterans are used to, you know, guys and girls. I used to being in these, you know, when they're in the service, there's a huge sense of comradery. They work together and mess around with each other, give each other crap in our grows. It's the same. You get such a sense of comradery in our offices and I'm real proud of our company. But in our offices and that office environment, and there's not that same sense of comradery.

Speaker 2: You, you're not allowed to cuss out other people in the office. You get written up for that. You're not allowed to somebody in the office that's a fireable offense and possibly more. But in the warehouse, on the growth side of things, I consider it like a high school, like high school, like literally guys are deep passing each other in a positive way. They're doing it as fun. What do you guys are tripping each other over, benching each other, giving each other crap. And then if you complain about it, then they just make fun of. And it's a in that environment, we're okay with it. And the inner environment, it's like a construction environment. They're super happy. They're super depositive. They definitely have a higher, uh, you know, they're definitely more happy with their work day than our office grew. Our office was not allowed to say and do this and this is one of the reasons that they're a little more stressed out.

Speaker 2: So I thought it really fit over to the veterans on that. So all these things ended up reasons why we thought veterans would do really well. And then boom, we started with the capital veterans now out of the 11 that we brought into the company only to have not paid it, made it past the 90 day trial. Got It. So when I spoke, when we spoke weeks back, um, all 11 at the time, I think only nine people were in it. Now there's 11 and only two haven't made it. Um, and they were solid. They were solid people. It was just, you know, whether it was lack of dedication or they had multiple things going on in their lives or whatever it was. So far the success rate for the people we brought in the organization is just playful moment. Yeah. No, amazing. And, and I love how you, your point is like, I'm not trying to be a good guy here.

Speaker 2: I'm just trying to run a business. Yeah, exactly. That's don't think meeting them type of thing. One hundred percent. Yeah, it's been crazy beneficial that we had a hard time finding employees. We finally find employees that are good value add and then on top of employees being good value add, we're going to talk to people such as yourself and get all this exposure for exactly. It'd be like mean. That's just a dream. Finding an employee that's gonna, that's gonna profit the company. And then on top of that you get a claim for doing it. I mean I wish we could do that with everybody we hire. There we go. Alright, so now let the accolades continue writing and cause the next thing you mentioned the grow and you mentioned the office and if I remember the. This is a two parts of one building. Yes, that's correct.

Speaker 2: So you know what I'm going to now, right? With sustainability. Yes. With sustainability. So two things that I. I thought you were getting at, number one is on the office side, which is a pretty unique thing in our company is huge chunk of the management and people in charge are all female and I'll get into the sustainability and second what I want to do this first. Yeah. On the opposite side, we have a huge chunk female. A primary reason for that is is it wasn't intentional. It was the co founder of the company is female. The few people that she first brought on board were female and then those people, because the females are head management who did, who were all their friends and who are the people. They hired a female. So it was not like a play on our company to have all these females is the head positions in our company just happened to be the guy.

Speaker 2: The person who is running the grass grow was a guy person who was running the office in sales was a woman. So it just trickled down that way. And then it made me also realize not to give, you know, other people a pass, but that's how a company with like an old white guy and then there's a bunch of old men in it. It's not to me, I, I used to think of maybe it was sexist or racist is now I've seen things play in our company. Um, we have a lot of um, African American women and we weren't going after African American women because they're the management and the company and African American women are then hired other African American women and we have a huge amount and by no means are you going to call our African American women racist or sexist for hiring a bunch of African American women.

Speaker 2: That's not the case. So just as go back to the other side where corporate America gets blasted for a bunch of old white men, which again, I'm not taking their defense. But I also started to see how it would happen because our company has a lot of living. You hire what you know almost exactly. You hire your friends are and who you trust, particularly in the cannabis industry. Because there wasn't, you're not hiring people with years of experience doing something and this is a cash based industry. You need people you can trust, so you're hiring people close to heart. Those are people a lot of times that are very similar to you. So basically the whole spiel is, yeah, our company has a large female influence and yeah, he management management. Um, because they were the people that were the founding founding and our company.

Speaker 2: And also you might be familiar with the fact that that's right, the women are smarter. Yep, Yep. Yeah, I've, I've been told that since I was born and now I see it a little bit in business, but definitely in regards to me and will depend on and people doing what they say. Uh, yeah, the women in our company, I've, I've crushed it. I mean obviously that's what's gotten us to this point. Perfect. Perfect. All right, so sustainability. So now sustainability is something that I truly, truly care about. I keep bringing up farming and trying to do better for the world. So sustainability is really what we care about. I'm all about are. We are all about creating life. That's part of what farming is. All types of industries in this world are a zero sum game where if someone else wins, someone else loses and farming.

