Ep. 365: Eitan Kuperstoch, Israel Ministry of Economy

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 365: Eitan Kuperstoch, Israel Ministry of Economy

Eitan Kuperstoch

Eitan Kuperstoch Joins us and talk about the importance of medical grade Cannabis and industrial growth. “This is a new sector. The export of medical grade will actually bring more and more entrepreneurs to this new sector with more and more ideas. It goes into new drugs and maybe even new medical equipment. I mean, new ideas in curing diseases. As you mentioned, the sky is the limit.”

Transcript:

Eitan Kuperstoch: Eitan Kuperstoch in charge of the export policy in the ministry of economic industry.

Seth Adler: These are busy days.

Eitan Kuperstoch: These are very busy days.

Seth Adler: Paint the picture from your perspective.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Our concern, I mean, the ministry of industry and trade for [inaudible 00:01:44] ministration is that it will be possible for each goer in Israel to export his product worldwide.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: Besides products can be multiplied.

Seth Adler: What do you mean?

Eitan Kuperstoch: It means that, for example, technology can be used without us being in a position to know if the export is used not for medical purposes.

Seth Adler: We need to know that is what you're saying.

Eitan Kuperstoch: We need to know that and we cannot control when we are talking about multiple products that can be multiplied. We cannot control if it really goes and used for medical purposes.

Seth Adler: Podcast land knows no time, but since you and I are speaking as this decision is being made, I think what you're telling me is actually what we are specifically discussing and the hesitation because the prime minister pulled it back a few weeks ago and this is one of the reasons. How do you solve for such a thing?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, he pulled it back ... we don't mind his decision. I mean, this is his decision to pull it back and rethink and so on.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: At the end of the day it was clear right from the beginning that the prime minister is also concerned about Israeli export and Israel being really in this case a pioneer worldwide.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Eitan Kuperstoch in charge of the export policy in the ministry of economic industry.

Seth Adler: These are busy days.

Eitan Kuperstoch: These are very busy days.

Seth Adler: Paint the picture from your perspective.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Our concern, I mean, the ministry of industry and trade for [inaudible 00:01:44] ministration is that it will be possible for each goer in Israel to export his product worldwide.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: Besides products can be multiplied.

Seth Adler: What do you mean?

Eitan Kuperstoch: It means that, for example, technology can be used without us being in a position to know if the export is used not for medical purposes.

Seth Adler: We need to know that is what you're saying.

Eitan Kuperstoch: We need to know that and we cannot control when we are talking about multiple products that can be multiplied. We cannot control if it really goes and used for medical purposes.

Seth Adler: Podcast land knows no time, but since you and I are speaking as this decision is being made, I think what you're telling me is actually what we are specifically discussing and the hesitation because the prime minister pulled it back a few weeks ago and this is one of the reasons. How do you solve for such a thing?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, he pulled it back ... we don't mind his decision. I mean, this is his decision to pull it back and rethink and so on.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: At the end of the day it was clear right from the beginning that the prime minister is also concerned about Israeli export and Israel being really in this case a pioneer worldwide.

Seth Adler: Certainly.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah. And we are talking about a new sector. I mean, it is a combination of life science and-[crosstalk 00:03:53]

Seth Adler: Agriculture-

Eitan Kuperstoch: Agriculture and somehow I would say even science fiction.

Seth Adler: Sure. Technology as well, right.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Technology and it really reflects the whole Israeli agriculture industry somehow.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: Because we know we are known to be leaders in agriculture technology and the fact that this sector will attract foreign investors means that foreign investors will also invest in agriculture in general.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). In other things.

Eitan Kuperstoch: In other things.

Seth Adler: Right, yeah. We've got the pretty lady out front and she is cannabis.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly. Exactly. The honeysuckle.

Seth Adler: Just getting back to your point about that we need to make sure that we know when it goes, that it is only used for medical use because the medicalization, as Yuval Lanchef says, this medical grade cannabis, that is the point as far as these or the government is concerned.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly. Exactly.

