Ep. 403: US Congresswoman Dina Titus

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 403: US Congresswoman Dina Titus

Ep. 403: US Congresswoman Dina Titus

US Congresswoman Dina Titus joins us and highlights the progress in Cannabis legislation across the country: “We reached a tipping point where more states have come on board. You’ve got a new crop of Democrats who are young and progressive, and will be supportive. And I think you’ll see some of the Republicans – once it comes to the floor – be in favor of it. Because either their state has gone that way, or they’re in a district that would be more in favor. “

Transcript:

Seth Adler: US Congresswoman Dina Titus returns. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two Ns and the word economy. First, a word from Evolab and then, US Congresswoman Dina Titus.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Well, I can tell you that we've set up infrastructure in Nevada, and we are looking to set up infrastructure in Canada, which will allow us to serve pretty much the globe, both from unregulated products and regulated products, to be able to distribute those ingredients in Secret Sauce.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Once you get to Canada, you can get to the rest of the world.

Speaker 2: Well, I can get to 15 other countries from Canada at the moment.

Seth Adler: Excuse me. Excuse me.

Speaker 2: But I mean, yeah, it's almost the globe.

Seth Adler: Congresswoman Dina Titus, thank you so much for having me back. It's good to see you.

Dina Titus: You, too. It's been a little while.

Seth Adler: Well, it's only been six months, but what they say is cannabis years are dog years.

Dina Titus: Now you took that quote away from me, because I remember you said it before, and I was going to refer to that.

Seth Adler: We can always edit this out and then you can come in. But it's, really it's been an eventful six months. Because podcast land knows no time, but we're making our way into a new Congress, which is a different Congress.

Dina Titus: Well, that's right. We had a blue wave for Democrats in the election, but it was really a green wave for marijuana. You lost a couple of people like Rohrabacher, but I think you gained a lot more. And if you add to that the initiatives that passed that expanded medical marijuana and recreational use, it was kind of a banner election year.

Seth Adler: Absolutely. I mean, you know, 2016 was pretty good. This one was pretty good, as well.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: Now it's up to us here on Capitol Hill to maybe make some change. The Farm Bill is on the table. I like to call that the Hemp Bill.

Dina Titus: Well, that's right. We have now legalized the growth of hemp. I'm trying to encourage farmers in Nevada to grow that instead of alfalfa.

Seth Adler: Okay. Fair enough. We don't like alfalfa sprouts any more?

Dina Titus: Well we like alfalfa, but it uses a lot of water, and most of it is exported.

Seth Adler: And Thomas Jefferson can tell you, you don't really need to do a lot to hemp to get it to grow.

Dina Titus: So, that would be perfect for the Nevada landscape.

Seth Adler: That's it, to foster better results. Who knows? Now in that Hemp Bill, that does take hemp .3% and below THC, takes that off the Controlled Substances Act. So fantastic, round of applause, check the box, we did it.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: Having said that, the medicine for, you know, little kids with epilepsy comes from different plants. So there is that CBD Bill, that very small bill that also does need to pass for that medicine to be federally legal. When I start there, where can we end as far as what can happen in this next Congress?

Dina Titus: Well, before we get to the next Congress, we got to finish up this Congress.

Seth Adler: Well sure. Yes.

Dina Titus: And like you said, the Hemp Bill and the Farm Bill will be voted on later this afternoon by the House. But we've also got to be sure that they don't put some things in the appropriations bills that are left, or take some things out.

Seth Adler: US Congresswoman Dina Titus returns. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two Ns and the word economy. First, a word from Evolab and then, US Congresswoman Dina Titus.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Well, I can tell you that we've set up infrastructure in Nevada, and we are looking to set up infrastructure in Canada, which will allow us to serve pretty much the globe, both from unregulated products and regulated products, to be able to distribute those ingredients in Secret Sauce.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Once you get to Canada, you can get to the rest of the world.

Speaker 2: Well, I can get to 15 other countries from Canada at the moment.

Seth Adler: Excuse me. Excuse me.

Speaker 2: But I mean, yeah, it's almost the globe.

Seth Adler: Congresswoman Dina Titus, thank you so much for having me back. It's good to see you.

Dina Titus: You, too. It's been a little while.

Seth Adler: Well, it's only been six months, but what they say is cannabis years are dog years.

Dina Titus: Now you took that quote away from me, because I remember you said it before, and I was going to refer to that.

