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Ep.338: Lukas Behal

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep.338: Lukas Behal

Ep.338: Lukas Behal

Lukas Behal joins us and provides his background in events which has led him to organize one of the world’s largest trade shows in the Czech Republic. He notes that there were better times in the past- decades ago, just after Czechoslovakia split, homegrow was prevalent and public consumption was not an issue. Since 2010, he’s been building the trade show within the context of legal cannabis.
And based on Lucas’ personal experience, we also get a chance to discuss the differences between socialism and communism. And we come away thinking the true enemy of society being laziness coupled with an aversion to conceiving of original thought.

Transcript:

Lucas Behal joins us and provides his background in events which has led him to organize one of the world's largest trade shows in the Czech Republic.

Speaker 1: He notes that there were better times in the past decades ago. Just after the checklist of Ikea Split, homegirl was prevalent in public consumption, was not an issue since 2010. He's been building trade show within the context of legal cannabis and based on Lucas's personal experience, we also get a chance to discuss the differences between socialism and communism and we come away thinking the true enemy of society being laziness, coupled with an aversion to conceiving of original thoughts. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American economy. That's two ends. And the word economy wookah should be how? Yeah, how? Yeah. How nice

Speaker 1: or something. Oh, look at that. So long distance runner. What do you stand in there for it or that could. You know what I'm talking about? The, a grateful dead song. Yeah. Yeah. I grew up on the grateful dead and there we go. All right. What else you got? What? Uh, do you remember? Any of the albums are live albums or tapes. Did you have tape? Yeah, I went through many different kind of music, like rock music, rap music or rock rock rock like faith. No more are okay. They're like nine each night or we are. We have to be the same exact age as we discussed. We basically are because faith no more was a moment in time, you know what I mean? That didn't happen for a long time. Or Jane's Addiction. Oh sure. There you go. And speaking of Jane's addiction and the grateful dead, there was a cover album that they put out where Jane's addiction does a version of ripple. While I have no clue about that, you have to please look that up. It is worth your time, I promise. Okay. I will do that. And so I asked you if I could pronounce your name. Whew. Gosh. And you said well, yes, of course. Yeah. It's like a slavic. Who Know Luca, she slavic, so I make it easier for Americans. And then just lucas. Yeah. Do you mind if I still call you? She even though I'm American, fine, it's my name.

Speaker 1: Alright. So we have a lot to talk about because I've spoken to a number of folks from, you know, many parts of the world haven't spoken to anybody from the Czech Republic will get to Canada fest, but give us just a sense of what's going on on the ground in the Czech Republic regarding cannabis. Whoa. As you mentioned, the kind of fsts a war or east trade, a trade show. Interesting. Have you told everybody, because there's a lot of people say we're the world's biggest where though

Speaker 2: this kind of marketing and the many people from, uh, from our business already noticed that we are the largest. Everyone who is visiting,

Speaker 1: he's always like very surprised because comparing to your trade shows, it's something totally different. You know, how many, how many people, how many exhibitors? Yeah.

Speaker 2: If I tell a world's largest, it means, uh, if you count the indoor a exhibition space, uh, the, it's not about the number of companies participate. I say body, it's about space because, uh, usually at your trade shows you got to just, uh, all, uh, all the booths are the same. You know, it's like three by three by three and no matter if you are just small company or if you are like huge company, you know, at my trade show and the most of European trade shows, every company can choose the size, uh, they want to show up and feel like we might be doing that now too. But like spike right span of from the beginning, I was just fighting with spanner is going to be the biggest, just uh, every, every time I come with the, with the opinion that the are with the, with the meaning that we are the biggest largest that they come the next year.

Lucas Behal joins us and provides his background in events which has led him to organize one of the world's largest trade shows in the Czech Republic.