Seth Adler: And so what are some of the solutions that you're conceiving of in ensuring that, that is in fact the case. That when it goes, it goes to medical.

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, the whole Israeli export is complying with what we call the export ordinance.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: The free export ordinance. And we will add special chapter, maybe even a special sub-HS number for cannabis medical grade products to the ordinance and in this chapter it was written exactly what we need. We can control the end user. We can control that each export shipment followed by license by the specific license by the importer and in this case, these three pillars, end user and licensed by the importer can be controlled. In this case, the customs actually is the Coast Guard in this case or gate guard.

Seth Adler: Okay. So we've got some answers and we just have to kind of work out the details over the next however many hours or days or whatever it turns into. You were speaking at Cannon, which is why I'm here at the first medical cannabis conference ever put on by a government of any kind in the world. So congratulations again.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Thank you.

Seth Adler: You outlined, essentially, the books. How Israel looks economically. Do you mind re-painting that picture without the aid of the slides. Just to give us some context of the numbers that we're talking about before we discuss what cannabis could mean.

Eitan Kuperstoch: You mean the potential of the medical grade cannabis?

Seth Adler: Certainly, but what I would love is for you to just paint the general economic Israeli picture so that we understand how it fits.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Israel is how to call it, an economic phenomena somehow. I mean, I don't know the exact number worldwide, but we think that we are one of the leaders of export built capital.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: And without export, without foreign trade, the Israeli economy is based on free foreign trade. Somehow Israel and maybe Singapore are the most, how to call it, easy or free trade economies.

Seth Adler: It might have something to do with the physical size of both locations.

Eitan Kuperstoch: The physical ... yes, yes, yes. Somehow also most of the Singaporean GDP comes from transit transaction.

Seth Adler: Uh-huh.

Eitan Kuperstoch: We are more or less relying on new products, new technologies, and so in this case we think that we are somehow leaders and we don't have to think it. Others are actually looking to this phenomena.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: Basically if you look to this Israeli free export ordinance, you see that everything can be traded.

Seth Adler: Right.

Eitan Kuperstoch: This is the main idea of this ordinance.

Seth Adler: Okay. Now let's dive in on cannabis. What is the total picture? What do you see in your one year, two year, three as the economic possibility here for the country?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Listen, you know, there was somebody actually told us that the numbers are like $1 billion, $2 billion, $4 billion. It doesn't matter because if you look to the entrepreneurs here in Israel, for them it is actually eternity. I mean, it is ... the numbers are not important. And dealing with Israeli foreign trade the last 29 years, and when somebody's asking me how many umbrellas the Germans are using? And I was actually the Israeli trade representative in Germany for 10 years.

Seth Adler: Uh-huh.

Eitan Kuperstoch: I ask him-[crosstalk 00:10:17]

Seth Adler: What does it matter?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, what does it matter? I mean, for you it is eternity. Don't matter. When you are looking to the size of Israel and the size of the world, you see that if we are a player and we are a great player in foreign trade, although we are tiny-[crosstalk 00:10:37]

Seth Adler: Yes.

Eitan Kuperstoch: And our volume of foreign trade is not so ... if you look worldwide, it is not so high, but for us it is really, really, really ... the numbers are really great.

Seth Adler: So when you speak of the entrepreneur, the sky's the limit?

Eitan Kuperstoch: The sky's the limit.