Seth Adler: We can always edit this out and then you can come in. But it's, really it's been an eventful six months. Because podcast land knows no time, but we're making our way into a new Congress, which is a different Congress.

Dina Titus: Well, that's right. We had a blue wave for Democrats in the election, but it was really a green wave for marijuana. You lost a couple of people like Rohrabacher, but I think you gained a lot more. And if you add to that the initiatives that passed that expanded medical marijuana and recreational use, it was kind of a banner election year.

Seth Adler: Absolutely. I mean, you know, 2016 was pretty good. This one was pretty good, as well.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: Now it's up to us here on Capitol Hill to maybe make some change. The Farm Bill is on the table. I like to call that the Hemp Bill.

Dina Titus: Well, that's right. We have now legalized the growth of hemp. I'm trying to encourage farmers in Nevada to grow that instead of alfalfa.

Seth Adler: Okay. Fair enough. We don't like alfalfa sprouts any more?

Dina Titus: Well we like alfalfa, but it uses a lot of water, and most of it is exported.

Seth Adler: And Thomas Jefferson can tell you, you don't really need to do a lot to hemp to get it to grow.

Dina Titus: So, that would be perfect for the Nevada landscape.

Seth Adler: That's it, to foster better results. Who knows? Now in that Hemp Bill, that does take hemp .3% and below THC, takes that off the Controlled Substances Act. So fantastic, round of applause, check the box, we did it.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: Having said that, the medicine for, you know, little kids with epilepsy comes from different plants. So there is that CBD Bill, that very small bill that also does need to pass for that medicine to be federally legal. When I start there, where can we end as far as what can happen in this next Congress?

Dina Titus: Well, before we get to the next Congress, we got to finish up this Congress.

Seth Adler: Well sure. Yes.

Dina Titus: And like you said, the Hemp Bill and the Farm Bill will be voted on later this afternoon by the House. But we've also got to be sure that they don't put some things in the appropriations bills that are left, or take some things out.

Seth Adler: Uh-huh (affirmative).

Dina Titus: Now the provision that's the Rohrabacher Amendment that I'm a co-sponsor of-

Seth Adler: Yep. Rohrabacher-Blumenauer. Right.

Dina Titus: Yes. In the Justice and Commerce appropriations bill that says you can't go after companies that are doing legal things in states where it is legal-

Seth Adler: For medical?

Dina Titus: Right. That's in the Senate bill, not in the House bill. But we want to see it stay in there.

Seth Adler: So we're still doing that whole thing?

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: We're still doing that dance?

Dina Titus: That's right.

Seth Adler: That's amazing.

Dina Titus: It is. So let's get that done and then look into the new Congress. I think it opens up lots of possibilities. We'll go after banking. We'll go after the veterans piece, go after more research. Now you don't have Sessions there blocking the Rules Committee, so nothing gets-

Seth Adler: Pete Sessions.

Dina Titus: Pete Sessions. So, nothing gets passed. You don't have the other Sessions there either, as Secretary of ... Attorney General, I mean. We'll see who replaces him, and what that means for the administration's position. But, I'm pretty optimistic that some things will get done, for sure in the House.

Seth Adler: All right. We'll get to the House in a second. Because, you brought up the administration. Three quotes of interest came out all in one week. Surgeon General said that we need more research. FDA said that it's inevitable. HUD said we've got to kind of iron out the differences between federal and state law. Can you remember another week of executive branch quotes like that?

Dina Titus: No, that's really good. If we can just get the VA on board, too. But you know, this administration, oftentimes the President contradicts what his secretaries or his advisors say. So, don't take it to the bank yet.

Seth Adler: One way or the other is your point.

Dina Titus: Right.

Seth Adler: That's fine, and that's fair. You bring up the VA, and you brought up veterans before. We've got the Veterans Bill to just, hey, maybe the VA could do some research around the plant.

Dina Titus: Well, I think it's two things. A lot of research is done by the Veterans Administration, so they should be looking at marijuana. And second, VA doctors cannot recommend to veterans the use of medical marijuana.

Seth Adler: Two different issues. Indeed.

Dina Titus: And that, I think we have to address both of those, especially for veterans where you have such a high opioid addiction problem. If you could use medical marijuana instead of just, "Here, take a pill for your pain," I think we'd all be a lot better off.

Seth Adler: Yeah. Absolutely. Who is anti-veteran, Congresswoman?

Dina Titus: That's right. That's not a partisan issue.