Speaker 1: He notes that there were better times in the past decades ago. Just after the checklist of Ikea Split, homegirl was prevalent in public consumption, was not an issue since 2010. He's been building trade show within the context of legal cannabis and based on Lucas's personal experience, we also get a chance to discuss the differences between socialism and communism and we come away thinking the true enemy of society being laziness, coupled with an aversion to conceiving of original thoughts. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American economy. That's two ends. And the word economy wookah should be how? Yeah, how? Yeah. How nice

Speaker 1: or something. Oh, look at that. So long distance runner. What do you stand in there for it or that could. You know what I'm talking about? The, a grateful dead song. Yeah. Yeah. I grew up on the grateful dead and there we go. All right. What else you got? What? Uh, do you remember? Any of the albums are live albums or tapes. Did you have tape? Yeah, I went through many different kind of music, like rock music, rap music or rock rock rock like faith. No more are okay. They're like nine each night or we are. We have to be the same exact age as we discussed. We basically are because faith no more was a moment in time, you know what I mean? That didn't happen for a long time. Or Jane's Addiction. Oh sure. There you go. And speaking of Jane's addiction and the grateful dead, there was a cover album that they put out where Jane's addiction does a version of ripple. While I have no clue about that, you have to please look that up. It is worth your time, I promise. Okay. I will do that. And so I asked you if I could pronounce your name. Whew. Gosh. And you said well, yes, of course. Yeah. It's like a slavic. Who Know Luca, she slavic, so I make it easier for Americans. And then just lucas. Yeah. Do you mind if I still call you? She even though I'm American, fine, it's my name.

Speaker 1: Alright. So we have a lot to talk about because I've spoken to a number of folks from, you know, many parts of the world haven't spoken to anybody from the Czech Republic will get to Canada fest, but give us just a sense of what's going on on the ground in the Czech Republic regarding cannabis. Whoa. As you mentioned, the kind of fsts a war or east trade, a trade show. Interesting. Have you told everybody, because there's a lot of people say we're the world's biggest where though

Speaker 2: this kind of marketing and the many people from, uh, from our business already noticed that we are the largest. Everyone who is visiting,

Speaker 1: he's always like very surprised because comparing to your trade shows, it's something totally different. You know, how many, how many people, how many exhibitors? Yeah.

Speaker 2: If I tell a world's largest, it means, uh, if you count the indoor a exhibition space, uh, the, it's not about the number of companies participate. I say body, it's about space because, uh, usually at your trade shows you got to just, uh, all, uh, all the booths are the same. You know, it's like three by three by three and no matter if you are just small company or if you are like huge company, you know, at my trade show and the most of European trade shows, every company can choose the size, uh, they want to show up and feel like we might be doing that now too. But like spike right span of from the beginning, I was just fighting with spanner is going to be the biggest, just uh, every, every time I come with the, with the opinion that the are with the, with the meaning that we are the biggest largest that they come the next year.

Speaker 2: Oh No, we are biggies. Then they are just so now we are just building new halls every year and bring more exhibitors. But a sim from this, uh, industry, I mean organizer of trade shows and exhibitions from before. So spannabis is in March, in November. If I'm around November. Yeah. These. And so when you say big, how many square feet or how many square meters or what just say. So, um, uh, we just finished the eighth year of, a three weeks ago. And, uh, we had, uh, we covered a, around a hundred and 75 thousands of square feet of indoor exhibitions, just indoor. We got some outdoor and you've got some accompanying programs and like this. But this was just the exhibition area. What though? I'm thinking that if it was a grow, it's not even that big. You know what I mean? Yeah. If it was canopy, you know, they got much bigger warehouses now they, uh, hockey in Canada and all over.

Speaker 2: Yeah. I say it's changing. Ended up even the, our cheese, I know that the potential in the United States is much more bigger. You got more company. So even if it's okay because we keep it federally illegal for just that recent, just to keep you guys bigger than us. But uh, you know, um, uh, already a focus to American changes and can idn changes, uh, for the last three years maybe. So my activities, uh, are uh, also fuck used to for the future in your country. So I'm just, you know, started with manifest. And from the beginning I knew it has to be as much international exit. It gets so helps it be this big, just trying to connect all different parties and then is everything, you know, and uh, so uh, last year, uh, we had like a 25 different countries participating, but we got like more than hundred different nations of visitors every year.

