fbpx

Ep. 386: Hemp Spotlight, Kelly Thornton and Cory Sharp

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 386: Hemp Spotlight, Kelly Thornton and Cory Sharp

Ep. 386: Hemp Spotlight, Kelly Thornton and Cory Sharp

Kelly Thornton and Cory Sharp join us and share a number of ways hemp can be used in manufacturing and construction: “Straw is going to mold if it gets wet. Critters can get into straw. With hemp, the hydraulic lime is the key to making a concrete alternative which is extremely fire resistant. It’s an alkaline material so it’s anti-mold and anti-mildew.”

Transcript:

Seth Adler: Hemp Spotlight Two, Kelly Thornton and Corey Sharp. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Download episodes on CannEconomy.com. That's two N's and then word economy. All of these episodes were recorded throughout 2018 and with the passage of the farm bill or the hemp bill, it seems appropriate to release them now. So first a word from Wana Brands and then Kelly Thornton and Corey Sharp.
Want to know with Wana Brands, that's the global expansion specifically into Canada.

Speaker 2: Because it's already federally legal for medical and will be federally legal for recreational, once they are completely federally legal, they will have the opportunity to not just produce product for their own population, which is sizable, it's equal to the size of California. But they're also going to have the opportunity to produce product in Canada and ship it anywhere in the world where it is legal. And even beyond that, this is interesting, the Canadian companies, again, because it's legal, are actually able to be listed on the major stock exchanges. So they have enormous stock valuations. So they actually have the money to go directly to countries where it's legal and just set up operations there.
So it's a very exciting opportunity for us to partner with the right group in Canada.

Seth Adler: I feel like you have an appreciation for life.

Kelly Thornton: I do.

Seth Adler: Right?

Kelly Thornton: Yes.

Seth Adler: If we're here, why not live it type of thing?

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: Is that your take?

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Have you always had that take?

Kelly Thornton: I've always been kind of a steward for the planet, so yeah.

Seth Adler: Steward for the planet. What do we mean by that?

Kelly Thornton: I've always recycled as long as I was able to. A lot of community garbage places never got into recycling. A matter of fact, I recycled so well when I lived in Illinois, that I canceled my garbage service until the city me a letter that said, "Well, there's a city code that says you have to have garbage service."

Seth Adler: Even though you were recycling everything.

Kelly Thornton: Right. Even though I didn't have any trash.

Seth Adler: But you still have to pay for trash, sir.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Is what the city says.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. They need that capital coming in.

Seth Adler: Okay. All right. Well, how much was it a month, do we know?

Kelly Thornton: $15-$20. But it's the point of ...

Seth Adler: Digestible.

Kelly Thornton: ... let's recycle. I've been to Europe. I have a lot of friends in Europe. Germany's like one of the ace countries for recycling.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: They've got glass bins where you put each different colored glass. You don't just throw it all in one. You throw it in five different bins.

Seth Adler: Green, brown.

Kelly Thornton: Yep.

Seth Adler: Clear.

Kelly Thornton: Blue, red. They'll walk down there with their little basket of wine bottles and just chink, chink, chink. Doing their thing.

Seth Adler: Wow. All right. So you've subscribed to that for as long as you could have.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: All right. Steward for the planet. Any other steward for the planet kind of things before we dive into hemp here?

Kelly Thornton: Well, so I'm a huge fan of the national parks.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Kelly Thornton: As a hydrogeologist, I'm adamantly against fracking.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: Because I'm against big oil and gas, but that's just me. And I know ...

Seth Adler: Are those two different things though? In other words, what does fracking do?

Kelly Thornton: Oh, so when you're drilling, you're sending this hydraulic fluid into the bed rock below to crack it open to release the gases or the oil that's down there.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: But the fracking fluids one of the centers of controversy. What's in it? Because you've seen the videos of the people saying, "Well, why don't you drink some frack water," and they present it to the person who's pro fracking, be it a corporate head or whatever. And they're like, "Oh, I'm not drinking that." You know what I mean? Of course not. Because it's poisonous. And then there's a lot of methane released. You've seen maybe ...

Seth Adler: Lighting my water on fire.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. What's the Fox movie? Gas Land.

Seth Adler: Okay. Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: He does an excellent piece, and he's in Pennsylvania for half of it, and then he's in Weld County Colorado because I think they have over a million fracking wells. I can't even conceive of such a thing.

Seth Adler: Got it. So just besides your maybe distaste for the companies, exclusive of that, the actual fracking is an issue for we the people.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: I think so.

Seth Adler: All right.

Kelly Thornton: I'm a big fan ... I don't know if we can use profanity.

Seth Adler: And you're a geologist.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I have a master's in hydrogeology.

Seth Adler: Okay. So you do know what you're talking about there.

Kelly Thornton: A little bit. I'm not an expert by any means, but yeah, I've got an idea of what goes on.

Seth Adler: Would you call what you just said an opinion or is it more based in fact?

Kelly Thornton: I think the downsides of fracking are extremely factual.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: Not fractual.

Seth Adler: They are that too.

Kelly Thornton: Some people being able to light their well water on fire because methane has leaked into their well and it's coming into their homes. I mean, this isn't a fantasy. I mean, this actually occurs. You've seen the videos.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: And there's also ... I mean, people's property values going down to zero because their land is now contaminated. I'm not even a global warming ...

Seth Adler: Proponent.

Kelly Thornton: ... proponent as much I am an anti-pollution proponent because we're polluting. I think pollution is the thing we need to worry about not the actual gases in the environment os much. And, like I said, I'm not an expert. That's opinion. But I know we are polluting on a massive scale, and we just keep going. Like there's no end. And if I can be candid, I think my favorite idiom that I've ever heard in my entire lifetime is don't shit where you eat.

Seth Adler: Yeah, no. That's something.

Kelly Thornton: So why pollute the soil, the air, the water.

Seth Adler: Why would we do that?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, why would we do that?

Seth Adler: You said if I can be candid, I hope that you're candid the whole time, Kelly. That's our goal I think together here.
All right. So you said the words global warming, and I wonder if you chose those and if there is a difference in your mind to climate change or is that all in the same area?

Kelly Thornton: Well, the opponents of climate change always refer to the earth having cyclical warming periods.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: It's a fact. I mean, they do. If you've seen the book The Little Ice Age, when the Vikings came across, they were able to grow grapes in New Finland, which is traditionally too cold I would imagine to grow grapes. But during that period of time ...

Seth Adler: New Finland is how I know it. So all the way up in Canada, all the way east. Okay, go ahead.

Kelly Thornton: So there was a warming. I mean, it was green historically is what the record says, and they were able to grow the food they needed to sustain themselves there. But then it got cold again and guess what, glaciers, whatever. We have lots of stuff going on. But I think global warming's thrown around too easily, and right now if we could do a whole podcast on geo-engineering, but the excuse for geo-engineering, which we now see our skies painted with checkerboards and crisscrosses, which never happened when I was a kid. Contrails came out of the back of the jet and then they disappeared. They didn't stay there all day and then eventually form a mat of clouds, to which they argue, and NASA's admitted this, this much of it anyway. Is that they're trying to block the sun to ward off global warming. I'm like, "Excuse me. The planet relies on the sun's energy and UV rays."

Seth Adler: Right. Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: And who are you to block that? The planet's UV rays. So I don't know what their deal is.

Seth Adler: Why are trails staying there, I guess? If we could just quickly ...

Kelly Thornton: Well, they're spraying particulates into the air to ... So they're doing cloud seeding. They are making a mat that's supposedly will reflect UV rays is my understanding.

Seth Adler: Because we opened up the ozone layer and this is to try to close it?

Kelly Thornton: Well, I don't know about any of that. It's just to stop the UV rays from coming down and warming the planet anymore than it already has. It's all the sun and the earth hasn't been here for 13 billion years.

Seth Adler: You're outside of my depth now. You've lost me as far as that's concerned. But I just want to make sure ... So climate change does happen is your point. It is cyclical.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: But your point also is humans are doing harm to the planet.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I believe that's totally through pollution. I mean, if you look at the plastic sheets in the Pacific, if you look at the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington where they buried a lot of nuclear waste right along the Columbia River. I know MSNBC's actually done a couple of exposes on that, Rachel Maddow in particular. Denver was always the hottest if you looked at our nuclear or radioactive map of the United States. Denver on Rocky Flash just west of the city was always the hottest spot in the United States until Fukushima kind of took over and was letting that stuff flow towards the coast of California or the entire west coast really.

Seth Adler: Just a couple years ago.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I think it's going on 11 or 12 years now.

Seth Adler: Is it that long?

Kelly Thornton: It's been leaking.

Seth Adler: Oh my god.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. And DepCo, of course. They're not doing anything. I wish they would seed bomb it with hemp. They did throw hemp in Chernobyl and they got actually surprisingly good results from ... Because the plants such an amazing bioremediator if we want to segway into the hemp.

Seth Adler: Yeah, let's do it. But I just want to make sure because you mentioned a name that would ... My hope is that listeners are from kind of all points on the circle that is political affiliation as opposed to left and right.

Kelly Thornton: Right.

Seth Adler: So you mentioned Rachel Maddow. I wonder if you could just share what you feel your politics are to make sure that everyone understands where you're coming from.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I heard a wise man once say that he's now apolitical, and I think ...

Seth Adler: That's me. I just told you that.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. You did just tell me that, and I think that's probably where I'm at now. Thinking in the boxes of left/right, moderate/conservative, Republican/Democrat, I mean, it's just abject failure. There's nothing that ever comes out of it.

Seth Adler: What it does is it puts you against someone else.

