Ep. 377: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 377: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

Ep. 377: Julianna Carella, Treatibles

Julianna Carella returns and shares how Treaibles is handling FDA regulations: “It’s more important to keep the product on the shelf because now we have a situation where animals are relying on it, and last thing we want is for regulators to be confused about it and then pull the product.”

Transcript:

Seth Adler: Julianna Carella returns. Julianna Carella returns, welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two Ns and the word economy, or wherever you currently get your podcasts. First, another piece of the conversation I had with Nancy Whiteman of Wana Brands, and then Julianna Carella.
Want to know with Wana Brands? Nancy, more on ratios, 10 to one.

Nancy Whiteman: Yes. We have two 10 to one products. We have it in capsule form, and then this past year we also introduced it in gummy form. It's a strawberry, which is very delicious, and it's just a great product for people who are looking for the medicinal benefits, but they don't want all the psycho activity. It's been quite a popular product.

Seth Adler: So if we're outside and it's Oakland, you must be Julianna Carella.

Julianna C.: Yeah, it works out like that every damn time.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: What happened there?

Seth Adler: This is our thing. This is what we do.

Julianna C.: There's no choo-choos going by this time.

Seth Adler: Oh, I know. It's a different side of Oakland I guess.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Which would be a good second album effort from you, if you were a musician. A different ... Julianna Carella, A Different Side of Oakland.

Julianna C.: If only I was a musician.

Seth Adler: But yeah, no. It was the dancer, it wasn't the musician. Have you seen Inside Llewyn Davis?

Julianna C.: I haven't.

Seth Adler: I'm very addicted to this movie. Now, it might be because it's the only download movie that I have on my phone, so on the plane when we get the extra long thing where the WiFi isn't working and we're not in the air yet-

Julianna C.: I hate that.

Seth Adler: Inside Llewyn Davis is my point.

Julianna C.: Yeah, there you go.

Seth Adler: No further commentary about Inside Llewyn Davis, because there's no reason for me to be talking about it. But we can talk about Mookey. And I think this is the first time-

Julianna C.: Mookey?

Seth Adler: Mookey is coming up on the ... there's that guy.

Julianna C.: Hi.

Seth Adler: Who's an Oakland native. So Mookey is an American Staffordshire Terrier, currently five months old. She is female, and I mean that biologically. We're not sure what she identifies-

Julianna C.: As opposed to?

Seth Adler: Well, if she identifies, we're not sure what she identifies as, and it's the 21st century. Whatever she needs to do is cool. She hasn't really talked about it with us.

Julianna C.: She might be too young to really express those things.

Seth Adler: She doesn't seem to care about anything other than chewing things at this point.

Julianna C.: How does she pee? That's really how you tell these things.

Seth Adler: Oh, with both legs on the ground. Well, yeah no all four legs on the ground.

Julianna C.: But some boy dogs do that too.

Seth Adler: I see. But those are-

Julianna C.: You just can't generalize with dogs, okay?

Seth Adler: Well this is one my first questions. Mookey has proven to be prone to injury-

Julianna C.: Aw.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Everything is fine, but here's a rash, there's a rash. We had the pink eye thing. What else happened? She got hives.

Julianna C.: I thought you were going to say she got high. I was going to say, "Damn, already?"

Seth Adler: Well no, but that's what I'm here to talk about with you.

Julianna C.: Oh, Jesus.

Seth Adler: No, it's CBD, so-

Julianna C.: How'd she get hives?

Seth Adler: She got hives because she got stung by a bug, and her little system was like, "I don't like this," so we gave her, and this is ... you ready to cringe?

Julianna C.: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Benadryl.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: Yeah. What should we have given her instead of Benadryl?

Julianna C.: Treatibles.

Seth Adler: Yeah, well but that's the-

Julianna C.: Hello?

Seth Adler: So here's, in all seriousness, my girlfriend has a thought for you to put, "Here's the condition. Take this for treatibles."