Seth Adler: Right. When we talk about Israel in context as far as the numbers with the rest of the world, not a good comparison. What I'm trying to understand is how important is the export of cannabis potentially to the bottom line, without maybe numbers, but how important ... what is the ... and again, we did mention that these are busy days. So that's yet another phone call.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, just-

Seth Adler: How important is the export of medical grade cannabis to Israel?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, as I mentioned, this is a new sector. The export of medical grade will actually bring more and more entrepreneurs to this new sector with more and more ideas. It goes into new drugs and maybe even new medical equipment or whatever. I mean, new ideas in curing diseases. As you mentioned, the sky is the limit.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is very difficult to attract entrepreneurs into the life science-[crosstalk 00:12:24]

Seth Adler: Field-[crosstalk 00:12:24]

Eitan Kuperstoch: Business. Because it takes time. Entrepreneurs are looking for-[crosstalk 00:12:30]

Seth Adler: Quick wins-[crosstalk 00:12:31]

Eitan Kuperstoch: Quick exit.

Seth Adler: Yes.

Eitan Kuperstoch: But this particular sector and you saw it during the conference how many young actually entrepreneurs already raised money for their startups. It is really a high potential for ... not only to attract, of course, Israeli entrepreneurs, but also to attract foreign entrepreneurs to come to Israel and to cooperate with Israelis and create new entities.

Seth Adler: So you mentioned the macro, which we're discussing again now, at the beginning. And I'm trying to get to the micro and what I'm understanding from you Aton is no, this is a macro conversation.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yes, yes.

Seth Adler: This is about the fact that we have something that is attractive ... and I made a clunky metaphor before, but we have something that people want ... have interest in being involved in and we have the opportunity here to lead and so we will and then benefit from leading with what happens to be cannabis so that we raise the tide for everything else in our economy.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly. Exactly. And don't forget it is ... if you look worldwide you don't see any economy dealing with medical grade cannabis. They are dealing with cannabis that is used for medical, but not medical grade.

Seth Adler: [crosstalk 00:14:08] We've heard the distinction.

Eitan Kuperstoch: This is the revolution.

Seth Adler: Yes. How do you make that distinction? I've spoken with Yuval. He tells me-

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yuval is the expert, actually, but as far as I understand is that medicalizations of cannabis means that up from the growing, the first stage of growing you think medical.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: If you take one or two or I don't know, 10 acres of cannabis, the production is actually in the same level. Then it goes into ... the same batch goes then until it becomes medicine.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). That's the direction.

Eitan Kuperstoch: That's the direction. This is actually the medicalization of cannabis.

Seth Adler: Now, obviously folks will point out the fact that Canada has a medical program which has been running and your point is that there's a little-bit of a difference. How do you draw the distinction between Canada?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Canada didn't actually, they didn't medicalize the cannabis. They are producing high grade cannabis and sell it for medical use, but once we will lead the new standard of medicalization, it will take time for others as well, Canada is one of the players, to adapt to this new standard. I'm sure. I'm sure.

Seth Adler: You're sure that they'll come along.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah and it will take some years. So we will have the lead somehow.

Seth Adler: And the lead is because, we had Raphael Mechoulam here, which was wonderful.

Eitan Kuperstoch: The lead is a combination. We have Raphael Mechoulam. We have other scientists.

Seth Adler: This is my point.

Eitan Kuperstoch: And we have Yuval.

Seth Adler: Oh, certainly.

Eitan Kuperstoch: If you go around the country and actually only a few kilometers from here, you can see that people are already walking around this case.

Seth Adler: Let me unpack that for us, right? What I was getting at with Mechoulam is that since the 50s, the 1960s, he's been doing research and he has brought other researches along. Yes, around the world, but specifically in Israel. There is just a hotbed of cannabis research being done in Israel. That is something that no other country has. Then we move forward to Yuval and his position, which is the agency that he runs connects agriculture and health and economy and security. Every aspect of commerce and otherwise is involved in cannabis here in Israel from the top.

Eitan Kuperstoch: This is exactly the new, what I meant, the new sector.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is really a new sector of ... let's say in the future maybe we will talk about medical, agri-medical.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: And it will reflect also maybe a new source for ... also for food and other very important things.