Kelly Thornton: Right. Instead of against the people we should be against probably, the ones causing a lot of the pollution and a lot of other things. But anyway, so that being said, I tend ... I was always identified more with Democrats until I just learned the whole game was ... I mean, it's a lot of rich people sitting in Washington acting like they're bickering or maybe they're really bickering because they're like two rich kids fighting.

Seth Adler: Yeah. That's what it feels like.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, that's what it feels like.

Seth Adler: So the whole drain the swamp thing, actually a good idea, right?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. If it was ever actually able to be perpetrated. I don't think it is.

Seth Adler: So we'll see.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, sure.

Seth Adler: In the meantime, let's talk about hemp, right?

Kelly Thornton: Okay.

Seth Adler: Kelly, does that make sense?

Kelly Thornton: Sure, that's great.

Seth Adler: So you're a hurd guy, is what it is.

Kelly Thornton: I am a hemp hurd connoisseur I guess you'd say.

Seth Adler: So to set this up, we've got the .3 and above folks, those are the people that I'm used to talking to.

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Then you've got the .3 below, and as I understand it, there's the flower people, which are the CBD, the consumption people.

Kelly Thornton: Sure.

Seth Adler: And then you make your way down the planet ...

Kelly Thornton: There's also seeds in that too.

Seth Adler: Seeds.

Kelly Thornton: For just the non-medicinal, hemp seed oil, Manitoba Harvest kind of thing where you go by the hold hemp hearts in the grocery store and put them on your salad or your yogurt.

Seth Adler: Hemp Spotlight Two, Kelly Thornton and Corey Sharp. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Download episodes on CannEconomy.com. That's two N's and then word economy. All of these episodes were recorded throughout 2018 and with the passage of the farm bill or the hemp bill, it seems appropriate to release them now. So first a word from Wana Brands and then Kelly Thornton and Corey Sharp.
Want to know with Wana Brands, that's the global expansion specifically into Canada.

Speaker 2: Because it's already federally legal for medical and will be federally legal for recreational, once they are completely federally legal, they will have the opportunity to not just produce product for their own population, which is sizable, it's equal to the size of California. But they're also going to have the opportunity to produce product in Canada and ship it anywhere in the world where it is legal. And even beyond that, this is interesting, the Canadian companies, again, because it's legal, are actually able to be listed on the major stock exchanges. So they have enormous stock valuations. So they actually have the money to go directly to countries where it's legal and just set up operations there.
So it's a very exciting opportunity for us to partner with the right group in Canada.

Seth Adler: I feel like you have an appreciation for life.

Kelly Thornton: I do.

Seth Adler: Right?

Kelly Thornton: Yes.

Seth Adler: If we're here, why not live it type of thing?

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: Is that your take?

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Have you always had that take?

Kelly Thornton: I've always been kind of a steward for the planet, so yeah.

Seth Adler: Steward for the planet. What do we mean by that?

Kelly Thornton: I've always recycled as long as I was able to. A lot of community garbage places never got into recycling. A matter of fact, I recycled so well when I lived in Illinois, that I canceled my garbage service until the city me a letter that said, "Well, there's a city code that says you have to have garbage service."

Seth Adler: Even though you were recycling everything.

Kelly Thornton: Right. Even though I didn't have any trash.

Seth Adler: But you still have to pay for trash, sir.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Is what the city says.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. They need that capital coming in.

Seth Adler: Okay. All right. Well, how much was it a month, do we know?

Kelly Thornton: $15-$20. But it's the point of ...

Seth Adler: Digestible.

Kelly Thornton: ... let's recycle. I've been to Europe. I have a lot of friends in Europe. Germany's like one of the ace countries for recycling.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: They've got glass bins where you put each different colored glass. You don't just throw it all in one. You throw it in five different bins.

Seth Adler: Green, brown.

Kelly Thornton: Yep.

Seth Adler: Clear.

Kelly Thornton: Blue, red. They'll walk down there with their little basket of wine bottles and just chink, chink, chink. Doing their thing.

Seth Adler: Wow. All right. So you've subscribed to that for as long as you could have.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: All right. Steward for the planet. Any other steward for the planet kind of things before we dive into hemp here?

Kelly Thornton: Well, so I'm a huge fan of the national parks.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Kelly Thornton: As a hydrogeologist, I'm adamantly against fracking.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: Because I'm against big oil and gas, but that's just me. And I know ...

Seth Adler: Are those two different things though? In other words, what does fracking do?

Kelly Thornton: Oh, so when you're drilling, you're sending this hydraulic fluid into the bed rock below to crack it open to release the gases or the oil that's down there.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: But the fracking fluids one of the centers of controversy. What's in it? Because you've seen the videos of the people saying, "Well, why don't you drink some frack water," and they present it to the person who's pro fracking, be it a corporate head or whatever. And they're like, "Oh, I'm not drinking that." You know what I mean? Of course not. Because it's poisonous. And then there's a lot of methane released. You've seen maybe ...

Seth Adler: Lighting my water on fire.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. What's the Fox movie? Gas Land.

Seth Adler: Okay. Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: He does an excellent piece, and he's in Pennsylvania for half of it, and then he's in Weld County Colorado because I think they have over a million fracking wells. I can't even conceive of such a thing.

Seth Adler: Got it. So just besides your maybe distaste for the companies, exclusive of that, the actual fracking is an issue for we the people.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: I think so.

Seth Adler: All right.

Kelly Thornton: I'm a big fan ... I don't know if we can use profanity.

Seth Adler: And you're a geologist.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I have a master's in hydrogeology.

Seth Adler: Okay. So you do know what you're talking about there.

Kelly Thornton: A little bit. I'm not an expert by any means, but yeah, I've got an idea of what goes on.

Seth Adler: Would you call what you just said an opinion or is it more based in fact?

Kelly Thornton: I think the downsides of fracking are extremely factual.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: Not fractual.

Seth Adler: They are that too.

Kelly Thornton: Some people being able to light their well water on fire because methane has leaked into their well and it's coming into their homes. I mean, this isn't a fantasy. I mean, this actually occurs. You've seen the videos.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: And there's also ... I mean, people's property values going down to zero because their land is now contaminated. I'm not even a global warming ...

Seth Adler: Proponent.

Kelly Thornton: ... proponent as much I am an anti-pollution proponent because we're polluting. I think pollution is the thing we need to worry about not the actual gases in the environment os much. And, like I said, I'm not an expert. That's opinion. But I know we are polluting on a massive scale, and we just keep going. Like there's no end. And if I can be candid, I think my favorite idiom that I've ever heard in my entire lifetime is don't shit where you eat.

Seth Adler: Yeah, no. That's something.

Kelly Thornton: So why pollute the soil, the air, the water.

Seth Adler: Why would we do that?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, why would we do that?

Seth Adler: You said if I can be candid, I hope that you're candid the whole time, Kelly. That's our goal I think together here.
All right. So you said the words global warming, and I wonder if you chose those and if there is a difference in your mind to climate change or is that all in the same area?

Kelly Thornton: Well, the opponents of climate change always refer to the earth having cyclical warming periods.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: It's a fact. I mean, they do. If you've seen the book The Little Ice Age, when the Vikings came across, they were able to grow grapes in New Finland, which is traditionally too cold I would imagine to grow grapes. But during that period of time ...

Seth Adler: New Finland is how I know it. So all the way up in Canada, all the way east. Okay, go ahead.

Kelly Thornton: So there was a warming. I mean, it was green historically is what the record says, and they were able to grow the food they needed to sustain themselves there. But then it got cold again and guess what, glaciers, whatever. We have lots of stuff going on. But I think global warming's thrown around too easily, and right now if we could do a whole podcast on geo-engineering, but the excuse for geo-engineering, which we now see our skies painted with checkerboards and crisscrosses, which never happened when I was a kid. Contrails came out of the back of the jet and then they disappeared. They didn't stay there all day and then eventually form a mat of clouds, to which they argue, and NASA's admitted this, this much of it anyway. Is that they're trying to block the sun to ward off global warming. I'm like, "Excuse me. The planet relies on the sun's energy and UV rays."

Seth Adler: Right. Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: And who are you to block that? The planet's UV rays. So I don't know what their deal is.

Seth Adler: Why are trails staying there, I guess? If we could just quickly ...

Kelly Thornton: Well, they're spraying particulates into the air to ... So they're doing cloud seeding. They are making a mat that's supposedly will reflect UV rays is my understanding.

Seth Adler: Because we opened up the ozone layer and this is to try to close it?

Kelly Thornton: Well, I don't know about any of that. It's just to stop the UV rays from coming down and warming the planet anymore than it already has. It's all the sun and the earth hasn't been here for 13 billion years.

Seth Adler: You're outside of my depth now. You've lost me as far as that's concerned. But I just want to make sure ... So climate change does happen is your point. It is cyclical.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: But your point also is humans are doing harm to the planet.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I believe that's totally through pollution. I mean, if you look at the plastic sheets in the Pacific, if you look at the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington where they buried a lot of nuclear waste right along the Columbia River. I know MSNBC's actually done a couple of exposes on that, Rachel Maddow in particular. Denver was always the hottest if you looked at our nuclear or radioactive map of the United States. Denver on Rocky Flash just west of the city was always the hottest spot in the United States until Fukushima kind of took over and was letting that stuff flow towards the coast of California or the entire west coast really.

Seth Adler: Just a couple years ago.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I think it's going on 11 or 12 years now.

Seth Adler: Is it that long?

Kelly Thornton: It's been leaking.

Seth Adler: Oh my god.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. And DepCo, of course. They're not doing anything. I wish they would seed bomb it with hemp. They did throw hemp in Chernobyl and they got actually surprisingly good results from ... Because the plants such an amazing bioremediator if we want to segway into the hemp.