Seth Adler: Julianna Carella returns. Julianna Carella returns, welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two Ns and the word economy, or wherever you currently get your podcasts. First, another piece of the conversation I had with Nancy Whiteman of Wana Brands, and then Julianna Carella.
Want to know with Wana Brands? Nancy, more on ratios, 10 to one.

Nancy Whiteman: Yes. We have two 10 to one products. We have it in capsule form, and then this past year we also introduced it in gummy form. It's a strawberry, which is very delicious, and it's just a great product for people who are looking for the medicinal benefits, but they don't want all the psycho activity. It's been quite a popular product.

Seth Adler: So if we're outside and it's Oakland, you must be Julianna Carella.

Julianna C.: Yeah, it works out like that every damn time.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: What happened there?

Seth Adler: This is our thing. This is what we do.

Julianna C.: There's no choo-choos going by this time.

Seth Adler: Oh, I know. It's a different side of Oakland I guess.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Which would be a good second album effort from you, if you were a musician. A different ... Julianna Carella, A Different Side of Oakland.

Julianna C.: If only I was a musician.

Seth Adler: But yeah, no. It was the dancer, it wasn't the musician. Have you seen Inside Llewyn Davis?

Julianna C.: I haven't.

Seth Adler: I'm very addicted to this movie. Now, it might be because it's the only download movie that I have on my phone, so on the plane when we get the extra long thing where the WiFi isn't working and we're not in the air yet-

Julianna C.: I hate that.

Seth Adler: Inside Llewyn Davis is my point.

Julianna C.: Yeah, there you go.

Seth Adler: No further commentary about Inside Llewyn Davis, because there's no reason for me to be talking about it. But we can talk about Mookey. And I think this is the first time-

Julianna C.: Mookey?

Seth Adler: Mookey is coming up on the ... there's that guy.

Julianna C.: Hi.

Seth Adler: Who's an Oakland native. So Mookey is an American Staffordshire Terrier, currently five months old. She is female, and I mean that biologically. We're not sure what she identifies-

Julianna C.: As opposed to?

Seth Adler: Well, if she identifies, we're not sure what she identifies as, and it's the 21st century. Whatever she needs to do is cool. She hasn't really talked about it with us.

Julianna C.: She might be too young to really express those things.

Seth Adler: She doesn't seem to care about anything other than chewing things at this point.

Julianna C.: How does she pee? That's really how you tell these things.

Seth Adler: Oh, with both legs on the ground. Well, yeah no all four legs on the ground.

Julianna C.: But some boy dogs do that too.

Seth Adler: I see. But those are-

Julianna C.: You just can't generalize with dogs, okay?

Seth Adler: Well this is one my first questions. Mookey has proven to be prone to injury-

Julianna C.: Aw.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Everything is fine, but here's a rash, there's a rash. We had the pink eye thing. What else happened? She got hives.

Julianna C.: I thought you were going to say she got high. I was going to say, "Damn, already?"

Seth Adler: Well no, but that's what I'm here to talk about with you.

Julianna C.: Oh, Jesus.

Seth Adler: No, it's CBD, so-

Julianna C.: How'd she get hives?

Seth Adler: She got hives because she got stung by a bug, and her little system was like, "I don't like this," so we gave her, and this is ... you ready to cringe?

Julianna C.: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Benadryl.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: Yeah. What should we have given her instead of Benadryl?

Julianna C.: Treatibles.

Seth Adler: Yeah, well but that's the-

Julianna C.: Hello?

Seth Adler: So here's, in all seriousness, my girlfriend has a thought for you to put, "Here's the condition. Take this for treatibles."

Julianna C.: Yeah-

Seth Adler: We know that.

Julianna C.: The FDA doesn't like when people do that.

Seth Adler: We don't ... I see.

Julianna C.: So we don't do that.

Seth Adler: That's why we don't do that.

Julianna C.: That's why there's no information about what conditions we can treat because the FDA-

Seth Adler: On the website.

Julianna C.: Would be ... Yeah. Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Can you put out a pamphlet?

Julianna C.: Let me jus walk you through the complications around this.