Seth Adler: But I mean, in other words, if we can get it out of the Rules Committee, there's no more Pete Sessions, so, fantastic. Can we vote on this? Can we send this to the Senate, at least a VA thing?

Dina Titus: I think we will. And we reached a tipping point where more states have come on board. You've got a new crop of Democrats who are young and progressive, and will be supportive. And I think you'll see some of the Republicans, once it comes to the floor, be in favor of it. Because either their state has gone that way, or they're in a district that would be more in favor.

Seth Adler: So, coming from the outside, the industry is in my ear saying, "Passing the States Act is inevitable in this next Congress." So of course, we need the Senate, also.

Dina Titus: Exactly.

Seth Adler: Right. Let's just focus on the House for a second, because it's States Act in the House, face States Act in the Senate. As far as bringing that up to a vote, making sure that we get the votes, and then send it to the Senate, is that something that is so certain in your eyes? If you and me are still talking about Rohrabacher-Blumenauer?

Dina Titus: I'm pretty confident though, because the chairmanships will change. The membership has changed. Leadership has changed. And we were already close. A lot of people were saying if you brought it to the floor it would pass.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Dina Titus: It was just Sessions keeping it out of all the bills as amendments. So, I'm pretty confident we can get it out of the House.

Seth Adler: Okay. And since you have more friends in the Senate than I do, what happens when we put it on the doorstep there? What do you think? What do you hear?

Dina Titus: I don't think McConnell is too supportive. But then again, he's the one who pushed the Hemp Bill, because it helped him in Kentucky.

Seth Adler: Absolutely. With a hemp pen.

Dina Titus: Signed it with the hemp pen.

Seth Adler: Exactly.

Dina Titus: Right. So, that was a lot of showmanship. But hey, he was there. We'll take it.

Seth Adler: Exactly.

Dina Titus: And again, as it tips at the state level, that puts pressure on the senators, as well. You're seeing with the referendum. I mean, Utah, for goodness sakes, passed medical marijuana. I mean, who would have ever thought?

Seth Adler: You can't really get more red than Utah.

Dina Titus: Exactly.

Seth Adler: And so, if that's where we are outside, we've got the House, okay, great. States Act. But it doesn't sound certain from what I'm hearing from you.

Dina Titus: No.

Seth Adler: We still got work to do, as far as I'm concerned.

Dina Titus: Absolutely. That's why these groups that are now becoming much more professional, much more involved, providing good information here on The Hill, are so important. And I appreciate the effort. Used to just be kind of NORML by themselves. And now, there's-

Seth Adler: Right. You're going back. Yes.

Dina Titus: I go back a long way.

Seth Adler: Right.

Dina Titus: But now, there are a number of groups. And there are business groups too, that have weighed in. I think that's important for getting Republicans on board.

Seth Adler: Yeah. How much of a big deal is seeing Constellation Brands not only invest, but re-up into a Canadian company, and then Altria invest billions of dollars into a Canadian company? Does that make maybe some business minded, free market type folks on the right pay a little bit more attention? Does the money help?

Dina Titus: I think it does. You have to make the argument to people depending on where they're coming from. Is it a tax issue? Is it a business issue? Is it a criminal justice issue. Is it a personal liberty issue? Different people see it in different ways. And the more we can make the argument across that whole spectrum, the better.

Seth Adler: There we go. Speaking of tax issue, how are we doing in Nevada as far as that is concerned?

Dina Titus: Nevada's doing great. Much higher tax revenue than they anticipated. $420 something million, and an estimate that it'll be a billion by 2022, I think. The big move now in Nevada, and I think this is going to affect the industry everywhere, is public consumption. Instead of taking it home and smoking it in private, are you going to have clubs, or recreational settings, or dance halls, or whatever where you can smoke it in public?

Seth Adler: What do you see, I'd love your point of view, what you think, but then also what you see as the solution, whether you are with it or against it? What's realistic? Personally, where are you on the issue?

Dina Titus: In Nevada, you've got Tick Segerblom, who was a state senator, big champion of legalizing marijuana.

Seth Adler: Yes. Tick is the best.

Dina Titus: Who is now on the county commission, so Clark. He will be pushing Clark County in that direction. I think you're going to see some movement towards public use. A lot of the dispensaries are already planning for that, with construction of additional facilities. Big question too though, for Nevada, and maybe in some other places also, is how it overlaps with gaming, and how do you keep it separate. Or if it becomes legal at the federal level, then you don't have to worry about keeping it separate. But right now, it's a big regulatory issue. But if anybody can do it, Nevada can, because we're good at regulating sin.