Seth Adler: Yeah, let's do it. But I just want to make sure because you mentioned a name that would ... My hope is that listeners are from kind of all points on the circle that is political affiliation as opposed to left and right.

Kelly Thornton: Right.

Seth Adler: So you mentioned Rachel Maddow. I wonder if you could just share what you feel your politics are to make sure that everyone understands where you're coming from.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I heard a wise man once say that he's now apolitical, and I think ...

Seth Adler: That's me. I just told you that.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. You did just tell me that, and I think that's probably where I'm at now. Thinking in the boxes of left/right, moderate/conservative, Republican/Democrat, I mean, it's just abject failure. There's nothing that ever comes out of it.

Seth Adler: What it does is it puts you against someone else.

Kelly Thornton: Right. Instead of against the people we should be against probably, the ones causing a lot of the pollution and a lot of other things. But anyway, so that being said, I tend ... I was always identified more with Democrats until I just learned the whole game was ... I mean, it's a lot of rich people sitting in Washington acting like they're bickering or maybe they're really bickering because they're like two rich kids fighting.

Seth Adler: Yeah. That's what it feels like.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, that's what it feels like.

Seth Adler: So the whole drain the swamp thing, actually a good idea, right?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. If it was ever actually able to be perpetrated. I don't think it is.

Seth Adler: So we'll see.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, sure.

Seth Adler: In the meantime, let's talk about hemp, right?

Kelly Thornton: Okay.

Seth Adler: Kelly, does that make sense?

Kelly Thornton: Sure, that's great.

Seth Adler: So you're a hurd guy, is what it is.

Kelly Thornton: I am a hemp hurd connoisseur I guess you'd say.

Seth Adler: So to set this up, we've got the .3 and above folks, those are the people that I'm used to talking to.

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Then you've got the .3 below, and as I understand it, there's the flower people, which are the CBD, the consumption people.

Kelly Thornton: Sure.

Seth Adler: And then you make your way down the planet ...

Kelly Thornton: There's also seeds in that too.

Seth Adler: Seeds.

Kelly Thornton: For just the non-medicinal, hemp seed oil, Manitoba Harvest kind of thing where you go by the hold hemp hearts in the grocery store and put them on your salad or your yogurt.

Seth Adler: And within consumption, those people lie.

Kelly Thornton: Sure.

Seth Adler: Right. In those products.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: And then you make your way down to the stock, right?

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: And then there's fiber and hurd. Fiber is for, I don't know, t-shirts and paper.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, and that's two things you can do with it. They say now that the industrial hemp plant is up to 10,000 uses. There's a company called Pure Vision Technologies here in Colorado that takes the entire plant and they kind of do their thing and cook it down and try to make fuels and plastics and stuff like that with the molecular stuff that they're getting out over there. Like I said, I can't really speak to that.

Seth Adler: But you'll put me in touch with those guys, right?

Kelly Thornton: Oh yes. Ed Lehrburger is the guy.

Seth Adler: All right. Sounds like he could be Jewish. So I'm already a fan. So that's the fiber, that's the outside of the thing there. Then you get inside and there's the hurd.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: And what are we doing with the hurd?

Kelly Thornton: So what I'm doing with the hurd is I'm ... I got into hempcrete construction. Hempcrete is a generic name given to lime hemp construction.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: So you take the woody pulp, it looks like really light wood chips, and when you get them out of Europe, they're nice and uniformly processed. You mix them with a lime binder and water, and then you've got this product that hardens. And you can use it for installation inside of buildings.

Seth Adler: Great.

Kelly Thornton: And it's an amazing, amazing building material. That being said, some of the side thing you can do with hemp hurd are use it for just animal bedding. As soon as it's processed, the exact same bale I buy to use for hempcrete, you can throw on a horse stall.

Seth Adler: What's the benefit? Why is it better?

Kelly Thornton: Super absorbent because of the porosity of the hemp plant, and it also doesn't ... A lot of animals are allergic to straw. So cats, dogs, horses, I mean, if they have a straw allergy, this is an awesome ... It's a better thing to use in the first place, but it's a great alternative to using straw in horse bedding. And, I mean, everybody's seen wet straw and it's nasty and it molds. I think hemp's a little more resistant to that sort of thing when you throw it in the horse stalls.

Seth Adler: Got it.

Kelly Thornton: And another thing, you can take that same woody core of that plant, and they have wood pelletizers. You see the wood pellets for pellet fed stoves.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: You can do the same thing with that.

Seth Adler: All right.

Kelly Thornton: And, of course, one acre of hemp is equivalent to four acres of trees in paper production. I'm sure it's probably similar ... It might not be as much for wood pellet production. But I'd much rather use hemp, which grows in 12 to 16 weeks than I would a tree that took five to 10 years to grow.

Seth Adler: All right. So then how is this possible? One acre equals four acres, break that down for us as best you can.

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So that's in the paper side.

Seth Adler: Yeah, yeah, yeah. Right. That's outside. That's the fiber.

Kelly Thornton: That's outside of the scope of my ...

Seth Adler: These are things we can look up basically.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, sure. Absolutely.

Seth Adler: All right. And then what were you saying about BMW doors?

Kelly Thornton: Oh, okay. So a lot of the European companies ... So Europe's and Canada's as well been involved in hemp since like '95. I think most of those countries around that time period legalized hemp product. So France has been doing hempcrete work for 30 years or going on 30 years. I'm not doing my math in there.

Seth Adler: Ish.

Kelly Thornton: Ish. Yeah. Same with Canada. Canada's the big seed food production place. A lot of the products you see are going to come out of Canada.

Seth Adler: My hemp hearts are probably coming from Canada.

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely. Probably. We're starting to see some production in the United States in Kentucky and Tennessee, but not in the volume of Canada.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: So one of the things you can do with fiber from the plant is they're pressing it into forms to make door panels. So you know how you have your plastic door panels that always get dirty and crack in the sunlight and all that stuff. They're making them out of hemp fiber. So if you see a BMW i3 or i8, for example, probably more likely to see the i3. I've only see two i8s. Great car.

Seth Adler: I guess that depends on where you live, Kelly.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. That's right. Did see a couple i8s in Germany. But, anyway, all you have to do is look through the window. Don't look like you're looking in the car to get into it or anything like that, but just take a real quick glance and you'll see the fibers in the door panels and the dashboard.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: England has a car called the kestrel car, which looks likes it's modeled after the Lotus Elise, and what they've done is pressed the hemp fiber into a plastic and then coated it. So that's shiny. The BMW stuff looks like, almost like a felt material, just to look at it.

Seth Adler: Oh yeah. Huh. So you can do ... We can worry about aesthetics, and we can treat this. So it's not like we have to look like dirty hippies with our hemp.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. It's become so inconspicuous that like I usually have a hemp t-shirt on or something like that, and no one would ever know. I mean no one would ever know unless I said, "Hey, this is made out of hemp."

Seth Adler: Conspicuously, inconspicuous.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. That's right. That's right. And also, I mean, that goes without saying too. If you see the people who are cannabis consumers, you can't tell anymore. I mean, you'll have lawyers, you'll have all kinds of people.

Seth Adler: Yeah. We're here at DIA, as you call it, Denver International Airport, and really anybody here could be a cannabis consumer.

Kelly Thornton: Sure. That's the point.

Seth Adler: All right. Ope, right there. Guy sitting right next to us, without question. All right. Sorry. So let's jump into hurd here. All right. So we've got lime, we got water, we got hemp hurd.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: And we got insulation for our house.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: So how much of the house can be constructed from hemp hurd?

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So I'll start out by saying hemp right now is not structural, the hempcrete.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: I know companies are working on blocks to make structures without having any wood frame. So what we do is we have to have a frame, and what we're going to do is insulate around that frame. So anyway, what we're going to do is once you get your house framed, we can use the hempcrete in the floor, we can use it in the walls, we can use it if you have a second floor, we can use it in there.

Seth Adler: Insulation, insulation.

Kelly Thornton: All insulation.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: There are varying consistencies you want to use for different applications, but they're pretty close. It's usually like one part hemp hurd to one and a half to two parts binder.

Seth Adler: Okay. What binder would you be using?

Kelly Thornton: It's hydraulic lime.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: And you could take a six to nine week course on lime the way that everybody used to produce it because it used to be widely used before Portland's cement inception in the early 1900s.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: I mean, back to Roman times when they're making concretes and stuff like that. So it's a great natural building material. It comes from limestone. It comes from the process of basically cooking limestone. They call it slaking. If you're anywhere around Wisconsin, you can still the kilns right along the sides of these quarries where they would take the limestone directly to the kilns and then cook it.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: And there's so many products that come out of that from hydrated lime, which is lime you find in Home Depot. It's a construction material that's widely used. To hydraulic lime, which is much better to work with and it's a better binder. Like I said, you'd have to go in and look at the difference between hydrated and hydraulic. Just for the sake of time, I'm not going to get into that.

Seth Adler: I gotcha. But you mentioned porousness. It plays into what you're saying right now, right?

Kelly Thornton: Absolutely. So the hemp hurd is very porous. So it's got incredibly ... So hempcrete, in and of itself, is hygroscopic. That means that it traps moisture. So what it does, it's an excellent regulatory of humidity and temperature in your house because of the porosity of the plant, and then once you coat it with the hydraulic lime and stick it together, you've got pores in between the hemp hurd.

Seth Adler: Got it.