Seth Adler: That's just what I'm hoping for. This is what I'm hoping for.

Julianna C.: Here's a good example of how distorted things are. When we get a product review, which we get five to 10 a day, we have customers emailing us things like, "I love your product. My dog's epilepsy's gone."

Seth Adler: Yep.

Julianna C.: "Thank you."

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: It's amazing.

Seth Adler: They might even say it's cured.

Julianna C.: They usually do.

Seth Adler: Right, yeah. Which I said that, you didn't.

Julianna C.: No.

Seth Adler: I used the C word, it wasn't you.

Julianna C.: The C word will get you in trouble man, be careful.

Seth Adler: Yeah, you can't use cure, I know that. That much I know.

Julianna C.: There are some other words that are off limits-

Seth Adler: Off limits, yeah.

Julianna C.: As well. Yeah. Then we kindly reply to the customer-

Seth Adler: Yes.

Julianna C.: "Thank you so much. We love hearing these stories. That's awesome. Let us know when you need more product for your animal-"

Seth Adler: Indeed.

Julianna C.: "Because we want to make sure that the progress stays consistent." Because you can't take a dog off our product after they've had that kind of success, right?

Seth Adler: Sure.

Julianna C.: Well, we have to tell the customer, "We want to post your review-"

Seth Adler: But ...

Julianna C.: "Because it's positive, but can you change the word epilepsy to seizures?" Because seizures is more benign, and they are not calling that disease name.

Seth Adler: Right.

Julianna C.: And they say, "Well sure, but why?"

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: And we have to explain to them, "Well because the FDA will look at our website and they will see the word epilepsy and we could actually get into trouble for that. So please just change it to seizures, and that's okay."

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: Because we're calling out the symptom, not the disease. I mean it all goes back to these products need to go through the process of being FDA approved before we could make those kinds of claims.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Julianna C.: But unfortunately, that could be some time before that actually happens.

Seth Adler: Why? Why can't they just get FDA approved, Julianna?

Julianna C.: Well the FDA approved CBD with Epidiolex.

Seth Adler: But that's today-

Julianna C.: Right.

Seth Adler: You're talking about today. The podcast line knows no time.

Julianna C.: Do you know what else happened today?

Seth Adler: Yes.

Julianna C.: The DEA rescheduled CBD, but Epidiolex-

Seth Adler: Yeah, schedule five.

Julianna C.: Schedule five.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: Right?

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: And when the Farm Bill passes in a couple of months, God willing, it's going to-

Seth Adler: God willing, we've got leader McConnell on the case.

Julianna C.: I know, I know it's got bipartisan support-

Seth Adler: Of course it does.

Julianna C.: But there's other things holding up it passing. And it has nothing to do with hemp.

Seth Adler: Like Pete Sessions?

Julianna C.: It's got nothing to do with hemp at all. It's just the other features of the bill, there's some issues.

Seth Adler: They're problematic.

Julianna C.: Problematic. Anyhoo, that's another podcast-

Seth Adler: But we're not ... yeah. We'll get to ... Pat will what? Get to that crossroads when we do.

Julianna C.: It's going to pass. It has bipartisan support.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: It's going to pass, and when it does, it's going to remove hemp-derived cannabinoids and hemp in general from the Controlled Substance Act altogether.

Seth Adler: Which is going to be great for Julianna.

Julianna C.: Which is ... well, it's great for everybody.

Seth Adler: Of course.

Julianna C.: It's great for all the animals.

Seth Adler: It's great for Mookey.

Julianna C.: It's great for the world.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: I mean, we need to bring hemp back for a number of reasons, not just for the medical value. But there are so many other uses of hemp [crosstalk 00:07:32]-

Seth Adler: Anything that you could make with what? Plastic, with cotton, with paper, you can make with hemp.

Julianna C.: Yeah. Yeah, so this prohibition of cannabis and intersex with the prohibition of hemp in a weird way, in a lot of weird ways, and I am just excited that we're moving forward and things are changing.

Seth Adler: So we're getting there.