Speaker 2: These numbers are greater. We got the in three days, like 30,000 visitors. Oh, look at that. It's not bad. Yeah. It also makes it the biggest, uh, that I know of. So now I'm with you as far as visited as well, but I mean, who knows how many people go to Spanish? That's not the point. Is it? Oh, well, I'd say it's another story. You know, I, I can discard describe you how they count the visitors. Just the usual, like a unit. Remember looney tunes one for you. One, two. For me, that's how they did, you know, uh, when I started to organize the first cannabis, it was like 2000, 10 time ago. Now I was just making it in secret. I didn't tell to anyone for almost one year. And then you could, you use, if it was a secret kind of a, I was just, I use the, uh, the official when you, uh, for our trade shows in Prague or you taught to.

Speaker 2: Yeah, but because I was from, from, from that, uh, industrial, you know, the people, so I knew people, so I just closed the agreement with them and uh, I had the, the, the exclusivity for, for the venue for the whole year. So no one will, no one else was able to organize the same show, you know, and uh, I was preparing it a almost one year before telling to anyone, just few close people, you know. And then I went to a Barcelona which was, at that time the biggest, the largest trade show of cannabis. I went to there. And uh, I started to a visiting every single booth, one by one from the biggest companies and just introducing the plans for the trade show in Czech Republic. And everyone was just impressed, you know, because we had quite good conditions, uh, for a long time and we were quite free country and also everyone was calling a product like new Amsterdam and.

Speaker 2: Well that's, and so, you know, I've, I've spoken with a couple of Dutch people and we have a sense of what's going on on the ground in Amsterdam in Holland where, uh, you know, Amsterdam is and the Netherlands where, uh, you know, outside of Amsterdam button as far as the Czech Republic, give us a sense of what is happening on the ground as far as the cannabis economy outside of the trade show. Wow. I remember at times, you know, now we were better times are better. Explain please. Well, uh, uh, from my, let's say teenage age, all the way back, I remember we've already just quite free with the growing and the smoking on a public place. He's and nobody, uh, essentially decriminalized, right? Not an issue. Yeah. By the, I mean, uh, it wasn't, uh, any law regarding that too. No, there was no prohibited. Oh, I do, I do.

Speaker 2: It wasn't nobody. Nobody just took care of it, it was just a not controlled and uh, and people who are not educated that much. So were other drugs controlled I wonder? Well, were, and there were. So this was kind of, you know, purposely left out even they've probably, thc was on our list of forbidden substances, but still they didn't do anything. Even police, they were not educated enough to recognize what it was, what it was or to know how to behave when you meet someone and, you know, how would they know anyway. So, and they, they knew it's a, nothing like, uh, important and then it's not a nightmare. So that's when you were a teenager. When did things start to change then? I wonder? Well, uh, it was quite a long time because when you were a teenager would have been Czechoslovakia.

Speaker 2: Uh, actually, uh, the, the, uh, the wellhead, the revolution when the changes were, uh, after the, uh, so it was like a 19, 89 November. So, and so. And in that time, uh, I was like 13. So after that, right after, I remember when I met, when I met a cannabis for the first time, like a smoker, it was, uh, when I was like, uh, let's say 15, 16, and, uh, it was quite common to a smoke in clubs in bops or in the park anywhere, you know. And uh, because everything was free. Freedom was new. Is that fair? Oh yeah, you can, you can say it was because of, because of this. Yeah. Because it was like a five years of freedom and yeah. So just, just quickly if you don't mind, because again, I haven't spoken to somebody from your land and I wonder what it was like to go through that transition from Czechoslovakia to the Czech Republic from what must have been communism, correct?

Speaker 2: Yeah, yeah. To, to certainly not communism. What, what was that like as you were old enough? Right? If you were 12, 13, 14, 15, you knew what was going on while he. I was, I was old enough and I was educated or informed by my parents were totally against communism. So, uh, so I, you, uh, what is bad on that system? You know, and uh, so I, I knew uh, that something is working wrong, you know, and uh, so for me it wasn't a really good system and about the, so when the change came a, I remember we started to travel it because until that time we were not able to travel anywhere else just to Bulgaria, Romania, and then few other countries where they had also communities. So it wasn't anything special, uh, Poland or not because they didn't pull lines also. Yeah, bother.