Speaker 2: Everybody wins including the environment if you do it correctly. So although we are an indoor grow, which has its negatives on its carbon footprint, there's also a lot of positives that we can do such as controlling any waste or run off that would normally go into groundwater or streams. The other thing that we can really, really kill is the amount of water we use. A we can recapture and research water that we use in our irrigation because of this, um, our water usage for farming per square foot as substantially lower than what it would be for an outdoor or greenhouse farming indoors. We can control our environment, why? I understand outdoor, but couldn't you do that same thing as far as water capture with greenhouse, with greenhouse, if it was a mixed light climate controlled 100 percent, you could do it the exact same. But if it was just a traditional greenhouse with our climate control and basically if it was a greenhouse without environmental controls, you can't do it if it's a greenhouse with environmental controls.

Speaker 2: Yes, most definitely can do it. All right. So there's the water now talk about the electricity. So on the electricity, there's multiple different aspects, um, that indoor growers can try to be sustainable. Now. This is where we can't compete with outdoor and why sun grown is the true way that plants are grown, if that's breaking news or not. But Sun grown is definitely where plants are made to be grown. But again, indoor has a lot of positives. Um, and a lot of reasons that people prefer to grow or consume indoor in the cannabis industry is because of cleanliness, a potency levels of the product, knowing what's in the product. But Ansi consistency. Exactly. Exactly. Um, but in regards to electrical use indoors and for the past years we have not done solar panel because we don't even. California is so behind. We don't even have permits until, as of recent.

Speaker 2: So when we don't know what tomorrow holds, we haven't invested in assets that take three and a half to five years to pay themselves back, but now that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, so to speak, um, yeah, we're implementing solar at all of our locations, but solar, um, even with as efficient as it is, it's still offsets just a small amount of the power that we can use at our location. So other ways that we're able to offset power usage is not just with solar but with equipment and basically technology that we use to light a for lighting and for technology, for environmental controls. So on every single aspect, whether it's the electricity going in to how you're using the electricity, there's ways to be efficient at our company. We've started to implement led lighting and some on some square footage, but not all across because again, we're a small company and from a cost standpoint, um, you know, we have to take these steps slowly.

Speaker 2: You can only do what you can do. Uh, we also, uh, in regards to lie on the vegetative side, we've moved over to different forms of light emitting ceramics, so other forms of energy efficiency there and we also play or are playing around with life's a light cycles because the traditional way of, you know, 16 to 24 hours of light and vege and 12 hours and flour, those are just numbers, but you can play around with that a little bit to actually shorten flower or shortened windows of light so that you can save electricity there and you can also dim lights, dim and adjust lighting to reflect the sun. So it doesn't necessarily mean that you need a thousand to 1500, you moles of light every minute. That light can actually fluctuate throughout the day. So how many square feet are you growing a square foot of warehouse between all of our office and all of our locations.

Speaker 2: Take, take away just canopy. We're about 60,000 square feet of indoor canopy. Okay. And what you told me, which I find fascinating is 60,000 square feet of canopy and the office was using more electricity. Uh, no, the office is not using more electricity. The office use multiple fold more water. Water was the water. So this is where the water in the office and you make it great, but you're bringing up. That was the excellent point. Yeah, I'm in California where water is the end all in regards to utilities total. Um, we work closely with ACEP, Americans for safe access, really believe in what they're doing the best and exactly. And so it was Don Duncan and so they, uh, so basically don for California had us do some really detailed water analysis at one of our locations and considering this as for a second, I really value asap.

Speaker 2: I didn't, we didn't want to like halfway do this. I wanted to be like really dialed in. So if, if a cell was going around the world presenting this information that it was as accurate as can be, right. So we took one of our 20,000 square foot locations at this 20,000 square foot location. There's about 10,000 square foot of canopy. The other 10,000 square foot is processing dry common areas. A tiny bit of office. But this total location has about 10 cold cultivators and about 20 to 25 people in the trim and process department because we a trim and process everything by hand at this location when we went through it all, basically we use somewhere in the neighborhood of about 1800 to 2000 gallons a day in our cultivation and that 10,000 square feet out of that 1800 to 2000 gallons, we're recapturing at a high end, around 1400 gallons a day on a low end.