Julianna C.: We are.

Seth Adler: We're getting there.

Julianna C.: Absolutely, on both sides, in the cannabis space and the hemp space, but it's two different battles going on, but they're kind of-

Seth Adler: Simultaneous.

Julianna C.: They're simultaneous and they're similar and different.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative), they're cannabinoids but all cannabinoids are not created equal. Have you noticed that.

Julianna C.: Not all hemp or cannabis is created equal either.

Seth Adler: That's a different point though.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: That's a different ... I mean, yes, we understand that and agree, and check where your cannabis, or where your hemp, or where your CBD is coming from please.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: But back to this customer who needs ... there's the train, by the way, so we're not far enough away. Check where your CBD is coming from, but back to this ... again, still the train.

Julianna C.: I know.

Seth Adler: This customer needs to identify epilepsy, not necessarily ... or seizures-

Julianna C.: Seizures.

Seth Adler: Not necessarily epilepsy for the now definitely what we've got an FDA-approved actual drug.

Julianna C.: We had 800 reviews that needed editing before our website could be completely compliant.

Seth Adler: Remarkable.

Julianna C.: Yeah, so that was interesting.

Seth Adler: Remarkable.

Julianna C.: And then we get these long testimonials and they're beautiful, they make me cry, and then we have to go ask the customer, "Can you take this, this, this, this out and change it to this, this, this, and this?" And they're like, "What the heck?"

Seth Adler: What the hell is wrong with people?

Julianna C.: I thought we had freedom of speech.

Seth Adler: Well yeah, also and [crosstalk 00:09:21] ... I love ... why are you making it difficult for me? I'm trying to be friendly to a company.

Julianna C.: You know what? It's a process. It's just this process that has to happen before we get there. I get it. It is what it is. It's more important to keep the product on the shelf because now we do have a situation where animals are relying on it, and last thing we want is for regulators to be confused about it and then pull the product.

Seth Adler: Gotcha. Let's speak about it this way, so if I had hives and you didn't own a company that had anything to do with cannabis, what would suggest that I do about my hives?

Julianna C.: I'd tell you to try some full spectrum hemp oil.

Seth Adler: Aha, okay. All right, full spectrum hemp oil.

Julianna C.: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: That'll take down the hives. I won't have to take Benadryl-

Julianna C.: Add topically, topically-

Seth Adler: Do it topically.

Julianna C.: And inter ... yeah, take it-

Seth Adler: Both.

Julianna C.: Yep, absolutely.

Seth Adler: Hit it both ways.

Julianna C.: Yep.

Seth Adler: All right.

Julianna C.: Yep.

Seth Adler: Fair enough. Okay, now let's say I have a rash on my belly because I constantly lie down on the ground outside naked.

Julianna C.: The one time-

Seth Adler: Again, we're talking about me, not a dog.

Julianna C.: No, no.

Seth Adler: And you're my friend and we're not ... yeah.

Julianna C.: This works for all species-

Seth Adler: Fair enough.

Julianna C.: Because we all-

Seth Adler: Any mammal.

Julianna C.: We all have an endocannabinoid system-

Seth Adler: Any mammal does, right?

Julianna C.: Any animal, reptile or-

Seth Adler: Reptiles, too?

Julianna C.: Any animal with a skeleton has ... all animals except insects have an endocannabinoid system.

Seth Adler: I didn't know about the reptiles. I don't think I know about the birds either.

Julianna C.: We have a bear in Oregon at the Wildlife Safari using our product because he had arthritis in his hind legs. He went into hibernation and he came out of hibernation and he couldn't walk. So they purchased our product at a local store that carried our high potency capsules, and they started giving it to him, and all of a sudden he's running around like a little bear cub again.

Seth Adler: Now again, let me separate these things. Let's not talk about the bear, let's just talk about the capsules. This is just Seth asking Julianna about the capsules. What's in the capsules?

Julianna C.: It's the full spectrum oil. It's got CBD-

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: CBDV, THCA, CBDA.