Speaker 2: There is nothing to see in Poland. Do you know, there's an interesting relationship I've noticed by the way, my girlfriend's Polish, there's an interesting relationship between you guys and, and it's kind of like a brother, sister type of situation, right? It's kind of like sibling rivalry. Say for someone. Yeah, you okay, you can have this feeling, but um, you know, it's, we are able to understand the language and they are not able to understand the US, you know, somehow I didn't know they cannot concentrate. Same thing. It's a basic, it's like books like it really, it's like New York

Speaker 1: and New Jersey. It's like the rivalry because it's, it's not, you're just annoyed by each other, you know what I mean? It's just like, hey. Yeah, right. It's not like anger, it's not anger, it's just like, Hey, yeah, I'm a so, so. Okay. So that's that relationship. But I'm getting back to this kind of transition. Did you, did you understand the kind of level of change that was happening or because if you, if you were still young, this was just part of your life, right?

Speaker 2: Everywhere, you know? Uh, I remember straight after Dr Evolution, we were just traveling to a, it was 1990. Okay. I was like first months of our freedom. Yeah. And uh, I was traveling with my parents to Vienna, to Australia. No, and I remember straight, uh, when we crossed the borders, uh, I saw they had like organized fields, you know, they had like nice banks on the, on the building, you know, they had flowers in the windows, you know, something I have never seen and it's not that far away at all. And then, then there were shops and the shops were full of products. Yeah. Products, which we were able to see only in some catalogs, magazines, you know, and uh, and everything was quite, uh, quite, uh, expensive for us, you know, because what academy did you have?

Speaker 1: Yeah. Well, well then how did that change, you know what I mean? When did that change? When did it start? When did you start to kind of find your sea legs as far as, you know, a national economy?

Speaker 2: Yeah. So a straight after the changes, uh, I found a, it's a, it's a, I, I went to the university that was a step. It was seed was a Czech Republic. He was in the Czech Republic. It was 1995 know, so it was like five, five a year, softer, dear evolutionary. So, uh, and I was able to travel everywhere, you know. So as a student I was able to go to some program like work and travel, you know, and uh, our was visiting many countries, including a, your country, United States. Where did you go? Uh, well, uh, my first experience with the, our country was a, uh, as a worker in Syria on Alaska. Really? Yeah, I was, I was uh, working in a feature factory, like in a cannery and

Speaker 1: sievert of seaward. Yeah. Okay. Alaska. Yeah. Yeah. So I don't know if I was there. I visited like six or seven different towns. I was in Anchorage, Anchorage. I know of course now, and then they're there like, I don't

Speaker 2: know, like three months may be so cold in Alaska and it's so far away. How did you find my name was my dream to uh, you know, I, I grew up on Chegg, London and.

Speaker 1: Oh, that's fine. So how did you ever find the Alaska though? Wait, where was that?

Speaker 2: Well, I think it was Charles Program, as I mentioned, like work and travel program. So there were some agencies were able to find a new job and it was just official work, you know, I had a working visa for your country, so I was paid a, just regular salary. It was fine. So there's a lot of money out. It was, it was. And uh, I was working there just with the American students and the alcoholics and the released prisoners.

Speaker 1: That's great. These are, your buddies are so good and still to this day, right? Doesn't matter. Exactly. Exactly. All right, so just one more question before we get to kind of you diving into cannabis or actually before that you diving into trade shows and all that. I wonder how you got into it, but I've spoken with other folks that were, um, you know, under communist rule and they conflate the theologies of communism and socialism. They see no difference between those two theories are a d, is this true for you as well or can do, do you see the, is there a difference?

Speaker 2: Of course there is a difference. Uh, I think, and I agree, we opinion that the most people, uh, don't see de France and the datasheets as exactly the same communism or socialism, you know it, but there are differences for sure and the communities and be more like a more tough more, uh, it's a regime, you know, it's so like, um, how to say it. It's dictate to know it's, uh, something, uh, if, if you, if you don't, uh, if you don't have the personal experience with that, it's hard to understand, you know, and, uh, that's, uh, that's the problem that a lot of people, uh, they are not experienced enough and they are not receiving information from their parents and your ancestors. So, uh, most of them they are, they are now like unhappy in our country and they think we had better times during communism and they want it back, you know.