Speaker 2: If it's a cold, dry day, we were capturing next to nothing. Um, but in California or in southern California, we don't get too many cold days are normally decently warm, decently warm days, have a lot more room in the air to hold moisture, meaning that relative humidity we can suck out and we can recapture and feet to the plant. So we need heat to hold humidity to recapture the moisture. Right? So basically spiel is, is, you know, we're using an 1800 and 80,000 gallons at best we can capture around 1400. So you know, we're recapturing maybe you know, on a, on a, on a good spiel, about two thirds, about 67, 68 percent of our water that we're really proud of and we market that. We tell people that what we hadn't done was track how much water we use in the office because we're just tracking the grow.

Speaker 2: Well that's what you're talking about. Like suzy who's tracking flushing toilets and in the break room, you know, you know, and they don't check that well we have to track this for aces so they could get the whole breakdown. So we track our grow with all these flow meters. Then we track the actual water usage for the main line coming into the building. Yeah, well the mainland coming into the building where on the growth side we're using about 400, 500, 400 to 600 gallons a day. Um, for the cultivation we're using around $1,200 more gallons a day for the office. Twelve hundred gallons. Sounds like an absurd amount. Yeah. But when you took a family of four uses, they save 400 gallons of water a day, which I don't necessarily believe because they say when the government calculates that, they say the average person takes a five minute shower and I don't want to sound sexist at all.

Speaker 2: But growing up any girlfriend or my mom or my grandma, anyone that has long hair takes a lot longer than a five minute shower. So I already think these numbers are skewed. But if we want to go with a 400 gallons of water a day for a family of four, well yeah, you can see how 35 employees on an eight to 10 hour day use 1200 gallons. Our break room, our warehouse, we don't have some super nice break room where people are hanging out. We don't have showers. This is a warehouse. It's a low end break room with a couple bathrooms and they're using 1200 plus gallons a day. So my whole spiel there is his offices are using way more water and I can only imagine like for example, an office in a high rise that has a super nice break room where it's water cooler talk where people are hanging out all day and they're talking using up their time to go use the restroom breaks just to kill time at the office. I can only imagine how much water a facility like that uses. So that's the whole spiel though. The um, the offices use multiple fold. The water that are our groceries.

Speaker 3: And what's Nice here is that now we can say a second save. We can say moving forward, you know, what a better, you know, what a better use of this facility or this square footage or this land would be is growing cannabis because you can put an office building in here and you're going to just kill the environment. Whereas if you put a grow in here, we can go ahead and be sustainable.

Speaker 2: Exactly, exactly. We haven't done it yet, but on marketing platforms, we haven't done it yet, but we want to create like chart, you know, like basically a map of our warehouse and then all the grow I wanted to show like light and color so it's like this light rain and then I want to show them the offices and the restroom and break room like deep red, like torrential rain. I as just assemble like, have you really cared about water usage and environmental impact, you know, actually the farms are a lot more efficient than offices are. There

Speaker 3: we go, there we go. And we wouldn't necessarily think that so that I'm really glad that we have had a chance to sit down and I feel like, uh, we just, even a, you know, that was the tip of the iceberg. We can talk much further but not right now. And so I'll ask you the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and asking them in order. Got It. What has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of your life? One track, one song that's got to be on there. First things first though, you've had a lifelong relationship with cannabis in some way. What's most surprised you about cannabis? What's most surprising

Speaker 2: to me is basically how society and the world as a polarizing flip 'em in the mid nineties when I was in high school and I, my father and I were arrested for growing cannabis. I was literally treated like a murderer or rapist in Oklahoma. Worst kind of criminal, exactly the worst kind of criminal. My Dad's family, like literally disowned him for a sustained period of time. It led to my parents divorced. Um, but my mom's a huge cannabis advocate. She didn't divorce. It wasn't because he has so, um, but so because I'm not trying to say my mom left. My mom loves cannabis and my mom's still here to this day. So there's a huge cannabis advocate. But my spiel is, is basically you go from the nineties where cannabis was horrible. It was horrible. People did it. It was a bad thing. And literally you just go over a decade later and now cannabis is like the cure all for every disease or problem in the world.

Speaker 2: And so now I'm a huge canvas advocate, but I'm now like when people bring it up, I'm like, hey, cannabis is great, but there's still some downfalls to it. So it's like, it's literally gone from 15 years ago where people were like, cannabis was the worst drug known demand to 15 years later. Like cannabis can't do anything wrong. It's like you've got cancer, cannabis, AIDS, canvas, you're having a problem with school cannabis, no matter what it is with like cannabis, we're curious and it's just crazy how society does this polarizing flip and such a short amount of time. Or are you saying there's maybe a touch of hyperbole there when you say kind of still has its downfalls? What do you mean? What are you getting? I'm just saying, yeah, there's a touch of hyperbole. What I'm getting at is, you know, cannabis is great, but everything including water to a point, even water and mass consumption can lead to health issues.