Kelly Thornton: So you've got a microscopic pore inside the plant, pores inside the plant, and then you've got porosity within the walls. And what it does is like on a very micro level it's regulating the vapor. It's vapor permeable is what it's called. In and out of your house. Once you get the hempcrete all insulated, you encapsulate the wood frame.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: And I'll just add real quick that you can actually save a little bit on wood because it does provide some strength at 12 inches thick to where you can put your studs maybe 24 inches instead of 16. So that'll save a little bit of wood use. And then once you get done, what you want to do is apply a permeable material. You can do hydraulic lime plaster.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: And that's still breathable and it's very weather resistant. So it's like the best thing in the world to use. And what it'll do is if it's really hot and humid outside, it's going to keep your house nice and cool, and then it's going to do the opposite in the summer. Or I'm sorry in the winter. It's going to keep your house insulated.

Seth Adler: So I have the pleasure of speaking with you, Kelly, before this conversation. Actually, we've been communicating a lot lately.

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Right. And in one of the conversations, you mentioned flooding. When flooding happens because of the porousness nature of the materials that you just explained ... Well, just take me through it one more time.

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So basically everybody knows when your house floods, if it's an external flood, if it's a pipe breaks on the inside, you're looking at replacing all the drywall that's been effected, all the fiberglass insulation because it's basically like a sponge.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: And it's going to mold. So you have to get it out of there. Hempcrete's ability to move water in and out of itself at a microscopic level, the vapor barrier exchange, it's going to take that moisture from an area of high concentration of moisture, and it's always higher concentration to lower concentration. It's going to wick that moisture very slowly out of your wall. So theoretically, you could get it extremely wet, and as soon as it dries out, if you got fans on it, if it got hot outside and was able to dry out, it's going to hopefully completely fix itself without you having to tear anything out.

Seth Adler: Unbelievable.

Kelly Thornton: That's my theory.

Seth Adler: Unbelievable. So we got to test that. That we got to test.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. And I just mean to give you an example, one of the tests they did. I'm not sure if it was a Canadian or a British test, they wanted to test the vapor holding capacity of hempcrete. So they put, I think it was 1300 pounds of moisture, so almost a half a ton of water vapor inside of a wall, 12 inches thick. It was a five by seven, so 35 cubic feet. Five by seven by one. And then they put a downward pressure on it. But, I mean, the wall didn't fail with 1300 pounds of water vapor. That's a lot of water.

Seth Adler: That's a lot of water.

Kelly Thornton: You're probably not going to get ...

Seth Adler: So that brings me to the structural question, right? Because you mention that hempcrete is not structural unless they put it into blocks.

Kelly Thornton: Right.

Seth Adler: So first explain why that's the case and then I will ask you about the blocks.

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So I've seen some of the blocks that this one company in Canada is making, and it's essentially like a Lego. They put ...

Seth Adler: Why's it have to be in block form to be structural? Why isn't it strong enough without that?

Kelly Thornton: I think it's got something to do with the compression that they use to form those blocks, and I don't know what they use for a binder.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: So it just depends on what they're using. The problem with compressing hempcrete ... So I like to build in stitch. We form the walls, we put it in by hand, and we tamp it.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: The insulating ability of hempcrete is based on its porosity between those fibers of hemp hurd. If you crush it down so much that there's no porosity or at least limited porosity, you're going to greatly reduce the amount of insulating capacity that's available.

Seth Adler: I see. So maybe we don't want to necessarily ... Like we'll see what happens with the blocks, but that might mess up our whole flooding thing.

Kelly Thornton: Well, it should still wick the water out.

Seth Adler: Oh, it should still?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. It should still wick the water out. But like I said, I'm not sure about the internal makeup of the hempcrete blocks. I think it's a pretty a proprietary thing right now.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: I know of two companies ...

Seth Adler: So you'll put me in touch with those guys.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, I'll put you in touch with them for sure.

Seth Adler: Okay. So that brings us to processing, right?

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Sure.

Seth Adler: Because we got to get this from fiber and hurd into whatever we need to get it into.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: And for that we needed a decorticator.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. So if you look at a book called The Great Book of Hemp, it's one of the best hemp resource books out there. It's a parallel journey of both cannabis and I refer to marijuana as cannabis because I'm trying to be part of that effort to make it a not racist thing.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Good goal.

Kelly Thornton: So anyway, I call marijuana cannabis as a general rule, and then I call hemp, hemp, even though it's still cannabis sativa.

Seth Adler: It is, indeed.

Kelly Thornton: It's the same plant, looks exactly the same. I get people all the time thinking, "Oh, what does it look like?" I'm like it looks like you have a field of weed behind your house."

Seth Adler: Imagine, here's what it is. Imagine cannabis plant but it has .3% or less of THC. What do you think that would look like? It would look exactly the same.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. Even smells pretty close when you're growing it.

Seth Adler: Yeah, we got your terpenes right here, man.

Kelly Thornton: That's right, and hopefully we'll get rid of that .03%, which is a completely arbitrary number that was come up with by somebody, I don't know who. Everybody knows you're not going to get stoned smoking 2% THC or less. And it puts a lot of restrictions on farmers, they have to get their field checked if it's 'hot.'

Seth Adler: That's a whole nother thing because we're talking building materials here.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: So we just got to the decorticator, right?

Kelly Thornton: That's right. So the decorticator and The Great Book of Hemp, you can see the one that John Deere had made I think in the early 1900s, 1917, 1918. Great big thing. Horse drawn wagon basically.

Seth Adler: Was that in the scientific American article in 1938 article?

Kelly Thornton: Yes. Yes, it was.

Seth Adler: Okay. Great.

Kelly Thornton: And, of course, they said hemp was going to be the next billion dollar crop, and that didn't happen. Lots of various entities ... Anyway, now they have all manner of decorticators that are in China. Because the demands there for countries that have been growing hemp for 20-30 years, and it's the qualities there. We've got some hemp from New Zealand through a company called Old Dominion Hemp. And they're a distributor out of Virginia. Most of their market, like I said before, is horse ranchers. They use it for horse bedding. But lucky for me, I have a great source to get hemp hurd for hempcrete because everybody's always like, "Well, how hard is it to get?" I'm like, "It's not hard. All you have to do is order it and then they ship it." Just like everything Amazon, right?

Seth Adler: That's what I was just about to say. Just like a pair of socks.

Kelly Thornton: But I don't think you can actually get hemp hurd on Amazon. Isn't that a thing?

Seth Adler: Well, sure.

Kelly Thornton: Because I thought that you could get everything there.

Seth Adler: Well, they have anti-cannabinoids on Amazon. We're going to try to talk through these announcements because who knows how long they'll go and they're done.

Kelly Thornton: All right.

Seth Adler: So there you have it. So you're getting yours from Virginia.

Kelly Thornton: Yes.

Seth Adler: Right, and as I understand it, we've got decorticator in North Carolina. That's the big one. And then there's on in Kentucky, and then there's one in Nebraska. Nebraska just went backwards with their whole hemp legislation as I understand it.

Kelly Thornton: Really? I hadn't heard that.

Seth Adler: Yeah. I've got to check back with myself. I had the details, and now I don't.

Kelly Thornton: They'll regret that later.

Seth Adler: Indeed.

Kelly Thornton: When everybody else is miles ahead.

Seth Adler: How do we not have a decorticator here in Colorado?

Kelly Thornton: You know I have this conversation with just about everybody I talk to about hemp. They're like, "What do you need to get this stuff?" I'm like, "Well, we need a decorticator." You can get entry level decorticators for like less than $5000.

Seth Adler: Well you got the mobile ones here.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: But we want the big one, right?

Kelly Thornton: I haven't even seen a mobile one.

Seth Adler: Oh, they're around. I now can put you in touch with some people ...

Kelly Thornton: Good. Because I haven't seen one, and I wouldn't even mind a mobile one. But yeah, so I'm actually doing a business plan this weekend for a guy for a decortication plant.

Seth Adler: Good.

Kelly Thornton: I mean, because he's got investors.

Seth Adler: Good.

Kelly Thornton: This is the fifth year we've been growing now. It's like all this hemp hurd has gone to waste if they baled it up and let it set outside where it can mold just because it's immediate. It's all compacted and getting wet. So mold ...

Seth Adler: Because it has not been processed.

Kelly Thornton: It has not been processed. It's just sitting there. I have 1000 pound bale of hemp that somebody brought out and dumped in my yard.

Seth Adler: Production has been doubling each year, right?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, just about.

Seth Adler: 12,000 I think sub makers.

Kelly Thornton: I know at the meeting we went to at the Colorado Department of Ag, it was 9000-some acres last year grown, and they expected that to double within Colorado. So I'm not sure where we're at, but hopefully it's 18,000 acres.

Seth Adler: Okay. All right. So we're working on a decorticator. This is the first that I'm hearing about that. How public is he with his business plan?

Kelly Thornton: Well ...

Seth Adler: You're writing this weekend.

Kelly Thornton: First anybody's heard about it is that. He just wants ... For his investors, he just wants a bare bones, what do you need, what are the benefits, what are the draw backs. I mean, there really aren't any. You an get access to so many ... Even the people growing for CBD, there's so many strains out there, and of course it depends on what the strain is, how long it's growing that determines whether that cores a nice solid wood core or if it's got a real big pith in the middle that's not really ideal for anything.

Seth Adler: What's a pith?

Kelly Thornton: Oh, that foamy. You know when you break open a milkweed plant?

Seth Adler: I do not.

Kelly Thornton: Really? Oh.

Seth Adler: You're talking to someone that's from New York.

Kelly Thornton: Oh, okay. Maybe you don't have vegetation there. I'm not sure.

Seth Adler: If given the choice of if I'm urban or not, the answer is I'm urban.

Kelly Thornton: Right on. Right on.

Seth Adler: So dumb it down for me.