Seth Adler: Hemp was brought up. I know that it's just extremely early days and I know that this is kind of outside your per view, but do you have any thoughts there about when we mention new sectors, new industries and the import of these new sectors and industries to the bottom line of Israel? Do you have thoughts on what hemp could do?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah. I just told you. It is a medical agriculture. Maybe it is a new ... in a broad sense it is a new sector.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, medical agriculture or med-agrow could be really a potential because the other [inaudible 00:18:38] maybe hemp could be used for medical reason.

Seth Adler: Completely understood. Plant medicine here we go. Industrial hemp, where you can make anything that you can make into plastic or into paper or into cotton, you can make from industrial hemp. There's a whole large opportunity there. We're not necessarily closing to the door that either.

Eitan Kuperstoch: No, no, no. We only attract more entrepreneurs to go into this new sector.

Seth Adler: Okay. Let's make sure we understand. You said 27 years that you've been-

Eitan Kuperstoch: 29 years.

Seth Adler: 29 years, excuse me. Right? So three decades. And now you're from Israel?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yes, yes.

Seth Adler: Okay. And how did you know that you should get involved in doing what you do? Maybe what ... serving the people?

Eitan Kuperstoch: 29 years ago. It is funny. I'm coming from the fashion industry.

Seth Adler: You, no?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Really.

Seth Adler: Really?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I worked ... actually I was an entrepreneur in the fashion industry. In the 80's, the 1980's, during the huge inflation in Israel, I actually was bankrupt.

Seth Adler: You were bankrupt?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, yeah, yeah. And I looked for new opportunities. Suddenly I found myself working as a civil servant. In '92 I went to Germany after the unification of Germany and worked in South and East Germany to bring Israeli and Germans together.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Can we just, for one moment, discuss that, because that's a very specific time in Germany's history-[crosstalk 00:20:45]

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly, exactly-[crosstalk 00:20:46]

Seth Adler: And your mission was very specific as far as just general society is concerned.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It was a very interesting period. It is not only the Germany change, but Israeli economy changed in the sense that suddenly and not so suddenly, but if you look back to the 90's it was actually the beginning of the IT revolution.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Certainly.

Eitan Kuperstoch: The beginning of the 90s and it is two days ago. We didn't have computers.

Seth Adler: Yeah, right, exactly. Two days ago-[crosstalk 00:21:27]

Eitan Kuperstoch: I'm not talking about-[crosstalk 00:21:30]

Seth Adler: The phones-[crosstalk 00:21:31]

Eitan Kuperstoch: The phones, the mobile phones. Everything, everything in this industry is coming basically from Israel.

Seth Adler: In the IT sectors?

Eitan Kuperstoch: In the IT sector. The world actually changed and Israel played a major role. We were the first to bring the IT standards. The Israeli industry, Israeli companies were the first to talk about standardization of the IT. It means that we can talk together either in Israel or in the States or in Europe. So we benefit out of it. And this is actually ... when I talked you will remember the revolution from [inaudible 00:22:21], from pure agriculture to Java.

Eitan Kuperstoch: And now we are talking maybe not from Java, but you put on the top of it also the cannon which means that it is a new agriculture sector and new combination of agriculture life science and so on.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). So it's an exciting time.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is exciting.

Seth Adler: You're taking the opportunity and you're going back to Europe.

Eitan Kuperstoch: I am going back to Europe again. In the meantime, in between, I served also five years in Japan.

Seth Adler: And it was the same type of thing with Germany? Obviously-[crosstalk 00:23:05]

Eitan Kuperstoch: The same type of thing-[crosstalk 00:23:05]

Seth Adler: Obviously there would be different details, but some similar?

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is completely different because when I arrived to Japan, Israel was in fact somehow boycotted by Japanese, how do you call it, business sector.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: Nobody knew ... when I look for the sources for boycotting Israel, I didn't find the reason. I knew the reason. The reason was the 60s and the oil and so on. The dependence on oil. And then somehow Japanese companies realized that they are competing with European and American companies that are using Israeli technology and products in their own countries.