Speaker 1: Well, here's the thing, it's, it's easy to read a book [inaudible]. That sounds fantastic. The problem with any theory from a is that

Speaker 2: when you put it into the hands of humans, they have a, a tendency to really mess that up with the best intentions, uh, really in, in human hands, just fall, fall, right down. Anybody that's looking for power and can just mess up anything for sure about the. I found that, you know, that the problem is that the most people, not only in our country about globally, they are lazy. They are lazy to do anything with their lives to know. And uh, so during the communities they had nothing to do a, they, everything was organized for them, you know, so they didn't have the daily choices of what to do, where to go, what to buy. And it works better for some because they don't even have to worry about. And now you know, they have to find the job, you know, they have to do something to survive. And so they don't.

Speaker 1: It's amazing. So what was it from your parents, you know, why do we have this, uh, uh, this, this tenacious person? Right. Why are you, uh, why do you feel the need to get up every day? I'm seeing a likeminded spirit here. I just get up, I do the work, I go to sleep, I get up, I do the work just because that's what I do. Right. And it's instilled in me from my parents. It was that the way that your parents were as well? My,

Speaker 2: my father, a entrepreneur, a, he's a, he's an art black Smith and art blacksmith. Yeah. The first time I've heard of that, what does that mean? He's just making a, um, uh, like many things from a metal. He's a blacksmith, but he's making, he's artistic, thinks about everything, like sculptures about all. I'd also like fancies and gates, a hair or a whatever, like many different things. But uh, he was, uh, he's, he had his own company already drink communities. It wasn't somehow do that because he was an artist, so he was just a outside the law part of some, uh, like uh, association of artists really was able to make his own, uh, products and sell it through some agency as our to, you know. So he was outside, I said, outside of law. Yeah. Yeah. To Bob was like a, it was from 1986, which means like three years before the changes.

Speaker 2: So, so, uh, in those times, uh, communities in system was already like falling apart little bit. Yeah. Yeah. But still, you know, when everybody else is still playing the game, he certainly wasn't that informed you, I guess. Yeah. And he's a brave guy, you know, and absolutely like a strong head, you know. And uh, so I grew up in that environment, you know, and then the, the, the funny thing is that they have my grand, my grandfather and his father. Yeah, he was quite a, he was a real communist, you know, he was a true. Um, but uh, yeah, he didn't mean what do you mean do true community? He believed in, in the system and in everything. Even he knew what the bath they can do, you know, by the, by the, he had also some quite high position, uh, connected to the, not the high government but some type of thing.

Speaker 2: He was like deputy of something, you know, so, and the river all the time just fighting, you know, because my father was totally anticommunist yeah. And uh, he was teaching me that the communities is really bad and so we had many quarrels and then we had like many years without visiting each other, you know, with uh, with my grandparents, you know. And it was like, where do you think, how do you think your father came to such unique thought? You know, a hard to say it was, it was just in his blog, you know, it was a. yeah. That's amazing. I think. Yeah, it is. It's hard to explain. I was always thinking how it was passed. He because we know. I remember. Uh, yeah. Father is. We should ask him. Yeah. We gotta ask them seriously. Yeah. Yeah. That's, that's smart. Yeah. Yeah, sure. All right.

Speaker 2: So then how did you find the trade shows? The conferences, the whole thing? Yeah. Wow. So, uh, my story about the trade show of a cannabis, quite a I want to know about first you because you knew the drill. You knew the iop done. Yeah, sure. So how did you, uh, I was just so after I finished university study, so I was trust traveling around the war, uh, doing many different jobs. I was also working on a cruise ship, carnival cruise lines of course. So we are going from Miami to Obama's highline and from New Orleans to a, some Mexico islands, like New Orleans, crazy town. I was, I spent there like, almost a half a year. Yeah. Is there any place on earth that you've seen that's like New Orleans? Oh, well, uh, for me, you know, New Orleans, the French quarter, it was part of my hometown and, you know, what does it feel like it was another place is what I'm asking. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. It is unique atmosphere. And in those times I was just mad was quite a young, crazy drinking law to now. So we're taking a Kubara show and casinos forever and the whole thing.