Seth Adler: Now and again THC and THCA, two different things.

Julianna C.: There's no THC in the product-

Seth Adler: There we go.

Julianna C.: There's a teeny, teeny, tiny, tiny amount that can't be removed, but it's well, well under the .3%.

Seth Adler: Under .3, exactly.

Julianna C.: The THCA on the other hand, is valuable in that it's not toxic to animals, it's not psychoactive, and it's fantastic for inflammatory pain. So coupled with the CBD in the other cannabinoids, it's awesome.

Seth Adler: There is not a doctor in front of your name, but can you explain to me why the acidics are different? How is THCA different than THC? Or is that over our heads here?

Julianna C.: I mean I can give you the layman's-

Seth Adler: Sure, that's what I'm asking for. I'm not [inaudible 00:12:08] understanding [inaudible 00:12:09].

Julianna C.: CBDA turns into CBD when it's decarboxylated. Same thing happens with THCA-

Seth Adler: There you go.

Julianna C.: Decarboxylates and it converts to THC. The difference is that when THCA, in that form it's not psychoactive, but it becomes psychoactive when it converts to THC. It converts to THC through heat. So that's why we have to smoke it, or we have to cook it in order to activate that psychoactive feature of that chemical.

Seth Adler: Which I am allowed to do, and that's on me.

Julianna C.: Okay.

Seth Adler: We're talking about ... we're either talking about Mookey, or not talking about Mookey. I can't remember.

Julianna C.: We are talking Mookey because this is all-

Seth Adler: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Julianna C.: Relative to-

Seth Adler: Indeed.

Julianna C.: You, your dog, your dog's rash, and I wanted to tell you that the first time that we tried our dropper bottle product topically on a dog was with one of our brand ambassadors who's this killer pit bull that lives here in Oakland. She's a sweetie. Ramona, shout out to Ramona. She had this rash on her belly and we put a few drops of our oil on there and rubbed in it. I swear to God, 20 minutes later the rash was gone.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Julianna C.: So we're like, "Wow, it really works as a topical. How about that?"

Seth Adler: Let's do this old chestnut for anybody that maybe hasn't done the arc of the Julianna/Seth conversations on the Cannabis Economy podcast. What if someone else is concerned about the dog going nuts because of the ... you know, it's cannabis, Julianna. We've got to be worried about this. Again, you said no psychoactivity, THCA is not THC. But how can we be so sure? Why?

Julianna C.: Well, lab tests. Show them the lab tests-

Seth Adler: There we go.

Julianna C.: And then it's all right there. They don't lie.

Seth Adler: Now you've been lab testing since you started Auntie Delores.

Julianna C.: We're one of the oldest companies that's been lab testing because labs started testing our product before we even started testing our product. We're some of the first edible companies that were tested, so we get it. We love working with the labs because they just help us develop products that are consistent. You can't create a consistent product with the labs. You've got to look at that stuff and use it. A lot of companies are not really up on that apparently.

Seth Adler: And still, and still which is amazing.

Julianna C.: Well they may be in a state where they don't have access to a cannabis lab-

Seth Adler: Sure. I mean, I'm talking about California because we're here in California-

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: And we just got some results back where it's just like you guys are failing.

Julianna C.: Well, yeah. I mean there's ... that's again, another podcast in a few. That's like a whole subject-

Seth Adler: Sure. Sure. But you've been doing that since [crosstalk 00:14:59]-

Julianna C.: 2008.

Seth Adler: Yeah, since the ... wow. This is like a decade, oh my God.

Julianna C.: Actually, there were no cannabis labs in 2008. They started doing business, I think, in 2009/2010.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Okay, so fine. It's tested and we can see that there's no THC so we can go ahead and give it to Mookey, put it on the belly, everything's fine.

Julianna C.: And you should make sure you see a lab test for a cannabis or a hemp product before you give it to your animal because THC is toxic to dogs. It can actually kill them. It can give them Static Ataxia, and they can die from Static Ataxia. So it's serious.