Seth Adler: Uh-huh.

Eitan Kuperstoch: And they are coming ... the European American companies are actually introducing Israeli technology and while the Japanese are not. And they are losing to the Europeans and it was very interesting at that time and then as they decided, "Okay, let's think about Israeli." What happened is you need only one or two persons within the Japanese bureaucracy and I found, fortunately, two other-[crosstalk 00:24:31]

Seth Adler: The right folks.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Capital of people that told me, "Oh my God. We have to change it." And it was changed and today Japan became a major corporation partner in industry. And of course, maybe the next revolution will be with China, but China it will take time.

Seth Adler: To what? To kind of soften the edges or to understand-[crosstalk 00:25:06]

Eitan Kuperstoch: To understand actually what is China. We experience now-[crosstalk 00:25:12]

Seth Adler: It seems like they think they know, right?

Eitan Kuperstoch: They know, of course-[crosstalk 00:25:18]

Seth Adler: They want to be the world's economic power.

Eitan Kuperstoch: They are.

Seth Adler: So that's interesting.

Eitan Kuperstoch: They are.

Seth Adler: Right from the American they want to be and from everyone else they are.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, they are. They are an economic power. President Trump wouldn't care about China if they were only a minor player. No, they are a major player.

Seth Adler: Sure. What I'm saying is the pre-eminent player.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, exactly.

Seth Adler: Right.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly. Exactly.

Seth Adler: And so do you care to share what you'll be doing in the Netherlands or-

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, I will do mostly the same. I will open ... it is not only I will be sitting in the Netherlands, but I will be in charge also of the Scandinavian, mainly Sweden and Denmark. Over the last few decades we experience difficulties with Sweden because of the influence of human, so-called human rights organizations that wanted to influence the local economy and to somehow boycott Israel, but it looks as if the business sector in Sweden understands that there is a difference between, how do you call it, political views to the real life. At the end of the day, people are doing business as businesses open the minds for new ideas and so on and so on.

Seth Adler: Capitalism seems to steer democracy as opposed to the other way around.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yes, yes, somehow. I'm not a capitalist.

Seth Adler: No, understood. What are your thoughts? What would you add there as far as what folks might misunderstand about Israel?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, I don't think that I have to deal with explaining ourselves. It is a matter of you are losing by not cooperating with Israeli business sector. And the Israeli business sector is not only a Jewish business sector, don't forget. We have also in the cannabis industry, we will have many non-Jewish entrepreneurs that will play actually the Israeli foreign and I really I invite you. It's a pity that you will not be here to our Israeli/Arab incubator. Life science incubator in the nerves.

Seth Adler: We have that. It's already up and running.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Of course.

Seth Adler: In Haifa?-[crosstalk 00:28:11]

Eitan Kuperstoch: No, in Nazareth.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Eitan Kuperstoch: For a long time.

Seth Adler: For a long time, it's running.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It's very successful. You will see actually the potential and then people there, they do not understand because they are Israeli's. They are non-Jews. They are cooperating with other entrepreneurs. Most of those entrepreneurs are actually from the technion and Haifa University up in the North. They are doing really so many nice and new products.

Seth Adler: So this is ... obviously I will make this a priority on my next trip. I'm seeing that this is something that is also important to you and I'm seeing that you are speaking both as a representative of the government, but also for yourself this is important.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, I mean, of course. You cannot ... I am working for the government, but I am an Israeli and there are Israelis that are not necessarily Jews, I would say. And they are part of our economy as they are integrated. They should be more integrated. Cannabis for example. Medical cannabis great. Products are part of the game because, by the way, there are very good Arabs over the last years now taking also a major role in the Israeli high tech industry.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: And life science, of course.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). So I mean, is that maybe the solution that we've been looking for, for these thousands of years? Is simply just good business?