Speaker 1: So Carnival cruise lines. So there's a little bit of hospitality, there's a little bit of, you know, kind of taking care of people. I was working in a bar and it was really good experience for me. I find conferences or trade shows

Speaker 2: and then when I went to beg, Houma after my travels, uh, I had a feeling I have to stay, uh, in the Czech Republic for some time. And um, so, uh, I started to looking for, oh no, I, I was there for like a year working for my father just to make some money and get some more experiences from different field, you know. And, uh, and then, uh, I just realized I have to find some job and somehow some circumstances. And uh, the first job I found was, uh, at the fairgrounds of brock look at us and, uh, they were just looking for someone to, uh, to, for like, um, it was like a product manager or a production a or something. And I, uh, I started there and I established the first year of a trade show for kids really completely different though. I don't know, they, they had a, just a trade show or a living and then the furniture and like this and that.

Speaker 2: They wanted to enlarge the activities of this trade show. So I came with the trade show for kids and, and, uh, the second year I just realized that the organizer of trade shows, so of that facilities are just a domestic and they have no, uh, like international visitors and they have no for Ain exit barriers, anything like that. So I, uh, I tried to establish a, like, foreign relation office and, uh, I started promoting trade shows abroad and, and, uh, uh, attracting, uh, uh, companies from abroad to come. Uh, and that was the beginning with the trade.

Speaker 1: There you go, and you kind of figured out how to do it and what the system was. I wonder how you found, you explained how you built the cannabis show. How did you find cat? Why did you know that cannabis was a thing that you should be doing when you did it?

Speaker 2: Well, uh, well as I told you, uh, I was, uh, in closer touch with cannabis through my teen years, 10 years, and then of course studies, so where I started to take it more seriously, so I was digging for more information, irs, many books about that and uh, you know, I was just more experienced a, yeah, it changed my life for sure if I didn't, uh, didn't meet, cannot base a, I was an alcoholic, you know, now or. No, no, I'm, I'm, I'm being serious. Being serious for sure. Yeah. I, I remember, uh, we were quite wild and I was just drinking a lot, but when I started to smoke, uh, I just, uh, quit with the. Not Wait, but you know what I mean. Balanced. Yeah. And, uh, I was controlling everything, you know, and so, so it was better for me and I started, started to think more like a positively, and I didn't have any bad stories.

Speaker 2: And then, so it was a, I knew it's good and I started to educate people around me, you know, started with my family, with my parents and grandparents and everyone. This is not bad now. So I remember from my 18th or 19th, uh, when we had a, we had a family celebrations. I always smoked weed in the state of drinking, you know, because, you know, in, in our country, um, we are quite country of alcoholics, you know, and uh, the, the problem is probably that, uh, every single celebration including Christmas, eastern about birthday parties, everything at your family, uh, you as a child, uh, you see from the childhood that it's just common. It's normal for parents to drink in every single occasion, you know, too much, too much, too much. We just have no stops, you know. And uh, so for us it's just normally, you know, uh, it's normal to drink beer every day, forever, forever. And but the, not only beer or liquor or alcohol, whatever. And um, so, uh, uh, I started with the canopies during the celebrations and uh, I was just showing to my parents and the other family members the, if I smoke they can see if I change or if I control myself or anything and they found it. It's like nothing. It's even better than

Speaker 1: who's the only one not falling down as well. Gosh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. You can say it like this. So I could talk to you forever, man, but I got to ask you the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you them in order and then if you don't mind, we'll do this again sometime. How about that? Okay. That sounds good. All right. So the three final questions, what's most surprised you in cannabis and you might adjust, told us what's most surprised you in life. That's the second question. And then on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, but first things first, what has most surprised you in cannabis? It might be what you just said.

Speaker 2: Oh, what surprised me in kind of obese man, uh, to be honest, I'm surprised every day, you know, every single day because we are involved more and more into cannabis and there are more money in that business. Crazy. Uh, it's good. On one hand it's good because the more money you officially make on it, the more money you can invest back into the research, you know, officially meaning above board in close. We have many, uh, many scientists, then the universities and Dr and uh, and uh, we are also supporting some researches, so for like, uh, for uh, how to heal cancer with the carnaby's, uh, and so, uh, I'm surprised every, every day, uh, with the new results and the new files on what cannabis can do. You know,

Speaker 1: it's amazing how, you know, we knew right the plant you when we were teenagers and we just felt like, okay, this is a good plant. It's amazing.