Seth Adler: So we're not pitching Treatibles here, because we would never do that. But as far as those lab tests do, can I go to treatibles.com and then see the lab tests?

Julianna C.: Yes. Well, unfortunately we had to take the lab tests down-

Seth Adler: Oh no.

Julianna C.: For compliance reasons-

Seth Adler: Of course.

Julianna C.: But they are available to anybody who wants them. They just need to email us and we send them everything.

Seth Adler: So okay, so we want it to be compliant with the new California regulations, and that-

Julianna C.: It's not the California regulations-

Seth Adler: Oh, it's not?

Julianna C.: It's regulations around hemp products in the pet space.

Seth Adler: Specifically?

Julianna C.: It is very specific, yes.

Seth Adler: Who did this rule? Where did that come from?

Julianna C.: Good question.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: There's an organization called the National Animal Supplement Council that's actually been instrumental in bringing regulations that are already in place for other animal supplement products. I'll wait until this guy goes by.

Seth Adler: That's a good looking car, though. It really is.

Julianna C.: It's bumping.

Seth Adler: It's a whole refurbished situation.

Julianna C.: It's like cherry, man.

Seth Adler: Yeah. That was good. Anyway.

Julianna C.: Yeah, so the NASC, they've been really instrumental in basically adapting the current regulations to the hemp space, and that's been phenomenal for companies like us that didn't have that regulatory framework to work with when we're developing this brand and developing these products. Nobody came before us to tell us, "This is how you do this, and this is how you stay compliant."

Seth Adler: Sure.

Julianna C.: So when we started off, some of the products we developed early on are actually not even compliant.

Seth Adler: Okay, which you're used to, that you've done before.

Julianna C.: I'm used to it, it's just, again, when there is a framework to abide by, it's almost welcomed because without it, you kind of feel like, "Wow, I'm making this product but it could get pulled because I'm not in compliance with the people that have the power to actually tell me to stop making this product."

Seth Adler: Exactly.

Julianna C.: I want to make sure I'm doing this right, and without those guidelines, it's very hard to carry on in business.

Seth Adler: It's the same thing with Mookey. She just wants rules. Bridge the gap here, why take down the actual lab tests but then send them by email?

Julianna C.: Because, again, we're dealing with the fact that this is a product that's a full spectrum hemp oil product, so these are naturally occurring chemicals that come from the plant.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Julianna C.: I don't think the regulators have totally wrapped their head around the fact that this is something that comes from the plant naturally, and we are just taking that and using it in these products. Taking the lab tests down was necessary to be FDA compliant.

Seth Adler: Just to be FDA compliant and these are the rules, and those are the rules, and that's why. Because they're the rules. Is that ... I mean was there any reason you give them?

Julianna C.: It's just something that was suggested ... yeah, the suggestion was given by the National Animal Supplement Council.

Seth Adler: Oh, totally understood.

Julianna C.: Along with many other suggestions-

Seth Adler: Got it.

Julianna C.: Around packaging. Just for instance, we can't make any claims about the product. We couldn't put any claims on our packaging, that would a violation of these regulations.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Julianna C.: We actually can't call out CBD anymore. A lot of people don't know this, but CBD is now an approved drug-

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: So it can't be listed as an ingredient.

Seth Adler: Wait, it's an approved drug so it can't be included as an ingredient?

Julianna C.: It would be like making a product with Aspirin in it and putting Aspirin on your ingredient deck.

Seth Adler: Oh, I see. Oh, okay.

Julianna C.: You see what I mean?

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: It's how these things work.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah.

Julianna C.: So we've had to understand all that and adapt our business around that. It's been interesting.

Seth Adler: Sure, it's been interesting, but you and I, now, you and I have been having this when you bring it Auntie Delores, we've been having this conversation forever.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: It's always been, "Here's the new rules. Here's the new way. Here's the new thinking. So I got to adapt."

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Adapt, adapt, adapt.

Julianna C.: We started in San Francisco, which typically had the most stringent laws. So we always had to adapt to what those local laws were and then the rest of the California just didn't seem to have any rules at all. So it's like, "Okay, we'll take these San Francisco rules and bring them everywhere else, because at least we know we're compliant."