Kelly Thornton: So I heard when I was a kid the Natives would eat or chew on the center of these plants, sort of like a gum, just something to chew on. It's the foamy, white center of a lot of plants when they grow solid. I think even up to sunflowers probably have a foamy pith up toward the top. I did grab ... Now that I'm in the hemp game, I grabbed a really thick sunflower stalk and it was actually woody. So it makes me wonder ...

Seth Adler: So you want to get rid of the pith though.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. We don't need it.

Seth Adler: All right.

Kelly Thornton: But I think it would come out in the wash as you're processing the hemp and separating the fiber. I mean, what I'd like to see is every hemp stalk get decorticated. I don't know how realistic that is, even once we get a processing center because you might not want to waste time decorticating some of the different strains.

Seth Adler: Right because the stalks are thinner than they should be.

Kelly Thornton: Thinner, yeah.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: So the first time I grew hemp, I went to a 420 thing probably in ... I want to say it was 2013.

Seth Adler: Okay. So before the farm bill.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. Or it might have even been 2014. Whenever it was legal.

Seth Adler: Okay. 2014.

Kelly Thornton: A guy was handing out hemp seeds at the cannabis expo. So I was like, "Cool." I took them home. I planted 10 seeds. If I did my extrapolation right, I measured how many seeds were in a teaspoon, and then elevated up to a two quart jar. So I had two, two quart jars of seeds. I had white sheets out. I was collecting like every seed that fell on the ground. The plants got 12 feet tall, easily an inch and a half at the bass, and when I cut the first one off, you could see the growth rings just from that season and it was solid wood.

Seth Adler: Wow.

Kelly Thornton: There was no pith at all, and then not to mention the next year I found that I had missed about 150 seeds. So at the end of the day, it was 48,000 seeds generated from 10 female plants.

Seth Adler: And so then what can you ... How much product, hurd product that you can work with does that give you?

Kelly Thornton: So they say that with two acres, and like I said this is a huge variable because it depends on how densely you plant your field and what strains you grow.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: Two acres will provide enough hurd for 1000 to 1500 square foot home.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: So you can literally grow your own home.

Seth Adler: That's fantastic.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, that's our tagline.

Seth Adler: I like that. Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: That's copyrighted.

Seth Adler: Yeah, you should. You need to work on that. Okay. As far as the things that need to happen to make your job and life easier, we need the decorticator, we need processing, we need the supply chain to exist, essentially, right?

Kelly Thornton: That's absolutely right. It's kind of like they put the cart before the horse. Is that it?

Seth Adler: You were putting the cart before the horse. There is no horse to pull your cart type of thing.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. That's right. In the hemp industry, we started growing because we could, and then nobody was like, "Hey, what are we going to do with all this?"

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: Well, let's just put it in the barn. We'll just let it sit there. So yeah, we definitely ... I mean, five years on with growing, we need to get processing and the whole supply chain, like you're saying, down to a T. I think other states might even actually be ahead of us in the game.

Seth Adler: Well, they say Kentucky is, right?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I mean, Kentucky, historically grew a ton of ... Just literally a ton of hemp back in the Colonial Times.

Seth Adler: And then up through hemp for victory, right?

Kelly Thornton: Right. Absolutely.

Seth Adler: World War II.

Kelly Thornton: So maybe they deserve it. I'd like to see it here in Colorado.

Seth Adler: Gotcha.

Kelly Thornton: Since that's where I'm at. But ...

Seth Adler: It's justified.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. I mean, no one's taking the initiative yet. I know people are working on it, but I've heard for four years now that someone's going to get a decorticator and maybe there's some mobile ones around. But I still haven't actually even seen one.

Seth Adler: But we got your guy. Your guys going to give it to us, right? I mean, it's going to be his investment.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I hope so.

Seth Adler: Paying for it.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, I hope so.

Seth Adler: And all that. So I want to talk to him whenever he wants to talk. How about that?

Kelly Thornton: Okay. That sounds great.

Seth Adler: We just real quick got to know ... You sound like you're a guy that is interested in finding out about information about everything.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. Do a lot of internet searching and reading and yeah.

Seth Adler: It was something like that that brought you to hemp. Can you kind of crystallize for us.

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So when I was in high school, all the 'hippie' kids had their hemp bracelets, and I had heard of hemp and I knew they used to be made for rope. But, of course, looking through a 1902 replica of a Sears catalog, you can find hemp carpet samples that you can buy. Well, the word canvas, supposedly it's anemology, it's cannabis.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: So anything you see in a 1902 Sears catalog that says canvas tents or Army tents, I'm sure the Civil War greatly benefits from having hemp as a fiber material back then to do their canvas. So I'd always heard about it. And I knew that it was illegal. And my thought as a kid was even, "Well, why is hemp illegal?" And I didn't even put it together that it was a cousin of cannabis at the time because I didn't really know about cannabis.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Kelly Thornton: And then as you get older, you're like, "Oh, cannabis, right." And then when you all the way down the rabbit hole, you realize that cannabis was outlawed because of hemp.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: I mean, that's my opinion.

Seth Adler: I understand.

Kelly Thornton: They couldn't get to hemp because you couldn't say anything bad about it. People used to leave it in their wills. They used to pay their taxes with this plant. God, wouldn't that be great?

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: You know what I mean?

Seth Adler: Yeah. To England and otherwise. Thomas Jefferson's writing letters about it, telling everybody how to plant it.

Kelly Thornton: That's exactly right. So it was such a ...

Seth Adler: Ben Franklin's using the hemp kite string.

Kelly Thornton: Yep.

Seth Adler: To find electricity.

Kelly Thornton: That's right. So it was so widely used in everything that when these other companies came that had their product that they wanted to get out, I mean, the easy thing to do was go after hemp. But what are you going to do? Oh, you're going to villainize cannabis.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: Oh.

Seth Adler: Let's call it marijuana, and it's those Mexican people out west that are doing it. So you don't want your kids doing it, do you?

Kelly Thornton: That's right, and a whole other plethora of racist things they said about it.

Seth Adler: Yep.

Kelly Thornton: To get it illegal. The thing I always find quite interesting was that they come up with all this business in 1937 about, "Oh, this is the devil's lettuce. It's evil. Don't touch it. Don't go around it." And then in two years, they're like, "Hey, can you guys maybe grow some hemp because we need to outfit our ships for the war."

Seth Adler: We need rope.

Kelly Thornton: And nobody said, "Wait a minute," greatest generation, right? "What do you mean you need it now? You outlawed it. By the way, after 200 years, you outlawed it." It's like what's happening? What's going on? Nobody questioned it. They just did it.

Seth Adler: Well that's you realize that you and I both Gen X, that's what millennials think about Gen X that we didn't ask enough questions.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: So that's far.

Kelly Thornton: So maybe they did, but we've always definitely asked questions. And I'm really happy and surprised at the same time that cannabis and hemp are where they are right now. They need to be further along in a hurry because where were the entrepreneurs and the millionaires and everybody when Canada, Britain, everywhere else was like, "Hey, we're going to grow hemp because we can do all this stuff with it." We're like, "Meh. Go ahead."

Seth Adler: Well, you realized that we're Americans still, right?

Kelly Thornton: We only have original, good ideas, right? And since we didn't have that one, I would rather them pulled the Fred Flintstones, 'Hey, I'm glad I thought of that." You know what I mean, and actually just went about and did it.

Seth Adler: Just did it. It's our idea. Well that's what we did with The Office.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: The television show.

Kelly Thornton: Right. Right. So anyway, when I moved out to Colorado for a job, got laid off in two months due to downsizing and getting bought out and all this stuff with the geology firm.

Seth Adler: Okay. Was that around the economic downturn and all that?

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, yeah. Well, I actually had work all through the economic downturn. This was in 2012. So this is a little bit after, which was kind of surprising.

Seth Adler: Lagging indicator.

Kelly Thornton: Yes. But my roommate at the time used cannabis medically. So I was like, "Oh. It does work medically." I mean, I witnessed it and then I was around all these different people using it for different things. There was a kid who was five years old was going to die from cancer. He's running around now like just a beast. And it was cannabis. I mean, no chemo or radiation. They just started giving him cannabis.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Kelly Thornton: I saw another kid who actually moved out here from Illinois as well who had Crohn's disease.

Seth Adler: Yep.

Kelly Thornton: It basically put his Crohn's disease in remission for good. I mean, I don't think he's had any problems.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: So I was like, "Wow." So going to all these ... Taking my roommate to all these different things got me interested in the whole thing, and that's when I really was like, "Hey, man. Hemp is, I mean, infinitely better than I ever was led to believe." I started doing straw bale houses. Going to some seminars, learned how to building sustainable ... always been curious about sustainable construction anyway. Did a lot of remodeling. That's what I do kind of on the side now is just remodeling jobs.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: To make ends meet. And after I went to some straw bale lectures, I was like, "Man, this is really good." And then someone said, "Hey, look at that. It's hempcrete." And I was like, "Yeah. Straw bale's pretty cool." And then I went and looked and started to read about hempcrete, and I'm like, "Wow. Hempcrete's much better than straw."

Seth Adler: And why was straw better than whatever? Just so we make the link.

Kelly Thornton: Okay. So straw bales great because it's got excellent insulating qualities.

Seth Adler: So for some of the same reasons.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah. For some of the exact same reasons. But the downside is straw will burn, even if it's ... I mean, because everybody thinks straws going to explode. Only if you throw an open bale on a bonfire does it explode.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: When it's a compacted media, much hard to light on fire, plus you're covering with hydraulic lime plaster, the same you use in hempcrete, the exact same thing.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: But if it gets wet, straw is going to mold. Most likely, straw's going to mold. Critters can get into straw. Hempcrete, the hydraulic lime is the key to making hempcrete extremely fire resistant. It's an alkaline material so it's anti-mold and anti-mildew.