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is a good-[crosstalk 00:29:56]

Seth Adler: But in all seriousness, I mean as far as-[crosstalk 00:29:57]

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, if you look ... you want to talk about the history.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Eitan Kuperstoch: I mean, if you look to the big conflicts worldwide, they always were actually basically economy conflicts.

Seth Adler: Right. As opposed to religious.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Post-religious.

Seth Adler: Not religious.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Not religious.

Seth Adler: How so?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Economy. Economy. Pure economy. Religious is actually the initiator, but if you look really to the conflict, economy fire conflict. It means for living and so on.

Seth Adler: So in [Kasaria 00:30:34] where I went and I sat in the amphitheater, the Roman amphitheater where they used to watch the Jews and the Christians fight each other as gladiators, that seemed to be religious to me.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, but don't forget-[crosstalk 00:30:48]

Seth Adler: Of course, the othering of these religions.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Control of the time, the state , the Israel region, the Mediterranean region was also partly economy. If you look to Roman and then Greek in the past, they actually weren't concurred the rest of the world of that time because, purely because of economy. They fought against the Persians or whatsoever-[crosstalk 00:31:26]

Seth Adler: To get resources.

Eitan Kuperstoch: To get resources.

Seth Adler: Right, yeah. It's all-[crosstalk 00:31:30]

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is all about-[crosstalk 00:31:32]

Seth Adler: It's the economy stupid-[crosstalk 00:31:34]

Eitan Kuperstoch: It is all about economy somehow. It is really.

Seth Adler: Unbelievable. All right. So I will pick up that conversation and I'll kind of take that learning into other conversations. I'll ask you three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and then I'll ask you to talk. What's most surprised you in cannabis? We talked about it, but we'll talk about it more. What's most surprised you in life? And on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there, but we'll get to that.

Seth Adler: First things first. You mentioned science fiction when you talked about cannabis, what's most surprised you in cannabis and why mention science fiction when you-?

Eitan Kuperstoch: You know, Yuval actually gave us an overview of cannabis treatment results.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Eitan Kuperstoch: On diseases, you know, mainly on kids that are affected from-[crosstalk 00:32:28]

Seth Adler: Epilepsy.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Epilepsy and other. And I know even in our ministry, there is a lady that told me that the cannabis saved her son's life and saved family actually. And we do not know. Now it is only cannabis that is being used for medical. Imagine yourself what will happen. That we will really have a cannabis, medical cannabis.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Eitan Kuperstoch: It will be a revolution. This is somehow science fiction.

Seth Adler: How is it possible that it can do all of these things? What's most surprised you in life?

Eitan Kuperstoch: I don't think that something can, at my age, surprise me anymore. I mean-[crosstalk 00:33:17]

Seth Adler: You just deal with whatever they give you?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Yeah, yeah. You cannot be surprised. I'm only surprised what's different from the ... I'm not surprised. I actually understand the cynicism of politics.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Of high politics.

Seth Adler: Sure. Everybody's got a message to sell, right?

Eitan Kuperstoch: Exactly. Exactly.

Seth Adler: On the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there? A special or favorite song that you've got.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Oh my God. I'm a fan of music and What a Wonderful World.

Seth Adler: Louis Armstrong.

Eitan Kuperstoch: Louis Armstrong.

Seth Adler: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Eitan Kuperstoch: I made a tour in Vietnam. Up from the North, the South with my wife.

Seth Adler: Okay. As a tourist, this is later?

Eitan Kuperstoch: All the way I thought about what a wonderful world. Maybe because of Good Morning Vietnam. If you remember?

Seth Adler: Sure. Of course. The movie with Robin Williams. Yeah. That took place during the war. You went there after. All right. Fantastic. Well, those were those travels. These are these travels coming up and of course we've got the big decision coming up on export. Thank you so much for your time and I can't wait to check in with you down the line. How about that?

Eitan Kuperstoch: All right. Thank you.

Seth Adler: And there you have Eitan Kuperstochk. Very much appreciate his time. Very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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