Speaker 2: This is an amazing plant, right? Yeah. You know what I mean? Yeah, yeah, exactly. And the, I still think no one understand the, just, just a full, the full of just a very small part, what we understand right now, but we already know and uh, it's proved that it has like unlimited potential, you know, that's it. No need to know the cure for everything, but it's not, that's it. What's most surprised in life? Well, big question, right? Wow. That's a big question. Of course. I'm not stone so I cannot find anything, right? Yeah, it'd be easier just because.

Speaker 1: How about that? How about just that it was most surprised you in life, is that if you had a little bit right now it, it, it fly off your tongue, but you don't. It isn't,

Speaker 2: you know, uh, all the time. I'm just surprised with the many people who are just a, how to say, arrogant, greedy, and the thinking. Yeah. And I'm not present. Yeah.

Speaker 1: Can Be arrogant and greedy. Only if you're not present. If I am looking in your eyes and you're looking in mine, it's tough for either of us to be arrogant

Speaker 2: or green. But that's the, that's the surprise. Uh, people can surprise me every, uh, every day, you know, with those. But the, the good thing is the mother of nature. Of course, I love to travel, I love to stay in, uh, in uh, the uh, wild forest, you know, or anywhere else I left animals, you know, so, and uh, I love to watch or discover discovery and then the national geography again, like this. So, um, um, life life itself, it's actually, and like two, three days ago, I was just checking on the Internet and I'm planning to, to, uh, buy, uh, well, I, I,

Speaker 1: I can maybe find the award for that or cooler or binoculars, binoculars for watching sky. So tell us the copy and then that's the body even in check, we got telescope, you know, but uh, I can find probably different, right? No, I, anybody that I speak to that speaking to me in English and it isn't their first language. I always say don't worry about it because I only know one language and I don't even know what that. Well, you know, and this is my native tongue, so go figure like this. Yeah, yeah. Alright. Biggest question on the soundtrack of your life. One track one song that's got to be on there. Wow. Sound truck? Yeah. So one track, one song that's got to be on there. It doesn't have to be the perfect song. Doesn't have to be the most appropriate song, but something that's definitely on there. If you're talking about sand trucks because I'm a big movie Fan. The Fan. Yeah. I'm asking for a song, but it's okay. Tell me about the movies. What movies do you know about? I mean like, uh, I always, uh, go into the details of movies, including music. I got Ya. Okay. Like, uh, my very, uh, I, I got like a lost of de Moines canes.

Speaker 1: Exactly. Yeah. And that's a very.

Speaker 2: Yes, uh, the song I played like two days ago after, after a long period, but they just wanted to show it to my girlfriend. She wasn't familiar with that movie and so even with the song was just instrumental songs, so that was good. But uh, I love like old movies, uh, of course. And so it would be maybe some,

Speaker 1: like some Kubrick stuff, right? Kubrick for sure. Yeah, he like Fellini A. Yeah, I can kind of be well who I can't pronounce his name from France. Bring you out. And Louise when you guys are facing right? A character sour by the car. So view. We talk about the Americans. So I love broader score and maybe David Lynch's out of his mind. Jim, Jim Jarmusch. I love them. I love them. What did I just, I just started watching because somebody told me about Patterson. Jared, did you see patterns yet? Nobody yet now. But you saw coffee and cigarettes. I'm sure. Of course, of course was totally movies for sure. Yeah. And the Bill Murray one with the uh, what's that called? Broken flowers that. Yeah. Uh Huh. Yeah. All right, well let's go watch a movie or something. All right. Gosh, I appreciate it. Thank you for, for the interview and we will see you down the line. How about that? Oh, so sounds good. That would be fine. And there you have. Ooh, Gosh, I, you know, very much appreciated that conversation because he was able to kind of take us through really what it feels like to live under a different type of rule, so very much appreciate his time. Very much. Appreciate Yours. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.