Seth Adler: Great.

Kelly Thornton: So that's what gives it time to dry.

Seth Adler: And is that also that magic word how you can get energy from it as well? Alkaline battery?

Kelly Thornton: Maybe it is. Yeah. Because I know I read that they're doing a lot of stuff with inventing a hemp graphene. It's infinitely cheaper to produce than regular graphene.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kelly Thornton: And, god, what a renewable, sustainable source.

Seth Adler: It's amazing.

Kelly Thornton: It's just that's the thing about it is it's such a renewable source. You can grow an entire crop and ... I mean, you can grow multiple crops if you're in a warmer climate, right?

Seth Adler: Yeah, sure.

Kelly Thornton: But think about the Midwest and all of the soil. I mean, they supposedly have the best soil in the world, although I don't think they tend to it too well.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Kelly Thornton: If they could plant hemp and remediate that soil, get rid of corn and soy, which are both subsidized, worthless things that we have to turn into ...

Seth Adler: We don't need to subsidize this.

Kelly Thornton: No, not at all.

Seth Adler: And we've got a few more friends that have joined us here at the airport. So we got to kind of land this plane so to speak to mix metaphors in a way that they're not too mixed but don't make sense necessarily if you actually dive into what I just said. Essentially what I'm getting at is I'm going to ask you the three final questions. I'll tell you what they are and ask you them in order.

Kelly Thornton: Okay.

Seth Adler: what's most surprised you in cannabis, .3 below/.3 above, whatever? What's most surprised you in cannabis sativa? That's the first question. Second question is what's most surprised you in life? Third question is on the side track of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there. But first things first, what's most surprised you in cannabis?

Kelly Thornton: So getting into the whole hemp thing, I think it's the catch phrase you hear all the time is that hemp has like 10,000 uses. That's amazing to me. Oh, let me qualify that. The fact that we have an endo cannabinoid receptor system.

Seth Adler: I know it. That's the one.

Kelly Thornton: I didn't know about.

Seth Adler: No one knew about it.

Kelly Thornton: I have taken anatomy and physiology classes in high school and college.

Seth Adler: So you were in the right place to learn about it and they didn't teach you.

Kelly Thornton: And they didn't even teach me about it. So that's the most surprising thing is that it's the best suited plant on this planet for human consumption.

Seth Adler: There we go. So that's number one.

Kelly Thornton: That's number one.

Seth Adler: So it's like almost two part. It's that one and then also the other side of the plant will give you 10,000 different things.

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: Which is crazy that it's in the same plant.

Kelly Thornton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: Oh my god. Anyway, what's most surprised you in life?

Kelly Thornton: So the thing that's most surprised me in life is that growing up, you know you watch these movies, you read these books and the good guys always win.

Seth Adler: Oh yeah.

Kelly Thornton: And in real life it just seems like the bad guys always win. Crime does pay if you're in the right white collared t-shirt.

Seth Adler: Yeah. So Leo Durocher who was the manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers until he wasn't, and then was the manager of the New York Giants, the rival New York Giants, was at spring training and he was looking across the field at the other team. And his buddy says to him, "You know, he's a nice guy." And so Durocher goes, "Yeah, but nice guys always finish last."

Kelly Thornton: That's probably accurate.

Seth Adler: So here's the thing though, here's the thing, Leo 'the lip' Durocher, maybe he's right for the moment. But I just have to draw that silver lining around this and it does feel like in this moment and time, in this wackiness and weirdness, there are some of us that are thinking a little bit differently than we were before, right? And as soon as we can kind of get out of that pointing fingers at each other and yelling at each other and realize that there is no ends to those means. We got a shot here. And you're looking at me like I'm a crazy person.

Kelly Thornton: No, I hope that's true. I hope that's accurate.

Seth Adler: All right. So I guess I'm positive guy, you're negative guy. We got to go forth together, right?

Kelly Thornton: That's right.

Seth Adler: Into the final question, which is on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on it.

Kelly Thornton: This will kind of back up my second answer to my question, but I think my favorite musician that's ever existed in the modern times would be John Lennon.

Seth Adler: Oh, sure.

Kelly Thornton: So I'm going to go with Working Class Hero.

Seth Adler: Oh, fine. Yeah. It wasn't going to be Imagine, right? Based on the fact that bad guys ...

Kelly Thornton: Right. Right.

Seth Adler: Working Class Hero's a great song.

Kelly Thornton: Yes.

Seth Adler: His two albums after the Beatles, his two solo albums after the Beatles, magnificent.

Kelly Thornton: Yes.

Seth Adler: You know what I mean? The only thing is I don't like the fact that he said I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me. Yeah, Yoko and me. I kind of thought that was a little too much.

Kelly Thornton: Well, I think it was just the whole aftermath of the Beatles break up. So he was kind of in that frame of mind.

Seth Adler: It was in the moment.

Kelly Thornton: I have no doubt that if he would've survived past his assassination we will call it.

Seth Adler: Sure. Murder.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah, straight up murder, but that's a whole nother podcast.

Seth Adler: Right.

Kelly Thornton: But he would've reconciled, and surely they would have sat around and realized at the time they were the first band to do all this stuff, right? On this level. They didn't know that, "Hey, guys. We can just take a break and go do our solo projects and then come back like everybody else does."

Seth Adler: Have a reunion tour.

Kelly Thornton: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Exactly right. Kelly, I appreciate it. I look forward to talking to all the people that we brought up that I will talk to, and then talk to you again down the line, how about that?

Kelly Thornton: Okay. Sounds great.

Corey Sharp: Corey Sharp, CEO of HempLogic.

Seth Adler: All right. So thank you for joining us, Mrs. Corey.

Beth: It's Beth.

Seth Adler: Beth is better. So our names rhyme.

Beth: Yes.

Seth Adler: And, Corey, thanks for giving us a few minutes. We're here at NoCo. It is packed, by the way.

Corey Sharp: It's incredible. I'm very surprised.

Seth Adler: People are telling me it's three fourths, five times the size of last year.

Corey Sharp: And this is supposed to be the light day.

Seth Adler: This is the light day.

Corey Sharp: Yeah, this is supposed to be the light day, and I'm kind of scared for tomorrow.

Seth Adler: All right. So there are, by definition, because we have so many people, at least a couple buildings. And I'm walking from one building to the other, and I see this gigantic piece of agricultural equipment, and I go up to the guy standing next to it, and I said, "What is this?" And they say it's a decorticator. And I've been, for the past bunch of months, I've been talking about decorticators. I'm from New York so I have no idea what ... I'm downstate. So I have no idea what I'm talking about. Here's the decorticator finally. It's only $1.2 million. But what you're doing is saying, "Well, you don't even need to buy it. I'm going to bring it to you."

Corey Sharp: Exactly. The plan is is we've started Hemp Hubs USA, and our first location is in Colorado. Number one, it's closer to the manufacturing plant. So if there's any changes or any modifications, it's close to that.

Seth Adler: And we're going to name drop Power Zone Center.

Corey Sharp: Absolutely. Power Zone is in their center Colorado. They're the ones that's building this. This machine here, when it's finished out, it's actually going to be closer to $2.5 ...

Seth Adler: Million?

Corey Sharp: $2.5 million, yes.

Seth Adler: Because it comes with custom software and the whole thing.

Corey Sharp: Yeah. What we're actually doing with it is it's going to be a self contained. So the material coming out, the hurd and the fiber's all going to be packaged. So it's not just going to be loose. It's a fully contained situation.

Seth Adler: But, again, I don't have to buy a decorticator because Corey's coming to my town.

Corey Sharp: Absolutely. We're going to have Hemp Hubs all over the United States. Farmers are going to be able to ... Once they learn where the location is, they're going to be able to come in. We're going to have it set up just like you would hay where you're going to come in and you're going to bring your bales of fiber. Everything will be marked and covered and everything until we can get here. So you're not having to double ... You can pull your fiber from the field and take it right to the hub and just stack it there and wait for us to get there.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Corey Sharp: Go ahead.

Seth Adler: Yeah, no. So wait for us to get there. You're starting in Colorado. The weather doesn't matter. The time after harvest doesn't matter. Just stack it and wait for us.

Corey Sharp: Well, you're going to want to stack it and get it off the ground, and you're going to want to cover it.

Seth Adler: Okay. So those are the two things we've got to do.

Corey Sharp: Yes. And a lot of times people are ... They're not covering it. It's an investment to go ahead and cover your product and get it off the ground. So a lot of guys are putting it on railroad ties. Because what happens if you do put it on the ground, you're going to have rot and it's going to come up.

Seth Adler: Okay. So I do that investment and I wait for Corey to get here. How much should I be expecting from my crop? That's a loaded question for you.

Corey Sharp: That is a very loaded question, and I'm going to use it as depends. We don't know. 2018 is going to be a complete learning process, and anybody in the hemp industry knows pretty much we're pioneering an industry. And so we don't have the answers for you. Unfortunately, it's just fact. We're going to ... We have people that have grown for grain and have cut their fiber. So we don't know what that's going to look like coming through the decorticator. What we're trying to do is get people to instead of throwing money at the ground and growing grain, which is ... The Canadians are over producing. There's no food processing in the United States. If you're going to throw money at the ground, let's try a fiber.

Seth Adler: Right.

Corey Sharp: Let's grow specifically for fiber and run that through the machine.

Seth Adler: Let's just, again, go through the various applications of the fiber that I might already have in the ground, right? I'm waiting for Corey to get there. What can my decorticated fiber turn into?