Seth Adler: That's exactly it. That's why things stay in Las Vegas. But as far as regulating sin, as far as regulating consumption, how would that come to be? I mean, yes, we're going to push it, and yes, it's going to happen. But, is there a bill in the Senate, or can Tick just do it right from the county seat?

Dina Titus: I think you may have to have legislation. The session will start in January. And it's a short session in Nevada. It just goes for four months. You've got a new Democratic governor. You've got Democratic majorities in both houses of the Nevada legislature. So, I don't know if the counties can do it by themselves, or they'll need some state enactment. But I'm sure they'll be working together. I'll think you'll see some movement.

Seth Adler: And then, take me through the cross-section of gaming and cannabis. Why is that an issue, for those of us that are not blessed to be from the great state of Nevada?

Dina Titus: That's right. When I say sin, I say it tongue in cheek.

Seth Adler: Of course.

Dina Titus: The Gaming Control Board in Nevada has said if you have a gaming license, you cannot be involved in the marijuana business because it is still illegal federally. And if there's anything we don't want to invite, it's federal intervention into the gaming world. We think we regulate that on our own very well. But if it becomes legal, then that will be a different story.

Seth Adler: I gotcha. We just want to kind of keep it away, because we want to keep it away.

Dina Titus: Exactly.

Seth Adler: Fair enough.

Dina Titus: Fair.

Seth Adler: What you're talking about now makes me think of your book. We talked a little bit about it. The Federal-State book. Take us through, again, what the construct and the context is of that tome.

Dina Titus: Well, it looks at federal-state relations in many areas. And you know, there's a lot of collaborative effort, whether it's with Medicare/Medicaid, or food stamps, or whatever. But there are certain areas that are strictly under federal jurisdiction. If you're talking about borders, for example.

Seth Adler: Of the country. Yeah.

Dina Titus: Right. And then, there are other things that are left to the states under the 10th Amendment. And the regulation of gaming is one of those. So, we want to keep it that way.

Seth Adler: Sure.

Dina Titus: We don't want to see the federal government get involved in it. We're facing that issue right now with sports betting, as they begin to look at sports betting and how there might be some federal regulation there, with the leagues involved, and all of that. So, we're just saying we do it well. We've been doing it for a long time. Leave us alone and let us do it.

Seth Adler: You speak the language of your friends on the right on this issue.

Dina Titus: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: I mean, it sounds exactly lockstep. So, what other lessons are there in that book that maybe we could employ in this next Congress, in terms of the relationship between the federal government and state government?

Dina Titus: When you talk to some people who are on the right, and use the argument of states' rights, they use it conveniently. Sometimes they like states' rights, and sometimes they like federal intervention.

Seth Adler: Well, that's former Attorney General Sessions. Right?

Dina Titus: That's right. But if you use the argument of states' rights, you can say look, the states, either through the initiative process or the legislative process have enacted this. And do you want the federal government to come in and throw those people in jail or fine them or treat them differently from other small business? I think you don't. And so, that goes back to my point, you use different arguments for different people depending on their own ideology, or their own districts, or their own inclination.

Seth Adler: Okay. Outside of cannabis, you are a busy person I have noticed.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: What else are you focused on in these next couple of years?

Dina Titus: I'm going to be chairing a subcommittee of transportation and infrastructure. That committee has to do with FEMA, GSA, all our federally owned buildings. So, I think we'll be looking at climate change and catastrophes and FEMA's response to that. We'll also look at federal buildings and how they are located all around the country. Are they leased? Are they bought? Are they built? And under that domain, we'll look at the post office that's now the Trump Tower, and look at the recent move by the President to intervene in the location of the new FBI Building. So, we'll have some oversight, as well as a little fun.

Seth Adler: Okay. That's an interesting approach. And I kind of appreciate that approach. We're not talking about arming. We're not talking about artillery.

Dina Titus: Right.

Seth Adler: We're talking about, hey, let's see where we all agree on maybe some ideas here, some concepts here.

Dina Titus: Well, infrastructure shouldn't be partisan. Roads and bridges and buildings. Everybody likes to cut a ribbon or hand out a check.

Seth Adler: Sure. On that issue, is it possible to actually make progress here? Because, you do hear from the White House. There are others that aren't necessarily in your party, that do appreciate at least let's look at an infrastructure bill. Would you be open to the kind of private/public partnership approach? What are you thinking?