Speaker 2: So what I'm saying is cannabis is great, but it's just come full circle now that no matter what the problem is, they bring up cannabis, like it'll cure it. Whereas just, you know, years ago, no matter what it was, cannabis was a negative. So that to me is so, so how society, not just people, but society overall can just have a flippable arising. Sure. Yeah. What we do it every four or eight years. We flipped this way. Flip that way, flip this way, that way. I mean, do you remember the last couple of folks that are running the place, right? Yeah. Oh yeah, exactly. None of them are similar, right after each other. Exactly. Never is. What's most surprised you in life? Ooh, that Ben. That one's a hard one. Uh, but, uh, just sort of goes into what we just said. One of the things that most surprised me in life because I've come, I'm only 36, but I grew up very, very poor, rural Oklahoma.

Speaker 2: And, uh, you know, I grew up making straight a's and working my butt off, but I basically thought, you know, the world was going to be really hard. Um, I would see like adult men and women going around like where I really knew what they were doing and they are super intelligent and they're really on it. And I'd be like, oh my gosh, I hope one day I can be on that level. It will be so much easier once I'm an so much easier. What's an adult? Exactly. And now that I am an adult, um, I already brought up the highschool analogy to the warehouse basically, now that I am somewhat of an adult, I realized a lot of these people I've looked up to and a lot of the business I've looked at, it's basically like my same friends from high school. It is just people from it.

Speaker 2: It's basically what I'm getting at is the main business world in this mainstream world. Um, people are savvy on complex, but at the same time, just like in high school, everyone's trying to fit in to be cool. Everyone's trying to find their niche. They may come across like they have these great ideas and these grandiose platforms and they come across like they're really confident but they're there but they're not. And so, and people are full of these ideas that they were gonna take over the world and do all this. Just like in high school they go going to Harvard and they're going to be president. And as I've gotten to the real world, I've just seen again, just like high school people are full of these ideas and grandioseness, but usually they don't follow through with it. And also, you know, all these people that I thought were likely savant and so forth, really smart people, but they're just normal people that work hard.

Speaker 2: And so that's, it's all about working hard. Absolutely. But what you said about kind of, you know, once we get to this point in time, it'll, we'll all kind of realize them, reminds me of a Janis joplin quote where she says, um, as we discussed on the train, and it's because they were on a train, which is actually captured in a movie, but that's, you know, I digress. Uh, I think it was something express, uh, you can look it up, but I've actually rode that train from the bay to Tahoe, the same train ride they were on. I thought it was across Canada. Oh my God, I'm wrong. Yeah, it was across Canada, but they each year up in the bay, they'll do it from the bay to Tahoe and it's just a few hour ride, but they recreate the experience of when like the dad and Joplin and I've seen the movie as well.

Speaker 2: Yeah. So I've actually been, I've read the train ride where they, it's only a three hour ride, but they recreate that experience for you that you gotta keep in touch. You're going to tell me about the next time the train goes. But basically she says, uh, as we discussed on the train, tomorrow never happens. It's all the same effing day, man. Her point. Yeah, kind of your point. Exactly. Very close. Very close on the soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there. Ooh. Uh, it have to. If there's one song, this is going to show how crazy I am though. If there's one song that definitely defines me, it would be pink floyd, dark side of the moon. Great Gig in the sky. Oh, come on. So that's one of the greatest pieces of music that there is. So I know I'm not a woman and I know I'm not a vocalist, but the vocals on that song from that woman definitely defined basically how I feel about society in this world. So that's the fee. What, when she's singing, that's how you feel is your point that that would be it. So if there's one song that. Yeah, I would say greg in the sky lunatic is, uh, in the, on the grass. I think.

Speaker 1: Luminary tickets in my mind, right? Yep, exactly. We could go on. We can't. So Brian, thank you so much. Appreciate it. Thank you. And there you have Ryan. Gentlemen, I loved the focus. Love the focus of employing veterans. Love the focus of reducing the carbon footprint. I mean really two very good goals, hardworking people that we can depend on that work their asses off and they're not coming into this thinking it's a cakewalk. Thanks to Ryan, thanks to you. Thanks to the veterans.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.