Corey Sharp: Oh, okay.

Seth Adler: The basics. The 101.

Corey Sharp: The basics, I've got a company out of Taiwan that's coming in and they want to ... They are actually discussing building a factory here in the United States. They have an eight step process, and they're going to do four of the processes here in the United States, and then take that back to Taiwan and finish it off with the other four processes. A lot of things that people ...

Seth Adler: What are they making?

Corey Sharp: Fabric.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Corey Sharp: Fabric. I was going to get to the fact that people ... They always ask, "I want to grow hemp and I want to make t-shirts." And it's like, "Wow. You don't realize what it takes to make fabric with hemp." It's a wonderful product, don't get me wrong. But there's a lot of processes that go with that.

Seth Adler: So if you're setting up a mobile supply chain in the United States of America for industrial hemp, and oh, by the way, thanks.

Corey Sharp: You're more than welcome.

Seth Adler: What are some more direct uses of my fiber if t-shirt is a couple steps, a couple few steps? What should I be expecting to produce?

Corey Sharp: I think as a farmer, and this is where everything's back down to the farmer. We call it a first mill. So first mill, you're only options are is to sell it to somebody else that's going to do another process for it.

Seth Adler: There we go.

Corey Sharp: Okay. So you can take that fiber and you can put it on the secondary market. What we're hoping to do with the Hemp Hubs is actually build a farmers market.

Seth Adler: An actual farmers market?

Corey Sharp: An actual farmers market where the farmers going to have decision to make. Are they going to pay us to decorticate and then be responsible for their product, their end product? They might have a market for it, and I'm fine with that. I'm going to get my ... We're going to make our revenue from the decortication process. But also, they're going to have the option to let us just buy it straight off the end of the decorticator based on quality and whatnot.

Seth Adler: So you will buy anything out of the decorticator?

Corey Sharp: If the quality ... See, that's the one thing about 2018. 2018 is kind of a mess because we don't know these grain varieties that are coming out of Canada. What kind of fiber? What kind of hurd is coming out of these varieties? What we're going to find is we're going to come out of 2018 and we're going to say, "Look, okay. This fiber didn't quite match up what we need. We didn't quite get as much what we needed out of this. The fibers weren't as long as we wanted." What do you want to grow next year for us? Yes. Let's change your variety.

Seth Adler: Do these things.

Corey Sharp: Do these things. Now we got 2019 and then 2020, that's when it's really going to start cranking up.

Seth Adler: Now I've been told that there decorticators in Kentucky and in South Carolina.

Corey Sharp: North Carolina.

Seth Adler: Excuse me, North Carolina.

Corey Sharp: Yes.

Seth Adler: Corbin says those aren't actually decorticators. Corbin says.

Corey Sharp: Well ...

Seth Adler: Corbin from Power Zone.

Corey Sharp: Corbin from Power Zone.

Seth Adler: So he's trying to sell decorticators, right?

Corey Sharp: This is a different ... They have a different business model.

Seth Adler: Okay. What is that business model?

Corey Sharp: They are canafe. Canafe is something the company in Kentucky is paying farmers. They're giving them the seed. They have to grow it a certain way.

Seth Adler: I gotcha.

Corey Sharp: And they'll give them a percentage of ...

Seth Adler: Okay. Different business model.

Corey Sharp: Different business model. What we're finding in the numbers is you have a static location. You have to have 3000 acres within a 100 miles of that location for it to pay for itself.

Seth Adler: How many total acres of industrial hemp are currently happening in the United States of America?

Corey Sharp: Well, 2017 there was, let's just say, 26,000 acres just roughly.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Corey Sharp: And how much of that was done for CBD production. So you take ...

Seth Adler: Most of it.

Corey Sharp: Most of it.

Seth Adler: Right.

Corey Sharp: So you take that away. This is a market that is going to exponentially expand as we get this thing rolling.

Seth Adler: And it's why you going to various hubs, so to speak, actually makes sense. Because there's just not enough.

Corey Sharp: There's nothing. We're filling a market. We're taking and putting in a marketplace for farmers to have a place to bring their fiber. One of the coolest things about what we're doing is the guys that are growing for grain and for food process, we can actually try. We can triple up on that. So if you look at Power Zone, they have the grasshopper. Goes on the end of the combine, and it collects that flower chaff material from the grain. Okay. Well that has a CBD content to it. So now you're taking ... Even if it's 1% or 2%, now you're taking that material. Now you've doubled up. Now you've just made grain, now you've got a CBD content with flower material. Go back through and cut the stalks, bale that up, and bring it to the decorticator, bring your flower material, and we're going to have buyers and ...

Seth Adler: You've got multiple products, meaning you've got multiple customers that can buy multiple different aspects of your plant.

Corey Sharp: Absolutely. And this is really exciting for the farmer.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Corey Sharp: Everything HempLogic is doing nothing but trying to bring it to the farmer. We want to have ... And I'll say this, there's never been a time in the current history, modern history, where the farmer has actually been at the beginning of a stage of a product that they're going to be able to control.

Seth Adler: That's it.

Corey Sharp: That's amazing. I'm so excited.

Seth Adler: We're not talking subsidies here.

Corey Sharp: No, no, no. This is something that the farmer is going to actually be able to control the market.

Seth Adler: Control the market.

Corey Sharp: They can control their own market. That's the cool part about what I'm telling you is that if you pay me to decorticate, and you want to take your product home with you, there you go. But if you want me to cut you a check at the end of the process, then we can do that too.

Seth Adler: There you go.

Corey Sharp: So it's amazing for the farmer.

Seth Adler: Okay. It's amazing for the farmer. Are you a former farmer? How did you get into all this? What's your background? Where are you from?

Corey Sharp: I'm from Moses Lake, Washington.

Seth Adler: Okay. Washington State.

Corey Sharp: Washington State, and they had their first year, we were the first farmers to actually plant hemp in 80 years.

Seth Adler: When was that?

Corey Sharp: This was last year.

Seth Adler: Last year. What were you doing before that?

Corey Sharp: I sold irrigation equipment.

Seth Adler: Okay. So you're in this space. You're from agriculture.

Corey Sharp: Yes. I run around in circles in a tractor, and this is my ... I don't want to run around in circles in a tractor anymore.

Seth Adler: I gotcha. Not run around in circles. So bigger circles around the United States.

Corey Sharp: Exactly. Exactly.

Seth Adler: How did you find hemp? How did hemp find you?

Corey Sharp: Okay. My original thought process when hemp in 2016, the governor of Washington vetoed the hemp bill, and my first initial reaction was, "Screw him. I'm planting hemp anyway." It was a renegade, I'm going to do this whether he said I was or not. Well, then I realized, "Well, I can't really make money doing anti-government stuff. So how can I make a business of this?" And so well, two and half years later, this is a ... I'm sitting here and these opportunities just keep coming. We've got involved with Power Zone, and hooked up with them in a partnership there. That's how I got into it. It was more or less stick it to the government.

Seth Adler: I gotcha. As far as kind of this industry is concerned, it comes from activists. The only reason that there is, whether it's .3 above or .3 below, the only reason that there are industries here is because of those activists. So we appreciate those activists.

Corey Sharp: Honestly, and I'll say this. The HIA and the NHA and all these other ...

Seth Adler: Associations. Yeah.

Corey Sharp: These associations, without their activism, you and I aren't having this conversation.

Seth Adler: That's exactly right.

Corey Sharp: Doug Fine, him and I were at this thing in Wisconsin, and his speech was talking ... He goes, "I want everybody to grow hemp using ox." I was like ... I got up on the panel and I said, "You know, Doug, I heard you." I said, "We're back to back. We want the same thing, but you want to grow hemp with ox and I need a 500 horsepower tractor." It was just kind of ...

Seth Adler: Again, it's a different business model, right?

Corey Sharp: Different business model. It's all about different business models.

Seth Adler: How I guess are you built with this solution set mind? Meaning, I literally have been running around looking for a decorticator. I hear there's just two of them in the United States. I stumble across this thing in the parking lot here, and then I meet you. And you're literally taking it to the farmer to make sure that we are processing.

Corey Sharp: Yes.

Seth Adler: You are creating the supply chain. Where does that solution mindset come from? Was that from your parents?

Corey Sharp: No, no, no. I've been an entrepreneur my whole life.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Corey Sharp: This isn't my first ...

Seth Adler: Find one nickel, find another nickel, rub them together, try to get a third nickel.

Corey Sharp: I don't know about it's that definitely. I'm rubbing two pennies together.

Seth Adler: Right.

Corey Sharp: Just a year ago, my partner was like, "Hey, let's go get a cup of coffee," and I'm like, "Dude, I don't even have $2 to go buy a cup of coffee."

Seth Adler: Right.

Corey Sharp: So and this is where a lot of people start from. But where does this come from? Just like any other entrepreneurial situation, there's a hole. And every time I would come up against something, it was there's no processing. There's no processing. We thought in the original business plan was food. That is a nightmare. That is a ...

Seth Adler: Forget about it.

Corey Sharp: Yeah. That's a beast that I don't know.

Seth Adler: Exactly. We don't want anybody ingesting anything. Let's talk textile. Let's talk fiber. That's it.

Corey Sharp: Textiles. The story how I got hooked up with Power Zone is I called them and called them and called them, and finally they called me back. They're like, "Well, what can you do for them?" I said, "Well, the technology coming out of Europe is antiquated. There hasn't been a lot of innovation." I said, "I know the United States can do better." And I said, "To be honest with you, I just want to build something cool," and you said you saw the decorticator, is that cool?

Seth Adler: That's definitely cool.

Corey Sharp: It's a cool thing.