Dina Titus: I think it's all on the table. We've tried to use some of that in Nevada. It's not the silver bullet that people say it is. You're going to have to make an investment, and not just an expenditure, but an investment. I'm not in favor or toll roads. I don't want to charge people from California to drive to Las Vegas and come and gamble and have fun. And that won't solve the problem, either.
But, I think we do look at all the possibilities. The chairman of the committee, Mr. DeFazio, has a plan, has a way to pay for it with just a slight tax increase at the pump, which hasn't been done in two decades. So, I think you'll see some support for moving infrastructure. And it's so important to Nevada, because it brings our tourists there. Whether you're talking about a modern airport, high-speed train to Southern California, interstate highway to Phoenix, all of that's so important.

Seth Adler: The gas tax, when it was introduced, it was before the France protests. I know that we're talking about completely different percentages of money. And it's a completely different thing. But, in these days and times, gas tax equals gas tax, even if it doesn't. Do you have thoughts on that?

Dina Titus: Well, I don't know that it'll pass, but it's certainly worth talking about. Especially if it's such a small amount and hasn't been raised in such a long time. They're also looking at mileage traveled as a way to raise revenue. But what you've got to do is be sure that you include all users of infrastructure, not just people who drive cars that use gas. You've got now electric cars. You've got more mass transit. Let's just be sure everybody's at the table.

Seth Adler: Okay. Perfect. You said that public partnerships are not necessarily the silver bullet that people make them out to be. What do you mean?

Dina Titus: We tried to use it with Project Neon in downtown Las Vegas. And for one thing, there are not as many people bidding on it. And the constant-

Seth Adler: What is Project Neon, just so we know?

Dina Titus: It's a big interstate exchange right in downtown Las Vegas.

Seth Adler: Okay.

Dina Titus: There are not as many people bidding on it. And the cost of private money is more than the cost of public money, when you're looking at interest rates. Sometimes it means selling bonds, and sometimes people will buy those bonds and support that, sometimes not. Sometimes that has to go on the ballot. It's just more complicated than it sounds.

Seth Adler: Yeah. And we are in this, now, conversation of what is a free market. Because, and now I'm going to change the subject on you, you don't even have to say anything maybe. But, when I saw the kind of Amazon approach to we're going to look for a new headquarters, and if you're a city, bid for us. Then we've got all the cities bidding. Everybody, okay, great. And then we just went to two big cities. We just went to New York City, and Washington, DC, Crystal City, and Queens, Long Island City.
But, essentially with a ton of subsidies. So, okay, fine. We're going to add a few jobs. But the subsidies kind of kick in, and I, as far as I'm concerned, I think we're doing the capitalism thing. That doesn't feel like capitalism. That doesn't feel like a free market. The whole process was very baffling to me.

Dina Titus: Nevada has just experienced a similar thing. We gave some tax breaks to Tesla to locate his battery factory up North. And also, we used some room tax, which is paid for by tourists, to help built the Raiders stadium. The calculation in both of those cases, and I think has proven to be true, is it created jobs to build those facilities, jobs to run those facilities. And in the case of the stadium with the Raiders, even if the Raiders aren't your team, you may come from somewhere else to see your team play the Raiders. Everybody loves to hate the Raiders. So, we think that will add greatly to tourism more than just a stadium in some town that's not as known for entertainment and fun and tourism as Las Vegas is.

Seth Adler: You see this as a net add.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: So, the Tesla thing is working as far as you're concerned, and the stadium thing is working as far as you're concerned.

Dina Titus: But you have to be careful. Tesla has also created a great demand for housing, because now more people are going to be employed there. We've heard the same thing here in Washington for the new Amazon that's going to make housing prices go up. It's a balance. You have to weigh the pluses and the minuses.

Seth Adler: Again, I think what we're stumbling upon is that it's not a silver bullet.

Dina Titus: That's right.

Seth Adler: As you intoned to begin with. So, this whole thing of legislating and creating laws, it turns out that it's nuanced and difficult.

Dina Titus: Exactly. It's never just one side of a story. You've got to look at all sides. That's why compromise is not supposed to be a hanging crime like it has become and a sign of weakness. Compromise is how the system is supposed to work, and that's how it was set up by the founding fathers. That's why you had two houses. That's why you had three branches. That's why you had federalism, state, and local, all of that to lead towards compromise.

Seth Adler: How do we get back to that, number one, here on The Hill, and number two, out there? Because all I have been hearing is how much those people suck, and then the other people, they suck, also. And if I'm over here, I don't like them. And I've I'm over here, I don't like them. It's almost like but do you remember that you're both Americans, by the way?