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: But yeah, it's nice that there's a little bit more structure now.

Seth Adler: Indeed. This is you have always behaved this way. You're telling me that it does feel more natural to have these kind of regulations in place, and to know what the rule set is. When do we kind of pass through to okay, actually maybe the hand is a little too heavy at this point, or are we still good? Are we still in a good territory where everything's going smoothly now? Now I'm asking you about how things are going in California.

Julianna C.: Yeah. Well California, I mean are you asking me how we're affected by the California regulations? Or are you asking ... What are you asking?

Seth Adler: I'm asking an industry icon what your perception is of how things are going in California.

Julianna C.: Oh, yeah. I mean I just keep hearing really sad stories about companies that are colleagues of mine that are not doing well. It makes me sad, you know?

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative), too much?

Julianna C.: I mean, it's-

Seth Adler: Too much of [inaudible 00:21:13] or not enough preparation for the regulations on their part, or a little bit of both?

Julianna C.: Both.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: Both are involved, and also a lack of understanding around how, especially with edibles, how products are made and the threshold that's everybody's got to abide by in fitting into those required cannabinoid levels and product, is like that's not something that can be achieved when you're making edibles. That's a difficult process.

Seth Adler: Tell me how many milligrams of salt is in this, when I'm cooking my pasta. So, I don't know I added it when I was boiling the water-

Julianna C.: Well I mean, you know, I mean obviously standardization is important.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Julianna C.: And I think that there's obviously some room for that. It's just a delicate balance. It's like everything else. It's like we didn't want regulations back in 2008 until it got really hard to operate without them, and then we're like, "Well what do we do to get regulations?" And now we've got them and we're like, "How the hell do we go back to how it was before?"

Seth Adler: You kind of did that, because we ended the last interview with you were like, "Auntie Delores, I love it, but I'm focused on Treatibles."

Julianna C.: I'm focused on CBD. I mean we still produce Auntie Delores products, and we just only do CBD products, and that's going really well too. It's just it's less restrictive right now, than THC products. And we can sell these products across state lines. It's just a totally different business model in general. I mean, this is a business model that is easier and is more profitable for us. If we stayed in California and kept doing what we were doing, I don't see how we could have profited and survived, and [inaudible 00:23:02] to be quite honest, it came down to economics more than anything else.

Seth Adler: Right.

Julianna C.: I've got a staff to take of, I've got people that ... I've got investors involved. They want to see us succeed come hell or high water, and we're going to do it, damn it.

Seth Adler: And you'd also like to pay the rent too.

Julianna C.: I'd like to pay the ... I'd like to keep the lights on.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: That'd be nice.

Seth Adler: You know, why not? I do want to call attention to one other reference of another conversation that we had, which was one of your claims to fame was ... I don't know if we did this on microphone, was that you were so excited when you got the review from the Village Voice. I think that was right at the beginning of Treatibles. I'm here to report that Village Voice, bye-bye.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: I know.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: So sad.

Seth Adler: It is, right?

Julianna C.: Damn.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: I didn't know that. Is this like [crosstalk 00:23:54]-

Seth Adler: I mean it's ... I saw the article of the fact that it was going out of print. I didn't see the article of this was the last edition yet.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Because it could be saved maybe, much like Twinkies was.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: No, not like Twinkies was. Twinkies and the Village Voice, those are diametrically opposed.

Julianna C.: Yeah, we're-

Seth Adler: Those are not the same thing.

Julianna C.: What's the relation here? I'm not-

Seth Adler: No, Twinkies was going to go out of business, and then somebody made it not go out of business is the point.

Julianna C.: Interesting.

Seth Adler: So that's how we still have Twinkies today.

Julianna C.: Well goddamn.

Seth Adler: There we go.

Julianna C.: That's a blessing.

Seth Adler: Don't worry about eating Twinkies. You can eat as many Twinkies as you'd like, and you can get reviews on the website and everything.