Seth Adler: How did you find them, right? Because this is in the parking lot is the only decorticator besides the other two, which are from Europe. So only U.S. made decorticator.

Corey Sharp: A lot of internet searches.

Seth Adler: Got it.

Corey Sharp: When you first start, and I think people, your listeners, will understand that when they start researching hemp, all of a sudden you realize you got 20 tabs open, and you're like, "What rat hole did I just fall into?" So that's one of the things we had to really focus on was what do we want to be when we grow up? You have to take one, and I would say this to anybody that wants to get into hemp. There's three distinct disciplines of hemp. There's food, fiber, and pharma. Now they do and can cross over back and forth, but you have to decide what you want to be.

Seth Adler: Where's fuel in that?

Corey Sharp: Fuel? Like biofuel? Right now the market, there's no room for biofuel.

Seth Adler: Got it.

Corey Sharp: It's just right now we got to get the fiber out, and I've got, like I said, I've got textile companies wanted to get involved. I got lumber mills in Washington State wanting ... Plywood companies wanting to buy our fiber to make hemp plywood.

Seth Adler: Look at that.

Corey Sharp: Once we start decorticating, this thing is going to absolutely ... I'm not going to have enough acres.

Seth Adler: No, you're not. All right. So let's get into that podcast land knows no time. You and I are talking in April. That doesn't matter for when people are listening. Let's go through when you expect to where you expect to be in the United States in 2018. You're starting in Colorado and then ...

Corey Sharp: Then we're coming out of Colorado, and we're going to go straight up to North Dakota. The reason why we're going up north is because we don't want to be in North Dakota in December.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Good idea.

Corey Sharp: There's going to be a little bit of work in North Dakota because some of these farmers were smart enough to bale their fiber. Whether they didn't have a market for it, they saw the ... At some point, this might work. So we're going to have right now I've got 600 tons just sitting there, and that's from one guy. Okay. Once word gets out about these Hemp Hubs. So North Dakota, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and then we're going to shoot up to New York. New York just released $10 million. Everybody knows, all this grant money is being thrown around. They're looking for a decorticator. So what does this mean? Well, it's like well, we got a decorticator coming and dropping down. Let's just ... Why are we spending millions and millions of dollars on a facility that's static? Once again, it's that 100 mile radius. So we come in ...

Seth Adler: Just do that 100 mile radius again, what do you mean?

Corey Sharp: 100 mile radius. On a static location, you have to have 3000 miles or 3000 acres within that 100 mile radius to make a static decorticator pay for itself.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Corey Sharp: That's a lot of acres in a very small circle.

Seth Adler: Yes. We mentioned we just don't have that acreage.

Corey Sharp: Yeah. It's not there.

Seth Adler: Just yet.

Corey Sharp: So by us coming in and doing as many tons per acre as we're going to be doing, which is 10 ton an acre or 10 ton an hour, sorry. I get acres. So 10 ton an hour.

Seth Adler: Acres and hours.

Corey Sharp: Yeah. Acres and hours. We're going to be able to take and actually take care of that location for 2018 and possibly even 2019.

Seth Adler: Where do you go from New York?

Corey Sharp: So New York, down into Pennsylvania, West Virginia. Then we're going to drop down in North Carolina. And then by then we're going to be back into Kentucky. Now we do have Oregon, California's kind of saying that they've got some stuff going on. It's going to be a very flexible, fluid. We've got to figure it out from here who's got the most product to decorticate.

Seth Adler: How do we get in touch with you?

Corey Sharp: Go to HempLogic.com. It's pretty simple. HempLogic.com.

Seth Adler: And you've got email and the whole thing there, Corey?

Corey Sharp: There's a contact deal there. It's not as efficient as I wish it was, but go ahead and just send me a note that you're interested in the Hemp Hubs. We have a gentleman that he's going to be handling all the Hemp Hubs. Another exciting part of what we're doing with this Hemp Hub is doing Hemp Expos.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Corey Sharp: So that's another interesting part of what we're going to be doing because it comes back to where these are end users of the product, we need to talk to the guys who are putting seed in the ground.

Seth Adler: We'll get to that, but essentially what we're saying is Corey's going to be there with the decorticator.

Corey Sharp: Yes.

Seth Adler: Corey can process in the decorticator all of the fiber.

Corey Sharp: Yes.

Seth Adler: All of the hemp fiber that has been grown this year, he can process that this year.

Corey Sharp: Yes. That's the plan.

Seth Adler: And then we'll talk about 2019 when he figures out how much quality y'all have out there.

Corey Sharp: Exactly. It comes back to quality and the varieties that we're doing. I believe that the varieties are going to change.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Corey Sharp: Because farmers are going to want to maximize their crop.

Seth Adler: There we go.

Corey Sharp: So that's one of the ... That's the cool part about what we're doing is mobile, and we're coming to you.

Seth Adler: I love the fact that I'm talking to you right before it starting, and I can't wait to keep checking in with you down the line.

Corey Sharp: I'd love to have you come out and actually hang out at a farmers market.

Seth Adler: I will most definitely see you in New York.

Corey Sharp: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: All right. I got three final questions for you. I'll tell you what they are and then ask you them in order.

Corey Sharp: All right.

Seth Adler: I know that the hemp guys don't like me calling it cannabis, but it is. So I'm going to keep the question the same. The first question is, what's most surprised you in cannabis? Second question, what's most surprised you in life? And on the third question is on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there?
First things first though, what's most surprised you with this plant?

Corey Sharp: The versatility of it. I call it a rat trail, and I don't ... You can call it a rabbit trail. But no, it's a rat trail because you can find in yourself down the rat trail and just go, "Holy. How did I end up here?" Yes.

Seth Adler: There's so many solutions that we can't even talk about them yet. I brought up fuel, and you said, "We're not even there. First, we got to work on fiber."

Corey Sharp: Yeah.

Seth Adler: We're barely working on pharma and food.

Corey Sharp: We have to get ... The biggest thing for us is getting it decorticated, getting it broke down, and getting into markets. It'll expand. People are going to come to us and go, "Can you provide this?" Absolutely. Let me grab this farmer and let's switch him over from what he's doing. Let's get him into something else.

Seth Adler: There we go. What's most surprised you in life?

Corey Sharp: Surprised me in life. I've kind of gone through a ... I'm 51 years old, and so I've been an entrepreneur my whole entire life, more or less. Lot of failures, and I think it's something I've been told, "Corey, one day you're going to be a rich man," and I said ... and this was one of my low points. And I said, "How can you say that? I just came out of one of the worst disasters of my life." He says, "Because every life sucks for an entrepreneur ends up being they have a lot of failures behind them." So this is one of those interesting opportunities and the wife will tell you, I wake up in the middle of the night, and she goes, "Oh, lord." I said, "Yeah. I got an idea. I got to go research this real quick. I'll be right back." Two hours later I come back to bed.
So the surprising part about this ...

Seth Adler: Beth's look to me just said everything. So thank you Beth for kind of being behind the guy here. You know what I mean?

Beth: Well, I do what I can to support my husband. I love him.

Seth Adler: That's it. That's it.

Beth: And he's doing great.

Seth Adler: And she's the chief ... What is she?

Beth: I'm the executive better half.

Seth Adler: The executive better half. That's it. So you're going on the trip?

Beth: Yes, I am.

Seth Adler: All right. Fantastic. All right. So I guess we're up to that final question.

Corey Sharp: Okay.

Seth Adler: And then we'll let you get on the road to decorticating.

Corey Sharp: Absolutely.

Seth Adler: On the song track of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there.

Corey Sharp: I was thinking about that while we were talking. I'm like, "What song?" I got so many different cool songs.

Seth Adler: Can I give you one? It'll be Willie Nelson's On The Road Again.

Corey Sharp: On The Road Again. Oh, I'm more ... I'm going to go deeper, and I want to do something ...

Beth: There's a song on The Greatest Showman, and he hasn't seen that movie yet, but it's called This Is Me. And it's about a ... It's just about somebody who is going to put themselves out there and they're just going to be who they want to be and you take me as I am or leave me. I don't care. But that is the premise of the song. I'll have to have you listen to it.

Corey Sharp: You know what, I think that's ... I'll go with that.

Beth: It is an amazing song. And it goes for him. I think. That would be my song for him.

Corey Sharp: Yeah.

Seth Adler: Corey.

Beth: Look out because here I come is one of the lines in the song.

Seth Adler: There you go.

Corey Sharp: I'm definitely one of those gentleman that you get what you get. I don't sugarcoat a lot of stuff. It gets me in trouble. And I'll say this, this is the cool thing about the hemp industry and what worked. We were just talking about the question beforehand. Hemp allows me to be Corey, and I've never been in an industry where I can actually just be my true self. I'm always been in sales. So you want to say the right thing. You want to schmooze the right person. Hemp allows me to be me, and because I'm dealing with the farming community, when I walk into the room and there's 20 farmers there, I'm not intimidated. I understand them. I understand ... my dad was a dairy farmer. We struggled. Farmers struggle on a daily basis. So if i can build something and allow the farmer to control their commodity and make money, that's my mission.

Seth Adler: Look out, here I come, Corey.

Corey Sharp: That's what it is. I look forward to our other ... I look forward to doing more of these. This has been a great one.

Seth Adler: You got it. Let's go decorticate.

Corey Sharp: Let's go do some decortication. Thank you very much.

Seth Adler: And there you have Kelly Thornton and Corey Sharp. Very much appreciate their time. Very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

Read the full transcript:

Become a member to access to webinars, quarterly reports, contributor columns, shows, excerpts, and complete podcast transcripts

Become a Member

Already a member? Login here.

Subscribe now to get every episode.

Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.