Dina Titus: It's very difficult. We've gotten very divided, very partisan. It's gotten worse over the years. People are saying it's tribal. And people are living in places where they're comfortable, so that tends to reinforce their value set.

Seth Adler: And then I go online, and I've got the same thing going on there, too.

Dina Titus: Right. You watch the TV channel that's the same as your views.

Seth Adler: Yeah.

Dina Titus: What the answer is, is I don't know. I think we try in Congress sometimes. And then just as you're getting close to a compromise, maybe like this in the recent days, it all kind of goes to hell.

Seth Adler: Because we throw something in to maybe make it not work, type of thing.

Dina Titus: Yes. That's right. Like a wall.

Seth Adler: Yeah. That was an interesting meeting. Did you have thoughts?

Dina Titus: Well, we certainly watched it on TV, and then we heard a report from Nancy Pelosi when she got back from it. But my thought is that it was a Saturday Night Live skit. I couldn't believe that this is how the President acts, and that this was really the way government is being conducted. I think the public probably thought the same.

Seth Adler: Here's the thing though, if this is where we are, why not next time, next meeting, okay, fine. Camera's stay. Let's do the meeting. Let's do it.

Dina Titus: Well, it's reality TV. It's not how you make policy or make good policy.

Seth Adler: What I'm saying is, why not just go ahead and bring everybody with you? This is how we're making the sausage. This is exactly what happens. Let's not go into the next room. You guys stay here. It's fine. He wants you to stay here, fine. We're okay with you staying here. And continue the conversation. What would be the issue with that?

Dina Titus: You can call it transparency, and I believe in transparency. But what happens is, instead of really talking about what you need to get done, you start playing to the camera. Each side plays their own extreme. It's just like talk television. You get the talking heads from extreme ends. Nobody cares about who's in the middle. They're boring. So the more fireworks you have, the better people like to watch it, and the less is accomplished.

Seth Adler: Got it. Well, that's why I watch C-SPAN. I love the feed.

Dina Titus: You need a life.

Seth Adler: I know. I know. That's fair. That's totally fair. I accept it, I own it, so to speak, to turn a phrase. I will go ahead and ask you the final three questions for returning guests, because Ben just looked at his watch. So, that means it's-

Dina Titus: Time to go.

Seth Adler: Time to go. Exactly. For both of us. Here they are. What would you change about yourself, if anything? What would you change about anything else if you could? And on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on here? That's always the last question. You might remember from last time. What would you change about yourself, if anything? It might be something you're already working on.

Dina Titus: You always make New Year's resolutions, right?

Seth Adler: Indeed.

Dina Titus: You always want to lose 20 pounds.

Seth Adler: That's me, too.

Dina Titus: Get rid of some wrinkles or some kind of personal improvement that you want to do. I would hope that I am doing a good job in the job that I'm doing for the people of District 1.

Seth Adler: I mean, it sounds like you're speaking straight, out loud, and forward. So, I don't see how they could want anything else. What would you change about anything else if you could?

Dina Titus: I want to see a Democrat elected President in 2020.

Seth Adler: Uh-huh (affirmative). Interesting. Fair enough. I feel like it makes sense based on what letters are associated with your name. I don't want to go with names, but I do want to go with approach. What do you think is the right approach?

Dina Titus: For the presidential election?

Seth Adler: For 2020, indeed.

Dina Titus: I think that we have to be a contrast to Donald Trump. But we have to not talk about Donald Trump. We have to talk about what the Democrats want to accomplish. That has to be something that relates to people and their immediate needs.

Seth Adler: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Jobs.

Dina Titus: Yes.

Seth Adler: Economy.

Dina Titus: Exactly.

Seth Adler: Jobs.

Dina Titus: Get paying for children to go to school, keeping your health care, have a decent home, a decent retirement.

Seth Adler: Paying for health care, we'll leave that aside. As far as the-

Dina Titus: You're asking more than three questions.

Seth Adler: You're right. Okay, fine. I'll stop. We'll ask those next time. On the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there.

Dina Titus: As Time Goes By.

Seth Adler: Oh, I thought we were going to do Viva Las Vegas, but that's fair. Congresswoman Dina Titus, thank you so much for your time. We'll check in with you down the line.

Dina Titus: I hope so. Thank you.

Seth Adler: And there you have US Congresswoman Dina Titus. Very much appreciate her time. Very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.