Julianna C.: Oh.

Seth Adler: And everything's going to be okay. Isn't that ironic?

Julianna C.: I know.

Seth Adler: Don't you think?

Julianna C.: You know, I don't even know if they have to put lab tests on their website.

Seth Adler: Yeah, I'm sure they don't.

Julianna C.: Just to see the labs on those Twinkies. Can I see the labs?

Seth Adler: Can I eat all of the Twinkies, people? Just do the lab test.

Julianna C.: I'd love to just ... just give me the Certificate of Analysis. I'm just curious for medical reasons. I've got some dietary issues I'm dealing with and I just need to make sure that this Twinkies's healthy.

Seth Adler: Yeah, or just don't eat Twinkies is another option, and I don't even mean that ... I mean that more for me, I think. It's a [crosstalk 00:25:09]-

Julianna C.: You don't mean it for me. You don't have to tell me to eat no Twinkies, so I'm good.

Seth Adler: Yeah, you wouldn't eat a Twinkie. You would not do that.

Julianna C.: I don't know if I've ever eaten a Twinkie.

Seth Adler: I'm going to try to, on the spot, conceive of three final questions for you that are not the initial two final questions-

Julianna C.: Oh shit. I didn't even plan my song.

Seth Adler: We'll you're going to have to figure something out because that is, of course, always the final question. The three final questions, to begin with, are what's most surprised you in cannabis? What's most surprised you in life. The second set is what's most ... well, if you could change anything about yourself, and then if you could change anything about anything else ... but you've answered all those questions.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: I guess, let me try ... Literally, on the spot.

Julianna C.: Yeah.

Seth Adler: How do you think you're doing? That's the first question.

Julianna C.: Do I answer or do I wait until you get through those [crosstalk 00:25:59].

Seth Adler: Oh, I'll tell you what they are. How do you think you're doing? How do you think we're all doing? And then on the soundtrack of your life, one track one song, that's got to be on there. How do you think you're doing?

Julianna C.: Me personally?

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: Just great.

Seth Adler: Okay, that's fair. Do you want to expand on that, or is that ...

Julianna C.: I mean, yeah. I feel awesome.

Seth Adler: You're doing better than you were.

Julianna C.: Yeah, I mean we've kind of got through some difficult times with all these changes and regulations and everything. It's been a wild ride. 10 years. We just celebrated our 10 year anniversary-

Seth Adler: Come on, high five.

Julianna C.: High five back.

Seth Adler: Come on, 10 years.

Julianna C.: We're still here, man. We've changed a little bit but we're still here.

Seth Adler: Yeah, well you've got to change. You've got to adapt, you've got to innovate. But name another ... I mean there's not too many of the decade people, the Decade Club, come on. How do you think we're all doing? That's the second question.

Julianna C.: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: Hm.

Seth Adler: All of us.

Julianna C.: Hm.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Julianna C.: You know what? We're pulling through.

Seth Adler: You think we're going to make it?

Julianna C.: We're going to make it.

Seth Adler: All right.

Julianna C.: We are.

Seth Adler: On the soundtrack-

Julianna C.: It's going to be a tight squeeze, but we're going to make it.

Seth Adler: It's going to be rough here for a little bit. On the soundtrack of your life-

Julianna C.: Damn.

Seth Adler: One track, one song that's got to be on there.

Julianna C.: I hate this question.

Seth Adler: No, come on. You can do this.

Julianna C.: Okay.

Seth Adler: Let's go back-

Julianna C.: Let me think about like-

Seth Adler: We've done ... yeah. Do the-

Julianna C.: How about Ramble On, Zeppelin.

Seth Adler: Oh my God. Done.

Julianna C.: Fuck yeah.

Seth Adler: Done. Track five on Led Zeppelin two.

Julianna C.: Ramble on. Notice I pulled the mic away because I don't want to scare everybody.

Seth Adler: Yeah, no you're a singer. You know how to do it. Is what-
And there you have Julianna Carella. I very much appreciate her time. I very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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